Podcast appearances and mentions of Jay Inslee

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23rd Governor of Washington, United States

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  • Aug 15, 2022LATEST
Jay Inslee

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Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Monday, August 15th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 15:31


Good Monday everyone, this is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Monday, August 15th, 2022. FLF Conference Plug: Folks, our upcoming Fight Laugh Feast Conference is just 2-months away from happening in Knoxville TN, October 6-8! Don't miss beer & psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers which includes George Gilder, Jared Longshore, Pastor Wilson, Dr. Ben Merkle, Pastor Toby, and we can’t say yet…also dont miss our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and stuff for the kids too…like jumpy castles and accidental infant baptisms! Also, did you know, you can save money, by signing up for a Club Membership. So, go to FightLaughFeast.com and sign up for a club membership and then register for the conference with that club discount. We can’t wait to fellowship, sing Psalms, and celebrate God’s goodness in Knoxville October 6-8. Now, here’s what you may have missed over the weekend: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/idaho-supreme-court-abortion-bans-will-be-allowed-challenges Idaho Supreme Court: Abortion bans will be allowed to take effect amid challenges The Idaho Supreme Court ruled Friday that strict abortion bans will be allowed to take effect. The ruling comes as legal challenges over the laws continue and the court sped up the timeline for lawsuits to be decided. Two justices agreed with expediting the cases, but noted that they felt laws should not be enforced until the legal process has been completed. A doctor and a regional Planned Parenthood sued Idaho over three anti-abortion laws. The Justice Department is also suing Idaho in federal court over a near-total abortion ban; the judge has not yet ruled in that case. The state Supreme Court's ruling means that potential relatives of an embryo or fetus can now sue abortion providers over procedures done after six weeks of gestation and another stricter ban criminalizing all abortions is slated for later in August. Potential relatives can sue for up to $20,000 within four years of an abortion. On Aug. 25, per the Idaho Supreme Court's decision, a near-total criminalizing of all abortions – still allowing doctors to defend themselves at trial by claiming the abortion was done to save the pregnant person’s life – will take effect. Planned Parenthood has also sued over a third ban that criminalizes abortions done after six weeks of gestation except in cases where it was needed to save a pregnant person’s life or done because of rape or incest. That law was written to take effect on Aug. 19. The Supreme Court said the plaintiffs both failed to show that allowing enforcement of the laws would cause "irreparable harm" and that there was not enough evidence that they had a "clear right" to a remedy. This ruling comes as other states face similar challenges following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In nearby Wyoming, a judge blocked the state's near-total ban on Wednesday. The Louisiana Supreme Court on Friday denied an appeal filed by plaintiffs, allowing the ban there to stay in effect. In Kansas, the elections director said the state would go along with a request for a hand recount of votes from every county after last week's decisive statewide vote affirming abortion rights. https://hotair.com/karen-townsend/2022/08/13/monkeypox-is-getting-a-new-name-because-the-who-says-the-name-is-racist-n489435 Monkeypox is getting a new name because the WHO says the name is racist Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, met with scientists this week to discuss best naming practices for diseases. The focus is to avoid offending any “ethnic, social, or professional groups and minimize harm to trade, travel, tourism, or animals.” Monkeypox is at the top of the agenda to receive a new name. Two clades (variants) of the disease have already been given new names. The WHO released a statement on Friday announcing the new names of two variants of monkeypox. Using Roman numerals instead of geographic areas, the Congo Basin variant is now Clade one or 1 and the West Africa clade is Clade two or II. This is to avoid stigmatization. Is all of this political correctness run amok? It looks like it. Who are they afraid of offending? Monkeys? Africans from the Congo or West Africa? Other diseases are named using geographic locations and they aren’t being renamed. It’s like the coronavirus that came from Wuhan, China. No one was supposed to call it the Wuhan virus because it might offend Communist Chinese leaders. Monkeypox has been around since 1958. The world’s population has managed to live with that name since then. It was a commonsense name at the time – research monkeys in Denmark were observed to have a pox-like disease. Monkeys are not thought to be the animal reservoir. Now that it is spreading globally and health experts are beginning to panic, calling it a health emergency, suddenly the virus needs a new name. The WHO declared the disease an international emergency in July. The U.S. declared its epidemic a national emergency this month. Before that, back in May, Sleepy Joe was pushing the panic button and telling Americans that “everybody” should be concerned about monkeypox. The first human case of monkeypox was reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1970, thus the name of that variant. The WHO is now reporting that it held an open forum to discuss a name change for the disease after a group of 30 scientists from Africa warned of an “urgent need” to change the name. It has a stigmatizing potential, they said. The virus has been reported in several other African countries and abroad. The Western outbreak began in May in the U.K., Portugal, and Spain. It has spread to the U.S., Canada, France, and Germany. Scientists are concerned about racist connotations and also stigma for the LGBTQ community. There have also been attacks on and poisoning of monkeys. I think there is an urgent need to alert gay men of how monkeypox spreads. Outside of Africa, 98% of cases are men who have sex with men. There is a limited global supply of vaccines. Health officials are rushing to stop monkeypox from becoming entrenched as a new disease. There’s been a lot of tippy-toeing around that fact out of fear of offending gay men. It isn’t exclusively gay men, it’s also bisexual men who have sex with women. Anyone can get it. Even children can get monkeypox from skin-to-skin contact. It is, however, stoppable. Scientists know how it is spread and how to stop it. If Team Biden has declared monkeypox a national emergency, why hasn’t he ramped up vaccine production. There’s a shortage. The longer the virus hangs around and spreads, the more likely it produces variants, like what happened during the coronavirus pandemic. It gets more contagious. The Biden administration continues to prove how inept it is in dealing with emergencies. Where are the public service announcements targeting the communities most at risk? Biden seems to be asleep at the wheel once again. Call the virus anything they want, more education and outreach is needed. Treat it like other STDs. Don’t ignore it and hope it goes away. Name changes are just window dressing, politically correct window dressing. Boniface Woodworking LLC: Boniface Woodworking exists for those who enjoy shopping with integrity; who want to buy handmade wooden furniture, gifts, and heirloom items that will last for generations. From dining tables and church pulpits to cigar humidors and everything in between; quality pieces that you can give your children’s children, tie them to their roots, and transcend the basic function of whatever they are! So, start voting with your dollars, and stop buying cheap crap from people who hate you! Visit www.bonifacewoodworking.com to see our gallery, learn our story, and submit your order for heirloom quality wood items. https://thepostmillennial.com/seattle-hospital-over-130-percent-capacity-no-longer-admitting-non-emergency-patients?utm_campaign=64487 Seattle hospital over 130 percent capacity, no longer admitting non-emergency patients Harborview Medical Center in Seattle announced Thursday that the facility is over capacity by approximately 150 patients, and will have to temporarily stop admitting patients with less acute conditions, diverting people to other facilities for treatment. The hospital’s licensed capacity is 413 but has more than 560 inpatients, meaning that capacity is over 130 percent. Other area hospitals report ready and willing to work with the medical center which all said they could "surge" to accommodate additional patients. According to a release from the hospital, there are also over 100 patients who are waiting to be discharged. Harborview CEO Sommer Kleweno Walley said, "Given the unique position Harborview has in the community as the level 1 trauma center, as the disaster center, and here for all critical illness, we had to make a very difficult decision today - one that has been weighing on our minds as UW Medicine leadership." "In order to ensure that we maintain our critical capacity for any type of trauma that is needed in our region and for any type of critical illness, we have moved to going on what we call 'basic life support divert.' Patients not in need of more urgent care will be needed to be taken care of and brought by ambulances to other hospitals surrounding Harborview in the area. Harborview for this time period will no longer be able to take care of the less acute patients in order to maintain our capacity." "In order to ensure that we maintain our critical capacity for any type of trauma that is needed in our region and for any type of critical illness, we have moved to going on what we call basic life support divert," Walley said. Dr. Steve Mitchell, acting medical director of Harborview Medical Center, said "What has been happening is that when ambulances arrive at Emergency Departments, they are unable to offload patients into beds inside the Emergency Department and they're having to wait for longer and longer periods of time, sometimes for hours, which is then impacting their ability to serve their communities for emergencies when they occur." According to an internal email obtained by the Postmillenial: "Harborview is currently at 130% capacity. Factors include the lack of staffing at nursing/rehab facilities that would normally receive patients needing that level of care. That is creating a backlog of patients in the emergency department, impacting Harborview’s ability to receive additional non-critical patients." Medical facilities in Washington state have been suffering from a staffing crisis following a Covid vaccine mandate that was enacted by Democrat Governor Jay Inslee for state and hospital workers. Earlier this week, the Yakima Board of Health sent a letter to Inslee asking him to rescind the vaccine mandate. County Commissioner Amanda McKinney criticized Proclamation 21-14.5, which requires employees, volunteers, and contractors for state agencies, schools, and health care organizations to be vaccinated against the coronavirus. Last Friday, Inslee removed the requirement for boosters but left the vaccine mandate in place following negotiations with labor unions. According to a survey conducted by the Washington State Hospital Association this year, hospitals in the state suffered a net loss of about $929 million in the first three months of 2022, due in part to high inflation and labor shortages, which have resulted in labor, drug and supply cost increasing faster than payment rates. https://nypost.com/2022/08/12/fernando-tatis-jr-suspended-80-games-for-violating-mlb-ped-policy/ Fernando Tatis Jr. suspended 80 games for violating MLB PED policy The Padres will be without Fernando Tatis Jr. for the rest of the season. Tatis Jr. tested positive for Clostebol, and will be suspended for 80 games. The news of the suspension was first reported by ESPN’s Jeff Passan. “I’ve been informed by Major League Baseball that a test sample I submitted returned a positive result for Clostebol, a banned substance,” Tatis Jr. said in a statement, through the MLBPA. “It turns out that I inadvertently took a medication to treat ringworm that contained Clostebol. I should have used the resources available to me in order to ensure that no banned substances were in what I took. I failed to do so. “I want to apologize to Peter, AJ, the entire Padres organization, my teammates, Major League Baseball, and fans everywhere for my mistake. I have no excuse for my error, and I would never do anything to cheat or disrespect the game I love.” The 23-year-old phenom had missed the entire season due to a fractured wrist but had been expected to return soon. This is a blow to the Padres, who went all in trading a haul of highly-ranked prospects to the Nationals for superstar outfielder Juan Soto and formidable first baseman Josh Bell. The Padres are 63-51. While they trail the Dodgers by 16 games in the NL West, they would qualify for the postseason as a Wild Card team if the playoffs started today. Tatis Jr. signed a 14-year, $340 million contract with the Padres last February. This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. If you liked the show, hit that share button down below. If you wanted to sign up for our conference, sign up for a club membership, or sign up for a magazine subscription, you can do all of that at fightlaughfeast.com. And as always, if you’d like to send me a news story, ask about our conference, or become a corporate partner of CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Monday, August 15th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 15:31


Good Monday everyone, this is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Monday, August 15th, 2022. FLF Conference Plug: Folks, our upcoming Fight Laugh Feast Conference is just 2-months away from happening in Knoxville TN, October 6-8! Don't miss beer & psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers which includes George Gilder, Jared Longshore, Pastor Wilson, Dr. Ben Merkle, Pastor Toby, and we can’t say yet…also dont miss our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and stuff for the kids too…like jumpy castles and accidental infant baptisms! Also, did you know, you can save money, by signing up for a Club Membership. So, go to FightLaughFeast.com and sign up for a club membership and then register for the conference with that club discount. We can’t wait to fellowship, sing Psalms, and celebrate God’s goodness in Knoxville October 6-8. Now, here’s what you may have missed over the weekend: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/idaho-supreme-court-abortion-bans-will-be-allowed-challenges Idaho Supreme Court: Abortion bans will be allowed to take effect amid challenges The Idaho Supreme Court ruled Friday that strict abortion bans will be allowed to take effect. The ruling comes as legal challenges over the laws continue and the court sped up the timeline for lawsuits to be decided. Two justices agreed with expediting the cases, but noted that they felt laws should not be enforced until the legal process has been completed. A doctor and a regional Planned Parenthood sued Idaho over three anti-abortion laws. The Justice Department is also suing Idaho in federal court over a near-total abortion ban; the judge has not yet ruled in that case. The state Supreme Court's ruling means that potential relatives of an embryo or fetus can now sue abortion providers over procedures done after six weeks of gestation and another stricter ban criminalizing all abortions is slated for later in August. Potential relatives can sue for up to $20,000 within four years of an abortion. On Aug. 25, per the Idaho Supreme Court's decision, a near-total criminalizing of all abortions – still allowing doctors to defend themselves at trial by claiming the abortion was done to save the pregnant person’s life – will take effect. Planned Parenthood has also sued over a third ban that criminalizes abortions done after six weeks of gestation except in cases where it was needed to save a pregnant person’s life or done because of rape or incest. That law was written to take effect on Aug. 19. The Supreme Court said the plaintiffs both failed to show that allowing enforcement of the laws would cause "irreparable harm" and that there was not enough evidence that they had a "clear right" to a remedy. This ruling comes as other states face similar challenges following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In nearby Wyoming, a judge blocked the state's near-total ban on Wednesday. The Louisiana Supreme Court on Friday denied an appeal filed by plaintiffs, allowing the ban there to stay in effect. In Kansas, the elections director said the state would go along with a request for a hand recount of votes from every county after last week's decisive statewide vote affirming abortion rights. https://hotair.com/karen-townsend/2022/08/13/monkeypox-is-getting-a-new-name-because-the-who-says-the-name-is-racist-n489435 Monkeypox is getting a new name because the WHO says the name is racist Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, met with scientists this week to discuss best naming practices for diseases. The focus is to avoid offending any “ethnic, social, or professional groups and minimize harm to trade, travel, tourism, or animals.” Monkeypox is at the top of the agenda to receive a new name. Two clades (variants) of the disease have already been given new names. The WHO released a statement on Friday announcing the new names of two variants of monkeypox. Using Roman numerals instead of geographic areas, the Congo Basin variant is now Clade one or 1 and the West Africa clade is Clade two or II. This is to avoid stigmatization. Is all of this political correctness run amok? It looks like it. Who are they afraid of offending? Monkeys? Africans from the Congo or West Africa? Other diseases are named using geographic locations and they aren’t being renamed. It’s like the coronavirus that came from Wuhan, China. No one was supposed to call it the Wuhan virus because it might offend Communist Chinese leaders. Monkeypox has been around since 1958. The world’s population has managed to live with that name since then. It was a commonsense name at the time – research monkeys in Denmark were observed to have a pox-like disease. Monkeys are not thought to be the animal reservoir. Now that it is spreading globally and health experts are beginning to panic, calling it a health emergency, suddenly the virus needs a new name. The WHO declared the disease an international emergency in July. The U.S. declared its epidemic a national emergency this month. Before that, back in May, Sleepy Joe was pushing the panic button and telling Americans that “everybody” should be concerned about monkeypox. The first human case of monkeypox was reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1970, thus the name of that variant. The WHO is now reporting that it held an open forum to discuss a name change for the disease after a group of 30 scientists from Africa warned of an “urgent need” to change the name. It has a stigmatizing potential, they said. The virus has been reported in several other African countries and abroad. The Western outbreak began in May in the U.K., Portugal, and Spain. It has spread to the U.S., Canada, France, and Germany. Scientists are concerned about racist connotations and also stigma for the LGBTQ community. There have also been attacks on and poisoning of monkeys. I think there is an urgent need to alert gay men of how monkeypox spreads. Outside of Africa, 98% of cases are men who have sex with men. There is a limited global supply of vaccines. Health officials are rushing to stop monkeypox from becoming entrenched as a new disease. There’s been a lot of tippy-toeing around that fact out of fear of offending gay men. It isn’t exclusively gay men, it’s also bisexual men who have sex with women. Anyone can get it. Even children can get monkeypox from skin-to-skin contact. It is, however, stoppable. Scientists know how it is spread and how to stop it. If Team Biden has declared monkeypox a national emergency, why hasn’t he ramped up vaccine production. There’s a shortage. The longer the virus hangs around and spreads, the more likely it produces variants, like what happened during the coronavirus pandemic. It gets more contagious. The Biden administration continues to prove how inept it is in dealing with emergencies. Where are the public service announcements targeting the communities most at risk? Biden seems to be asleep at the wheel once again. Call the virus anything they want, more education and outreach is needed. Treat it like other STDs. Don’t ignore it and hope it goes away. Name changes are just window dressing, politically correct window dressing. Boniface Woodworking LLC: Boniface Woodworking exists for those who enjoy shopping with integrity; who want to buy handmade wooden furniture, gifts, and heirloom items that will last for generations. From dining tables and church pulpits to cigar humidors and everything in between; quality pieces that you can give your children’s children, tie them to their roots, and transcend the basic function of whatever they are! So, start voting with your dollars, and stop buying cheap crap from people who hate you! Visit www.bonifacewoodworking.com to see our gallery, learn our story, and submit your order for heirloom quality wood items. https://thepostmillennial.com/seattle-hospital-over-130-percent-capacity-no-longer-admitting-non-emergency-patients?utm_campaign=64487 Seattle hospital over 130 percent capacity, no longer admitting non-emergency patients Harborview Medical Center in Seattle announced Thursday that the facility is over capacity by approximately 150 patients, and will have to temporarily stop admitting patients with less acute conditions, diverting people to other facilities for treatment. The hospital’s licensed capacity is 413 but has more than 560 inpatients, meaning that capacity is over 130 percent. Other area hospitals report ready and willing to work with the medical center which all said they could "surge" to accommodate additional patients. According to a release from the hospital, there are also over 100 patients who are waiting to be discharged. Harborview CEO Sommer Kleweno Walley said, "Given the unique position Harborview has in the community as the level 1 trauma center, as the disaster center, and here for all critical illness, we had to make a very difficult decision today - one that has been weighing on our minds as UW Medicine leadership." "In order to ensure that we maintain our critical capacity for any type of trauma that is needed in our region and for any type of critical illness, we have moved to going on what we call 'basic life support divert.' Patients not in need of more urgent care will be needed to be taken care of and brought by ambulances to other hospitals surrounding Harborview in the area. Harborview for this time period will no longer be able to take care of the less acute patients in order to maintain our capacity." "In order to ensure that we maintain our critical capacity for any type of trauma that is needed in our region and for any type of critical illness, we have moved to going on what we call basic life support divert," Walley said. Dr. Steve Mitchell, acting medical director of Harborview Medical Center, said "What has been happening is that when ambulances arrive at Emergency Departments, they are unable to offload patients into beds inside the Emergency Department and they're having to wait for longer and longer periods of time, sometimes for hours, which is then impacting their ability to serve their communities for emergencies when they occur." According to an internal email obtained by the Postmillenial: "Harborview is currently at 130% capacity. Factors include the lack of staffing at nursing/rehab facilities that would normally receive patients needing that level of care. That is creating a backlog of patients in the emergency department, impacting Harborview’s ability to receive additional non-critical patients." Medical facilities in Washington state have been suffering from a staffing crisis following a Covid vaccine mandate that was enacted by Democrat Governor Jay Inslee for state and hospital workers. Earlier this week, the Yakima Board of Health sent a letter to Inslee asking him to rescind the vaccine mandate. County Commissioner Amanda McKinney criticized Proclamation 21-14.5, which requires employees, volunteers, and contractors for state agencies, schools, and health care organizations to be vaccinated against the coronavirus. Last Friday, Inslee removed the requirement for boosters but left the vaccine mandate in place following negotiations with labor unions. According to a survey conducted by the Washington State Hospital Association this year, hospitals in the state suffered a net loss of about $929 million in the first three months of 2022, due in part to high inflation and labor shortages, which have resulted in labor, drug and supply cost increasing faster than payment rates. https://nypost.com/2022/08/12/fernando-tatis-jr-suspended-80-games-for-violating-mlb-ped-policy/ Fernando Tatis Jr. suspended 80 games for violating MLB PED policy The Padres will be without Fernando Tatis Jr. for the rest of the season. Tatis Jr. tested positive for Clostebol, and will be suspended for 80 games. The news of the suspension was first reported by ESPN’s Jeff Passan. “I’ve been informed by Major League Baseball that a test sample I submitted returned a positive result for Clostebol, a banned substance,” Tatis Jr. said in a statement, through the MLBPA. “It turns out that I inadvertently took a medication to treat ringworm that contained Clostebol. I should have used the resources available to me in order to ensure that no banned substances were in what I took. I failed to do so. “I want to apologize to Peter, AJ, the entire Padres organization, my teammates, Major League Baseball, and fans everywhere for my mistake. I have no excuse for my error, and I would never do anything to cheat or disrespect the game I love.” The 23-year-old phenom had missed the entire season due to a fractured wrist but had been expected to return soon. This is a blow to the Padres, who went all in trading a haul of highly-ranked prospects to the Nationals for superstar outfielder Juan Soto and formidable first baseman Josh Bell. The Padres are 63-51. While they trail the Dodgers by 16 games in the NL West, they would qualify for the postseason as a Wild Card team if the playoffs started today. Tatis Jr. signed a 14-year, $340 million contract with the Padres last February. This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. If you liked the show, hit that share button down below. If you wanted to sign up for our conference, sign up for a club membership, or sign up for a magazine subscription, you can do all of that at fightlaughfeast.com. And as always, if you’d like to send me a news story, ask about our conference, or become a corporate partner of CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.

