Slices of Wenatchee

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Explore the people, news and events that keep the Wenatchee Valley moving forward with Wenatchee World's podcast. Slices of Wenatchee brings you insights into the vibrant Apple Capital of the World three days a week. https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/  

Wenatchee World


    • Nov 27, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 8m AVG DURATION
    • 155 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from Slices of Wenatchee

    Three months later Wenatchee School Board is back in person; Dr. Malcolm Butler stepping down from role at CVCH

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:21

    Today - After three months of virtual meetings due to maskless attendees and an online threat of violence against two board members, the Wenatchee School Board returned to in-person meetings this past week. The meeting was calmer and quicker than the board's previous meetings, with around 50 masked people in the audience and no disruptions. Items on the meeting's agenda included the election and appointment of several board positions and also the swearing in of two incumbents and one newly elected member. Those election results were certified Tuesday afternoon by Chelan County. learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee Valley food banks running lower than normal on food; Small business Saturday is here!

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 5:32

    Today - most Wenatchee Valley food banks have not yet felt the strain of nationwide supply chain issues, but that could change as the holidays and 2022 get closer. Food prices have risen nationwide as a result of supply chain disruptions and labor shortages, making it hard to get certain items. And for food banks, that's become most apparent as they ramp up for holiday boxes. Also, on Saturday, November 27th, from 9am to 4pm, head over to the Wenatchee Convention Center to get a jump on your holiday shopping. Shop local on small business Saturday with more than 30 local vendors who will be there selling their crafts. Visit us for more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Redistricting Commission misses the deadline to submit 12th District maps; Meet Wenatchee World's 30 under 35 Winner Nicole Germain!

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:41

    Today - The State Redistricting Commission's reworked 12th Legislative District boundaries could reshape North Central Washington politics. But the Commission released Legislative and Congressional District maps late Tuesday after missing the deadline for final deliberations the previous night. Their failure punted the redistricting to the Supreme Court, which now has until April 30 to draw new district boundaries. Later, we'll introduce you to a Wenatchee World's 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards. These were made possible by Chelan County PUD. Today we're highlighting 31 year old Nicole Germain - the Website manager at Confluence Health. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee School District to begin equity audit of curriculum and policies; Businesses still struggle to find employees

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 8:36

    Today - The Wenatchee School District will be auditing curriculum, learning materials, instructional policies, disciplinary procedures and other materials to ensure equity for students. Also, Wenatchee Valley businesses are still struggling to find employees. In fact, Glaze Bakery is no longer open Mondays. They've cut their hours on other days and can't always offer the full menu. Glaze co-owner Jim Eakle says they'd ideally have around 15 people. And at times, Eakle has had up to 30 employees. But right now there are just 10. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Chelan County PUD plans to expand operations, whats the cost?; Life drawing at Collapse Gallery; Wenatchee 30 under 35 winner Eliza Zuniga

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:28

    Today - Chelan County PUD is anticipating record growth over the next few years — but expanding its operations will come with a high price tag, meaning the district may add a new fee. Also, Collapse Gallery in Wenatchee is offering life drawing starting tomorrow. Sessions will include a live nude model. Finally, we're excited to share a Wenatchee 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards… These were made possible by Chelan County PUD. Today we're highlighting 30 year old Eliza Zuniga - the staffing manager at Confluence Health. Learn more on these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    One in six homes closed for over $700k in Wenatchee; East Wenatchee's Christmas tree breaks in half; Local pediatric vaccine clinics

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 6:57

    Today - Nearly one in every six of the 596 homes sold in the Wenatchee real estate market in the past six months closed for more than $701,000. So what's in store for the future? Also, it's not often — or ever, really — that East Wenatchee goes through two Christmas trees in one year. A two-tree Christmas wasn't the original plan. But when the first tree broke in half, city employees quickly had to come up with a Plan B. And two pediatric COVID 19 vaccine clinics are available today in Chelan and Wenatchee. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    65-unit affordable housing complex for farmworkers set to open Oct. 2022; Go see Leavenworth's Marlin Handbell Ringers

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 6:39

    A 65-unit affordable housing complex in Entiat that will primarily serve farmworkers is slated to be completed by October 2022. The $20 million development was announced Monday by non-profit Enterprise Community Partners, the Housing Authority of Chelan County, the city of Wenatchee and the Office of Rural and Farmworker Housing, also known as ORFH. The Mountain View Family Housing community, on the site of a former orchard, will consist of 12 buildings, including two-story townhomes, single-story apartments and a single-story common building. Of the 65 units, 52 will be set aside for local farmworkers. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee residents to see an increase in property taxes next year; Kenneled for a Cause raises over $5,000

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 8:12

    Today - Wenatchee residents will see an increase in property taxes next year. The city council approved the property tax levy increase last week on a 6-1 vote. Councilmember Keith Huffaker was the one who voted no. Also, volunteers raise more than $5,000 for Wenatchee Valley Humane Society. During Kenneled for a Cause, volunteers sat with either a dog or a cat while encouraging friends and followers on Facebook to donate money to the shelter. Incentives included treats, books and toys to make use of while inside of the kennel or even a victory lap around the shelter. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    One Man Star Wars Show coming to Wenatchee; City Council members unintentionally support homeless housing tax

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 5:19

    Today, The Star Wars movies are known for their elaborate special effects, costumes and music. But, for Charlie Ross, the creator of the One Man Star Wars Show, there aren't any special effects, no costumes and no music. Also, two East Wenatchee City Council members say they unintentionally voiced support for an agreement regarding the revenue from the city's homeless housing tax. The council first voted on an agreement with the city of Wenatchee regarding the tax funds on Oct. 5. However, the city's legal counsel determined that a revote would be necessary due to a parliamentary procedure mix up. Visit us at wenatcheeworld.com for more on these stories. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Razor thin results in Wenatchee School Board races; No more padlocks on Winthrop's Spring Creek Bridge

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 7:51

    Today, the contentious Wenatchee School Board races produced razor-thin results. Among the hot-button issues is, of course, masking and mask mandates. Also, town workers removed roughly 90 padlocks from the bridge last week using mechanical grinders and bolt cutters. And they have plans to remove any new locks in the future. Mayor Sally Ranzau said she heard there had been a couple cases of keys winding up inside of salmon. learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Chelan and Douglas counties may start translating election info; Leavenworth Adventure Park moves forward

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 8:53

    Today, Chelan and Douglas counties might start translating their election information in 2022 — a step that would improve voting access among Hispanic voters. Also, visitors heading into Leavenworth may soon be able to spot construction crews climbing up near the Wenatchee River as they begin setting up the Leavenworth Adventure Park. Finally, we're excited to share a Wenatchee 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards. These were made possible by Chelan County PUD. Today we're highlighting Caden Stockwell. He's a Mechanical engineer with Pacific Aerospace. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee School Board passes strategic plan & promises to "stop pretending"; Halloween festivities across Wenatchee!

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 9:43

    Today - The Wenatchee School Board passed a strategic plan Tuesday evening that outlines the district's vision for the next five years and beyond. The approval was the end of a two-year process that began soon after Gordon started on the job in July 2019. Also, The end of October is here, which means Halloween festivities are already happening across the Wenatchee Valley! Spooky-themed events this year range from classic trick-or-treating to a pet parade in Pybus Public Market. That Howl-o-ween Pet Parade starts at 10:30 a.m. today and will include a costume contest, giveaway and a photo station, perfect for that scary yet cute pet outfit. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee School Board candidates raise over $100,000; Mission Ridge Ski & Board featured in new film

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 7:11

    Today - The six candidates for the three Wenatchee School Board races have raised more than $100,000. That makes this one of the most expensive school board races in the state. The candidates say COVID-19 and interest in school curriculum are a big part of the reason for increased donations. Also, Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort is part of a film that made its debut earlier this month about independent ski areas around the world. The film, produced by Teton Gravity Research, is called “In Pursuit of Soul.” You can learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee finalizing $138 million budget for 2022; U.S. Defense Department supports Confluence Health