An Informed Life Radio
Bernadette & Xavier, Dr. Michael Gaeta

An Informed Life Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 111:03


In this episode of An Informed Life Radio, Bernadette and Xavier provide updates to the Governor Inslee's attempt to permanently mandate Covid shots for all state employees, how BOH is heading toward concerning rule-making, and they discuss the latest news on Monkeypox. Does the vaccine prevent infection, transmission, or symptoms? And in the second hour, Dr. Michael Gaeta discusses key medical ethics doctrines and their relevance with current events. Reference Links: https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/directive/22-13.1%20-%20COVID-19%20Vaccination%20Standards%20for%20State%20Employees.pdf https://informedchoicewa.org/covid-19/wa-state-employee-covid-shot-mandate-filed/ https://sboh.wa.gov/meetings/meeting-information/meeting-information/materials/2022-08-10 https://live.childrenshealthdefense.org/shows/good-morning-chd/0nQcvqmXeF https://news.yahoo.com/monkeypox-spreading-avoid-192529196.html https://www.statnews.com/2022/08/09/will-low-dose-vaccination-stretch-the-monkeypox-vaccine-supply-or-backfire/

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Marshawn/Police body cam footage in Vegas

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:13


Fastest 15Jaypal says inflation is "theoretical"61% living paycheck to paycheckWhole Foods CEO is anti-socialism // GUEST:  Bob the Barber on his battle with Inslee over being shut down while staying openhttps://omny.fm/shows/the-dori-monson-show/bob-the-barber-on-his-battle-with-inslee-over-bein  // Marshawn/Police body cam footage in VegasSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Breaking News: Olivia Newton-John died, crime over the weekend and Inslee Friday's news dump

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:23


Breaking News:  Olivia Newton-John died, crime over the weekend and Inslee Friday's news dumpSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

unDivided with Brandi Kruse
78: [un]Divided with Brandi Kruse: Condescension on crime (8.8.22)

unDivided with Brandi Kruse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 48:19


Governor Jay Inslee rolls back booster mandate. Four local mayors respond to "condescending" response they got after raising concerns over crime. 

An Informed Life Radio
What do Monkeypox & Rulemaking Have in Common?

An Informed Life Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 114:25


Description: In this episode of An Informed Life Radio, hosts Bernadette and Xavier examine Governor's Inslee's COVID shot Directive, the OFM's proposed Rule to permanently mandate Covid shots and boosters for all state employees, and the unfolding Monkeypox policies and protocols. What do they have in common? Tune in to find out! Show information links: https://www.fda.gov/media/131078/download https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/smallpox-monkeypox.pdf https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2021/208627s006lbl.pdf https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/pdf/Attachment-1-Informed-Consent.pdf https://www.truthforhealth.org/patient-guide-e-booklet-download-page/? https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/directive/22-13%20-%20State%20employment%20COVID%20vaccine%20requirement%20%28tmp%29.pdf https://lawfilesext.leg.wa.gov/law/wsrpdf/2022/14/22-14-104.pdf

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW
An Informed Life Radio 08 - 05 - 22 What Do Monkeypox & Rulemaking Have In Common

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 114:41


Description: In this episode of An Informed Life Radio, hosts Bernadette and Xavier examine Governor's Inslee's COVID shot Directive, the OFM's proposed Rule to permanently mandate Covid shots and boosters for all state employees, and the unfolding Monkeypox policies and protocols. What do they have in common? Tune in to find out! Show information links: https://www.fda.gov/media/131078/download https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/smallpox-monkeypox.pdf https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2021/208627s006lbl.pdf https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/pdf/Attachment-1-Informed-Consent.pdf https://www.truthforhealth.org/patient-guide-e-booklet-download-page/? https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/directive/22-13%20-%20State%20employment%20COVID%20vaccine%20requirement%20%28tmp%29.pdf https://lawfilesext.leg.wa.gov/law/wsrpdf/2022/14/22-14-104.pdf

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#1,250 - This Is An Outrage: Inslee Blasts Those Responsible For Ballot Box Surveillance Signs In King County

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 16:54


On Tuesday, the King County Elections office called for a removal of the signs, after receiving reports of "suspicious and intimidating" signs.Calling it "un-American" and "un-Washingtonian," Gov. Jay Inslee said Wednesday that placement of signs that read "under surveillance" next to King County ballot drop boxes is being done to intimidate people to stop them from voting."This is an outrage," he said. "An absolute affront to everything we hold dear, which is the right to vote." LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos everyday. https://bit.ly/3KBUDSK

Hacks & Wonks
37th LD State Representative Position 2 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 84:27