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 9:18

    Wenatchee is in the process of finalizing a $138 million unbalanced budget for 2022. Also, Confluence Health got a manpower boost last week from the U.S. Defense Department to support the center's operations as it struggles with low staff counts.  Finally we're highlighting one of Wenatchee World's 30 under 35 winners, Meaghan Greydanus. Meaghan is a Certified professional accountant and tax director at Homchick Smith & Associates. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local grocery stores struggling with supply chain issues; What to expect at Wenatchee's Haunted Museum

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 6:29

    Today -After a year and a half of scrambling for products, the owner of Sony's Oriental Market, is looking for a break. She's hustled to stock her shelves during the pandemic. But it's becoming increasingly more challenging to get specialty products her customers are looking for because of supply chain issues. Also, October's spooky time has arrived and there's more than a few ghoulish souls ready to startle guests at Wenatchee's Haunted Museum. The fundraising event, put on by the Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center, is taking this year's visitors on a journey through a wellness sanitarium-turned-evil. Read more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Over 100 Confluence Health and state employees protest the state's vaccine mandate; East Wenatchee City Council approved agreement with Wenatchee around homeless housing funds

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 7:01

    Right now, vaccination rates in Chelan and Douglas counties rank among the top 11 counties in the state for first-dose COVID-19 vaccinations. Still, over 100 Confluence Health and state employees and other residents met on the intersection Ninth Street and Chelan Avenue to protest the state's vaccine mandate for health care and state employees. Among the protesters was Shawna Caddy, a Tonasket resident and administrative assistant with Confluence Health for 10 years who took a leave of absence rather than get vaccinated. The East Wenatchee City Council unanimously approved an agreement with Wenatchee around homeless housing funds and a corresponding task force after being split on the matter in a previous vote. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Events will look different at Town Toyota Center starting Nov. 15th; Sophia Xiao opens Cute Dumplings

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:09

    Today - Attending a Wenatchee Wild hockey game or a concert at the Town Toyota Center will require proof of vaccine or negative COVID-19 test results starting November 15th. So what does this mean for events going forward? Also, Sophia Xiao is not the kind of person with a lot of free time — but it seems she likes it that way. Xiao opened Cute Dumplings, which offers handmade Chinese bao buns and dumplings, in April and has been working non-stop to make the business a success ever since, expanding across the state, including the Wenatchee Valley. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    City Council approves extra funding for city hall remodeling; Amazon Studios filming in Leavenworth

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 7:03

    Today - City officials say the remodeling of city hall is making good progress despite some recently discovered issues with the building. The Wenatchee City Council approved a $134,000 deduction from the project's contingency fund Thursday night to cover the issues.  Also, have you ever wanted to be in a rom-com movie? Well… now's your chance. Amazon Studios will be filming in Leavenworth between Nov. 3-5 and they're looking for extras! The film is called "Somebody I Used to Know." and it'll debut on Amazon Prime Video worldwide next year.   Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Big changes ahead for Leavenworth's Oktoberfest; Clyde Pangborn's sandwich at the Museum & Cultural Center

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:30

    Today - There will be two Oktoberfests next October. One in Leavenworth and another in Wenatchee. Why? Well, Leavenworth's annual Oktoberfest, as many know it, did not return this year and will not be back next year. Also, locked behind five doors, hidden in a dark container and wrapped in cellophane sits a 95-year-old artifact: Clyde Pangborn's sandwich. Yes. That is correct. The Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center has a sandwich from 1926, and plans to keep it, permanently. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local businesses adapt to plastic bag ban; Big Chill Ciderfest & Harvest Festival pulls in 400 guests

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:44

    Today - local businesses say their customers are adapting well a week into a statewide plastic bag ban. The ban went into effect Oct. 1st. Now customers are required to pay 8 cents per bag or bring their own. Also, the third annual Big Chill Ciderfest & Harvest Festival pulled in about 400 guests over the weekend, offering vendors a chance to showcase a twist to the valley's persona as the apple capital of the world. And finally we're highlighting Wenatchee World's 30 under 35 winner Jolyn Hull. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    $1.7 million/year in tax revenue to go towards homeless in Wenatchee; $10 million going towards NCW libraries

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 7:25

    Today - an agreement between the cities of Wenatchee and East Wenatchee for a homeless housing task force narrowly passed Tuesday night, with Mayor Jerrilea Crawford casting a tie-breaking vote. Also, library branches in Chelan, Douglas, Grant, Okanogan and Ferry counties will be getting facelifts and other improvements in the coming years. How? Well, NCW Libraries is set to spend $10 million renovating 28 of its 30 branches, tapping into its strategic initiative fund created in 2018 by the library board. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee Valley renters struggle to meet rising prices; Fire officials determine cause of Rooster Comb Fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 7:36

    Today - the story of Wenatchee Valley renters and their struggle to meet rising prices. A growing number of individuals are experiencing rent increases across Washington and the country at a time when pandemic restrictions have strained both renters and apartment owners. Meanwhile, vacancy rates in the Wenatchee area hover around 1%, which at least one expert said should spur more apartment development. But until that happens, double-digit rent increases have become the norm, forcing tough decisions on renters. Also, fire officials have determined the Rooster Comb Fire that scorched a Wenatchee hillside in August was caused by a person cutting a metal culvert. Learn more about these stories at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    CWH saw more COVID deaths in Sept. than any other month; Locals protest Texas abortion law; 30 under 35 winner Henry Hernandez

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 7:55

    Today - twenty-eight COVID-19 patients died in September at Central Washington Hospital, the most in a single month since the pandemic began. Also, last week a crowd of roughly 200 gathered at Memorial Park before marching through Wenatchee to protest a recent Texas abortion law. Finally we're taking a moment to highlight a Wenatchee 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards. Henry Hernandez. Henry is a Business adviser at Quincy Financial Services. To learn more about these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee School Board debates in person meetings; Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra returns to the stage

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 9:03

    Today, the Wenatchee School Board members debated returning to in-person meetings -- more than a month after a large group of unmasked people disrupted the August 24th meeting. Also, Over a year since they last performed in front of an audience, members of the Wenatchee Valley Symphony Orchestra are excited to return to the stage. The 2021-22 season kicks off Saturday with the group's “Diamonds” concert featuring works by Mozart, Haydn and Finzi. This season is noteworthy, as it's the ensemble's 75th anniversary season. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A day inside Central Washington Hospital's ICU; What's going on this weekend in Wenatchee

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 7:40

    Today, the story of a mother and daughter who ended up in Central Washington's ICU after contracting the coronavirus. How hospital workers are coping. Also, keep listening to learn about some great events coming up this weekend! To learn more about these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Construction for BMX pump park pushed to next summer; 30 under 35 winner Yuritzi Lozano

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:37

    Today - Construction for a BMX pump park in Lincoln Park will not be completed this fall. Instead, it'll be pushed to next summer. Also, the cities of Wenatchee and East Wenatchee are one step closer to a low-barrier homeless shelter. The Wenatchee City Council approved an agreement between the cities Thursday night. The East Wenatchee City Council is expected to vote on the agreement in October. Finally we're highlighting World 30 under 35 winner, Yuritzi Lozano. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Washington State Autumn Leaf Festival is back; Pear growers expect a bigger harvest than last year

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 6:30

    Today - After a year away, and a consistent worry that the event would be canceled altogether, the Washington State Autumn Leaf Festival returned to Leavenworth yesterday. Also, the Pacific Northwest's pear growers expect a bigger harvest than last year. According to forecasts by Pear Bureau Northwest, this year's harvest is expected to yield about 16.1 million standard box equivalents of pears between Washington and Oregon. This represents a 5% increase from last year's 15.3 million boxes. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee hospitals running low on monoclonal antibody treatment; A new agreement between Confluence Health and Premera Blue Cross

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 7:25

    Today, monoclonal antibody therapeutic treatment can serve as a short-term boost to the immune system to help the body fight against COVID-19, but locally, it's in short supply. We'll also be talking about the latest news on the agreement between Confluence Health and Premera Blue Cross, as well as The Chelan County PUD's announced that Kirk Hudson has been named as the district's next general manager. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Colville Tribes' development considered for 640 acre property; 30 under 35 winner Alisa Franklin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 7:01