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street - all running for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative District, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   37th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/37th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative district, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of the forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! All right. Good evening, everyone. Welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 37, for State Representative Position 2. We're excited to be able to live stream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we're recording this program, this forum, for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will intermittently scroll at the bottom of the screen. All of the candidates running for 37th Legislative District State Representative Position 2 are with us tonight. In alphabetical order, we have Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting on July 13th - that's this week, you will be receiving your ballots on Thursday or Friday of this week. You can register to vote, update your registration, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond - I will indicate if that's so. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear green, and then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, when time is up it'll turn red. I want to mention that I'm on the board for the Institute for a Democratic Future. Andrew and Chipalo are both IDF alums and Chipalo is also on the board. We've not discussed any of the details of this campaign or this forum and are expecting a lively discussion from everyone tonight. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 36th Legislative District State Representative Position 1 candidate forum this Wednesday, July 13th at the same time - 6:30-8PM. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Nimco, then Chipalo, next to Emijah, finally Andrew. Nimco. [00:03:19] Nimco Bulale: Hi, thank you. Good evening and thank you so much for the opportunity to speak to you all. My name is Nimco Bulale and I'm running for the open seat in the 37th Legislative District. I immigrated to Seattle from Somalia at the age of eight, a child of a single mother of nine. I know the importance of education, opportunity, and being supported by a strong, safe and nurturing community. I'm a lifelong community organizer, small business owner, university educator, and education policy expert working every day to help marginalized people in communities. As a woman of color, I'm acutely aware of the issues facing Black immigrant people of color communities and I'm excited to bring a systematically underrepresented perspective. I've spent my career working with marginalized communities and focused on creating a more inclusive, multicultural education system. I've largely worked in education policy, so this is where most of my experience on the issue lies. However, as a legislator, I will have the unique opportunity to look at this issue through a much broader lens. I am the co-founder and CEO of South Sound Strategies, a consulting firm focused on - [00:04:26] Crystal Fincher: That was time. Next we are headed to the next candidate - go ahead. [00:04:41] Chipalo Street: And I'm running here because I want the 37th to have the most effective representation possible. I've seen what education has done for my life and I want every kid to have the same opportunities my education has provided me. Police accountability is near and dear to my heart - during college, I was beaten by the police and so I want to make sure we have an accountable police force, while still working with them to make sure that we increase public safety. I've been a union member, so I would stand with our unions as they fight to make sure that working people can increase their compensation and benefits. In my professional life, I work for Microsoft for the Chief Technology Officer, where I advise our executive leadership on emerging technology. I think it's important we have legislators who understand technology, especially so given Roe, so that we can make sure that data isn't used unintended for people who are trying to get abortions. Serving in the legislature would allow me to magnify my efforts to improve our community. As a former union member, I understand the value of empowering the labor movement. As a BIPOC community member, I have experience with the important issues of our times like education, housing, technology, and interactions with the police. [00:05:50] Crystal Fincher: That is our time - next Emijah. Oh, you need to unmute, Emijah. [00:06:01] Emijah Smith: I was told that your staff would be muting us and unmuting us. So thank you. So my time starts now, or am I using my time? [00:06:12] Crystal Fincher: We'll start now and a reminder to everyone that if you mute yourself, we can't unmute you. If we do the unmuting, then we can unmute you. [00:06:20] Emijah Smith: Thank you. My name is Emijah Smith. I am a lifelong resident of the 37th Legislative District. I have the historical and current perspective of the 37th. I am a mother and I am a grandmother. I am focusing here on - ooh, this is good - I am focused on education policy ever since I was a senior in high school, surviving the War on Drugs - growing up in the Central District in South Seattle, I made a commitment to make sure that we get resources to our community to heal the harms. So I've been doing that - I'm the Mercer PTSA president, I'm the chief of staff of King County Equity Now, and I sit on the board of Tubman Health. So I've been doing the work currently in the Legislature for many years - going to Olympia with families, utilizing the power of our voice to bring meaningful change into our community. I walk with integrity - the integrity I walk in the community doing this work as a community leader - I will take that to Olympia. I have championed and been alongside the families that got us some current wins that is community reinvestment dollars for marijuana. Thank you. [00:07:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Andrew. [00:07:31] Andrew Ashiofu: Hi, my name is Andrew Ashiofu. I'm coming to you from a lived experience. I'm from - I was born in Houston, Texas and my family's Nigerian. When I came out, I lost my comfort zone. I got kicked out, lost my house due to depression, I couldn't keep up at work, and I was diagnosed with AIDS. And that was a - it was a tough process because I had to navigate ideologies and policies not created for people like me. I always say it was a good Samaritan that gave me accommodation. I have lived the experience currently in Seattle - I'm a coach of the Seattle LGBTQ commission. Here in the 37th district, I sit on the Harborview Medical Community Advisory Board, I am on the Seattle-King County HIV Planning Council. I have done immigration, LGBTQ rights advocacy on a local and global level with the Department of Homeland Security. For me, it's - we talk about healthcare, it's very important. I'm a renter also, so housing is important. But I have lived the experience, I have advocated in that experience and I'm here to serve you. Thank you. [00:08:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And with those introductions, we will get to the questions. We're gonna start by talking about housing. Housing affordability is not very affordable these days. We are at a crisis level. Lots of people are losing their housing, people are facing this all over the place. So beyond extending - beyond ending exclusionary zoning and making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, what else do we need to do to address housing affordability and to prevent displacement? And as a reminder, everyone has a response time of 90 seconds. And we will start with Chipalo. [00:09:19] Chipalo Street: So a bunch of things we can do - in the short term, we can add housing vouchers so that working people can live in existing market rate housing without spending their full paycheck on their shelter. We should have short-term rental assistance so that a temporary hardship doesn't end up in a situation that snowballs - like once you lose your house, it's harder to go to work, it's harder for your kids to go to school - that just gets worse. In addition to those, we need more renter protections. And so some tenant protections that I support are preventing landlords from using past criminal history to discriminate against prospective tenants, limiting the types of fees that can be charged by landlords. And David Hackney has a great bill that would provide recourse for tenants against a landlord who's looking to take some kind of action against them - you can already do that, but it takes a long time and so what's the point of taking action against the landlord if they've evicted you already. The harm has been done, we need to make sure that tenants can make sure that landlords are treating them well. Looks like I have more time, so those would be the main things. What would be some other things that we could do - I think you mentioned the exclusionary zoning - lifting the ban on rent control statewide would also be another option that would allow different municipalities and give them another tool in their tool belt for fighting housing costs. [00:10:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And next we're gonna head to Nimco. [00:10:47] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe housing is a human right. As somebody that had to - when we moved to the United States to Seattle specifically, that was pushed out of the 37th and more specifically the Seattle Central District - I'm keenly aware of the precarious of housing affordability, similar to many folks. The cost of housing is a major crisis facing working families in Washington State. Affordability is an issue, not only for persons facing or at risk for homelessness, but working families also struggle to ensure that they have secure housing as costs increase, especially around job centers. There are many actions that the state can take to address this. We've already mentioned the Housing Trust Fund, we've talked about land use regulations, encouraging low income and working workforce housing, as well as protections for tenants. But I also want to say that it's necessary to update, as mentioned, our land use laws to move past zoning that privileges single-family homes. Additionally, I think that we need wraparound services such as behavioral health, substance abuse services, as well as providing resources to local jurisdictions to bring their services to scale. I read recently that Black renters can't afford 93% of the zip codes in the top US cities and I think that that's a travesty. I think that those are just some of the ways that we can think about it. And also knowing that 16% of zip codes in the list, on the list had rents that were unaffordable to Latinx households - again, that is unacceptable. And when I do get to the Legislature, I believe that there's things that the state can do. [00:12:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - next we're headed to Andrew. [00:12:35] Andrew Ashiofu: This is very personal to me. That's why my campaign - we signed on to the Initiative 135 - social housing is a key. One thing I've been privileged is to see social housing work in Europe and in Amsterdam, they have the 40-40-20, where 40% of the building is social housing, and another 40% is affordable mid-level housing, and 20% is commercial or community space. I'm big on community space because I play dodgeball every Tuesday in the community space. But it's also very important that we protect - in the 37th district - we protect our housing through preventing gentrification. Property tax for the elderly and people living with disabilities should be eliminated - that's where I'm coming from. But also we have a lot of land in Washington state in cities where the downtown is empty, with population of less than a hundred - we should, we can utilize that to create social wraparound services for teenagers and youth at-risk, for domestic violence victims, for people going through mental and drug addiction. We need to invest in those kind of services as well. Thank you. [00:13:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - and Emijah. [00:13:52] Emijah Smith: Thank you. As we've heard that housing, healthcare, food are human basic rights. And so the way I would look at how we have to address housing, which is a very complicated issue, but when I think about being a survivor of the War on Drugs, the gentrification displacement that happened in the Central District and has been happening throughout the 37th currently, we have to look at the policies. The home I grew up in was taken from my grandfather due to some bad crime bill policies, but also we want to look at the Housing Finance Commission, most definitely, to make sure there is enough money in there that can come back into the community for housing development. And not just affordable housing, but stable, affordable housing. We have Africatown Plaza, Ethiopian Village, as well as Elizabeth Thomas Holmes - that came from community voice that I was part of to make sure that that money was sent down to the community. It wasn't gonna come to the community a couple years back without the power of our voice. In addition to that, we need to look at the barriers that are in the Department of Commerce, in terms of the application process, to even provide housing developments that could be stable for our community. There's so many loopholes that oftentimes it's the BIPOC and marginalized communities that don't get access to those resources. And although shelters and emergency housing is important to get someone off the streets immediately, it is important that we can provide some stable housing - if it's gonna be temporary, it needs to be temporary for at least a year. As a payee for my uncle who was dealing with addiction, it was because I was able to provide him stable housing for that year that helped him get stable. Thank you. [00:15:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Just a reminder to everyone that you do have 90 seconds to respond. It's up to you whether you choose to use that entire 90 seconds or not. If you want your answer to be shorter, feel free. We welcome that. The next question is we've seen - excuse me - significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but a lot of people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get any better despite the increase in funds. A lot of people attribute that to the continuing affordability crisis. Do you agree that this crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? And we are starting with Emijah. [00:16:11] Emijah Smith: Thank you for that question. I think that's an ongoing issue and I think it's an ongoing issue that has to do with our regressive tax system, our property taxes - people who are being pushed out are low-income working class families that cannot afford the rent, right? So it's a cycle of an issue that is occurring. When that cycle occurs, it's like - the burden of property taxes going up fall onto the renter who is then also gonna continue to be pushed out. So how are we solving the problem if we're not addressing some of the root causes of the issues. The root causes of the issue is also about having fair wages and wages that - where people can actually live in the 37th and pay the mortgages, buy the homes. So also these temporary three-day opportunities just - they're not long enough. And we're pushing people more into being renters who are carrying the burden of even homeowners who want to rent rather than providing stable housing, like I said, for at least a year in some place - so that people can build themselves up, not just go for three three days and then you have to transfer and go to another place, and eventually you're gonna get pushed out of the 37th going south, which is actually having its issues as well as our homeless population. We have the resources, we have the money, the 37th and Washington State can correct this issue. We need to correct the issue and we need to address the root causes of homelessness, not just providing people a three-day motel stay here or there or putting people in tiny home villages. Thank you. [00:17:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:17:47] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I also agree that it's an issue. And it's great that we're increasing funding for it, but I don't think the funding is keeping up with the magnitude of the issue. There's many things that are contributing to this - like Emijah mentioned, home costs for someone who's trying to buy a house are skyrocketing. That's pushing up property values, which then increases someone's tax burden. So if you're a low-income person and your property taxes rise, you have less spending power. If you're a senior on a fixed income, you have less spending power and sometimes get forced into selling. We also have insufficient tenant protections. And so if you lose - if you're a renter and you lose your housing, then you end up on the street and that snowballs. You can't go to work, your kids can't go to school, and the issue gets worse. So not only do I support all of those, or means to fix all of those, I also would like to see better paying jobs. So for example, I think it's crazy that after K-12 school, we don't elevate the trades. The trades provide a great means of well-paying stable jobs for everyone. And traditionally we have denigrated the trades like - oh, you went to the trades 'cause you can't hack it. No, these are great jobs that people enjoy. Two of my best friends from junior high school went through four-year college, hated the jobs they got, came back, became electricians, and now love those jobs and get paid more than they did before. So I think this - we need to think of this comprehensively, not only in how do we fix the housing market, but how do we increase job stability and the paying of jobs? [00:19:16] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:19:19] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Homelessness affects all of our communities in Seattle and King County and as mentioned before, it is a very complicated issue, but I think that we all have a role to play. Homelessness represents a multisector, multi-system failures and requires a whole of community solutions. Many of the strategies, connections, and services needed to support individuals experiencing homelessness are managed outside of the homeless service system or in geographically separated systems. So I think as a solution, we need to think about creating long-term institutional alignment across systems serving people experiencing homelessness. We must also ensure that community leaders in business, philanthropy, and those who have lived experience with homelessness and advocates can coordinate and align with regional and state level homelessness initiatives to cultivate share and promote solutions to homelessness. I think, while at times, efforts to support the unhoused in Seattle can appear scattered and disorganized - oftentimes initiatives and task force are renamed, replaced, discontinued. I think that every day we encounter people who are living on the street, often without a reliable place to store possessions, clean clothes, take a shower, and get a solid night of rest. Moving forward, I think that we must continue to invest in housing, supportive housing for people with serious mental illness, emergency housing, and affordable housing. The solution to ending homelessness is to provide more options for housing and that Seattle and King County will need private business to take an active role in housing the unhoused if efforts to end homelessness must be - [00:21:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next Andrew. [00:21:07] Andrew Ashiofu: Thank you for this question. As I said earlier in my introduction, I was able to come out of being homeless by someone giving me somewhere to stay. We've been approaching homelessness in - we'd say one-size-fits-all solution and that's wrong. Homeless has various degrees - from mental health to drugs, to PTSD with the vets, to domestic violence, to people like me that lost their jobs, to youths that are kicked out for coming out. We have a huge problem in the LGBTQ community. The first thing I think we should do is - I'm not a fan of shelters because it's just for overnight. Again, we need more. So we need things like investing in transition housing. We just had one open up right here on 12th. We need to, again, back to wraparound services, housing. We have the space, but we also - people talk about density. We have a lot of high-rises apartments coming. The problem why it's not affordable is one, it's not affordable. Also, it doesn't - it's all one bedroom studios and two bedroom. What about families? What about town homes? We don't have that kind of investment. So we need to create legislation that brings about things like right to return, but also invest in multi-family units, not just one bedroom or studios. We need more, more, more. Thank you. [00:22:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So families have been facing increased financial pressure. The cost of necessities like rent and childcare has been skyrocketing for years. More recently, gas, food and other prices have noticeably increased and people are having to make financial sacrifices. What can you do in your capacity as a state legislator to provide tangible relief to people who are struggling with bills? And we are starting with Andrew. [00:23:05] Andrew Ashiofu: The first thing is we need a tax relief for low-income families, working class families. Two, I think we need a gas tax break - for now - because of the high prices of gas. When it comes to childcare, we - I always say we need childcare vouchers, but also making it applicable whereby people can give what I call family, friends and neighbor - a part of childcare, but it's highly overlooked. So we need to create those vouchers as - oh, I can pay my family, I can pay a friend, I can pay a neighbor to help me take care of these kids. In campaigning, we see childcare as a huge need for people campaigning with children. We have that law that they cannot even use campaign phones for childcare. And a lot of people, especially women, have to drop out for running for office because of things like childcare. So we need that. And for - I think we need transportation, free public transit. I'm a transit - I use the transits occasionally. I've been endorsed by the Transit Riders Union, but we also need to invest in accessible transit and make it free for people to move around and reduce dependency on gas. Thank you so much. [00:24:25] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:24:29] Emijah Smith: Thank you. I think on a state level, the state can provide some relief. They can give credits of some tax credit - we need to address our regressive tax code, period. That will give a lot of relief. Our state is receiving revenue of our marijuana tax dollars. We have the money to make some different choices and we really need to release the burden off of our low-income and working class families. So I definitely just think that there should be some type of package that is offered. But I do agree that I think that things are starting to be cut back because of COVID, coming out of COVID. So we should still be making sure that our students are receiving free breakfast, free lunch - that should not be something that's gonna be cut - the feds are cutting it, the state needs to pick up on that. The state is doing a great job by supporting covering some of the healthcare costs and help for the insurance, but that needs to be extended. It needs to be covered because just to try to buy some food, to go in there and just try to buy fruit and be healthy - the 37th has a lot of food deserts. It costs a lot of money to be healthy and to thrive in this community. So our basic necessities, I think that the state should utilize some of that revenue and give us all some level of a break based on our income. I am a single parent, I have raised my kids, I have found innovative ways to survive and get through that paying through childcare. Definitely advocating for childcare, increasing the income levels for families to be able to access that - this screen is killing me, but - the state can do it. We have the money, we need to take care of our basic needs we need to give food vouchers to our community members. Thank you. [00:26:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:26:15] Chipalo Street: Sure. So one of the places that childcare is provided is in the schools. We have a program for early childhood learning. I think it would be great to expand that, not only because that would provide some relief for childcare, but also the earlier we get a kid into education, the better the outcomes. I think there are some other good ideas thrown out there around like a gas tax holiday, but a gas tax holiday is really a short-term band-aid on the solution where we really need progressive tax reform. Washington State has the most regressive tax code in the country, which is crazy given how fortunate we are in this state to have very good-paying jobs and we need to make sure that everyone pays their fair share. So I would love to see income tax implemented. Unfortunately it seems like there's some issues with that in the constitution, so we need to fight to keep our capital gains tax. There's some corporate tax loopholes that we could close and in doing so, we could then reduce some of the sales tax, which contributes to our regressive tax code. So I think we should look at this a little more holistically in terms of progressive tax reform, because so much of it comes down to where we fund different programs in our state. [00:27:23] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:27:26] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that Washington's economic climate is one of the best in the nation. And this is because unlike other states, our minimum wage is more reflective of the current economy and workers are offered generous employment benefits. However, this is often negated by the fact that we do have the most regressive tax code in our country. Our economy only works for the top, our economy works the best for the top 1%. I believe that workers and small businesses are fundamental to the health of our economy. I think that as a small business owner, we need to create an economy that fosters the growth of these businesses. And we need to invest in apprenticeship programs and strong unions to grow our economy and safe, living-wage jobs. At the same time, we desperately need to reconsider, like I said, our regressive tax code, which exploits working people by lowering taxes on low-income earners. And by requiring the wealthiest in our state to pay their fair share, we can spur economic growth and relieve this population of its economic burden. As a woman of color, centering the voices of Black, Indigenous and people of color is of the utmost importance to me. I'm committed to explicitly centering the perspective and the needs of marginalized groups who are so often underserved by being left out in the policy I work to craft. In addition to this, I support policies that specifically or functionally address the racial wealth gap, including affordable housing that helps people of color generate generational wealth, as well as the universal basic income, which has been shown to reduce the racial wealth gap. I think in addition to cutting taxes, we also - in addition to creating more taxes, we need to also cut taxes for low-income workers. [00:29:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We are sitting here after the Dobbs decision that struck down reproductive rights protections and the right to an abortion for women. According to Axios, 41% of hospital beds in Washington are located in religious hospitals. So although we are not one of the states that has an abortion ban immediately occurring because of the decision, we do have some issues with access. Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of mergers involving religious hospital networks? And we are starting with Nimco. [00:29:49] Nimco Bulale: Can you repeat the last part of the question? [00:29:52] Crystal Fincher: Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of hospital mergers, which we're having a lot of - involving secular or religious hospital networks. And what more can we do to protect abortion access? [00:30:08] Nimco Bulale: So I don't have a paddle, but I will say absolutely Yes, I would support that. I'm pissed - I think access to healthcare, reproductive, and gender-affirming care are at the forefront of my campaign as our nation continues to face an onslaught of threats to the rights of people of marginalized genders. And this is not okay. I think that we need to work harder to make this part of our constitution - the right to bodily autonomy is fundamental and I will always fight to protect these rights, especially in a state like Washington, which is soon to become a safe haven for birthing people in states looking to outlaw abortion entirely. As a longtime education policy activist, I understand the need for comprehensive sex education and I will continue to fight for that when I'm elected in office. I'm firmly committed to creating a world in which all people can decide when, if, and in what manner they decide to have children. Reproductive justice means we must also work to create a world in which those children are born into communities that are safe, healthy, and just. [00:31:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're going to Andrew. [00:31:15] Andrew Ashiofu: It's a Yes for me - we need to protect the right to choose. And we also need to call a special session to codify this in our constitution and create bills that would protect anyone that comes into our state to seek an abortion - currently there's been an increase. Now, when it comes to hospitals' merger, we need to protect the right to choose as part of this merger. And this is not just - this covers - because some of these hospitals also could choose not to treat me as a gay person because they believe - they might say - because of anti-LGBTQ rhetorics in some of these places. We need - healthcare is very important for everyone. We all deserve healthcare and there should be no barrier against healthcare. I have done a lot of advocacy, I have fought for my right to survive, and I know the red tape and the obstacles. We don't need that now. We need to create access. As a state, we need to call - I call on Governor Inslee to call a special session to codify abortion into our constitution here in Washington State. Thank you. [00:32:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:32:33] Emijah Smith: Thank you for the question. And just going directly to it - healthcare is a right and I believe having access to abortion is part of our basic healthcare. And so I definitely believe that we would have to interrogate, and I think that with this merger, those type of access - abortion access - should be available to all - to birthing parents and birthing people who need that. I also am in agreement with our Washington State really looking at our constitution and making sure that if we say we're gonna support and having access to abortion and it is a right for people for that choice, then we need to lock that in now and not be worried about a session or two here and somebody trying to undo that. That's the world that I grew up in and I totally support that no matter what I would choose in terms of if I want to have a child or not. I also want to just say healthcare equities are real. And particularly for Black women, we have the highest risk of death at birth. So this is a real issue for us around trying to have choice and just getting care in general. COVID just lifted up the top of how these he health equities are a real problem in our healthcare system. And too often, some of our healthcare systems are just moving for profit. We need to be moving for health. It is a basic right for our community. Thank you. [00:34:00] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:34:03] Chipalo Street: Yes, I'm a hundred percent supportive of this. If we didn't have enough issues at the state level to deal with before, the Supreme Court has given us a whole host of new issues to deal with, abortion access being one of them. I would love for my first bill to be a bill to enshrine protections for the right to choose into our constitution. Above and beyond that, I think we also need people who understand technology in the Legislature. So I work for the Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft and I think having folks who understand technology is incredibly important, especially for things like Roe, where we don't - where we want to make sure that companies' data can't be inadvertently, or even maybe specifically, used to target people seeking abortions. And then I also agree with Nimco that we need to increase funding for our abortion centers, because we will have an influx of folks coming from our surrounding states where they do not have access to it anymore. So we have to make sure that our folks have it, we have to make sure that we are a beacon of light for other surrounding states so that we can make abortion a option that people have when they consider their overall healthcare. [00:35:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So this next question is a little bit of a question. So crime has been increasing across the state. People are concerned about their safety and whether we're doing the right things to address the current levels of property and violent crime. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rate. The top three answers were lack of mental health and addiction services - that was 85% of Seattle residents gave that answer. Second answer was homelessness at 67%. And the third answer was economic conditions at 63%. When asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were at 92% addiction and mental health services, at 81% training police officers to deescalate situations, and at 80% programs to address the root causes of crime. Those were Seattle residents' top answers. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for these things that Seattle voters have requested like behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Chipalo. [00:36:34] Chipalo Street: Yeah, public safety and police accountability is a issue that is near and dear to my heart. In college, I was beaten by the police for not showing my ID so bad that I had to be taken to the hospital before they took me to jail. It was so bad that a student who was watching it said that she was traumatized. And so I, 100%, believe that we need an accountable police force. That said, I think police are part of public safety. They should be partners that we can work with and should not be afraid to call to come to violent crimes, to solve robberies. They are part of public safety and I want to work with them to make sure that we have a - we have more public safety. I also encourage our society to think more holistically about public safety - we ask police to do too much and things they're not trained for. So we should have counselors in schools, not cops. We shouldn't be sending police to respond to nonviolent mental health crisis, we should be sending professionals who are trained to do that. And so I think that reflects a lot of what you're seeing Seattle voters say is - yes, we need more addiction counseling, we need more mental health funding - so that we first prevent these issues from starting. And then if they do happen, we want a person who is trained to deal with that issue responding to it. So I would 100% support more of these services to get at the root causes of some of these issues while making our police accountable, just like any other professional accountability. We have professional accountability for lawyers and doctors. We should have the same thing for police. [00:38:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:38:10] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Regarding public safety and police, I absolutely believe that we need more law enforcement jobs that need to be reassigned to social workers and other service providers. I believe that the police are equipped with limited and largely punitive tools to handle many of the crises they're called to address. I support protecting our public safety by investing in broader emergency response teams trained to handle mental health, interpersonal, and addiction crises. Additionally, the police have jeopardized the public safety by systematically inflicting violence, surveillance, and fear on communities of color. I support deescalation, crisis intervention, and accountability in service of protecting public safety. I believe we need a justice system that makes our community safer and healthier. We need proactive policies that emphasize crime prevention and support for vulnerable communities instead of reactive policies that emphasize punishment. I also support setting up effective systems for crime prevention, including mental health and addiction resources, policies that tackle scarcity, and social work. Effective public safety comes from community and requires community healing when harm is done. [00:39:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:39:30] Andrew Ashiofu: Thanks. I'm gonna talk from the other side - from someone that has walked through the shoes of the other side, where people think otherwise about you. I tell people I had a mental crisis in 2020, and 'til now I'm still on a wait list to talk to a mental specialist. And what does that tell me is - we don't have enough trained, diverse mental health specialists even in our clinics that are affordable and accessible to many people that really need them. Most of them work for very expensive hospitals or clinics or practices. We, as a state, we need to invest in that form of education. And also when it comes to drug addiction, I tell people I am for safe injection or safe sites. And people say why? I said, because one, it brings these people to a place where you could personally reach out to them. And it also reduces diseases and spread of blood-borne diseases. And our police force - I think we've invested enough. We need more civilian engagement, more social workers, more people that are not violent. We need the police to go back and address sexual assault victims. We need more civil engagement. That's what I think we need in Washington State. Thank you. [00:41:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:41:07] Emijah Smith: Yes, thank you for the question. We definitely need - our state needs to invest, provide mental health investments. As a PTSA president at my son's middle school, every year we check in with the families and ask them - what type of resources, what do you need? And for the past few years, especially with COVID, everyone a hundred percent has prioritized social, emotional health and wanting some mental health support for our youth. So mental health supports go across the gamut - I know you were speaking to public safety, crime, and what the poll had indicated, but I want to say it's across the board. Recently had spoke with the leader of the If Project - a police officer who was also sharing - in the past that our police officers weren't even getting properly mental health care. And so how we're trying to look into how they are trying to look and making sure that police officers are getting behavioral health. So the behavioral health is across the board. We, as families have been impacted. And so our state should invest regardless - whether it's those who are having addiction issues, who are untreated or others. And if our youth are not being serviced well, then people are gonna go try to self-medicate and it's going to create a cycle. And we wanna interrupt that cycle of harm. We wanna interrupt that cycle of being untreated. I definitely believe that we need to make sure our resources are equitable, right? So the police force budget is way much larger than our education budget. And so we need to take a look at that. So I definitely believe in police accountability - all the things - deescalation, all the things, the training that's needed. [00:42:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Next, we're going to go with a question from a viewer. I'll read it verbatim. We've just found out that Starbucks is closing our CD neighborhood location on 23rd and Jackson due to crime concerns. That's a quote from them. I would be interested to hear candidate thoughts on this decision and how this loss affects a community gathering space. And we will start with Emijah. [00:43:19] Emijah Smith: I appreciate that question - you probably see my eyes. I'll honestly say I'm a little bit heartbroken about what's happening in the Central District. I was just talking with the new development complex about looking at that parking lot just this morning, saying the result of the people who are in that parking lot is a result of the poor policies that have come when you displace and gentrified a whole community. This is a place where people find to be their community. This is sometimes a place where people who are unhoused feel most safe - in that space - because someone will come and smile at them. So crime and different things are happening across not only our City, across the 37th, but across our nation. So to remove something as a community space that we need - so people can come together, come problem solve, come be a support in some way or another - I think that that is not the best move. I think it's like you came and you put your footsteps there, but then you're gonna step away and leave the problem. You need to resource the issue, bring in investments. I would rather Starbucks do that, especially when you look at the racial justice context and how they maybe even came into the community. So I'm disheartened about it, but at the same time, we as community and advocates work in solidarity - are working to address that issue. But I will say I've talked to those people in that parking lot, I've seen people I've grew up with in that community, and I know even a unhoused, homeless woman sleeping in the bench there said that was the safest place for them because they're amongst at least their own community. Thank you. [00:44:53] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:44:55] Chipalo Street: Yeah - if they wanna leave, they can leave - and I don't understand why they would leave for safety concerns. What I hope is that we can have another community business come in and take that spot - let's have Boon Boona Coffee, who has a place down in Renton and a place down on 12th Ave, come in and take that shop because I believe you can do good business in that location without vilifying the people who are in the parking lot. There are definitely issues with unhoused populations choking out businesses. You can see that down on 12th and Jackson where they've moved in front of Lam's Seafood and there's EBT fraud going on there. I would not put 23rd and Jackson in that same bucket. I quite frankly, wouldn't be surprised if there's a little bit of bias or racism going on in that decision to shut down. And Starbucks has shown that they want to do some union busting in other places, so losing Starbucks - to me - isn't the end of the world. I'll bet you that a better business will come in and replace it really soon because that's a booming area - they just opened up a bunch of housing around there. Yeah, that's their decision, that's fine. We'll get a better business in there. [00:46:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:46:04] Nimco Bulale: I'm disheartened by the closing, to be very honest - I remember as a young child growing up and meeting my grandfather at that Starbucks because he lived right at a senior center close by. And so I'm gutted to hear that that's happening. And it's unfortunate that - we know that oftentimes communities of color, the ones that are disproportionately impacted by these travesties and by gun violence and public safety - as a representative, I will lead with racial justice being central to the fight to end violence and specifically support policies that are common sense and that reduce police interactions and increase accountability for our communities. I think, as Chipalo mentioned, this could be an opportunity to have a community cafe there, an opportunity to really invest in the Central District and in that area. And I think it's a missed opportunity for Starbucks to leave in this condition and to say that it's because of safety concerns. I would've hoped that they would be a part of that solution in really being able to continue to invest and rehabilitate the community. Yeah, so it's unfortunate, but I think there's more opportunities to be - to really invest in that corner of our community. [00:47:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:47:25] Andrew Ashiofu: I'm going to address this in various forms for - when they say public safety, I think I go again with what everyone said - is based on racial bias. I really hope Brian of Tougo Coffee down here at Yesler opens another branch there. But also - I, as a frontline worker that has been working hard to be unionized at my airline, I think this is also a form of union busting, as Chipalo said, because we've seen that nearly all the stores that unionize at Starbucks - they close it down. And there's a huge - this is the time, the moment for the unions to come together. And Starbucks is - Okay, we're going to punish you. But also, I think as a state representative, or as on the state level, this is why we should invest in small businesses and among minorities and Black communities, immigrant communities, because - I used to say those are our safe space, even the LGBT community, but reality - those are our brave spaces where we could be who we are. We could be - so we need to invest in small business there and take back what was ours. Thank you so much. [00:48:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. Next we are going to a question about the Dobbs decision that eliminated the right to abortion. But in Justice Thomas's concurring opinion, he went further and he identified decisions he felt should be reevaluated after their ruling in Dobbs - cases that established our right to same-sex marriage, rights to contraception, and rights to sexual privacy. What can our state legislature do to proactively protect these rights? Starting with Andrew. [00:49:13] Andrew Ashiofu: Ooh - as a gay person and someone involved in the LGBTQ+ community and advocacy, this is really hard. It brings back memories of when I was kicked out, it brings back memories of being bullied and being called a f*gg*t. As a state, we need to create constitution that protects all those things. Contraception is part of healthcare - it's important, it's not an option. You can't tell me that - as a states we need to provide - contraception should be free, condoms should be free, Plan B should be free, IUD should be free, menstrual pads and all those tampons should be free - should not be for profit. We need to protect and make it accessible, not affordable - accessible for free - because again it's criminalizing minorities. Then when it comes to privacy and this is the whole LGBTQ witch hunting all over again. In this day and age, we need to create that as a protective class in our constitution, in our schools, we need to protect them in our workplace. We need to protect them - I want to walk down the streets and not have someone call me a f*gg*t. So this is something very dear to me. And I would walk hard to codify all that into protection in Washington State. Thank you. [00:50:39] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:50:41] Emijah Smith: Thank you. This is an opportunity for Washington State to really walk its talk. We talk about being progressive, we talk about all the things, and this is an opportunity for us to get in front of it. This is why I want to go ahead and be a state representative - because I do not wanna see us go back, turn the clock back. I'm there to push, hold the line, and take us forward - because this type of it's - I have no understanding for it. I'm triggered, right? We're here in the 37th and we talk about the progressiveness and I'm tired of talk and we need representation and leadership that will hold the line and also push the line forward. This is about safety in my opinion. This is a safety issue. If a person cannot show up who they are, then how can they be safe? They're going to be a target of violence. This to me is policy violence, and this is not acceptable. So this is who I am and how I wanna show up moving forward. We leave this place better than the way we found it. I do not need my children or my loved ones, or my neighbors, fearful of their own safety, because they cannot show up as who they need to be - because they don't have the proper resources or then we're gonna be stereotyped in some form or fashion, then more policies and that systemic racism will fall on those who are most marginalized. It's this type of rhetoric that has to come to an end. You have to be about action. Thank you. [00:52:21] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:52:24] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I can't agree more with what folks are saying. To me, what's interesting about this and ironic is that this is an example of extreme privilege. My understanding is that he left one issue out that is also built on Dobbs, which is interracial marriage, and he is married to a white lady. But yet he cited every other thing that he wants to take back. So why is it that this person in a position of power over so many people can just selectively exclude it? So I think it hits home for all of us in very many different ways. Personally, this hits home because I'm half Black, half white. And so even though he didn't include it in there, you know it's next - it just means that you can't trust what they say. And it means that you need to elect leaders to state representatives, to Supreme Court - I guess we can't elect people to Supreme Court, but Senators who confirm justices up and down the ballot - who support everyone's right, to see people as equal, who are with us on this march towards equality. [00:53:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:53:32] Nimco Bulale: Thank you so much for that question. I don't wanna re - I agree with what everybody said. I think additionally, Washington State needs to be in the business of justice. And when I say justice, I really mean the complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, economic, and social wellbeing of all people. It can only - I think that this can only be achieved when everybody has that economic, social, and political power, as well as the resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, about their sexuality, about their reproductive - reproduction - for themselves, their families, and their communities in all areas of their lives. I think that this is the kind of foresight that we need to have as a state and we really need to lead in these issues. If we say that we are beacon for supporting reproductive rights and other rights of all people, I think that we need to be leading in that. And we need to show the rest of the country that we are an example of folks that take that business of justice seriously. [00:54:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. And with that, we are actually gonna take a short two-minute break to give our candidates a chance to grab some water - it's a hot day. And grab their Yes and No paddles because we're going to be back with a lightning round. So two minutes is starting now and we will see you on the other side. All right. We are getting ready to begin our lightning round. So you all have paddles with - that are green on one side, red on the other. Green is what you show to face - that faces the camera - if your answer is Yes. The other side - red, if it's No. We will do these in rapid succession. And following the lightning round, following all of - the totality of the questions - everyone will have one minute to explain any of the answers that you want to. But we will go through this quickly, so I'll ask the question and then ask you to hold up for people to clearly see the Yes or No to the answers to these questions. So we're starting out - regarding housing and homelessness, are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? Yes or no? It looks like we have two either giving a No or a thumbs down for No. Looks like everybody is a No on that question. Next question. Will you vote to end single-family zoning in order to create more housing density and affordability? Yes or no? Everyone is a Yes. Next question. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Yes or no. Everyone is a Yes on that question. Next, do you support Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you have voted for the legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Yes or no? A mixed answer. So keep your paddles held up for that. So Emijah is a Yes, everyone else is a No - that's Chipalo, Andrew, and Nimco. Next, should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Yes or no. Repeating the question - should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Everyone is a Yes in that question. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Yes or no? Chipalo is a Yes. Emijah, Nimco, and Andrew are No. Do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes. Would you have voted this past session - for the session before last - for the Climate Commitment Act? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes on that question. Do you think trans and non-binary students should be allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Will you vote to enact a universal basic income in Washington? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes on that question. Our state has one of the most regressive tax codes in the country, meaning lower-income people pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than the ultra-wealthy. In addition to the capital gains tax, do you support a wealth tax? Yes or no? Everybody with quick Yeses to that. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes to that. Do you support implementing approval voting in Seattle? Yes or no. These are slow answers. We've got some waffling. We've got a lot of waffling. The only clear answer was Andrew with a No. Do you support moving local elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Yes or no? Quick yeses for that. Is your campaign unionized? Yes or no? Every - I can't see your answer there, Andrew. Everybody's a No. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their effort? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Yes or no? Everybody is a Yes. That concludes our lightning round. Now we will give each candidate one minute to explain anything they want to explain about their answers or their waffles. And we'll start with Nimco. [01:00:47] Nimco Bulale: About my waffles? [01:00:49] Crystal Fincher: About any of your answers or the answers that were a non-answer - is there anything that you'd want to explain? [01:00:56] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - maybe if I didn't vote on the question - it wasn't the ranked-choice question, it was the question after that. I wasn't familiar unfortunately with that idea. And so my only explanation is - is that I need to learn a little bit more about - can you explain, can Crystal, can you repeat what that question was? [01:01:15] Crystal Fincher: It was about an approval voting initiative that had been collecting ballot signatures, may appear on the ballot. However, we actually just got some breaking news today that there may be an effort from Councilmember Andrew Lewis to actually put ranked-choice voting on the ballot, which would supplant the approval voting process. So tune in there, but there is a possibility for approval voting, which is where you just vote for everyone that you like. And we've discussed it certainly, there's other people discussing it - lots of lively conversation about - the people and interests supporting and opposing it, and the differences between the two. But just an interesting question there. [01:02:02] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - I just will commit myself to learning more about that. Obviously I support ranked-choice voting and will get myself knowledgeable about approval voting. [01:02:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:02:17] Andrew Ashiofu: Yeah. I am not in support of approval voting. I'm more in support of ranked-choice voting. Also this very initiative has had a bit of scandal while gathering the signatures and all that - I've heard from them, I've listened to their ideology, which I truly appreciate in creating more voices in - more voices of the people voting in the approval, but I think ranked-choice voting is the right way to go. [01:02:55] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [01:02:59] Emijah Smith: Yeah. I wanted to share more information about my answer with regard to the rollbacks, when you spoke about the police legislation initiatives. I define rollbacks as taking us backwards, so I'm not sure how you were defining rollbacks, but when I think about the fact that there's Terry stops now - from the past legislative session, there are now Terry stops. Terry stop is where a person can just be pulled over, asked for their ID, they can be interrogated by the police - without probable cause. And I think that that's a huge problem. And so I'm not in support of things like that - the use of force - and how those things are defined. So I will - I push and want to champion police accountability that's going to make us more safety and bring more balance, not take us back to the 80s, 90s, and 2000s that I'm surviving from right now with overpolicing in our community. [01:03:58] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [01:04:00] Chipalo Street: Sure. So I think the one that I was different from folks was highway expansion. I think the key word to me in that question was "any" - there are times where I could believe you need to expand highways for freight mobility and those support our union jobs. So I would want to make sure that we could at least consider that. In general, I don't think we should be expanding highways. We should be investing in mass transit. But I do want to make sure that we can support our unions and freight transit, 'cause that is - that diversifies our economy and it's one of the strengths that Seattle has. Approval voting - yeah, similar to Nimco, I had no idea what that was. It'll be interesting to learn more about that. And then the police accountability stuff - I have a hard time believing I would've voted for it. The thing that I think that went really well is that Jesse Johnson did ride-alongs with the police - I think we have to be their partners, we have to understand the impacts of our legislation. And so I'd be open to partnering with them to understand how that impacts them and their ability to provide public safety. But given my experience, I have a hard time believing that I would've. But I do believe they're are partners and would like to partner with them to improve public safety. [01:05:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We'll now move on to our regular type of questions. We're currently not on track to meet our 2030 climate goals, and I'm going to ask a question from someone who's watching because of that and because transportation is the biggest polluting sector. They're asking - how can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? And we will start with Chipalo. [01:05:38] Chipalo Street: And one more time for me, please. [01:05:41] Crystal Fincher: Sure. How can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? [01:05:52] Chipalo Street: For sure. So I think one of the things that we have to do, that we saw last cycle when we passed Move Ahead WA, was investing in transit and forms of non-single-occupancy vehicles into our suburbs and rural areas. Mass transit is great, but we can't just focus on our cities because there are people who have longer commutes that need to get to jobs. Often, these are working people who have been pushed and displaced out of cities and into suburban and rural areas. So I want to make sure that whatever we do for transit thinks about the state comprehensively in conjunction with cities and our exurbs. [01:06:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [01:06:37] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that to quickly reduce transportation carbon emissions, we need to fundamentally shift our planning, our policy development, and infrastructure investments to prioritize public transit, walking, and biking over personal vehicles. I think often communities of color and working class communities lack access to reliable forms of public transportation or live in areas where bus systems lack sufficient funding. As legislator, I will support any and all legislation that helps expand public transit to be more reliable, accessible, and affordable for Washingtonians, especially for those who currently live in areas with limited access to public transportation and are forced to be more reliant on cars. I think that this will not only reduce carbon emissions, but it'll also help mobilize our communities and promote fuel efficiency. I do support a just transportation package to ensure that when planning transportation systems, there is a focus on people disproportionately harmed by our current transportation choices. No one should be burdened by pollution from transportation or unable to access - unable to access groceries or school without a car. This package must be a catalyst towards protecting future generations from the climate crisis today. [01:07:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:08:03] Andrew Ashiofu: One, I think is - we need to invest in the expansion of public transportation. There's no rail from here to Tacoma, there's no rail from here to Olympia - that's a red flag right there. We also need to invest in hiring public transport workers, especially bus drivers, to help us with our interconnection with cities, with urban areas. We also need to create incentive for environmental friendly rideshare programs. I hav