    Today - A Colville Tribes' casino, golf course and concert venue, along with a 100-home development are being considered for a 640-acre property between Chelan and Pateros. Also, today we're highlighting 33 year old Alisa Franklin. Alisa is a Registered investment associate at Stifel Financial. She's described as a self-starter, wise beyond her years, someone who succeeds in male-dominated industries of agriculture and finance. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee median home sale price hits $435,000; WVC dedicates building to Mish ee twie

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 7:05

    Today - The Wenatchee median home sale price has hit $435,000, that's up from $360,000 in 2020 Also, the newest building at Wenatchee Valley College was officially dedicated to Gloria Atkins, also known as Mish ee twie. The new building is named Mish ee twie in honor of Atkins who is a higher education advocate, tribal elder and proponent of tribal fishing rights at the confluence of the Wenatchee and Icicle rivers. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local COVID-19 cases seem to be trending downward; The Building Forest Partnership Program

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 6:34

    Today, the nine COVID-19 deaths reported Friday by the Chelan-Douglas Health District were all people who were unvaccinated. And now, COVID-19 cases seem to be trending downward or plateauing. Also, we're excited to share that Chumstick Wildfire Stewardship Coalition, North Central Washington Forest Health Collaborative, and the Tapash Sustainable Forest Collaborative are among nine organizations splitting $425,000 in state Department of Natural Resources grant funding aimed at increasing forest health and resilience. Learn more at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce Executive Director taking job at PUD; Highlighting 30 under 35's Rachael Goldie

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 6:19

    Today - Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Shiloh Burgess is leaving her post to take on a role with Douglas County PUD. Also, we're excited to share a Wenatchee 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards. Today we're highlighting 32 year old Rachael Goldie. Rachael is an Executive assistant at the Chelan Valley Housing Trust. She's also a fourth-generation Chelan native. To learn more about these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee residents recount their memories of 9/11

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 10:42

    Today - it's the 20th anniversary of the September 11th attacks. Together, they were the deadliest terrorist attack in human history... 2,977 were killed, more than 25,000 were physically injured, and long-term health consequences followed for so many first-responders who dug through the rubble looking for survivors. We sat down with four Wenatchee residents to hear how the events of 9/11 affected and shaped their lives. For more visit wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local emergency alerts need to be more accessible to Spanish speakers; Chelan and Douglas counties continue to add more jobs

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 8:25

    Today - Emergency alerts in our community are only available in English. For many, this makes it challenging to figure out what's going on around them.  Also, Chelan and Douglas counties had 3,700 more jobs this July than last and, for the second month running, its labor force expanded. The result? A 3.7% unemployment rate — one of the lowest in the state.   To learn more about these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A handful of local healthcare workers resign over vaccine mandate; '30 Under 35' award recipient Rachel Bishop

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 8:46

    Today - A handful of employees at Confluence Health and Cascade Medical have resigned over the state's mandate requiring all private healthcare workers to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19. Also, highlighting Rachel Bishop. Rachel is the Community programs manager at the Wenatchee River Institute and a winner of Wenatchee World's 30 under 35 awards. To learn more visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local man found guilty of murder gets sentenced reduced; Wildfires stretch American Red Cross resources thin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 7:33

    Today - A Snohomish man found guilty of a 2013 murder in Sun Cove will have his prison term reduced by five years. Why? Because his attorney neglected to factor the defendant's ADHD diagnosis. Also, Wildfires and structure fires have stretched American Red Cross volunteer resources thin this summer. They've also put a spotlight on the wide range of services the organization provides. To learn more about these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local COVID-19 hospitalizations indicate surge impacting Latinos; Firefighting crews work to contain the Twentyfive Mile Fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 8:22

    Today - COVID-19 hospitalizations at Central Washington Hospital show early signs that this latest surge is disproportionately impacting Latinos. Also, Firefighting crews are still working to contain the Twentyfive Mile Fire. It started on Aug. 15 near Twenty-Five Mile Creek State Park along Shady Pass Road. We spoke with spokeswoman Nancy Jones. To learn more about these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Staff of Central Washington Hospital stretched to their limit; '30 Under 35' award recipient Derek Todd

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 8:23

    Today - As COVID-19 hospitalizations rise the staff of Central Washington Hospital are being stretched to their limit. Also, we're highlighting 30 year old Derek Todd. Derek is the Counselor, Chelan High School and a recipient of the World's '30 Under 35' awards. To learn more about any of these stories visit us at wenatcheeworld.com Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    North Central Washington Fair ends tomorrow; Douglas County Sheriff's Office identifies remains found this year

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 7:15

    Today - Cars and trailers lined up for hours Wednesday afternoon at the Douglas County Fairgrounds as exhibitors waited to check their animals in for the North Central Washington Fair. Also, The Douglas County Sheriff's Office revealed that human remains found earlier this year on a Bridgeport hillside have been identified as those of Roy L. Groeneveld, a man missing for the last decade. visit us at wenatcheeworld.com to read more about these stories. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Unmasked locals prompt Wenatchee School Board to take meeting online; Omak Stampede attendees test positive for COVID-19

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 9:53


    Good Morning it's Thursday August 26th, and this is The Wenatchee World's podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today --- A group of about 30 unmasked and vocal people disrupted the Wenatchee School Board meeting Tuesday night. It caused the board to empty the room and take the meeting online instead.   Before we jump in, The Wenatchee Wine & Food Festival has been postponed because of an increase in COVID-19 activity in Chelan and Douglas counties. Our Publisher announced the postponement over the weekend. We still hope to hold the festival later this year, so stay tuned. Details on ticket refunds or exchanges will be announced next week.   Now our feature story…   A group of about 30 unmasked and vocal people disrupted the Wenatchee School Board meeting Tuesday night. It caused the board to empty the room and take the meeting online instead.   The incident began when some board members expressed concern about those in the room that weren't wearing masks.   Board member Martin Barron, specifically, suggested that anyone who wished to comment be masked. And that's according to the state mandate. But board member Julie Norton made a motion to continue the meeting and take public comment despite the majority of people in the room without a mask.   Board President Laura Jaecks and board member Maria Iñiguez then said they were uncomfortable being in the same room with so many unmasked people, and at that point they took a recess to decide how to proceed.   As this was all happening, people from the audience started yelling at the board. Jaecks began to pound the gavel on the table for order.   And after a 15-minute recess, the board, minus Jaecks and board member Michele Sandberg, came back into the room and voted to continue the meeting online. They also invited those who wished to comment to do so... online.     She explained that public comment is always welcome and appreciated, but they can't conduct the business of the board in a disorderly fashion when folks are calling out from the audience. She emphasized that she realizes it's emotional and tempting, and that people are only standing up for what they think is right - but it's their job to keep an environment where they can conduct the business of the board at the same time.   And while several people signed up to comment, only four people actually commented online.   One Wenatchee parent, Rachel Petro, said she was really looking forward to testifying in person.   Petro explained that she'd like to encourage the board to take a look at their governance and how they operate meetings in terms of interaction with the public. She continued to say that having public comments after a presentation on a policy is pretty much standard procedure in all legislative bodies.   Jeff Ovitt was also in attendance. He said he was feeling a little disappointed with the way the board handled things. In his opinion, the board didn't have to push everyone out - they're local people and tax supporters. Ovitt asked the board to keep the forum open and allow all people to speak, masks or not - they need to be heard.   This meeting came just ahead of the start of school in the Wenatchee and Eastmont School districts. It also follows Governor Jay Inslee's decision to require vaccinations for teachers and staff.    So far, Wenatchee Superintendent Paul Gordon said it's still early to talk about staff leaving due to the vaccination requirement. At this point they're still waiting for the official forms to come from the state for both medical and religious exemptions.   But the clock is ticking for employees to meet the October 18th deadline set by Inslee. That deadline means employees must get their first shot of Pfizer or Moderna in early September… if they haven't already.   Ultimately Garn Christensen, the Eastmont superintendent, summed up the situation by saying that all of us want to get angry. But that doesn't help anyone at this point. This is a time we need to be understanding and patient. There are many individuals that are sick with this and many families who've lost loved ones. And we have health workers that are just overwhelmed. We need to take a big deep breath and look backwards. We're better than we were a year ago.   Stay up to date on this story at wenatcheeworld.com.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next - More than two dozen people who went to the Omak Stampede earlier this month have tested positive for COVID-19.   And on Wednesday Okanogan County health officials urged anyone who attended the four-day rodeo to watch for COVID-19 symptoms. This applies to people who have been in close contact with someone who attended as well.   As of yesterday the cases that were identified were residents of Okanogan and Skagit counties as well as the Colville Reservation.   Okanogan County Public Health is working with the Colville Federated Tribes Health and Human Services and other county public health partners to identify other cases in people who may have attended the event.   Now, some history -    Did you know that Surviving the Game is a 1994 action thriller film filmed in and around Wenatchee? Starring Ice-T, Rutger Hauer, and Gary Busey, it is loosely based on the 1924 short story "The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell. The film revolves around a homeless man accepting a businessman's offer to work in a remote cabin, only to be tricked into being bait for a hunting game. You can stream the film on YouTube, Amazon, and Apple TV for $2.00.   Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Saturday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


    Chelan County PUD's new Discovery Center to open interactive exhibits; Wenatchee's 30 Under 35 winner Dylan Kling

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 8:25

    Good Morning it's Tuesday August 24th and this is Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - The Chelan County PUD's new Discovery Center is truly a sight to behold. Complete with unique interactive exhibits it'll certainly attract visitors far and wide.    Before we jump in, The Wenatchee Wine & Food Festival has been postponed because of an increase in COVID-19 activity in Chelan and Douglas counties. Our Publisher announced the postponement over the weekend. We still hope to hold the festival later this year, so stay tuned. Details on ticket refunds or exchanges will be announced next week.   Now our feature story…    That was Rachel Hansen from the Chelan County PUD   The Chelan County PUD's new Discovery Center is finally finished and it's set to open tomorrow - August 25th.   Debbie Gallaher, who's been the Rocky Reach Visitor Center Manager for 19 years, said it's something that she and Bob Bauer, the PUD outreach education specialist, have been planning for 14 years. The total project cost was $7.7 million.   And she's thrilled to see it come alive.   In 2016 when a study was done on what the Discovery Center could be, PUD Senior Project Manager Casey Hall explained that after a lot of research they were able to narrow it down and decide on what they wanted this place to look like.    Then, in 2018 design renovations began. The Museum of the Columbia and visitor center closed in fall 2019. New big fish viewing windows were installed in early 2020. Remodeling of the building started in October 2020. And finally the installation of exhibits started in May of this year.   Hall said one of the most challenging parts of the project was the remodel. In fact they ran into all kinds of issues. Another issue? Nothing in the building is straight — everything is curved.   Luckily, they had a great contractor and superintendent.   Another big challenge was, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic caused a huge backlog of supplies and materials. There were delays getting the materials to build the project.   So what can you expect to see now that the center is finished?   Well, the new Discovery Center is built on STEM principles. The goal is to reach as many kids and guests in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math because that is what the hydro industry is all about.   The displays are designed to be interactive and to teach people of those four areas. Visitors will also learn about the history of the Columbia river, the history of the early people, the history of the PUD and the wonderful marriage between a PUD and its community.   Bob Bauer, the Chelan County PUD outreach education specialist, said the center allows the PUD to showcase not only the Columbia River but also the PUD and its partnership with the community. He explained that the PUD's visitor center presents hydropower in the Pacific Northwest as a clean, renewable, reliable, and affordable energy source.   And he can't wait to show off the facility to students.   For Gallaher, he's most excited about how everything is hands-on. And this is totally new. Now, Gallaher says families and children can come in and push buttons to see how things work.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com -   Finally, we're excited to share a Wenatchee 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards… These were made possible by Chelan County PUD... Today we're highlighting Dylan Kling. Kling is a Counselor at Quincy High School, as well as an elected Quincy City Councilman.   Needless to say, he's giving back to the Quincy community on two fronts.    Through his career — as a counselor   And through his activity on the city's planning commission from 2016 through 2019 and currently as an elected member of the city council.   Kling graduated from Quincy High School in 2009 and earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from Eastern Washington University in 2014. He worked as the Gear Up site director in Quincy, helping students explore educational opportunities ranging from tech school to four-year colleges. He has five years on the board of the Quincy Partnership for Youth. It's a nonprofit designed to foster a healthy, drug-free community through activities and prevention and intervention programs.   We asked Kling what challenges he sees ahead and what needs to be done.. He told us that it's all about trying to make the best decisions that will help set our community up for the future. From infrastructure and activities to diversifying our community economically and culturally all while still staying true to our roots.  To him, it's a delicate balancing act and making sure we have community involvement and the best resources to make sure our community is a better place for the next generation of Quincy residents.   Some of the biggest challenges in education are getting students identified and connected to services. His position works with students who suffer from substance use and abuse issues but with COVID it's been extremely difficult to identify these students and get them to the resources that they need. Kling explained they don't know the full extent of this problem yet and won't know for some time.   He thinks the best thing to do is talk to and form connections with all the agencies in the area so once a youth is identified they can streamline the process to help these individuals get the help they need.   Did you know that the 1994 Steven Seagal film, On Deadly Ground, was filmed in and around Wenatchee? Seagal plays a firefighter who decides to fight back against the environmental destruction of his former employer. Seagal's only directorial effort, it also stars Michael Caine, Joan Chen, John C. McGinley and R. Lee Ermey. The film wasn't well-regarded and was nominated for 11 Golden Raspberry Awards including winning Worst Director for Seagal. Nevertheless, Roger Ebert wrote in his review: "if you like to see lots of stuff “blowed up real good”, this'd be a movie for you." Over the last 25 years, the film has attained cult classic status in some circles.   Thanks for listening. We'd also like to thank our sponsor again, Equilus Group, Inc, a Registered Investment Advisory Firm in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Thursday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Homeless population in Chelan and Douglas higher this summer; A potential site for new Wenatchee & East Wenatchee shelter

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 7:10

    Good Morning it's Saturday August 21st, and this is The Wenatchee World's newest podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - A new count of the homeless population in Chelan and Douglas counties shows higher numbers this season.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…   A new count of the homeless population in Chelan and Douglas counties shows higher numbers this season.   A Point-in-Time count showed twice the number of individuals in vehicles or RVs. They also counted 47 more homeless individuals in East Wenatchee and Wenatchee during July 6th through 9th compared to a previous count taken in January.   But it's important to understand that the two counts are not directly comparable. Of course, one was done in the winter, while one was done in the summer.    The Wenatchee Housing Coordinator, Oliver Crain, told us that we don't have enough data yet about the summer trends.   Still, one conclusion that can be drawn from the summer count is how homeless populations are distributed across the two counties. Both the summer and winter counts showed that about 98% of individuals experiencing homelessness are located in Wenatchee or East Wenatchee.   The July count, which covered 13 communities, was the first time the counties had done a count during the summer. Unlike an annual count completed across the country each January in accordance with state and federal requirements, the summer it was a local initiative.   Crain said elected officials, community members and homeless service providers in Douglas and Chelan counties opted to do a summer count to better understand the needs of homeless individuals year round. Anecdotal information had suggested homeless services were used more during the summer and the recent count helps quantify that.   And Crain added that as more summer counts are collected, it will be easier to understand whether homeless populations experience high and low points between seasons.   Now, we have another data point that the counties and the cities can use when planning their responses and informing the community about the needs and the extent of homelessness.   To read more on this story visit us at wenatcheeworld.com   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next, The hunt to find a location for a low-barrier shelter to serve Wenatchee and East Wenatchee may be over soon.   The two cities are eyeing a possible location across from the Salvation Army Social Service Office on South Columbia Street in Wenatchee.   The shelter will fill a need for additional beds in the area. The goal is to give police greater flexibility in their interactions with individuals experiencing homelessness.    Cities can't enforce ordinances that prohibit sleeping or camping on public property when there aren't sufficient homeless shelter beds.     We spoke to Glen DeVries, Wenatchee's community development director. He said that the Salvation Army expressed interest in partnering on the shelter earlier this year. That was after the Wenatchee and East Wenatchee city councils passed a sales tax to help fund the shelter and expand services for those experiencing homelessness.   The organization has a few vacant lots as well as an adjacent property owner with a vacant property who is willing to participate.   So far, the cities have provided the private land owner and Salvation Army with a mock layout of the shelter. And both parties were interested. They expect to hear back from the parties within the next two weeks. From there we'll know more about whether or not they'll be moving forward.   According to the mock layout, the location would hold 46 shelters. That includes some units accessible for people with disabilities. There would also be a mix of single and double units. The facility would also have a storage area for personal items, a dog off-leash area, wrap-around chain-link fencing, two picnic tables and an administrative building.    From the cities' perspective, the location has a number of advantages… Like its accessibility to bus and pedestrian routes. It may also save money since the Salvation Army's existing facility across the street has components like laundry services and a commercial kitchen.   DeVries says obviously, the details would have to be worked out, but as far as a starting point - it has key components that are necessary.   He explained that the cities hope to have the shelter at least partially open by winter, but construction season, the approval process and availability of materials may drag out the timeline.   Meanwhile, the East Wenatchee and Wenatchee are working on an agreement that would lay out how the cities will share shelter responsibilities.   Stay up to date on this story at wenatcheeworld.com   Now, some history…   Did you know that Malaga Springs Winery opened in 2004 with a tasting room to follow in 2010? Al and Kathy Mathews started with 9 grape varietals and have sought out cuttings from the original grapes grown in the area during the late 1800s when the railroads arrived. They've won a number of awards and you can sample the vintages in-person, pick it up in local shops, or have it delivered.     Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Tuesday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Gov. Inslee says COVID-19 vaccines required for school employees; “Into the Woods" at Ohme Gardens County Park