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 3: Inslee on climate change and the heat

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 33:26


2pm - The Big Lead @ 2 // GUEST: Attorney Daniel Benson for SPU to talk about possible AG lawsuit // Inslee on Climate Change and the heat // Biden administration and puberty blockers // LETTERSSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hacks & Wonks
36th LD State Representative Position 1 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 87:41


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Tyler Crone, Nicole Gomez, Jeff Manson, and Julia Reed - all running for State Representative Position 1 in Seattle's 36th Legislative district, which covers northwestern Seattle, including the neighborhoods of Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 13th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   36th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/36th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Hacks & Wonks - Julia Reed, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (April 26, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/julia-reed-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Nicole Gomez, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (May 10, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/nicole-gomez-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Jeff Manson, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (May 24, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/jeff-manson-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Tyler Crone, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (June 21, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/tyler-crone-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 1 in Seattle's 36th Legislative district. This covers northwestern Seattle, including the neighborhoods of Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 13th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! Hello everyone. We are here for the 36th Legislative District candidate forum. My name is Crystal Fincher - I'm a political consultant and the host of the Hacks & Wonks podcast, and I'm honored to welcome you to tonight's candidate forum. I'm so excited to hear from our guests - all running for State Representative Position 1 in the 36th Legislative District. Before we begin tonight, I would like to do a land acknowledgement. I would like to acknowledge that we are on the traditional lands of the first people of Seattle, the coast-Salish peoples, specifically the Duwamish people, past and present. I would like to honor with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe. So welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 36 Position 1. We're excited to be able to livestream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we are recording this forum for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will scroll intermittently at the bottom of the screen. The candidates running for 36th Legislative District Representative Position 1 with us tonight are - in alphabetical order - Tyler Crone, Nicole Gomez, Jeff Manson, and Julia Reed. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting today - ballots were mailed. You can register to vote still, update your registration still, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. So please take advantage of that and double check that everyone you know is also. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear as green, then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, and when there are 10 seconds left it will turn red. You will be muted as soon as time is up. I want to mention that I'm on the board for IDF or, The Institute for a Democratic Future. Jeff Manson is an IDF alum and Nicole Gomez was the program director for the most recent IDF class. We've not discussed any details of their campaigns or of this forum. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 47th Legislative District State Rep Position 2 candidate forum, in South King County, for next Wednesday, July 20th at the same time - 6:30-8p. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Tyler Crone, then Nicole Gomez, then Jeff Manson, finally Julia Reed. And we will proceed immediately to a lightning round of Yes/No questions following that. So starting with Tyler Crone. [00:04:14] Tyler Crone: Hi, I'm Tyler. I'm a global public health leader, human rights advocate, public school parent for 14 years and counting, and a mama bear of three. I'm not an ordinary candidate and this is not an ordinary time. The stakes are extraordinarily high. We are at an inflection point for shared prosperity and progress. We continue to live through a pandemic. We are experiencing an historic rollback of our rights, self-determination, and even our collapse of our church and state separation. COVID-19 has shown us that global health is local and public health is essential. Advancing sexual reproductive health and rights has been what I have done throughout my career and it is needed now more than ever with the overturn of Roe. And ultimately I had to jump into this race as transgender kids and their families, just like mine, are being criminalized across our country. I spent my lifetime making a difference for others, partnering with impacted communities, and centering those most impacted. And so I look forward to your questions and I see this as the leadership our state needs now. Thank you. [00:05:20] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next. [00:05:26] Nicole Gomez: Hi everyone. Hello, I'm Nicole Gomez and I'm a mom, an advocate, a community leader, and I'm running to be your next State Representative here in the place I'm really proud to call my home and where I've chosen to raise my family, the 36th District. I'm running to be the next State Representative of the 36th because I would like to help create an economy that works for everyone. And that means addressing our regressive upside-down tax code, healthcare for everyone, fully funded public education, affordable housing, addressing the climate crisis, and so much more that's important right now in the 36th and across the entire state. At age five, I went from living in a secure house and lifestyle to quickly losing a home simply due to the illness of a parent. And from that moment I learned everything I can to navigate complex systems. And so I've been quietly doing this work behind-the-scenes through my healthcare nonprofit that works on transformative policy. I currently sit on the Universal Healthcare Commission and I'm the Executive Director of IDF, and I look forward to talking to you more. [00:06:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and now Jeff. [00:06:31] Jeff Manson: Hi everyone. I'm Jeff - I'm a state administrative law judge, labor leader, and disability community advocate. And as an administrative law judge, I see every day how state laws and budgets affect people and I'm tired of underfunded government that tends to prioritize the wealthy and corporations over working people and the most vulnerable in our state. And although administrative law judges are state employees - for almost 40 years, we did not have the right to collectively bargain. So a few years ago, I organized my colleagues to successfully lobby the Legislature to extend collective bargaining rights to us. And then we formed our new union with 85% of my colleagues signing union authorization cards. I'm endorsed by the King County and 36th District Democrats, the Washington State Labor Council, the Environment and Climate Caucus of the Washington State Democrats, and Mary Lou Dickerson, who represented this district in the house for 18 years. And for those who are watching who are registered voters in the 36th - would be honored to have your vote. [00:07:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Julia. [00:07:32] Julia Reed: Thanks - my name is Julia Reed and I'm running for the State House to advocate for a Washington State where everyone can belong and everyone can have a place. I'm a workforce policy expert, an advocate for youth and racial justice, and a lifelong Seattleite - and I love my hometown. I love the 36th District. But I know that if my public school educator parents were moving to Seattle today, they couldn't afford to live here. As a millennial, my peers and I are living the housing crunch, the high cost of living, lack of childcare, and the threat of climate change. These aren't policy hypotheticals to us, it's about fighting for the future - for our future and the future of other young people. I know we can make different choices in Olympia that will build a vibrant, empowering, equitable economy, where everyone can participate and everyone can thrive. As someone who bridges old and new Seattle, I wanna help create a future of shared prosperity and possibility for generations to come and I'm excited to get your questions. [00:08:41] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. So now, we are actually gonna start right off with the lightning round portion. Candidates - get your Yes/No paddles ready to respond to questions. After the lightning round is complete - with all of the questions - you'll each get one minute to provide any further explanation of any of your votes or waffles or anything that happens like that. So we've got a number of questions to dive into - they go pretty quickly and we will attempt to announce the votes as they happen, so if anyone is listening along, you can hear that. So starting off - first question, do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? That is a Yes from everyone, and it looks like we have some background interference with green in that, for those of you who have that. So please make an extra effort to make sure that your green check is visible, but everybody appears to be a Yes for that. Are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? I see Nicole Gomez, Julia Reed, and Jeff Manson have said No. Elizabeth Tyler Crone has said Yes. We'll move to the next one. Would you vote to end single-family zoning to address housing affordability? I see that - I see Nicole Gomez and Julia Reed have answered Yes. Jeff Manson, Elizabeth Tyler Crone have answered No. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Everyone has answered Yes to that question. Would you vote in favor of Seattle's, or will you vote in favor of Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Everybody is a Yes vote for social housing. Would you have voted for the Legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Everybody is a No. Should the Legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? It's taking a long time to get those Yes and Nos up. This is - looks like everybody's waffling on this - so you can address this in your one minute afterwards. So we have a districtwide waffle on this. Should we continue to limit the circumstances under which law enforcement is authorized to perform vehicular pursuits? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support a state law that would remove obstacles, like qualified immunity, when suing police officers for violating a person's civil rights? Everybody is a Yes on that. Should we offer tax credits or rebates for the purchase of electric bikes? Another Yes from everybody. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Nicole Gomez is a No and the only one to answer definitively so far. Julia Reed says No. And Jeff and Tyler look like they have a more nuanced answer to this. Will you vote to ensure that trans and non-binary students are allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Everybody is a Yes. For people wanting to change their name to match their gender, do you support removing the cost and need to see a judge for legal processing name changes and gender marker changes? Everybody is a Yes. To provide relief from inflation, should we temporarily suspend the gas tax? I see everybody as a No. Would you vote to enact a Universal Basic Income in Washington? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support a wealth tax? Nicole, Julia and Jeff are Yes. Tyler was a little bit after the Yes, but it's a Yes. Should we increase taxes on large corporations? Everybody's a Yes. Should we increase taxes on small businesses? Everybody's a No. Should we lower taxes on small businesses? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support moving elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Uniform Yes. In 2021, did you vote for Bruce Harrell? We've got three Nos, except from Julia Reed who just came in with a No. In 2021, did you vote for Lorena González? We have uniform Yeses. In 2021, did you vote for Nicole Thomas-Kennedy for Seattle City Attorney. I've got a Yes from Nicole Gomez, a No from Jeff Manson, No from Tyler Crone, a Yes from Julia Reed. In 2021, did you vote for Ann Davison for Seattle City Attorney? Nicole Gomez, Tyler Crone, Julia Reed, and Jeff Manson all say No. Is your campaign unionized? We've got uniform Nos. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their efforts? Everybody says Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Everybody says Yes. There's more uniform agreement than I thought we were gonna have. The Legislature just passed a law that will cap insulin at $35 a month for out-of-pocket costs for Washington residents. Would you vote to expand price caps to other commonly used drugs? Uniform Yeses. Will you vote for a budget that increases funding for charter schools? Everybody is a No. Right now, money raised by PTAs and parent organizations can be donated to their individual school. Should we require that this money instead be distributed equally across all similar schools in the district? Nicole, Jeff. Okay. So Julia and Jeff are Yeses, Nicole Gomez and Tyler Crone say No. That concludes our lightning round today. So thank you - just kicks off, sets a baseline for where folks are and what they have. So moving into these questions, and we will begin the questions starting with Nicole Gomez. First question is we've seen significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, yet people are saying they're not seeing the problem get much better despite a significant increase in funding. Do you agree that our homeless crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? Starting with Nicole. [00:17:00] Nicole Gomez: Great. I think that - so the homelessness and - [00:17:08] Crystal Fincher: Oh! [00:17:08] Nicole Gomez: Wait, did we get to respond to our answers before we move on? [00:17:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, you did. I totally forgot that - thank you for that reminder, Jeff Manson. Yeah, you guys get to explain your waffles and there were a number of them. I just jumped into the other section. So pause on that, Nicole - thank you so much for your flexibility in that. And we will start the explanations starting with Nicole on that one. Anything you wanna clarify about your answers, waffles, your unique Nos? [00:17:35] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So I think the only one that was a unique No was the requiring PTAs or PTSAs to distribute equally to other schools as a requirement. I believe that individual PTAs should be allowed to make that decision. And the only reason is that back when my kid was at Salmon Bay K-8, that did come up as a topic. And so we were really interested in exploring it further and were able to vote on it together as a team. Parents have kids in their schools and so sometimes they would like to donate the money to their school specifically and other times not. So I think it's more democratic process to allow them to have that opportunity to vote. We ended up with a vote to share. [00:18:32] Crystal Fincher: Thank you, and now we move to Jeff. [00:18:36] Jeff Manson: Yeah, so a couple answers I'd like to discuss. One was collective bargaining rights for police officers. There have been a couple things that have been addressed. One is making the collective bargaining sessions open to the public, which I am opposed to, because I think that would undermine public sector unions beyond just police officers. And I don't think the benefit we would get would be worth that risk. It's been a right-wing, anti-union idea for years and I think we'd just be handing them something if we did that. In terms of - the other thing that's been discussed is the discipline process. I do think that law enforcement are in a unique position of power that other public employees like myself are not in. And so if we're careful about how it's written, there could be some aspects of the discipline process that we could look at. The other is highway expansion - should be our lowest priority, but wouldn't absolutely vote No. [00:19:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Tyler. [00:19:39] Tyler Crone: Yes, so the collective bargaining - I do not know enough to make a sweeping statement on that. Regarding eliminating single-family zoning, I think we all agree that there needs to be more density. We have affordability and housing as a middle-class crisis, but I am not in favor of eliminating single-family zoning all together. It needs a more thoughtful approach. The sweeps piece - I couldn't make an absolute statement to say, I would never agree to that, because there have been instances where there are encampments in schools and other places where children and families need to go and we need our civic space. Regarding the PTAs and the schools, we need to fully fund education so that our PTAs do not provide our specialists, our librarians, our counselors, our nurses, our arts. So I will fully support fully funding education. I understand that parents are desperate for options around - [00:20:35] Crystal Fincher: It looks like that is your time. And we'll go to Julia. Oh, Julia, you're gonna have to unmute yourself - there you go. [00:20:47] Julia Reed: Oh, sorry. There we go, I'm unmuted. I was just gonna say on the police bargaining question, I think that I have seen from working in City Hall, the challenges and obstructions that can come from police unions and sometimes that run counter to police officers' own wishes around wanting to implement reforms. So I'd like, but I'd also as someone who's endorsed by the Washington State Labor Council, I wanna be sure that any actions we're making regarding collective bargaining or something that the labor community feels is right and is not going to undermine overall labor rights across the board. And I thought Tyler's answer just now was excellent on the need to fully fund public education, so I feel like I wanna change my position on that question. She definitely convinced me, made a great argument. I think that fully funding our schools is essential. We shouldn't be relying on PTAs to fill the gap. [00:21:46] Crystal Fincher: And that is the time. Thank you so much. And now - thank you for your flexibility. We are heading into the general question portion. So restating the question and we will start this time with Jeff, we've seen significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get better yet despite the increase in funds. Do you agree that the homelessness crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? [00:22:24] Jeff Manson: Yeah, so I think we have - the City and the County make a lot of decisions about homelessness programs and contracts and parcel by parcel, but the state provides a lot of the funding for shelters, for tiny homes, for permanent supportive housing, for low income housing. And I think the - what the pandemic in the last few years have shown is that we've underinvested in these areas in recent decades. I do think that the services and the housing options are getting better. I just think during the pandemic, the lack of housing was rising faster than the services for homeless could keep up. So I think we're heading in the right direction, I think we are slowly seeing improvements, I think we're finding models that work. I think having peer navigators start with people when they're on the streets and looking through the whole process, I think tiny house villages are a good first stop for people. I think we've relied too much on our emergency shelters. As a housing option, they're great when it's subfreezing or 108 degrees but not as much as a night-to-night housing option. But a tiny house village is a good first stop and the majority of people there are placed in permanent housing within a few months. And I think permanent supportive housing is the gold standard. It's permanent housing, but with mental health therapists and other social workers on site for people who can't fully live on their own. And the Legislature put money in for about 2,000 more units statewide this last session, which should be coming online later this year, which is great, but it's not enough. We need a round two. [00:23:56] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And now we head to Tyler. [00:24:04] Tyler Crone: Thank you. I know that the issue of homelessness is top of mind. I was out door knocking today in Ballard and that's the major concern. I have seen us spend a ton of money. I do not know what the results are and we've been calling it a protracted crisis for a very long time. I think it is the moment to accelerate and strengthen our partnerships at a city, county, and state level. Coordination was one of the key takeaways from an article in The Seattle Times about what we needed to strengthen our response. One, housing is a human right - we do not currently have enough shelter to put those who are unsheltered on the streets somewhere safe overnight. We need more immediate shelter options. Two, that long-term work towards affordable housing is critical. Right now, housing insecurity now is a middle class issue. Three, we do not have a sufficient mental and behavioral health system. That is top of mind for me - that both, we need to have a place where people can go and people can be safe, but we also need to be taking care of those who are most vulnerable amongst us. And currently our sweeps are happening without necessarily a place for people to go and that is not okay, so circling back to an earlier point that I made. The last piece I'll make is that it needs to be a regional approach. Thank you. [00:25:33] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much - now Julia. [00:25:36] Julia Reed: Yeah, I think that - so when I was working in City Hall, one of the things that I remember - what came up in the conversations we had around the original start of the Regional Homelessness Authority was that actually the system within the greater Seattle area is exiting thousands of people and thousands of families from homelessness every year. The challenge is that tens of thousands of more are entering homelessness every year because of the high cost of living, the shortage of affordable rental property, the stagnant wages that we experience all across our country that mean that every person is really just one medical emergency or one sudden event away from finding themselves homeless. I understand that people's frustration is that we put money into it, it seems like it's getting worse. But I think that we invest comparatively little in our homelessness response. If you look at the billions of dollars we might put into roads and bridges, we don't invest a comparable amount in our human infrastructure in our state. And as a legislator, that is gonna be one of my big focuses - not just housing, mental healthcare - but also human infrastructure, like childcare, green spaces, access to healthy food. All of these things contribute to a safer, healthier community for everyone and particularly contribute to addressing our homelessness challenge in a permanent and lasting way. [00:27:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now Nicole. [00:27:11] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So I think of homeness as a phenomenon that also should be contextualized with systemic issues, right? Racism or ableism, education access - there's a lot of different things that go and contribute to homelessness. So while it might seem like our numbers have been increasing, we've also been in the middle of a pandemic. And that, in addition to the high cost of housing overall, has been - exasperated the problem. Our unhoused individuals are carrying an immense amount of pain and trauma and we need to be looking at the programs that are also supporting - we've been underfunding a lot of them for decades. And so it's really time for us to think about what our true north is again - and make universal housing a goal - making sure that we are housing everyone and make it a priority. And I think that we're on the right track, we just need to get there in the long run. It's an issue and a problem for a really long time and it's gonna take a while to fix. [00:28:40] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. For the next question - last year, Washington experienced a natural disaster in the form of our record breaking heat wave that left hundreds dead. Due to human-caused climate change, we're guaranteed to see more disasters like this. What will you do as a legislator to prepare our state and your district for future crises? And we are going to begin this question with Tyler. [00:29:13] Tyler Crone: Thank you. So to prepare our state for future crises - this is an urgent and top-of-mind response issue for me - accelerated climate action and the climate impacts must be embedded into all of the decision making we make. One of the things that was top-of-mind related, Crystal, to the heat dome question as I entered this race was how smoke season has come up as a issue in the very short time that my youngest child has been alive. I see a way forward as - one, bringing my public health expertise and prioritizing that as what are the health impacts of these climate emergencies and how are we centering frontline communities? Two, the UN report on the climate crisis has suggested a very important strategy and that is something that we have an abundance - is centering Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous leadership. That is another key priority and approach of mine. Three, it is again about planning and coordination. Do we have the systems in place to keep people safe and healthy? Four, there is a piece of - do we have the funds available to help people recover from these climate emergencies and navigate them? And five, I would say it is about leaning into the bold innovation and leadership across our state so that we are all working together. As a young student said to me, "It's Earth Day, and I don't know what to do to make a difference." Thank you. [00:30:50] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're headed to Julia. [00:30:53] Julia Reed: Thanks. When I was working in City Hall, a group of Parks Department staffers came to me early in the spring and said, "We really wanna work on getting ready for wildfire season early. Can you help us?" And as a mayor's policy person, I was able to help elevate that issue. We created the first ever Smoke Ready Communities Day, which was a four-countywide event across King, Pierce and Snohomish county that tried to create awareness and information about preparing for wildfire smoke, especially for low-income communities, because these climate emergencies - they touch all of us, but they hit our low-income communities, our communities of color, our working people who have to go out to work the hardest and first. It's one of the reasons I'm proud to be endorsed by Puget Sound Sage and one of the reasons why I've been talking about wildfire smoke resiliency from the start of my campaign. I really want to see the state use some of our cap-and-invest funding to create a grant program for small cities to increase their climate resiliency and to help create a strategy for those cities as well - because large cities like Seattle have the staff and the expertise to create their own filtration systems as we did when I was in the mayor's office, but smaller cities and towns don't have that support and their folks are suffering right now and they need the state to step in and help them understand what to do and help them afford to make the retrofits to keep their community safe. [00:32:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:32:25] Nicole Gomez: Sure. Our communities are being attacked, are being destroyed every day by the climate or impacts of climate change. And we're seeing this in the forms of the flooding, the wildfires, droughts and we're being threatened by the inaction that's been not taken. So I think Washington should lead on reducing the carbon emission through more sustainable, like transportation, construction and consumption. Also, one of the secret weapons - I've read articles - one of the secret weapons against climate change is affordable homes. And it's a problem that I think that if we think about it in a more holistic way and look at the larger overarching systems, I think we can come up with some really good ideas for tackling our goals, our climate goals. And then also with the creation of the HEAL Act that's just been put into place - and that's engaging community through our state agencies and being able to make those recommendations from the bottom-up will really help also with that environmental justice aspect as well. [00:33:52] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now, Jeff. [00:33:54] Jeff Manson: Yeah, I agree with what everyone else has said. I would just add, in addition to smoke season that we have now and the heat waves, which are gonna be more common, we also have a water crisis that's coming - and that's both our drinking water, it's our agricultural water, it's our electric power. So we need to be preparing for not only the disasters we're already experiencing, but the ones that we should be anticipating 5, 10, 20, 30 years from now. And we also need to keep leading on preventing these worse outcomes. Washington - the good news is Washington State has been a leader among states and among countries in terms of pushing our pro-climate policies to reduce our carbon footprint. The bad news is it's not enough. Even if every jurisdiction in the world copied exactly what we're doing, they're not gonna meet - none of us are gonna meet our climate goals of halving, cutting in half our carbon emissions by 2030 and even more by 2050. We had some low-hanging fruit this last legislative session - we had electric vehicle subsidies, which we can bring back - also support the electric bike subsidies, redoing our building code to promote electricity over natural gas. There was also a bill to include climate effects in the Growth Management Act comprehensive plans. So it's easy, low-hanging fruit to pick up next session, but we need to keep investing in green infrastructure and clean energy to prevent the worst from happening. [00:35:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Our next question will be an audience-submitted question. Pat in Greenwood wants to know what actions can the Legislature do to protect reproductive care with the Dobbs decision coming down from the Supreme Court, but our right already codified in state law here - but a constitutional amendment seems unlikely given the makeup of the chambers. So what actions can happen to protect reproductive care? And we are going to start with Julia. [00:36:04] Julia Reed: Yeah, I think that I want to just push back a little bit against the concept that a constitutional amendment is unlikely. I think that it'll be challenging - maybe we can do income tax and reproductive rights in the same push. But I think that we have to start thinking about a constitutional amendment. Our rights are legally protected, but that law is only as good as long as we have Democratic majorities in the Legislature and a Democratic governor. And that could change and I don't feel comfortable