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 9:35

    Good Morning it's Thursday August 19th, and this is The Wenatchee World's podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today --- Yesterday, Gov. Jay Inslee announced that COVID-19 vaccines will be required for all school employees — kindergarten through college — and most childcare and early learning workers in the state as well.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…   Yesterday, Gov. Jay Inslee announced that COVID-19 vaccines will be required for all school employees — kindergarten through college — and most childcare and early learning workers in the state as well.   Inslee also announced an expansion of the statewide indoor mask mandate to all people, regardless of vaccination status.   The announcements come with the rapidly increasing case and hospitalization numbers for COVID-19 across the state, including Wenatchee.   So what's the vaccination deadline for school employees?  All K-12 educators, school staff, coaches, bus drivers, school volunteers and others working in school facilities will have until October 18th to be fully vaccinated as a condition of employment.    The requirement includes public, private and charter schools. But it doesn't include tribal schools.   It's also important to note that employees won't have the option to provide test results instead of the vaccination. And, just like the state worker mandate, they can apply for limited exceptions to getting the vaccine. That includes legitimate medical reasons and sincerely held religious beliefs.   And those who refuse to get vaccinated will be subject to dismissal.   The vaccine requirement applies to anyone who works in licensed, certified and contracted early learning and childcare programs as well as contractors who work in license-exempt early learning, childcare and youth-development programs including coaches, volunteers and trainers.   The mandate doesn't include family, friends and neighbors providing childcare.   Inslee also expanded the statewide indoor mask mandate, which is effective Aug. 23, will include vaccinated people. Prior, only unvaccinated people were required to wear masks at indoor public places.   This expansion comes after the state broke the previous record for COVID hospitalizations. That record was set back in December. And now, every county in the state currently falls within the CDC's substantial or high transmission. On top of that, each of the state's 35 local health officers recently recommended all individuals wear masks indoors.   The mask exception includes office spaces not easily accessible to the public where vaccinated people are working and working alone indoors or in a vehicle with no public face-to-face interaction.   Small, private indoor gatherings where all attendees are vaccinated are also exempt.    Still, the Department of Health strongly recommends individuals also wear masks in crowded outdoor settings, such as outdoor concerts, fairs and farmers markets.   Stay up to date on this story at wenatcheeworld.com.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next - Rapunzel is letting down her golden hair. And the evil stepmother is refusing to let Cinderella go to the ball. There's Jack and his beanstalk. And little red riding hood visiting her grandmother in the forest.    See it all at “Into the Woods" at Ohme Gardens County Park.   We spoke to Michelle McCormick, the production manager for the show. She explained that it's a lot of fairy tales intertwined.    The story focuses on a baker and his wife, who are unable to have a child since a witch had previously cast a spell on the baker's father. The witch agrees to grant their wish for a child if they collect something as red as blood, hair as yellow as corn, slippers that look like gold and a white cow.   Of course, Cinderella has a slipper, and Jack has to sell a cow. So, that's how all of these other fairy tales are intertwined. And really, the story is more about ‘What are you willing to do for what you really want? Are you willing to compromise your ethics for what you really want?'   The Stage Teens production includes a cast of 36 members playing 18 roles, with each role being double cast. A majority of the cast is between 13 and 18 years old.   Stage Teens typically does a show every August with a cast consisting of performers through their senior year in high school. Since there was no show last year due to the pandemic, several of last year's seniors have returned for this year's performance.   Caleb Clifton, who plays Cinderella's Prince, said his character is compassionate but will do what it takes to get what he wants in the show.   And Carly Orstem, who plays Little Red Riding Hood in the performance, describes her character as bubbly, but naive. Director Alex Stroming has actually allowed cast members to do their own blocking for the performance, and be creative with their role.   He says that he basically sent the two separate casts away and said ‘Figure out your own staging. You decide what your scene's going to be about, you make all the choices here. Through that, the kids were really able to see that there is no one right or wrong way to play a scene or play a certain character.   Stroming also said the creativity reduces the competition and ego that comes with a double-cast show while also allowing students to make the show their own.   Most of the show's choreography was organized by three performers. Parts of the show incorporate American Sign Language, which was suggested by another performer and is something McCormick has no previous experience with. And several cast members organized the lobby so the experience of the show begins as soon as the audience arrives.   The audience is immersed in the performance, with the play taking place on three sides.    Performances will take place Aug. 18, 19, 20 and 22 at 7 p.m., with 10 a.m. shows Aug. 20 and 21.   It's at Ohme Gardens, and you can get tickets at stagekidswa.org.   There is fixed seating in the audience, though you can also bring chairs or blankets to sit on.   Before we go, some local history. Wenatchee Valley History is brought to you by NABUR. Now, some history -    Did you know that if you drove from Leavenworth to Plain, you'd be passing through Chumstick, a small unincorporated community surrounding Chumstick Road connecting the two towns. Surrounded by the Wenatchee National Forest and the Cascade Mountains.    Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Saturday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Washington State Tree Fruit Association forecasts increase over last year; COVID-19 cases linked to Watershed Music Festival

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 8:15

    Good Morning it's Tuesday August 17th and this is Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - The Washington State Tree Fruit Association is forecasting a crop of 124.8 million 40-pound boxes of apples during the 2021 harvest. That would be an increase of 2.3% over last year.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…    The Washington State Tree Fruit Association is forecasting a crop of 124.8 million 40-pound boxes of apples during the 2021 harvest.   This would be an increase of 2.3% from last year, but down from 2019.    But Tim Kovis, a spokesman for the tree fruit association, said the forecast will continue to change over the coming months.   Kovis explained that each growing season is different. So, crop sizes vary from year to year based on a whole litany of conditions and market forces. Harvest will go until the end of November, so there are a lot of variables.   These variables include things like hail that could bruise the fruit, wind damage and labor supply for growers. Higher than average temperatures will also impact the harvest.   And Ed Schaplow, the owner of Allview Orchards in Chelan, said the damage to the fruit isn't always visible from the outside.    During the record-breaking heat this summer, the apples are essentially cooked from the inside, which makes it difficult for workers to know what fruit they should pick off the tree. This issue is most prevalent on apples on the sunny side of the tree.   Schaplow said through sampling and checking crops, he estimated that at least half have been damaged this way.   And in addition to the heat wave, Schaplow said he's had difficulty finding labor this year to pick the apples on his 30-acre orchard.   He thinks, to increase the number of workers, the federal government should expand guest worker programs.   But while demand for Washington apples remains high, once the fruit is picked the potential challenges continue.   Todd Fryhover is president of the Washington Apple Commission. He said transportation costs for shipping the fruit domestically and internationally have increased drastically.   Washington typically exports about 30% of its apple crop to 60 countries around the world.   And right now there are tariffs in China and India, so that slows down movement.   Rebecca Lyons is the international marketing director for the Washington Apple Commission. She said freight issues have made it difficult to promote Washington apples in global markets.   So what should we expect from this year's crop?   Gala apples will be the most popular variety, at 21% of the crop produced. Red Delicious are expected to be at 16% of the crop. Honeycrisp and Granny Smith will both be at 14% and Fuji apples will be 13%.   This is a change from 20 years ago when Kovis said Red and Golden Delicious apples represented 68% of the state's apple crop.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Here's what else you need to know today.   The three-day Watershed Music Festival two weeks ago has been connected to more than 160 COVID-19 cases across the state.   The event, which was held July 30 through Aug. 1 at The Gorge Amphitheatre, was the origin of cases in multiple counties as well as one case in Oregon, according to the Grant County Health District.   The district reported cases among residents of King, Grant, Pierce, Skagit, Kittitas, Okanogan, Whatcom, Kitsap, San Juan, Lincoln and Stevens counties.   “As of today, we are aware of over 160 lab confirmed COVID-19 cases across Washington state in people who attended the event. We expect more cases to be confirmed in the coming days,” said Laina Mitchell, the district's communicable disease coordinator. “The outbreak is the first one traced to an outdoor entertainment event since the lifting of statewide COVID-19 prevention measures at the end of June.”   The county health district is working with local, state and tribal public health partners to identify other cases in people who may have attended the music festival. Individuals who attended Watershed are encouraged to self-quarantine and seek testing. ----- Finally, we're excited to share a Wenatchee 30 Under 35 winner from the 2021 awards… These were made possible by Chelan County PUD...   Today we're featuring 34 year old Yuritzi Lozano. Lozano is the Dean of Allied Health & Workforce Education at Wenatchee Valley College   She is also the first Latina dean at Wenatchee Valley College.    Hired in early 2021 to oversee allied health and workforce education, this is just the latest accomplishment in her academic career.   A 2005 graduate of Eastmont High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in international studies and Spanish, with a minor in diversity, in 2010 from the University of Washington. Then, in 2013, she earned a master's degree from the UW in educational leadership and policy studies. She is now pursuing a doctorate at Oregon State University in adult and higher education.   After completing her bachelor's degree, she worked as an adviser and guidance counselor for Latino high school students, then transitioned into the role of outreach coordinator.   She also created and implemented college access workshops, which ultimately led to her decision to pursue a master's degree.   After graduating from the UW, Lozano worked at Highline College, providing support and services to first-generation, low-income and disabled students. And in 2014, she returned to the Wenatchee area, accepting a position as the director of the College Assistant Migrant Program at Wenatchee Valley College. The program provides support, guidance and advocacy for students from agricultural backgrounds.   Her work there led to her moving into the dean position early this year, continuing her goal of improving policies and practice to be more inclusive of underserved students.   Lozano told us that from a professional standpoint, Wenatchee Valley College will continue to work collaboratively with our business and industry partners to ensure they are providing a service to keep talent and work accessible to those who are from the area. Through their work they want to continue to be catalysts for change.   Did you know that Sunnyslope kids used to attend school in a small frame house at the turn of the century? Known as Beacon Hill School and built in 1901, it originally consisted of just just two rooms. It was sold in 1915 to L.D. Merritt when the newer Sunnyslope School took its place.    Thanks for listening. We'd also like to thank our sponsor again, Equilus Group, Inc, a Registered Investment Advisory Firm in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    $2 million agreement with S.P.O.R.T. Gymnastics renewed; 11th annual Tomato Gala

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 6:35

    Good Morning it's Saturday August 14th, and this is The Wenatchee World's newest podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - The Chelan Douglas Regional Port Authority opted not to renew a $2 million purchase-and-sale agreement with S.P.O.R.T. Gymnastics on Tuesday.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story...   The Chelan Douglas Regional Port Authority opted not to renew a $2 million purchase-and-sale agreement with S.P.O.R.T. Gymnastics on Tuesday.   A previous agreement expired Aug. 2 after S.P.O.R.T. failed to secure financing and file a completed building permit with the City of Wenatchee by the stipulated deadline.   If those conditions are met, Port Authority CEO Jim Kuntz said the port would close on the sale. The property is now open to other buyers, but the port is not actively marketing it.   The developer, Flint Hartwig, said he miscalculated how much time he would need for the project when the agreement was initially signed in August 2020. Although he has turned in preliminary plans, the city has not yet deemed them complete.   Hartwig said “I should have seen that coming...I was just being overly optimistic about the timing.   Despite the setbacks, the port's board remains supportive of the project.   Kuntz told us that: “S.P.O.R.T. can and should continue to work on plans to submit to the city and to finalize its financing plan.”   Hartwig said he has 60 individuals who may be potential investors and that the port's decision not to renew the agreement won't impact investors' interest in the project.   S.P.O.R.T is planning a multi-use activity center using three buildings on the corner of Columbia Street and Orondo Avenue, a property formerly owned by Lineage Logistics, that total 36,830 square feet. The center would include a roof-top bar, zip-lines, batting cages and a ninja course.   Hartwig said “It's going to be a crying shame if it turns into another apartment house or mini storage or car lot or some industrial use. I think it needs to have a community vibe to it.”   The Merc Playhouse in Twisp is currently looking for submissions for its first, in-person performance since the start of the pandemic last spring.   The show, “CoronAnthology: The year we held our breath,” will be a collection of stories of what 2020 meant to different cast members. Missi Smith, executive director of The Merc, said they had a similar performance in 2014 after an especially destructive wildfire season.   Smith said: “It was very powerful when we did it before, to hear what everybody went through. It was super healing and valuable to reconnect with everybody in that way.”   The show is flexible depending on what the director selects, and Smith encouraged all age groups to submit.   Submissions must be shorter than 5 minutes and be either written, audio or video recordings, and can be submitted to hoochamungus@gmail.com. The deadline to submit is Aug. 30. An in-person submission session will also be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Aug. 25 at Yourspace in Building N on the Twispworks Campus.   --   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com --   Next,    If you're a tomato aficionado or just curious about which varieties you like best, here's your chance for a free, tomato-tasting bonanza. Visit WSU Chelan/Douglas Master Gardeners' 11th annual Tomato Gala between 9 and 11 a.m. on Saturday the 21st at the Community Education Garden in Wenatchee.    Whether you're a fan of tomato varieties like Super Fantastic, Early Girl, Sun Gold and Sweet Million, or little-knowns like Abe Lincoln, Orange Strawberry, Hillbilly, Black Krim and Pink Elephant… or you don't know what any of this means (!), this is your chance to taste and learn.   You'll get to talk with master gardeners, hear about some of their favorite tomatoes, and pick up growing tips. You'll also be able to vote on your favorites. The winners will appear in a future edition of Wenatchee World.   Read our full story on this at wenatcheeworld.com   Did you know that nearby Mansfield gets its name from... Mansfield, Ohio? R.E. Darling named the area after his hometown in 1905. Originally part of the Great Northern Railway, it took until 1911 to be officially incorporated. In 1914, a booming Mansfield had two hotels, a bank, a doctor's office, and had become a popular resort destination for travelers.   Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Tuesday!   Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Many local health officials support Gov. Inslee's vaccine mandate for health care workers; Cause of the Red Apple Fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 8:24