leaving our rights up to that kind of risk, especially not in this day and age. I also think another thing we can do is - in Washington State, we have legally protected access to abortion. But in many parts of the state, there are no accessible abortion clinics and hospital systems have merged with Catholic hospital systems that restrict access and information about abortion. So there are people in Washington State who have legal access to abortion, but they lack actual access to abortion. I think it's really critical that we ensure that we're regulating state hospital mergers and Catholic hospital mergers to ensure that everyone's access continues to be protected in our state. And I also think helping to support and create funding for people who may be coming here from other states - I want to applaud the governor's work limiting the State Patrol's ability to be pulled into investigations of people coming to seek abortion care in our state. [00:37:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:37:40] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so since the start of the campaign, I've been talking about the Keep Our Care Act, which is something that I worked on last session and I'm looking forward to continuing the work on it in the upcoming session. And that's similar - it's the bill that would ensure those health entity mergers, acquisitions, and contracting affiliations to improve rather than harm access to that affordable, quality care within the community. And it would, like Julia mentioned, put that prohibition on those consolidations that diminish that access to affordable quality care, including our reproductive rights. That is one very small thing that we can do right now. As Executive Director of Institute for a Democratic Future, one of the things that I heard a lot about when visiting the areas along neighboring states like Idaho was that we're going to need additional funding for those health providers that are right along the border there in order to appropriately have that intake of new, potentially new patients coming into the state to seek care. And so that's something I look forward to continuing to work on in the future. [00:39:10] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Jeff. [00:39:12] Jeff Manson: Yeah - again I agree with what both Julia and Nicole have said. I do agree that we need to push for a constitutional amendment. We, at the federal level - I think a lot of people thought that Roe was settled law, Roe v. Wade was settled law and we had a constitutional right to abortion access. And it took the right wing 50 years, but unfortunately they were successful and I don't think we can take anything for granted here. I feel rather confident that our current legislature is in the right spot, our current Supreme Court's in the right spot, but you never know what's gonna happen 5, 10, 20, 50 years from now - so we should push for a constitutional amendment for an explicit right to abortion access. In terms of what we can do, this last legislative session the Legislature did pass a bill to expand the types of providers who can perform services, anticipating that Roe may fall, which is great. That helps expand access, but I really think funding is gonna be a major issue. We need to make sure that we are fully funding our clinics and other providers 'cause people are already - even before Roe - people from Texas were already coming here for services as they were being further restricted across the country. And we should be a safe haven for people, we should be a place that people can come and feel safe, no questions asked and have access to services. And if that means also funding for their stay or transportation, I'm open to that as well. And I also agree that we need to - [00:40:48] Crystal Fincher: Oh, thank you - and now Tyler. [00:40:55] Tyler Crone: I've served on the board of Cedar Rivers, which is an independent feminist abortion provider in our state and one of the best in the country. I've also been on the frontlines of advancing safe, legal abortion around the world. This is an urgent moment, it is an all-hands-on-deck moment and is one of the key reasons why I'm running. One, we have to codify Roe - we have to do it. Two, we have to invest in the infrastructure of care - the services, the providers, the clinics. We have a desperate shortage in eastern Washington and in the 36th legislative district, you cannot get abortion care at a hospital because of the mergers. Just so you know, it is here at home that you cannot get the care you need. I also am deeply invested in increasing and expanding the funding that has already been initiated by Dow Constantine, by the governor, by our mayor to overcome barriers and to ensure access to care for everyone who is seeking abortion care in our state. We also have to think about upstream - let's ensure that we're scaling up our access to reversible, long-acting contraception such as IUDs - that will take the burden off of our limited clinic and service facilities. We need to invest in training - all of these rollback of Roe means that all those states where abortion is not legal, you cannot train to provide that care. And I guess I would like to say one last point - this is just the beginning. I hope you look to commentaries by my law school classmate, Melissa Murray - [00:42:30] Crystal Fincher: Appreciate that. And for the next question - the pandemic exposed our healthcare system's limited capacity - which has grown even worse, continues to grow worse and more limited - and our state's unequal access to health services. What action do you propose to increase our state's capacity to respond to a health crisis, including behavioral health crises, and what will you do to make sure that our response supports our most vulnerable communities? And we are going to start this with Nicole. [00:43:03] Nicole Gomez: Oh, Crystal - can you please repeat the question one more time? [00:43:06] Crystal Fincher: Sure. [00:43:07] Nicole Gomez: Thank you. [00:43:08] Crystal Fincher: The pandemic exposed our healthcare system's limited capacity and our state's unequal access to health services. What action do you propose to increase our state's capacity to respond to a health crisis, including behavioral health crises, and what will you do to make sure that our response supports our most vulnerable communities? [00:43:28] Nicole Gomez: Okay, thank you. One of the - I work on healthcare policy quite a bit at the state level, that's what I do. And one of the things that we have done to help increase access to medical care has been, like this last session, we got additional funding to help cover our undocumented population and we're seeking additional funding for that. So that was something that that was done during the pandemic because we saw the huge inequities in the way medical coverage and care is provided. I've been working on the Universal Healthcare Commission - I was appointed by Governor Inslee there - and so we are in the current talks of trying to figure out what the nuts and bolts of a comprehensive healthcare plan for Washington State would look like. [Noise of object hitting ground] And I just dropped my little thing. At any rate, we are currently in the process of doing that right now - to ready the state for a potentially single-payer program. And that's something that my nonprofit has been working strenuously on, and I'm hoping that by being there as an elected official, I'd be able to continue that work in a different capacity. [00:44:56] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Jeff. [00:45:00] Jeff Manson: Yeah. I support universal healthcare, universal coverage, health insurance coverage. Ideally the federal government would take the lead on this, but we can't and shouldn't wait for the federal government to get its act together and need to do it here in Washington. I supported the creation of the Universal Healthcare Commission and I want to give a shout out to Nicole for all of her great work on this issue. If elected, I'll be relying on her on healthcare access issues. We need to take the lead here and if federal government maybe could follow our example in how we set things up here. But we don't just need health insurance coverage. I do Medicaid hearings as an administrative law judge. These are people who are covered by Medicaid, which was expanded under Obamacare, which is great. But often there are not sufficient providers for a lot of different types of services, including behavioral health services. And often, I think they would say the reimbursement rates aren't high enough to be able to cover people. So we need to not just provide universal coverage, we need to be providing the funding so that the actual services are available for those with insurance coverage. So it's attacking it from all angles and really it comes back to - are we gonna raise progressive revenue through progressive revenue sources in order to fund the services that people need and deserve. [00:46:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Tyler. [00:46:34] Tyler Crone: First, I want to start with where you started - the pandemic exposed - the pandemic is not over. We need to be learning from where we fell short, what we did right, what we do better next time - that is the first pillar of continuing to navigate and recover from COVID-19. Too many of us are sick, too many of us have had our lives disrupted. A key piece of this, for me, is bringing that pandemic expertise coupled with investment and fortification of our public health systems, our public health leadership, and our public health infrastructure. A next piece of this for me, that is top-of-mind, is about how are we taking care of those who keep us healthy? We have an incredible nursing staffing shortage in our state, our healthcare workers are exhausted and overstretched, and we need to keep that top-of-mind if we're thinking about how we're navigating a crisis and who takes care of us. Likewise, we have frontline responders who are overstretched, such as our firefighters. I'd like to make sure those stay top-of-mind as well. I think the piece that I will close with here is how I would legislate and how I lead. I lead from behind centering those who are most impacted. A key question you asked is about how would those who are most vulnerable not be excluded - they would be partners in the solutions. Thank you. [00:47:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - Julia. [00:48:03] Julia Reed: I'm really proud to just recently have been endorsed by SEIU 1199 Northwest, which represents thousands of nurses and behavioral healthcare workers all across the state. It's an honor after all of the work that they've put in to keep us safe, that they've put in to keep us safe every day to have their support in this race. And one of the - we talked about two things in the endorsement process. One is the essential need for safe staffing. Too many of our hospitals in healthcare settings are being run at staff-to-patient ratios that are unsafe - that put the medical staff at risk, that put patients at risk, that put care at risk, that put our whole system at risk when there are stresses like pandemic. The other thing we talked about is the really important need to grow our healthcare workforce pipeline. I'm one of the only candidates in this race who has worked on and built workforce development programs and that includes having done work with the Somali Health Board to try to advocate for greater access for immigrant and refugee doctors. We have a lot of excellent medical, trained medical personnel in our state who, because of government regulations, aren't able to do the work that they're trained to do. And I want to work with SEIU 1199 Northwest Multi-Employer Training Fund to help grow our next generation of healthcare workers, especially women and people of color. Because to ensure they aren't excluded, we have to have, you have to have providers available who come from your community, who look like you. [00:49:40] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rates. The top three answers were: at 85% lack of mental health and addiction services, at 67% homelessness, and at 63% economic conditions. And when asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were: at 92% addiction and mental health services, 81% said training police officers to deescalate situations, and 80% said programs to address the root causes of crime. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Jeff. [00:50:45] Jeff Manson: Yes, I do. I think in terms of where we have underinvested in recent years, mental health and behavioral health services and interventions is where we are the farthest behind, where we need to invest the most. The Legislature did increase some funding this past year, but I think it's just a start, it's just a drop in the bucket. And I was trying to type up the numbers and I'll have to look it up later - and I think I generally agree with the respondents to the poll. I think mental health and addiction is a major contributor to criminal activity, and we need to make sure that we have these services available and that we are directing people who enter the criminal justice system into services, when they're properly identified to need those services. Drug Court is a huge success, other alternatives to incarceration for those with addiction issues and other mental health issues have been a real success story. But there are stories of Drug Court telling prosecutors not to - don't send as many referrals, we don't have enough providers to provide services for as many people who are wanting to come over to Drug Court. So we need to make sure that we're providing that funding so that the services are available. I do think that is the - one of the main causes of criminal activity and the cheapest way to reduce it. [00:52:12] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Tyler. [00:52:18] Tyler Crone: Investing in the criminal legal system does not work. It does not help us solve the problems of today. I'd like to put forward and agree with many in Seattle who do feel concern, grave concern, about our public safety situation at present and push you back, Crystal, a little bit and say it has to be nuanced. We are currently facing a public health and public safety crisis. And so I am not going to pit two things against each other of saying - absolutely, we need to be investing in mental health, we need to be investing in behavioral health. And those are some of my key priorities - bringing forward a public health and a harm reduction approach to both. But you said - would you say you would do this rather than - I'm not sure we're at a moment where we can say rather than. As much as I'd love to put forward public safety as public health, I recognize we have Starbucks closing down, I recognize that my child who worked at Majestic Bay had to shoo out a person using drugs from the entrance who lurched at them and they had to call out a manager. And my daughter last night had someone break a bottle on her car. So just to say we are facing a moment that is complex and nuanced and is going to take a lot of integrity, thought, and care to center human dignity and put the services that we need to prevent these types of scenarios. So thank you so much. [00:53:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And just clarifying the question - it's would you fund those things before passing other ones, not necessarily instead of. With that, we will go to Julia. [00:54:05] Julia Reed: I think safety, public safety, is the issue we hear about on the doors - all of us - the most every day. I think everyone deserves to be safe, but I think we can see that doubling down on our current system, which is broken, is leading to the results we're having in our streets. As someone who's worked in government my whole career, I really try to be led by data in making decision making. And I think the data shows us that we have solutions that work here in our City. I'm proud to be endorsed by Dominique Davis, the CEO and founder of Community Passageways, which is one of the leading examples of community-based, evidence-backed, non-incarceral, non-police-related solutions to public safety that create lasting safety in our City. I've also been a longtime board member for the YMCA Social Impact Center which sponsors the Alive and Free program, which similarly is a community-based program, community-based response to crime that has shown real measurable results. I want to see us investing in the solutions that work. I want to see us investing in things like Community Passageways, Alive and Free, greater access to advocates for victims of violence, of sexual assault, and addressing the scarcity and poverty that drives a lot of low-level crime, including the lack of mental and behavioral healthcare. [00:55:33] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:55:37] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so on the topic of behavioral health, I actually will - first, to answer the question - yes. But on the topic of behavioral health specifically, the Legislature just recently put in a really large package of behavioral healthcare funding because it is a top issue - top-of-mind not just here in the Seattle area, but across the entire state and nation, quite frankly. And there still needs to be additional investments. This past session - something that I'm proud to have helped pass was this budget proviso that one of my, one of the local nonprofits came to me and said, Hey, can you help with this? And we ended up passing a proviso for a pilot program that - mental health providers were coming to them and saying, Hey, I would love to volunteer my time, but there's no way that we can figure out how to pair patients with providers. There needs to be a screening process that's easy for us to manage. And so we helped pass that through, so it's a pilot in King, Snohomish and Pierce. And with innovative ideas like that, if it works - let's see if we can continue to do it, especially now that we have telehealth, that could potentially help get providers across the state specifically in the areas where there's a lack. There's a huge lack of mental health providers statewide. [00:57:15] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And with that, it's 7:30, it is a hot evening, there's a lot going on. We are going to take a quick two-minute break just to give people the chance to grab some ice, refill water, do whatever you need to do. So we will start that two-minute countdown now, which goes by pretty quick. So we will start that break and then be back shortly. Excellent. So it looks like we are back - I'm waiting for, there we go - we're all back. So this next question is a combination of two - a combination of a preexisting question and one sent in from a viewer. Starting off - Washington's facing housing affordability crisis - lots of conversation about ending exclusionary zoning, making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, but also balancing concerns of different constituents. One in particular writes in asking, citing a King 5 story where Seattle has lost 11,500 rental property units in the past year, mostly smaller locally-owned properties, according to this and suggested by the King 5 article. They're wondering if you're gonna pursue similar regulations at the state level, which they feel greatly disfavor and disincentivize mom-and-pop landlords. So that's question one. And question two - in addition to what you plan to do for landlords or not, what needs to happen to address this housing affordability crisis beyond expanding zoning and investing in the Housing Trust Fund? And we are going to start with Tyler. [00:59:07] Tyler Crone: Thank you. So I think that the first question piece was about these smaller landlords and what are we doing to find strategies that work? I think that we are at a extraordinarily difficult moment because one, we're facing a homelessness crisis that will only be exacerbated when we lift an eviction moratorium. This eviction moratorium is placing a disproportionate burden on some of these small landlords who are an important part of the solution. And so what I would look to do would be to one, bring these stakeholders around the table to see where have our actions had unintended consequences, or that article, Crystal - I just saw it on Twitter before we hopped on - where we're losing critical space where people are selling their units and it is impacting our housing availability. So one, that partnership with landlords looking for practical solutions, exempting small landlords from some of these onerous regulations. To that piece of affordability, we have to be finding smart ways forward around density, around building with that urban village model, increasing density along our secondary arterials and seeing it as a strategy for inclusive, safe, healthy neighborhoods. [01:00:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Julia. [01:00:41] Julia Reed: Yeah, it's hard for me to speak to that specific article without having read it and dug into the data a little bit more. I, like I said, I like to be driven by the data and I know sometimes television news can can create packages for clicks as opposed to things that are more nuanced. I am very concerned about the loss of rental property in our City and the lack of affordable rental property. The University of Washington researchers just put out a book that I've been deeply reading for this process called Homelessness is a Housing Problem - the thesis is in the title of the book. And one of the things that they identify is that the lack of affordable rental property is the number one most determinative factor in the rates of homelessness in a particular area. So it's a huge concern. I'm really focused on this rising trend around LLCs and corporations buying up homes as investment properties to increase corporate profits. I want to explore what that looks like in our state and see if we can regulate that to ensure that our market can remain something that individuals can buy into for their own ownership. And that's really gonna be, I think, a big focus of mine in the Legislature. [01:02:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [01:02:07] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So like others, I have not had an opportunity to read the article that was posted, but what I would say is that this is exactly the reason why we need different options for housing. Aside from being able to lift the ban on rent control or something of that nature, we would also need to look at limiting predatory fees. There's other ways in which we can work through making sure that we have more affordable housing. I was thinking about an article that I read - I think it was regarding Amsterdam and there's a 40-40-20 rule that they use there. And so essentially what that is - is you have 40% of regulated rent, and then you have another 40% of medium-term rental, and then 20% would be an expensive rent option. And looking at other countries who are tackling this problem and are doing it in a successful manner could be helpful in helping guide the work that we do. We're in a - oh, there's time. Thank you. [01:03:34] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Jeff. [01:03:36] Jeff Manson: Yeah, our housing affordability crisis, I think, is related to a lot of the issues we all hear at the door and I think we're all experiencing ourselves. I think in terms of the role the state can play in that - there's twofold - one is direct state investment at the lower end of the market. This would be the Housing Trust Fund, other direct investments. The other is we need more density. We need - we're tens of thousands of housing units behind where we need to be. People are moving here faster than we're building new units and that's causing the - one of the main reasons that prices are rising. Seattle has taken steps in recent years to increase density - it could do more - but other cities in the region haven't done nearly as much. I think another thing is people who are wanting to build more housing units are having a lot of trouble with just basic things like permitting. I hear, of course, at the doors about Seattle's process and we need to make sure that our municipalities have the resources, are able to raise the resources they need to process permanent applications expeditiously. In terms of small landlords, I also haven't read the article. I would say my overall approach is that we need to respect tenant's rights, but also need to make sure that we aren't disincentivizing providing rental units so much that we don't have any housing for everybody. So I do think it's a balance and it's complicated. But those are the two things I would be looking at in any of this legislation. [01:05:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Now we go to a audience-submitted question. What would make Washington's tax code more fair for the poor and working families? And how much funding would you look to raise for needed services in Washington? And we're gonna start with Julia. [01:05:28] Julia Reed: That's a great question. One of the things that makes our tax codes so regressive is that poor and working families who purchase more of their goods and consumables are paying a lot of money in sales tax. Tons of money in sales tax. Also, we talked about the gas tax earlier in the lightning round. People who have older cars, less fuel-efficient cars are paying more in gas tax than people who are buying - well, people who are buying Teslas in general aren't paying gas tax. So it's just another example of how working families are carrying the load for our parks, our roads, our schools, our infrastructure - and wealthy folks are getting a free pass. I think what we need to do in our state is - I'd like to see us create a statewide income tax. While we are working towards that, dealing with constitutional issues, I really support the wealth tax that Noel Frame who held this seat before has proposed - which she proposed a 1% tax on wealth over a billion dollars. I think you could even bring that threshold down a little bit. I also would like to see us increase the estate tax on large estates and use that as an opportunity to lower the estate tax on smaller estates so that families of color can afford to create generational wealth and that all working families can try to bring some generational wealth to the next generation. [01:07:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [01:07:04] Nicole Gomez: This is the billion dollar question. So I've been working with the Balance Our Tax Code coalition over the past few years. And we've been working in detail on this very issue. There's a lot of different ideas that are floating out there. We did pass the capital gains tax, so that was one effort. I do think we need to tax excessive wealth - that is something that we've been working on and will continue to work on it. That 1% tax on the value of stocks, bonds, and the other financial intangible assets over $1 billion, which again, I do also think that should be lowered. And I believe that they're working on a number that might be a little - a different number perhaps, or a different way of looking at it - but that only affects like a hundred people in Washington State. It's time that the wealthy do pay their fair share. There's also other ideas like a guaranteed basic income program I've seen out there. Baby bonds has also been floated where you're giving funds to - I think the bill was like $3,200 to give funds to people, to kids who are on the state's Medicare Apple Health program. And then that money grows over time and they get it when they're an adult, which is a good way to eliminate or to address the wealth gap. And I have so many more - I could talk about this topic for hours. So thanks. [01:08:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Jeff. [01:08:39] Jeff Manson: Yes - as I'm sure this is a very informed audience and everyone's aware that we have the most regressive tax structure in the whole country. It is by far the worst, and we're really feeling it right now with inflation and the affordability crisis - the sales and property taxes that are so regressive. That's one thing I hear at the doors all the time. So I support capital gains tax and am cautiously optimistic our State Supreme Court will find it constitutional. Same with higher earners income tax and a wealth tax. We need to be pursuing all of these progressive revenue sources. And once we raise enough money to fund the services that we say that we need, then we could provide some relief from the more regressive taxes. The second part of the question was how much more revenue do we need? I don't know if I can put a number on it, but it's definitely in the billions - like billions and billions. Think about all the things that we've all been talking about, we mostly agree on that we need - we've been talking about healthcare, we've been talking about behavioral health and mental health, we've been talking - we haven't talked about childcare, but that's really expensive and requires direct state subsidies. We're talking about low-income housing and Housing Trust Fund and permanent supportive housing - and fully funding education. All of these things cost money besides the basic government services that we already have - often, which are not acting at full capacity. So we have not enough revenue and the revenue that we have is being collected too aggressively. So we need more - [01:10:20] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now Tyler. [01:10:24] Tyler Crone: Thank you. My approach to this question, which is a critical question, is that we need to be closing corporate loopholes. We need to put our weight behind a move to an income tax. And I would like to see that income tax ultimately reduce our sales tax or move us away from sales tax, which I think Julia made a really good case of how that disproportionately impacts working people and people with less income. I am also very concerned about how our property taxes are affecting our seniors, our single moms - it's a concern that's raised to me, time and again, at the doors of how do we manage this and provide the supports we need with such an upside-down tax structure. A question that has been raised to me when I've asked it to colleagues is about a wealth tax. Will people move out of state? Is that something that we need federal leadership around or is it something that Washington can lead on? That's an outstanding question for me, but I just want to underscore the critical, critical need to fully fund our schools, to increase our investments in making high-quality childcare, and a strong start in life available - that we have and we see, as we've talked about throughout this call, a need to lift kids out of poverty and a need to really reinforce our behavioral and mental health systems and services. Thank you. [01:11:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. You just talked about childcare a bit, Tyler and Jeff. You were a little bit prescient in saying we haven't talked about childcare yet, but this question is about childcare. We are experiencing a childcare crisis. It was already out of reach for many Seattle families - exceeding $1,600-1,800 a month in the City of Seattle per child for many families and only got worse during the pandemic, with many counties in this state reporting a 40% loss of childcare providers since the start of the pandemic - causing costs to rise even further and access to lower and become even harder. What can be done specifically to make childcare more affordable and more accessible to all parents in Washington? And we are starting with Nicole. [01:12:41] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so I recall this - even pre-pandemic - my nine years, wait how old is my son now? Oh my gosh - he's 12 - 12 years ago. When we first started looking for a daycare