    Good Morning it's Thursday August 12th, and this is The Wenatchee World's podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today --- Some local health officials and providers have already affirmed their support of Gov. Jay Inslee's most recent mandate that state workers and private health care workers be vaccinated.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…   Some local health officials and providers say they support Gov. Jay Inslee's most recent mandate that state workers and private health care workers be vaccinated.   Inslee's new vaccine mandate requires that the 60,000 or so state workers and 400,000 licensed health care providers in the state be fully vaccinated by October 8th.   Elected officials, boards and commissions, K-12 and higher education schools do not fall under the governor's mandate.   So what did local health officials have to say about this news?    Luke Davies, the Chelan-Douglas Health District Administrator, said that this is a public health measure.   He explained that people who are vaccinated and have contracted the delta variant spread it less. That's why it's really important that we do this together -- to prevent the variant from spreading even within hospitals.   Andrew Canning, the Confluence Health spokesperson said that they will be requiring all of its staff, regardless of work location or role, to be vaccinated in accordance with the governor's mandate.    Canning said that it's never been more critical than right now to confront the COVID-19 pandemic with every tool we have.   As of Tuesday, 72% of Confluence Health's 4,400 employees are fully vaccinated. And about 94% of its 300 physicians are fully vaccinated.   Columbia Valley Community Health, which has facilities in Wenatchee, East Wenatchee and Chelan, is also supportive of the governor's mandate.   Manuel Navarro, CVCH chief operating officer, noted that they were actually already working on steps to mandate staff to get the vaccine. To him, it's the right thing to do.   About 84% of its total 300-person staff and all 25 or so doctors are already fully vaccinated.   But Chelan County Commissioner Kevin Overbay said he thinks that the governor's mandate may push away employees in smaller communities and jeopardize people's options.   So what's the situation in hospitals now?   At Confluence Health's Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee, 26 people were hospitalized due to COVID-19 as of Monday, up from 18 patients listed on Friday. And five patients were in the intensive care unit as of Tuesday morning.   COVID-19 cases continue to rapidly grow in Chelan and Douglas counties… yes due to the delta variant.   And The health district still recommends that the public vaccinate as soon as possible if they haven't already. In the last few weeks, they have seen an increase in vaccinations, weekly numbers going from 400 to around 600.   Davies says that they're seeing hospitalizations across the state at the highest level they have been in 2021. There are very few beds available.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next - Investigators still aren't certain what caused the Red Apple Fire last month, but they've ruled out an illegal burn. That's what was first suspected.   The fire ultimately burned 12,288 acres, threatened to destroy hundreds of homes and led Chelan County authorities to order varying levels of evacuations to 1,500 homes in Sunnyslope. Luckily - No homes were lost, but five outbuildings were damaged.   Chelan County Fire Marshal Bob Plumb says that they have two theories for what caused the fire: soot from an exhaust…. or grass may have ignited from contact with a muffler or engine.   But they're still not even sure about the exact spot. Plumb says the only thing they're sure of right now is that it didn't start in the burn pile on that one piece of property that they were focused on to begin with.   To determine where a brush fire began, experts look at what Plumb called “macro indicators.” This can include the burn pattern.    The Red Apple Fire appeared focused at the bottom of a hill — and the intensity that vegetation burned.    Sometimes, investigators will also look at individual stalks of grass with a magnifying glass. They can tell if the fire was advancing or moving to the side or backing.   One investigator narrowed the point of origin down to a 2-foot area, though Plumb cautioned he wasn't “totally sold” on that location.   The only thing he believes is that the fire started on the property to the north of where the burn pile was.   Now, some history -    Did you know that the Wenatchee area is home to towns that saw booms and then ultimately… busts. Bonita is one. Although no longer on any map, the town post office was established in 1903 and remained in operation until 1927. According to local legend, the community was named by Lieutenant Edward Nealer after a place where he spent time in the Philippines.   Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Saturday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation file lawsuit for wildfire damages; Wenatchee Valley College requires vaccines; Short Shakespeare

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 7:49

    Good Morning it's Tuesday August 10th and this is Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - Last week, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation filed a lawsuit against the United States for damages from the North Star and Tunk Block fires.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…    The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the United States for damages from the North Star and Tunk Block fires.   The fires burned more than 240,000 acres on the Colville Reservation in 2015. Now, the Colvilles allege that the U.S. failed to fulfill legally required duties before and after the fires.   The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. It also alleges that the U.S. failed to provide adequate firefighting resources for the Colville Reservation by prioritizing off-reservation, non-trust property.   The North Star and Tunk Block fires began back in August 2015 and burned more than 590 square miles and 800 million board feet of the Tribes' commercial timber. It all happened over a two-month period.   The lost timber was 20% of the commercial timber on the Colville Reservation and is the largest fire-related timber loss on any Indian reservation in recorded history.   Colville Business Council Chairman Andrew Joseph Jr. said the fires also caused long term damage to cultural resources on the Reservation.   He explained that tribal members hunt, fish and gather food and medicine throughout the Colville Reservation, and in many areas the fires burned so hot that they sterilized the soil and created a moonscape. Joseph noted that it will take decades for our resources to completely recover in those areas.   He also added the United States' insufficient preparation for and response to the 2015 fires have not been addressed and that the Colville Tribes remain gravely concerned about future wildfires on the reservation.   The Colville Reservation is currently dealing with the impacts of two active fires. One of them - the Chuweah Creek Fire - is 92% contained. But it destroyed five homes and burned 36,752 acres. The other - called the Summit Trail Fire is 18% contained and burned 28,036 acres. It's threatening 236 homes and other structures.   Joseph says he hopes this lawsuit will result in the Department of the Interior finally living up to its trust responsibilities to the Colville Tribes To stay up to date on this story visit us at wenatcheeworld.com   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Here's what else you need to know today.   Wenatchee Valley College will require vaccines for students enrolled in in-person classes.   Fall classes begin on Sept. 27. And students are expected to be fully vaccinated prior to the first day of school. They'll also need to document their vaccination status by that date using WVC's free online tool.   Laura McDowell, director of communications, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges says that the majority of community colleges in the state are now also requiring students to be vaccinated.   In fact, she said that 27 of the 34 state's community and technical colleges have decided to require vaccination as a condition of coming to work and learn on campus.    Still, waivers are available for medical, religious or philosophical reasons.   The decision was made in light of the governor's higher education proclamation last month, and in response to new information surrounding the COVID-19 delta variant.   WVC spokeswoman Libby Siebens said that staff are not currently required to be vaccinated, however, they must attest to their vaccination status.   For now, it's hard to say what the vaccination requirement will do to college enrollment. Some people will feel reassured about going back to school because there are vaccination requirements, while other people may view that as a hurdle they have to go through, but one they are not ready for.   And it turns out that college age students are one of least vaccinated populations statewide.    So will the vaccination requirement to attend college push more of this population to get vaccinated?   Finally, Children of various ages will be taking to the stage floor for the 43rd annual Short Shakespearean's production of “As You Like It” this weekend at the Riverside Playhouse.   Short Shakespeareans is a children's theater program with a cast aged 16 and below. And this year's show includes 35 young actors.   Cast members have been “amping up their excitement everyday,” according to  Mark Belton… he's the show producer. And this year's show is being directed by Kelly Atwood.   If you've never been - the plays are put on by volunteers with children and parents helping out. It is a fun time for everybody.   And the set has just been painted in preparation for Wednesday's opening night.   So what can you expect from “As You Like It?” Well, the comedy tells the story of two couples who fall in love while being caught between the court and the forest. And of course, cast members will then add their own fun to it. Tickets for the performance are $15 each, and are available at numericapac.org.   “As You Like It” has daily performances at 7 p.m. Aug. 11-14, with a matinee at 2 p.m. Aug. 14.    See you there!   Before we go, some local history,  Wenatchee Valley History, is brought to you by NABUR.   Did you know that Cashmere was originally called Mission and became a flag stop on the Great Northern Railroad in 1900? At that time, a small section house was built manned by two employees. This building has been preserved and you can visit it today at the Cashmere Museum and Pioneer Village. A few years later, the booming economy resulted in the construction of a larger train station and the renaming of the town to Kashmir with a K before finally taking the more Americanized spelling starting with a C.   Thanks for listening. We'd also like to thank our sponsor again, Equilus Group, Inc, a Registered Investment Advisory Firm in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Thursday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    East Wenatchee in good shape financially; Local artist Dan McConnell's exhibit in Pybus Market