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 3 - Murder hornets get woke

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 38:24


The Monologue: Asian Giant Murder hornet changes name -- over wokeness. The Interview: State Rep. Jacquelin Maycumber (R-WA07) responds to Jay Inslee's plan to create more police training centers. It's not his plan. It's based on Maycumber's 2019 bill that Democrats are stealing for political points. The Monologue: Government issued fentanyl is a thing in Canada. The Interview: Rep. Jesse Young (26th candidate for state senator) calls out the Tacoma News Tribune for bias. In fact, he says his opponent posted the TNT endorsement before he even sat down for an interview with the editorial board. LongForm: Sgt. Betsy Smith  (Ret.) from the National Police Association weighs in on this morning's Senate hearing on protecting law enforcement.  The Quick Hit: Chief Justice Roberts reportedly tried to stop Roe overturn by flipping Kavanaugh, but draft opinion leak doomed his efforts.  The Last Rantz: Rantz technically guest-hosted Tucker Carlson Tonight last night -- for three seconds.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: Inslee on CNN talking heat

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 34:22


12pm - The Big Lead @ Noon // Murderer of a 14-year-old could get out thanks to legislation that vacates one of the felonies that put him in for life under the Three Strikes You're Out law // Inslee on CNN talking heat // GUEST: Sylvia Johnson, the grandmother of 14-year-old Chelsea Harrison, who was murdered by a man who could be released thanks to new legislation // Repeat offender raped a woman in W SeattleSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross
The January 6th Commission

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 35:30


Margaret Brennan on the Jan 6th Commission // Feliks Banel All Over the Map // Mike Salk on the Mariners // Hanna Scott on Inslee's plan to hire/train more police // Dose of Kindness -- diversifying sailing // Gee Scott on the Jan. 6th commission // Rachel Belle on protecting WA wine from wildfireSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Todd Herman Show
You can't even say A_ ex Jo_ es! The Party and their war against questions.  Episode 218 - Hour 1 A New Attack On Alex Jones

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 59:06


THE THESIS: It was never about Alex Jones. It was about you. The Party is tired of being questioned, they demand we obey. Since that has proven difficult to achieve, they are doing that against which George Orwell warned: they are disappearing not just questioners, but the knowledge required to be an informed skeptic: how can we debate Covid policy when people have been conned into believing we don't have immune systems? Can Americans have an honest debate about race when “whiteness” and its inherent, “original pseudo-sin”  is government policy? Not only is this a tyrannical act of mental abuse, it is distinctly ungodly.   THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  The Bible is filled with people questioning and even trying to debate God. Notice that neither God, The Father or the second member of The Trinity, Jesus Chist banned debate or went around punishing questioners. I found the references in the article helpful.  Is it Wrong to Question God?; God loves every questioner regardless of our motives in the question. Our questions to God should be asked with a respectful and humble attitude of faith. The ultimate answer to every life's question is found in Jesus Christ. THE NEWS & COMMENT: Just minutes after posting new footage of the NY Times good friend, Ray Epps yelling at people to go to the Capital, the Twitter account was deleted. I got the audio before Twitter zapped it. It's in the show, but I cannot link to it.  Oddly enough, I was planning to discuss how the government's social media publishers--remember: they are not platforms--are banning any promotion of a film about Alex Jones. This isn't a film by, Alex Jones, it's not a movie promoting Jones, nor does it attack him (or so I am led to believe). Still, all of The Party's social media publishers refused to let the producers advertise it . . . but, wait until the hilariously good news about that! [AUDIO] - Facebook, Google censor Alex Jones documentary; Flo Read spoke to director Alex Lee Moyer about the suppression of her film Alex Lee Moyer is an acclaimed documentary filmmaker whose films have appeared at Sundance and SWSX festivals. Her latest movie — made with independent production company Play Nice — is called Alex's War. It is an investigation of Alex Jones, but despite it only being on only out on pre-sale, she has already found that her attempts to market the film have been blocked by the social media giants because of the controversial subject matter. According to Play Nice, when the team first released the documentary trailer, they were blocked by Instagram from adding paid promotion of it. Even posts screenshotting a Washington Post article that mentioned Alex's War was rejected. They were informed they were being rejected to ‘protect our community.' Three times this week, important, relevant news has broken while I was recording the show. This time, just as I was going through The Party's banning of the name Alex Jones, the German government was finally forced to admit what everyone in the Podcast family knows: huge numbers of people are being injured by the mRNA injections.  Of course, The Party has obviously banned all mention of that in America using threats against peoples's careers and medical licenses.  The German government admits hundreds of thousands of people have had severe side effects following mRNA shots; The risk-benefit of the Covid vaccines is getting worse and worse and worse We all know that only Democrats get to question election integrity (because Mitch McConnell and Kevin Mccarthy are moral cowards, afraid to even ask the obvious questions). Things are now reaching a truly funny level of desperation from The Party. In the separate Country of Washington, the new Secretary of State who replaced “Republican” Kym Wyman, who has joined the Biden regime, is giving a presentation where he will predict what lies we are going to tell about the election. From his email to the media:  “Secretary of State Steve Hobbs, the Office of the Secretary of State Elections Division, and the University of Washington's Center for an Informed Public, will be hosting an in-person roundtable to discuss likely false narratives surrounding the 2022 elections in Washington state.” The “Center for an Informed Public” still pretends the injections stop transmission and infection; they still pretend Washington's dictator, Jay Inslee hasn't been twice caught lying about Cobvid deaths. That will make it easier for them to pretend elections there are safe and secure. How could I utter such a conspiracy theory? Because of things like this: How a napkin can be counted as a vote in Washington, and why election officials say it's secure John Solomon has a write-up on election integrity worth bookmarking:  21 reasons to distrust the 2020 elections PS: good thing illegals won't get to vote . . .  House Republicans Demand Answers on Reports of Federal Resources Used to Transport Illegal Immigrant Minors to Get Abortions; “This outrageous use of federal resources to transport minors across state lines for abortions or otherwise providing or facilitating abortions in DHS or HHS custody is a heinous act and must be stopped.” All of these very obvious acts of censorship by The Party caused me to ponder just how much has been disappeared from us. In the show, I go into great depth about how The Party has stolen from 90% of Americans any real understanding of the spiritual battle, which makes articles like this scary for people to read. And, it connect back to why my show is not allowed to advertise on Facebook: we talk about the things that are never to be discussed and ask questions not to be asked. I have severe disagreements with Alex Jones, buy seeing the mere mention of his name banned has caused me to decide I need to spend time listening to him. Because, something tells me, while I will still have major disagreements with him given my personal history, I will hear a man who is often spot-on about The Party.  The Demonic Origins of Planned Parenthood, Part I: A Darwinian Sex Cult The Demonic Origins of Planned Parenthood, Part II: Channeling Dark Spirits, Sacrificing Children See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 1: Biden tests positive for COVID-19

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 27:21


3PM - Biden tests positive for COVID-19 and has "very mild symptoms," White House says // Inslee says state is not looking at bringing back masks // The brawl? No. A team meeting? No. Here's how the Mariners really became baseball's hottest team // The New Numbers on Music Consumption Are Very Ugly // More on new vs old music and the plague of internet bar jukeboxes See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: Inslee takes another dig at Dori

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 33:44


12pm - The Big Lead @ Noon // Inslee takes a dig at Dori, Dori digs back // GUEST: Joey Gibson, founder of Patriot Prayer whose riot charges were thrown out and chastised by an Oregon judge // Sen. Schoesler on  Reykdal's test dropping See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Urban Forum Northwest
A tribute to Joseph Staton Jr.

Urban Forum Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 54:42


Thursday, July 21 on Urban Forum Northwest - *Grover Johnson, an organizer for the Saturday, July 30 "Love Thy Neighbor" event that will be held in Olympia. The Tacoma Ministerial Alliance (TMA) came up with idea hoping it would bring the American People together. Governor Jay Inslee has signed a Proclamation for the event. *A tribute and memories will be shared about Joseph Staton Jr. (Joe Staton) the late Executive Director, Central Area Youth Association (CAYA). The following former teammates and classmates will comment: *William (Bill) North *Pastor Joe Carter *Janet Jones-Preston *Randy Bosley Urban Forum Northwest streams live at www.1150kknw.com. Visit us at www.urbanforumnw.com for archived programs and relevant information. Like us on facebook. Twitter@Eddie_Rye.

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross
The State Crime Report

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 36:44


Chokepoint: Mariner's edition // Scott MacFarlane on the Jan 6th investigations // Hanna Scott on the State Crime Report // Dose of Kindness -- TikTok steps up for a birthday party // Gee Scott on the impact of Biden testing positive for COVID // Hanna Scott on Governor Inslee's plan to address homeless encampments along I5 // Rachel Belle on the Top 50 Restaurants in the WorldSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Think Out Loud
Two new federal reports look at removing Snake River dams to help endangered and threatened fish

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 10:27


Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a report recommending the removal of four dams on the lower Snake River in southeastern Washington to boost the recovery of endangered and threatened salmon and steelhead in the region. Another report commissioned by the Department of Energy found that replacing the lower Snake River dams and the renewable energy they provide would cost between $11 billion and $19 billion. Meanwhile, Washington Governor Jay Inslee and U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) are expected to release a final report this summer on whether they think the dams should remain or be breached. Courtney Flatt, a correspondent for the Northwest News Network, joins us to talk about the political and economic obstacles to removing the dams, a move which would require Congressional approval.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1: Is Seattle Ready to Host the 2023 All-Star Game

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 37:00


 What's Trending: the Bellevue transit attack victim has died, the attacker was released 32 hours earlier, when will it be enough before we stop releasing people who should be in jail, President Biden was in Saudi Arabia to attempt to get oil production up and now wants to have less oil production, Carolyn Maloney wants you to know that she is a hero, she was arrested in front of the Supreme Court for protesting, claimed she put her own body on the line, //  Is T-Mobile Park ready to host the 2023 All-Star Game, will the streets of Seattle be clean and safe enough for the influx of people coming for the festivities, there is no plan for law enforcement to be able to handle this big week of events, Jose Trevino got his first All-Star hit while he was mic'd up //  Gov. Inslee calls out “certain radio people” over their opinions on the vaccine mandate, even though the vaccine does not prevent you from getting covid See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Brad and John - Mornings on KISM

Yesterday Cassie Cihorz was named Washingtonian of the day by Gov. Inslee and called a hero for her work fighting the spread of murder hornets!

Hacks & Wonks
Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:19


On this midweek show, Crystal has a delightful conversation with Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about her path to becoming the first Asian American, first Latina, first woman of color, and first LGBTQ+ justice on the court. They discuss the importance of state supreme courts in light of recent decisions that threaten people's rights on the national level, how that translates to why we should scrutinize judicial elections, and common misconceptions people have about the state Supreme Court. Justice Yu then shares about efforts to make courts more accessible and equitable to everyone, what she's most proud of in her career, and how people can be involved in restoring confidence in the justice system. Notes:  This episode was recorded before the end of filing week in May. The candidate filing deadline passed without any challenger filing to run against Justice Yu, so she will appear unopposed on the November ballot and serve another term on our state's highest court. This episode was also recorded before the Supreme Court's Dobbs decision, hence the reference to the leaked draft about overturning Roe vs Wade. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and Justice Yu at @JudgeMaryYu.   Resources Washington Supreme Court Bio - Justice Mary I. Yu: https://www.courts.wa.gov/appellate_trial_courts/supreme/bios/?fa=scbios.display_file&fileID=Yu   Campaign Website - Justice Mary Yu: https://justicemaryyu.com/   “Who's Marrying the First Gay Couple? Judge Mary Yu” by Dominic Holden from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/blogs/2012/12/08/15483647/whos-marrying-the-first-gay-couple-judge-mary-yu   Justice Mary Yu On Jimmy Kimmel Show: https://vimeo.com/673039715   State of Washington Commission on Judicial Conduct: https://www.cjc.state.wa.us/   Washington State Court Rules: Code of Judicial Conduct: https://www.courts.wa.gov/court_rules/?fa=court_rules.list&group=ga&set=CJC   Civil Right to Counsel or “Civil Gideon”: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_aid_indigent_defense/civil_right_to_counsel1/   June 4th Letter - Washington Supreme Court: https://www.courts.wa.gov/content/publicUpload/Supreme%20Court%20News/Judiciary%20Legal%20Community%20SIGNED%20060420.pdf   Washington Leadership Institute: https://www.law.uw.edu/academics/continuing-education/wli Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm once again just so excited to welcome to the program another very distinguished State Supreme Court Justice - Justice Mary Yu is with us today. Thank you so much for joining us. [00:00:51] Justice Mary Yu: Oh, Crystal, thank you for the invitation. I really appreciate your interest and I'm looking forward to having a fun conversation. [00:01:00] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And so I just wanted to start off talking and ask you - what was your path to the Supreme Court? [00:01:08] Justice Mary Yu: Well, I came from the trial court - so I was a trial court judge in King County Superior Court for 14 years - that felt like a lifetime in many ways. And prior to that, I was a prosecutor in the King County Prosecutor's Office. And then before that, I was just frankly very proud to be working, doing some organizing work in social justice in Chicago. So a little crooked path, but nevertheless, it's what brought me to the court here. [00:01:38] Crystal Fincher: Well, and I have found that those crooked paths are sometimes the most useful and oftentimes give you such helpful perspectives because you're not just coming from one point of view, you've seen things from different perspectives, have walked in different shoes, and have been able to see that. And you're actually the first Asian American, first Latina, first woman of color, and first LGBTQ+ justice on our State Supreme Court. What has that meant to you and how do you think that impacts the work that you do? [00:02:08] Justice Mary Yu: Gosh, Crystal - being the first sometimes can be a real burden in the sense that I know that I worry about not messing it up for others. I'm worried that, really, my path will create more opportunities for others. And so I'm aware of the fact that when people see me, they see all of what you just described. And I think at one level for our community, there's a lot of expectations that others will be able to follow, that this has opened up the door for all of us. On the other hand, I know that with that comes a lot of assumptions about it - our community - some will be positive, some will be negative. I think some people in their own mind wonder or not - I have a packed agenda or am predisposed to do something or decide a case in a particular way because I'm first. And I don't think that that's true, other than I do bring a level of sensitivity to what it's like to not have resources, what it's like to be other, what it's like to be an outsider. And frankly, I see that that's an asset at our table because there are nine of us and it means nine different viewpoints. And frankly, I think the viewpoint that I bring of the other, the outsider, a person of color, a person with little economic resources growing up - they ought be at the table too, not to control, but to contribute. [00:03:33] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely, that's such a great point. A lot of people are just now figuring out how important our courts are, our supreme courts are - not just at a national level, but especially if we lose rights at the national level, our states are really our firewall and the only thing standing between a lot of people and their rights. So right now, when we are basically looking at the overturning of Roe vs Wade - there was the leaked draft that looks like it's going to become official at some time soon. How do you view the state of not only abortion rights, but the ability to be covered by contraception and just access to healthcare for everyone. Where do we stand here in the state? And where do you stand, as a justice, in how you approach these issues? [00:04:33] Justice Mary Yu: Yeah, well, Crystal, I think you're right in the sense that a lot of these issues are going to be decided eventually by state supreme courts. And so state constitutions are pretty important and state supreme courts are important around the country. Each one of us is different, if you will, because our constitutions are different. So there really is no exact pattern of what this all means. In the State of Washington, I think we've already had the executive and the legislative branches indicate that they intend to protect the right to abortion, that they intend to protect healthcare rights for all people. And our branch - we don't declare policies, right? We will wait for a case to come to us. So at one level, it's inappropriate for me to comment on what are we gonna do when that happens. And yet at the same time, I can say is - our court is very protective of our own State Constitution. In our own state, we have had a long history of protecting privacy and individual rights. It's a long track record that our court's not gonna step in and undo. So I think Washingtonians can feel very comfortable that our court's going to follow precedent, our court's going to continue to protect the rights of Washingtonians as we have done for the last couple of hundred years, in some ways - even the territorial courts. So, it's right to be concerned. I can see the concern that people would have of what does this all mean when you look at the United States Supreme Court? But my understanding when I have reviewed the opinion - it really is seeming to indicate that these issues should be decided at the state level. And of course, I think they would be decided by the legislative branch. [00:06:19] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. I think one thing that surprises people still sometimes - for as much as people who are involved in politics and who do this know all of the rules and policies and everything surrounding elections - I think a lot of people, talk to a lot of people who see our federal Supreme Court being appointed, and then being very surprised that we elect our Supreme Court justices in this state. How do you think that impacts just how we should be looking at the Supreme Court, how we should be looking at these elections, and what is at stake with our State Supreme Court elections. [00:07:01] Justice Mary Yu: First of all, I do think that everybody ought to scrutinize all judges in all judicial elections. I think it's really important that Washington State has retained the right to vote for their judges. Now, what's interesting is we have a hybrid because when there's a vacancy, someone is appointed to fill the vacancy before they're subject to election. For example, I was appointed initially by Governor Locke to the Superior Court. At the Supreme Court, I was appointed by Governor Inslee and then stood for election. So in many ways we have part of the same process in terms of an appointment, but the check on it, if you will, is elections. And elections are an opportunity for the electorate to really evaluate someone and decide whether or not they want to retain that individual as a justice in our state. Unfortunately, people drop right off in the sense that they don't vote all the way down ballot. We are always at the bottom of the ballot and most people would say - I don't know anything about judges. There is an interest this year - because of all these issues that you mentioned, people are suddenly looking and saying who's on our court and what does it mean? And what's their track record and who are they? I think that's a good thing. I think it's really important for people to educate themselves, take another class on civics, and understand who's on our court - how many, who are they, what have they written, what have they said? Because they will - ultimately may be the decision makers on these important matters. It's not only in terms of healthcare, perhaps abortion, but it really includes questions related to race, incarceration, the death penalty - all the things that are important to people and touch them in every single way. So, I hope that people will pay attention, that they will bother to actually invite us to come and speak, invite us to come into classrooms, into forums. All of us are always willing to answer questions about what we do. [00:08:59] Crystal Fincher: And I do have to say - in our interactions with you, you have been exceedingly willing to talk and to share and just wanting to help people understand how the process works, how they can access and be a part of the process. And I really do appreciate just talking about how critical it is to engage in judicial elections at all levels. And even when it comes to just same-sex marriage and rights that people have to love the person who they love without penalty or consequence - was looking back, it was super fun - back in 2012, after the long and hard fought battle for marriage equality was won, you were actually on Jimmy Kimmel doing [Perfectly Named People] and you officiated the first same sex marriages in Washington State. What does it feel like - just the euphoria of that time and winning rights that so many had fought for so long to secure, to landing back where we are right now, where that looks to be in jeopardy once again? [00:10:15] Justice Mary Yu: Yeah, it's really interesting because when we talk about crooked paths, it was a crooked path to get to the place where same-sex marriage would be legal in the State of Washington. Unfortunately our court went - it had the opportunity to decide the matter, decided it incorrectly - and then it went to the people and it was really the vote of the people. It was a popular vote that really granted us the right to marry the person that we love. Again, another check on all of our systems. For me, I have to admit that my bailiff, who was a young Japanese man whose parents had to go to someplace else to get married because they lived in DC and could not marry because they were an interracial couple, said to me - Judge, we shouldn't wait one more moment for people to marry who they wanna marry, so let's start to do weddings at midnight, as soon as the law takes effect. And it was, as you described, it was a joyous moment. It was something to celebrate because finally we had equal rights, right? The right to marry who you love. I would say, Crystal, I don't think that's in jeopardy in the State of Washington, given that it is the law and there hasn't been a challenge to that law. And regardless of what may happen at the federal level, that's not going to really jeopardize the law in the State of Washington as it exists now. Now, if there's a challenge to it because of some federal action, that's a whole different matter - then it would make its way through the legal system, and perhaps somebody might challenge the law that was enacted by the citizens somehow, but that's not the pattern everywhere in the country. And despite the fact that we have a little comfort in the State of Washington, I think we should be concerned because we care about other people, and we care about other people in other states where they don't have a state protection and they did rely on federal law to grant them the right to marry someone. So what we're developing, which should be a concern to everyone, is just this big checkerboard in the country of rights being different, depending on where you live. That's a serious concern, especially for people who are transient - for example, those who are in the military - should their families have certain rights in one state and yet when they move, not have those same rights in another state. And we know that those military personnel will be moving around to different states, so it's a real concern. [00:12:46] Crystal Fincher: It is an absolute concern. One other concern that I've heard a number of people raise is just looking at the quality and the qualification of judges - there being a number of concerns at some of the judges that have been appointed, particularly in the last administration, who aside from questions of partisanship, just on questions of - do you understand the law as it is, in order to protect it. And people may have different perspectives on how to protect the law, how to decide if a case is consistent with it, but truly understanding and being just qualified enough to sit there and make those judgements is a different issue than partisanship. You happen to be rated "Exceptionally Well Qualified" by several bar associations, you're endorsed by all of the other State Supreme Court justices, and just so many people. I could spend, literally five minutes, just talking about all of the awards and accolades that you've been given. But when it comes to some of our local judicial elections that don't receive a lot of scrutiny, where a lot of times newspapers that used to cover those and that used to look into the backgrounds of judges - they've lost a lot of resources - and so there is a fear that there could be people who land in our courts here in this state that just aren't qualified, that are coming with an incorrect perspective of what the law is, who the law protects, and how it should operate. And that especially given this national climate and with some of the just extremism that we have been enduring, that that poses a real danger for local communities, potentially even when we do have a State Supreme Court that is doing its job correctly. How do you view that risk? [00:14:58] Justice Mary Yu: It's a real risk to begin with - what you described isn't something that's sort of a sci-fi movie. It's a real risk, but that's why people like you play an important role, as well as other media outlets. You do invite people to come and speak and talk with you. You have the opportunity to ask some questions and to help educate the electorate. As long as Washington remains a populous state where elections are important, you will always face the risk that there could be somebody who's not qualified or not competent to serve. It's the risk we take, it's the price we pay for the right to vote, the right to selection, the right to have a voice, and not to give up citizen power. But I would hope that the bar associations and other people would continue to try to make themselves available to rate judges, to ask questions, and to try to educate the broader community about who these people are. [00:15:54] Crystal Fincher: What do you think are the most common misconceptions that people have about the court? [00:15:58] Justice Mary Yu: Sometimes I wonder whether there are misconceptions or frankly realities, because I think a lot of people think that our courts are bureaucratic, insensitive, do not treat people of color fairly. And as much as I wanna be defensive about ourselves, I think some of that is very real - is we have to do a better job of becoming more accessible, of becoming a little less bureaucratic and simpler in our procedures. And we're trying to get there. I think some of the other unfortunate misconceptions are - is that we are groupthink or that we decide decisions together just to get along. And yet, if anybody studied our opinions, they would see that is hardly - hardly - the reality is it's hard fought, we sometimes will split 5-4 on some cases. We do our job best when we are in disagreement. So we're not a groupthink entity - none of our courts really, I would hope, are just stamping just to go along and create an assembly line. Every so often you might have a judicial officer that brings shame on the rest of us - somebody who has done something imprudent. I know there are a couple in terms of some sexual assault allegations and that's harmful because it hurts the whole judiciary when something like that occurs. But I think overall, we have a really functional system in the State of Washington and it may be because we're very transparent and open, and people can walk into our courtrooms anytime and watch the proceedings. [00:17:31] Crystal Fincher: You do bring up an interesting issue where there are a couple of judges that are the subjects of investigations or controversies, currently. There was just a recent situation where a judge had used the N-word and had some other behavior that their colleagues thought was inappropriate. Do you think our system of discipline and accountability for judges at all levels is sufficient? [00:17:59] Justice Mary Yu: I do. I do think it is. The Judicial Conduct Commission has the ability to investigate if there is a complaint. And I can say from personal experience, they are robust in scrutinizing judges and trying to really enhance confidence in terms of what we do. I think it's pretty robust and it's a very open process - anybody can file a complaint - that person's identity is protected, so there's no risk to them because judges can - right - they can punish, they can be coercive, they can manipulate. I think it's really important to protect people who would file a complaint, and we have that process. I think probably publicizing the rules might be a good thing in the sense of more people should know that in the State of Washington, we have a code of judicial conduct. We do have a code that governs how we should do what we do. We have a code that really guides us in terms of when we should recuse or not. We have a really strong board of ethics that will provide an opinion if a judge needs specific advice on a particular circumstance and probably the public does not know that. And I would say we might do a better job of letting people know. [00:19:16] Crystal Fincher: That is certainly very helpful. I do think a lot of people don't know. I'm also wondering what more can be done to help people, even if they don't come with a lot of resources, to participate in our judicial system and to be protected by it at all levels in our state. There are so many situations where - not so much at the Supreme Court, even though people are still trying to figure some stuff out there - but where a defendant may be up for eviction and they're in a tough situation, and coming in and they don't know all the rules, their landlord knows all the rules, seems to be very chummy with everyone else in there, 'cause they own a lot of properties and it seems like the system is working for them. They're all familiar with it, they're doing the same song and dance that they do all the time to the detriment of someone who still has rights and protections under the law. What more can be done to help people, especially those who are not familiar with the system or who don't have the money to hire people who are, to be able to receive all of their protections that they're entitled to. [00:20:30] Justice Mary Yu: We've been working really hard to try to increase civil legal aid. And that is to try to ensure that people have representation on the civil side as well. We've received a lot of money from the Legislature this past year to really offer representation to individuals who are being evicted. That's just one particular circumstance, but I have to admit that I'm very sensitive to the fact that there are a lot of hearings where people not only are at a loss in terms of housing, but their jobs, benefits, the inability to access healthcare at times. There are a host of issues where people need representation, so I have to admit that I'm a fan of civil representation 100%. I would love to have a case come to us that gives us the opportunity to do the same thing we did on a criminal side. And that is "Civil Gideon" - is to say that everyone deserves the right to be represented by an attorney, regardless of your income. I know it would be expensive, and yet the rights that are at risk in the civil arena are great, right? It is to be homeless, to be without a job, to be without benefits - are very real things for individuals. So we're trying, I think - our court and along with others are big advocates of trying to ensure that there is civil legal aid available to individuals. [00:21:54] Crystal Fincher: That would be tremendously helpful, and certainly would cost more. I do hope that we get better as a society. And as we - we're having legislative elections and conversations right now, but that we also examine the cost of going without it and what it means to potentially push someone into homelessness, or out of a job, or into financial crisis because they don't have healthcare or the services that they need - it is so costly. And often in ways that can't be compensated or reimbursed. So I just - I completely agree with you and thank you so much for bringing that up. What are other challenges you think the Court is suited to address within the justice system? [00:22:48] Justice Mary Yu: Well, I would say two areas I know that I have spent a lot of energy on that I think are very important is - one, has to do with funding of our courts. As you may know, our courts charge for everything, and you have to pay a filing fee, we also use monetary sanctions. And why do we do that? Because we have to fund ourselves. So I'm a big advocate that some day - there has to be some heavy lifting - and our courts really should be part of the general fund, so that we are not the cash registers. So we don't have to collect the funds in order to pay for the services that we're providing. We're a branch of government that ought to be, again, accessible and available to everyone. I know of no other branch where you have to pay before you get served, and yet that's what happens in our court systems. I know the judges, who are in our municipal courts or in our district courts, feel awful about having to constantly collect money in order to sustain therapeutic courts or any other kind of court that serves people. So that's one that I think is really important and we're working very hard on. The second is we're really wrestling with how do we eradicate racism from our system? It's systemic, it's institutional, and it's taking a lot of work to invite everyone to say - how do we do this better? How do we examine ourselves and our practices and how do we change? So we look at jury diversity, we've looked at legal financial obligations. We are trying very hard at every level to say - this is our responsibility, it is our duty to ensure that every single person can be guaranteed truly not only access, but a fair process. So we're doing a lot of education at this point. And as you may know, in 2020, our court issued a letter to the entire legal community inviting everyone to join us in examining our systems and to eradicating racism at every level. So we're doing that heavy work - those are the two things that I have as a priority, and that I think are important. [00:24:54] Crystal Fincher: And I appreciate that in our recent conversation with Justice Whitener, we talked about that letter and just how important it was in the role that our court took in leading the country, really and acknowledging that and stating plainly this is a problem that we are responsible to solve. It is widely acknowledged - I certainly believe we can't start to solve problems until we acknowledge them, and so having that acknowledgement and having people who are, who seem to be doing the work to fix it is something that I appreciate and I'm thankful for. You - again. I could go on about all of the accolades that you've received for quite some time. You received the 2019 Crosscut Courage in Elected Office award. You recently, just late last year, had your portrait unveiled at Seattle University. You have - my goodness, there's so much - you received the 2020 Latino Bar Association Trailblazer Award, the "Established Leader" Pride Award from Mayor Jenny Durkan in the City of Seattle, the 2018 "Voice of Social Justice" from the Greater Seattle Business Association, the 2017 "Lifetime Achievement" - and I'm telling you, I - this is literally about a sixth of the things that I could list from you. As you look at your career, what are you most proud of? [00:26:34] Justice Mary Yu: It's a hard question. It's hard because when I think about my life and not just a career, I think I am most proud that I think I fulfilled my parents' dream. And that's because both of my parents came to this country very, very poor with nothing. My mother was a farm worker. My father grew up on a ship that just floated around the world for years - he was a boy without a parent. And their dream when they came together, I think, was simply to provide an opportunity for their children to have food on the table, to have a decent job, and to maybe have an education. So when I look back and I look at my life, I think I'm most proud that I fulfilled their dream of in one generation, having the opportunity to be successful. When I look at my career, I would say the thing that I'm most proud of is having been a mentor to so many young people of color who have grown up and who are now judges. I am proud to be the co-chair of the Leadership Institute with Mr. James Williams, where we have graduated 196 lawyers from our leadership program and our focus is on underrepresented lawyers. And what we do is just really enable and empower them to see their gifts and talents. And we have a lot of them who have become judges. And we have one who is the US Attorney for Western Washington - Nick Brown was one of our graduates. So I would say I'm most proud of those acts because it's about giving back and it's about enabling others to do this work, so I would be very happy to rest on those laurels, is to say - you paid it back, Mary, and that's what it's all about. [00:28:33] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely, and they would be so proud and that you are also helping to enable that for so many other people in this state - I certainly appreciate. And I guess as we are looking forward and your continuing service on the court, assuming you're going to be re-elected, assuming all of us get out there and vote to make sure that happens. What do you most want to accomplish moving forward? [00:29:06] Justice Mary Yu: I wanna continue to do what I am doing, 'cause I think that's really important. And I'd like to put some more energy into restoring confidence in our courts. I'm trying to respond to Eric Liu's call to be concerned about the health of our democracy. His call has really resonated with me that we can't live with just accepting polarization - this is not the future of our country and the future of who we are. And that all of us, as judges and lawyers, we should be very, very concerned about keeping our democracy alive, keeping it healthy, and frankly being engaged. [00:29:47] Crystal Fincher: And if you give people some advice on how they can help ensure that within our judicial system, what would you say? [00:29:57] Justice Mary Yu: Crystal, can you pose that question again? I'm sorry. [00:29:59] Crystal Fincher: Oh, sure - no problem. If you were to give folks, one piece of advice for how they could engage with our judicial system, or something that they could do to help it be more equitable and healthier and to restore that trust - what advice would you get for people for what they could do to help that? [00:30:19] Justice Mary Yu: I'd say come to jury service - come to jury service and be a part of the decision making. Restore confidence in what we do - when I was a trial judge, I remember talking to the whole pool of jurors, 70 people who were just dying to get outta there. And I would just say before you raise your hand and ask to leave, I just want you to imagine and think about this - that if it were you, would you not want somebody like yourself to be sitting there to be the decision maker? Because all the people who come into our court system, they're there because there's something really important to them. The things that they hold most near and dear - and it could be innocence in a criminal trial, injury that they haven't been compensated for, some unfair contract, whatever it might be - it's something important to those individuals. And who would you want to be seated, sitting there, listening to this. Would you not want somebody like yourself? And I'd just say - just pause and think about that. And I'd have to say hands went down and people became a little embarrassed and thought - well, yeah, I guess I could do this. I can't do it for 10 weeks, I could do it for two days or three days. So I would say to everyone is - please, if you have the opportunity to serve as a juror, do so. You become the fact finder, which is the most important part of a trial - is somebody who determines what is true and what is not, or what you wanna believe or what you don't wanna believe. It doesn't even matter if it's truthful or not. What do you believe and how do you determine credibility should rest in the hands of other people? So I would say that's something everyone can do - is please come to jury service when you can. And if you get that summons, that's the beginning. From there, you'll be able to see the rest of the flaws and then maybe you can help us figure out the rest. [00:32:17] Crystal Fincher: Great advice. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us today - sincerely appreciate this conversation and all of the work you've done and continue to do. Thank you so much, Justice Yu. [00:32:29] Justice Mary Yu: Crystal, thank you so much. [00:32:31] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

Washington Post Live
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on the decisions of the Supreme Court and next steps for Democrats

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 28:40


Washington Post congressional investigations reporter Jacqueline Alemany speaks with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee about the impact of the Supreme Court decisions on climate change, abortion and public safety.

The Todd Herman Show
Remember what I said: they will NEVER end Covid. If you want it to end, We will have to end it.  Episode 185 - Hour 1 I Said They Will Never End Covid

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 56:50


THE THESIS: The Covid response Hoax is key to the Forever-Crisis The Party will use to install unfettered powers.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  List Of 365 Fear Not Bible Verses THE NEWS & COMMENT: Dr. Zev Vladimir Zelenko's statement by Dr. Paul Elias Alexander on his death, in praise and recognition of a true hero, angel, and patriot; he had a place in the world to save lives and he did it! Letter to the U.K. Gov from 76 Doctors; Comprehensive reasons why the U.S. FDA decision authorizing COVID vaccinations in infants and young children must not happen in the UK. [AUDIO] - Two teenage boys from different states died in their sleep due to the second shot of Pfizer vaccine they had received a few days back. [AUDIO] - Fed's Jerome Powell blames Americans not getting vaccinated enough for his inflation crisis Here's former Surgeon General, Jerome Adams showing his boastful pride in the letters by his name as he is corrected, first by a Mom and, second--in defense of Adam's attack on that Mom--by Dr. Martin Kulldorff. As a Harvard professor I analyzed vaccine data for two decades and helped develop CDC's vaccine safety system. It's illuminating to realize that @KelleyKga, a mother with no science degree, understands epidemiological data better than former surgeon general @JeromeAdamsMD. Dr. Paul Alexander: “Portugal EU country highest vaccination rate; today has the most new Covid-19 cases; with most new daily deaths per million inhabitants; the COVID injection did not work, never worked, killing people; I argue the COVID injections never ever worked! The COVID injections are driving infectiousness of the omicron sub-variant; vaccinated getting severely infected, hospitalized and even death.” Here's what the Washington Post published about Portugal and the mRNA injections on 9-30-2021: Portugal has nearly run out of people to vaccinate. What comes next? Portugal's feat has turned the country into a cutting-edge pandemic laboratory — a place where otherwise-hypothetical questions about the coronavirus endgame can begin to play out. Chief among them is how fully a nation can bring the virus under control when vaccination rates are about as high as they can go.  The emerging answer is promising — mostly. In Portugal, every indicator of pandemic severity is quickly trending downward. The death rate is half the European Union average and nine times below that of the United States. Lisbon is triumphant: a city of live music and partying, where early-risers might find sidewalks still sticky with beer. Traffic is back to normal as people settle into the rhythms of commuting to work. And the celebrity of the moment — on glossy magazine covers — is the former submarine commander who led the country's vaccination drive. But Portugal's experience is also providing a note of caution: a reminder that 1½ years into this pandemic, the current tools of science still might not be enough. The virus is still causing cancellations, lost work days and sickness — in rare cases severe. It spreads less quickly and less far than it would in places with lower vaccination rates — which benefits everyone, including the 12-and-under children not yet eligible for shots. But herd immunity remains elusive. Daily calculations about risk remain, even without large ranks of unvaccinated people to blame. [AUDIO] - EU warns boosters may destroy immune system Dictator, Jay Inslee is requiring state workers in executive and small cabinets to get a COVID-19 booster shot as condition of employment. All state workers will be next. Not content with mandating masks on toddlers, enforcing discriminatory vaccine passports and his remarkable hypocrisy, the mayor of New York announced he will be mandating vaccines for children to attend school this fall. Dr. Paul Alexander: Australia, oh Australia, what is happening there July 1st 2022? Escalating infections, escalating deaths, 85-90% vaccinated!!! We told you idiots, stop the COVID injection, it is driving infection! Australia is talking masks again...they will not listen to Geert, or Yeadon, or Bridle, or I, yet they do not yet understand it is the virus-host ecosystem that is driving this; China, et tu? Et tu? [AUDIO - PAUSE] -  Working-Age Folks Disappearing Out of Nowhere: You Can't Blame This on COVID or Missed Cancer Screenings  -- Ed Dowd: You can't tell me the virus switched from only going after older folks to now going after younger folks and switching from respiratory to cardiovascular." While Dr. Ryan Cole is being attacked to the degree that he has lost half his business, the truth is still emerging . . . [AUDIO] - Prof. Jeffrey Sachs: "I chaired the commission for the Lancet for 2 years on Covid. I'm pretty convinced it came out of a US lab of biotechnology [...] We don't know for sure but there is enough evidence. [However] it's not being investigated, not in the US, not anywhere." Doctors who spoke truth are viciously attacked by the same media who continue to lie about all things Covid Politico, Axios, and NBC News peddle a weird Covid smear of Clarence Thomas Yikes... Washington Post "fact check" columnist @GlennKesslerWP  pushed Politico's fraudulent Clarence Thomas smear around Ironic how “Disinformation” experts and reporters always seem to be spreading so much of it themselves [AUDIO] - 100 year old veteran break down crying : "This is not the country we fought for" . . .  Remembering his time in the Marines, Carl Spurlin Dekle said that while fighting in the war was his biggest pride, soldiers had not died for the America of today See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Endless Endeavor with Greg Anderson
EE 107: Aware, but Never Consumed!

Endless Endeavor with Greg Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 86:19


In Episode 107 we go solo once again! Gay Pride, abortion, personal excellence, Jay Inslee, we got some shit to talk about as always. BUT we shine a spotlight on the shit that's plaguing society so as to never be ostriches with our heads in the sand, and then we focus on how to be the best, most productive, most capable version of ourselves that we can be! That's the mission, that's the goal! Aware but not consumed! Please enjoy episode 107 of the Endless Endeavor Podcast. --- Connect with me Instagram: @granderson33 Website: www.theelectricnorth.com for podcast apparel and gear Email: gregandersonpodcast@gmail.com Linktr.ee: https://linktr.ee/Granderson33 Episode resources: Bio Pro + https://bioproteintech.com/bioidentical-alternative-to-human-growth-hormone coupon code ENDLESS saves $30 Cured Nutrition https://www.curednutrition.com coupon ENDLESS 10% Off Moya Brand https://www.moyabrand.com Coupon ENDLESS 20% off If you enjoy the show, make sure to give the Endless Endeavor Podcast a rating via your favorite audio platform OR on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCieFsr26t9cyPDKMbLQJzXw/featured!

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
#133 Corruption, Efficacy, and the Rise of the Trad-Vaxxers (Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying DarkHorse Livestream)

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 105:33 Very Popular


In this 133rd in a series of live discussions with Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying (both PhDs in Biology), we discuss the state of the world through an evolutionary lens. This week, we discuss the surge of Covid cases during the northern Summer. We talk about a new paper which finds that the mRNA vaccines against Covid do more harm than good, and the fact that both Canada, and the state of Washington, are implementing new vaccine mandates now, despite ever growing evidence that the Covid vaccines are not doing what we were told they would do. We ask whether Elmo knows what he's talking about when he advocates for young muppets everywhere to get vaccinated. And Heather talks to an anti-vaxxer who turns out not to be an anti-vaxxer at all; she is a trad-vaxxer.  Then we discuss Jordan Peterson's twitter suspension, and what “deadnaming” means, and whether it's a real thing. Finally: what is the value of work? ***** Support the sponsors of the show: LMNT: Electrolyte drink mix with all the good salts, and none of the bad stuff. Free sample pack of all 8 flavors with any purchase at www.DrinkLMNT.com/DARKHORSE Public Goods: Get $15 off your first order at Public Goods, your new everything store, at https://www.publicgoods.com/darkhorse or with code DARKHORSE at checkout. Eight Sleep: Personalized thermoregulation while you sleep, and when you wake. Eight Sleep's amazing Pod Pro Cover (for your mattress) is $150 off at www.eightsleep.com/darkhorse ***** Our book, A Hunter-Gatherer's Guide to the 21st Century, is available everywhere books are sold, and signed copies are available here: https://darvillsbookstore.indielite.org Check out our store! Epic tabby, digital book burning, saddle up the dire wolves, and more: https://darkhorsestore.org Heather's newsletter, Natural Selections (subscribe to get free weekly essays in your inbox): https://naturalselections.substack.com Find more from us on Bret's website (https://bretweinstein.net) or Heather's website (http://heatherheying.com). Become a member of the DarkHorse LiveStreams, and get access to an additional Q&A livestream every month. Join at Heather's Patreon. Like this content? Subscribe to the channel, like this video, follow us on twitter (@BretWeinstein, @HeatherEHeying), and consider helping us out by contributing to either of our Patreons or Bret's Paypal. Looking for clips from #DarkHorseLivestreams? Check out our other channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAWCKUrmvK5F_ynBY_CMlIA Theme Music: Thank you to Martin Molin of Wintergatan for providing us the rights to use their excellent music. *****Mentioned in this episode: Fraiman, J., Erviti, J., Jones, M., Greenland, S., Whelan, P., Kaplan, R.M. and Doshi, P., 2022. Serious Adverse Events of Special Interest Following mRNA Vaccination in Randomized Trials: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4125239 In Washington state, Governor Inslee mandates vaccines for state employees: https://www.governor.wa.gov/news-media/inslee-issues-directive-covid-19-vaccination-standards-state-employees In Canada, new mandates to get boosted every nine months: https://torontosun.com/news/national/two-doses-are-no-longer-enough-canadians-required-to-get-covid-shot-every-nine-months  On Sesame Street, Elmo gets vaccinated, and protects the whole neighborhood! https://twitter.com/elmo/status/1541778204129742850?s=20&t=LreC6hZFS_ZyxRRBw_FxhA JJ Couey on twitter: https://twitter.com/jjcouey JJ Couey in conversation with Kevin McSupport the show

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams
DAY 528: 1/6 cmte. examines possible witness tampering

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 42:10 Very Popular


Potential efforts to pressure and influence witnesses in the Jan. 6th investigation come to light following the last hearing. Trump's media company was subpoenaed in connection to a federal criminal probe. And exactly one week after the reversal of Roe vs. Wade, President Biden met with Democratic governors to talk about protecting abortion rights. Peter Baker, Luke Broadwater, Barbara McQuade, Gov. Jay Inslee, Tim Miller, and Michael Beschloss join.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 1: Howard Stern 2024

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 33:16


3PM - Jack Stine in for John // Aaron Granillo: Gov. Inslee permanently mandates COVID-19 vaccines for WA agency employees // Howard Stern Says He Is Running for President in 2024, Claims Bradley Cooper Wants to Be His VP // Shari worries about her flight getting canceled and Jack complains about the ads on cable television // Any updates on your fiber-eating friend, Jack? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 3 - Restricting abortion

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 37:42


The Monologue: Initiative 1922 will not be on the November ballot. The Interview: Rep Skyler Rude (R-Walla Walla) reacts to the mandate from Inslee. The Monologue: SPD staffing down another 30 officers. The Interview: Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA) calls out Democrats for declaring COVID solved at the border… but somehow, not at the state level. LongForm: Amanda Rogers (Mom's Tea & Cannabis founder) is hosting a march in support of abortion rights. I ask her to explain her position and when, if ever, abortion should be restricted. The Quick Hit: Media keeps giving free pass to family of Charleena Lyles to smear cops and pretend they aren't victims. The Last Rantz: I'm not going to tell you to enjoy the long weekend because I'm ambivalent towards the enjoyment or lack thereof for people who aren't… me. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NBC Meet the Press
MTP NOW July 1 — Gov. Jay Inslee, Cheney's Wyoming Debate, Abortion battle moves to states

NBC Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:58 Very Popular


Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee (D) joins Meet the Press NOW to talk about his meeting with President Biden on abortion rights. Kansas City Star's Katie Bernard, Louisville Courier Journal's Deborah Yetter discuss the abortion battle in Kansas and Kentucky. Eugene Daniels, Symone Sanders and Sara Fagen join the Meet the Press NOW roundtable. Michael Gerrard, professor and climate advocate, talks about the impacts of the Supreme Court's decision reducing the EPA's authority to regulate carbon dioxide.

Public Power Underground
Empathy and Nuance

Public Power Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 77:54


Kurt Miller, Dan Catchpole, KC Mehaffey, and Paul Dockery get together for a regularly formatted episode to talk about electric utility and electric-utility-adjacent news from a Power Department's perspective. The crew covers the Murray-Inslee draft report, Australia's electric market getting suspended, natural gas price slump after a fire, transfer of management of a fish hatchery to the Nez Perce Tribe, and Falconry at the Dalles Dam.19:10 - A draft report developed for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Sen. Patty Murray to examine the impacts of breaching the four lower snake river dams Coverage by KC Mehaffey in Clearing Up on the report and reactions to the report A study commissioned by NWRP and prepared by Energy GPS Consulting LLC on the full power cost replacement analysis for the lower Snake River dams 33:12 - Australian Energy Market Operator suspended their national electric market Coverage by the Guardian Discussion and analysis on The Conversation The Professor Jacob Mays Interview The Professor Frank Wolak Interview 43:53 - Freeport's Liquified Natural Gas had an unplanned outaged, and it impacted national natural gas marketsGrubert, E., & Hastings-Simon, S. (2022). Designing the mid-transition: A review of medium-term challenges for coordinated decarbonization in the United States. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, e768. https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.768 48:25 - Transfer of management of the Dwarshak National Fish Hatchery to the Nez Perce Tribe, also known as the NimiipuuCoverage by The Spokesman 56:51 - The ancient art of falconry used to help reduce salmon predation1:03:49 - TL;DR segment known as “Energy West …. Lite” Water, Weather Conditions Ripe for Boost in Sales for BPA PGE Considers Accelerating Renewables Acquisitions Idaho Regulators Approve Faster Bridger Depreciation for Idaho Power CPUC Approves Resource-Adequacy Plans CAISO DMM Suggests Clarifications to Extended Day-Ahead Market Proposal NRU Hires Matt Schroettnig Clatskanie PUD Case Study on Wildfire Risk Assessment Energy News Roundup You can find our merch on shopify. You can find the podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Remember to share this with any friends you have that are electric utility enthusiasts like us!Public Power Underground, for electric utility enthusiasts! Public Power Underground, it's work to watch!

unDivided with Brandi Kruse
68: [un]Divided with Brandi Kruse: A dubious directive (7.1.22)

unDivided with Brandi Kruse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:12


Washington Governor Jay Inslee doubles down on his vaccine mandate. Republicans need a better excuse to keep off-year elections. Independent Journalist Ali Bradley joins us from the southern border for “Fridays with Friends.” Freedom, Star Wars, and TikTok traps on “Florida Report.”

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Megan Rapinoe to get Presidential Medal of Freedom

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 34:20


1pm - The Fastest 15 // Megan Rapinoe to get Prez Medal of Freedom // GMA declared KBJ the "first black SCOTUS justice" // NY Guv says NY is one of the enlightened states // GUEST: Washington Policy Center's Elizabeth Hovde on Inslee's mandate directive for new hires // GUEST: Tacoma girls' who had their lemonade stand robbed See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: Inslee's directive regarding vaccination

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 34:36


12pm - The Big Lead @ Noon // Inslee's directive regarding vax // Dori shares audio from 1983, Soviet Defector on how to take over a society See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Inslee's mandate continues

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 37:19


What's Trending: Our fraudulent “pro-choice” Governor Jay Inslee just made permanent the COVID vaccine -- and boosters -- for employment with the state, and Twitter sleuths think they've found video of Trump lunging for steering wheel. MIP alerts coming soon. Groaning rubbish bins.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KUOW Newsroom
As many states move to outlaw abortion, Washington state Democrats look for ways to strengthen abortion rights

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 4:33


While the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the right to abortion is protected under Washington state law. But Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee and fellow abortion rights supporters are looking for ways to strengthen that protection.

KUOW Newsroom
Washington carbon exchange lets many big polluters off the hook

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:44


State officials are putting the final touches and taking public comment on the centerpiece of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee's push to fight climate change. Critics say the state's new system for capping greenhouse gas emissions from major polluters lets many of the worst climate offenders off the hook, forcing others to shoulder more of the burden of keeping the planet livable.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 1: Gov. Inslee pushing for state constitutional amendment supporting abortion rights

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:22


3PM - Supreme Court sides with Bremerton's praying coach // Gov. Inslee pushing for state constitutional amendment supporting abortion rights // Rantz: Violating policy, SeaTac Airport censored pro-life, conservative customers // Hotels Are Taking Wellness to Extremes, From IV Drips to MRIs // You're more likely to become friends with someone who smells like you  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KUOW Newsroom
WA officials put final touches on the centerpiece of Gov. Inslee's push to fight climate change

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:44


Critics say the system lets a bunch of big polluters off the hook.

Soundside
Gov Jay Inslee on abortion rights, the January 6th hearings, and more

Soundside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 22:57


It's been a busy few days. The Supreme Court's conservative majority has overturned the constitutional right to an abortion, struck a blow to states' power to regulate guns, and weakened Miranda rights. And hearings on the January 6th insurrection continue at the Capitol.