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 8:35

    Good Morning it's Saturday August 7th,, and this is The Wenatchee World's newest podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - The city of East Wenatchee is in good financial shape, according to its latest financial report. According to the presentation to the City Council earlier this week, the city's cash balances for all funds at the end of June were at $11.2 million.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story...   The city of East Wenatchee is in good financial shape, according to its latest financial report.   The report, which compares revenue and expenditures from June 2021 to June 2020, paints a positive picture of the city's finances.   East Wenatchee Finance Director Josh DeLay said that they're in a great financial position. It'll allow Wenatchee to continue to upgrade and modernize city infrastructure.    DeLay noted that people can expect to see increases in expenditures in the next few years for these upgrades, but these are all planned and that's the reason why cities build up their fund balances.   During a presentation of the financial report to the City Council on Tuesday night, DeLay said the city's cash balances for all funds at the end of June were at $11.2 million.   He explained that he doesn't think the city has ever been over $10 million.    A lot of that increase is thanks to $1.5 million in federal American Rescue Plan funds, but tax revenues have also contributed.   So in all, DeLay had a positive outlook on tax revenues during his City Council presentation.   He said sales tax is up 24.1% from last year, which is incredible. The numbers are just rolling in.   Gambling taxes are also up - 104% from last year.    Revenue from operating funds is up 59% compared to June 2020 and non-operation funds increased by 38%.    The revenue increase is more than just recovery from the pandemic. Operating funds revenue in June 2020 also increased from the previous year. Non-operating funds revenue did too - it rose by a whopping 722.42%.   DeLay said the increases are a combination of what appears to be a recovery from the pandemic, federal dollars received for the American Rescue Plan and a limited tax general obligation bond the city took out for capital purchases and improvements.   To read more on this story visit us at wenatcheeworld.com   Also,    Local artist Dan McConnell will have an exhibit displayed in the Pybus Market Board Room through August. So check it out!   The show, which is called Images in Grids, pulls together a variety of topics, dating back to watercolor paintings that McConnell painted in the 1970s. The show's name references McConnell's process when he was fresh out of college and would paint with watercolors and draw using an underlayment of gridded pencil drawings. Several of the pieces of art in the exhibit were created with this method.   Among the art pieces on display are Giclee prints, graphic novel page prints and original watercolors as well as original graphic novel pages.   McConnell will also have several bowls that depict presidents as caricatures.   The show will be open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sundays.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next,    Over 36,000 patients with Premera Blue Cross health insurance will be considered out-of-network with Confluence Health in February of 2022… that is unless the two sides settle a price dispute before then.   Confluence Health began negotiations back in April by informing Premera that they would not renew their contract. Why? Because of disagreements about Premera's pay rate.   Dr. Peter Rutherford, Confluence Health CEO explained that Health insurance contracts typically last between two to three years. And after months of negotiations, there was no real progress.   But David Condon, Premera vice president of Eastern Washington, doesn't believe that negotiations are at an impasse.   He said that they still have quite a ways on the runway, and they really do believe that they can come to an agreement. They want Confluence to come back to the table - it's in the best interest of members and for the community.   Still, Confluence Health says the issue is that Premera refuses to a pay rate consistent with other commercial insurance payers in the market.   For now, Confluence Health is not allowed to discuss any details of the contract, but Premera is the outlier among the many commercial insurers Confluence Health works with.   What we do know is that in 2020, Premera paid Confluence Health $167 million in claims, up from $160 million in 2019. The increase is attributed to rising hospital costs.   And if Confluence Health does not renew the contract, more than 36,000 patients across North Central Washington will be “out-of-network” which could mean higher deductibles and other fees for patients.   These Premera-affiliated health insurance providers will also be “out-of-network” or affected in some way starting in February of 2022…. LifeWise, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Regence Blue Shield, and Uniform Medical Plan.   Read our full story on this at wenatcheeworld.com   Now, some history…   Did you know the three lakes golf course was proposed in 1951? The course went through a number of fundraising efforts to put together the money needed to hit the links including a land donation from Harold Weed, a non-profit stock offering for $25,000, and a charity tournament with Bing Crosby and US amateur champion, Jack Westland. Originally only 9 holes and relying on volunteer labor, the early players had to go around twice to complete a full round.   Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Tuesday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Ban on single-use plastic bags worries Wenatchee business owners; Pateros Treehouse Early Education center to make childcare more accessible

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 9:01

    Good Morning it's Thursday August 5th, and this is The Wenatchee World's podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today --- A statewide ban on single-use plastic bags will go into effect Oct. 1, but business owners in Wenatchee say the transition may be rocky.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…   A statewide ban on single-use plastic bags will go into effect Oct. 1, but local business owners say the transition may be rocky.   The ban was initially scheduled to begin on January 1st, but Governor Jay Inslee delayed it.    Still, local business owners' have many concerns about the ban.   Those concerns include things like supply chain issues, cost increases, and of course… customer reactions.    So who will be affected? The ban applies to restaurants, grocers, retailers, convenience stores, farmers markets, food trucks, temporary stores and home delivery services. But food banks will be exempt.   Under the new law, stores can use paper bags made with 40% recycled content and plastic bags made with 20% recycled materials and that are a minimum of 2.25 mil thick.    Both plastic and paper bags will come with an 8-cent charge. According to the Department of Ecology, there won't be any restrictions on customers bringing in their own bags.   So how are local business owners feeling?   Francisco Cuevas, the owner of Futbol-Era Soccer Store on South Mission Street, is concerned about where he'll find bags that are compliant with the new law. He's currently looking into plastic and paper bags and hopes his current bag vendor — which is Costco — will sell ban-compliant bags.   Depending on the cost, he said he may end up not giving out bags at all. He's hopeful that customers will understand the ban and its implications for small businesses.   And Victor Garcia, the general manager of Original J's Teriyaki in East Wenatchee, is also concerned about bag pricing.   Garcia said It's gonna be a little frustrating at first, but there's no choice.   He also explained that the restaurant is evaluating ways to absorb the increased cost of bags, including discontinuing specials, switching plates or changing prices. Unfortunately, he said that these higher bag costs come in conjunction with other increased supply costs. Just this week, for example, their chicken went from $68 a case to $110.   Original J's Teriyaki is also still researching what kind of bags it will use. As a restaurant that relies heavily on takeout, Garcia said the staff is concerned about how paper bags would handle possible food spills.    Although the bag ban law mandates that businesses charge 8 cents a bag, that may not be enough to offset the higher costs of bags that are compliant with the law.   In fact, AnaMaree Ordway, the owner of Ye Olde Bookshoppe, said that doesn't even put a dent in the cost of the bags a small business pays.    Ordway already uses bags that would be compliant with the ban. They range from 12 to 54 cents a bag, but she's unsure whether prices will go up as demand for them goes up under the ban.   Finally, we spoke to Super Plaza Jet owner Jeff Lau who also worries about how an already strapped supply chain system will handle the transition.    He has yet to see paper bags that comply with the law. He added that with supply costs fluctuating so much, it's difficult to know what the new bags will cost. But he anticipates the store will be able to absorb the cost in sales.   It will be harder, however, for the store to adapt logistically to the new law. The ban exempts customers using food assistance programs like WIC from the bag fees, even if those customers are also using another purchase method.    Lau said that the ban's exceptions for WIC and other programs will present some logistical problems for the store as it revamps its checkout systems and technology. He's also concerned about customers' reactions. He said when the ban was originally slated to go into effect in January, he received a number of emails asking if the store would really go through with the ban.   But it's not a choice for them; it's the law. And they have to comply.   More information about the ban can be found on the Department of Ecology's website at wwrld.us/bagban.   Linda Haglund, executive director of the Wenatchee Downtown Association, has been working toward helping businesses prepare for the ban. She said at this point, after more than a year of changing COVID regulations for businesses, the ban is just one more thing owners have to navigate.   She's currently focused on getting clarity for businesses about how the ban will impact them and where they can source ban-compliant bags. She hopes to partner with other organizations, like the Chamber of Commerce to ensure businesses are read to go once the ban begins.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next - Access to child care is a huge challenge for families in North Central Washington. In fact, here, the number of available licensed slots meet only a third of the demand.   For Kailee Tanneberg, access to child care is crucial to being able to continue her work in financial analysis at Gebbers Farms in Brewster. Tanneberg and her husband Kelsey live in Mansfield, where he helps operate the family's fourth-generation wheat operation.   Their 3-year-old daughter, Palmer, goes to the Activity Based Child Care in Pateros. It's operated by Carlene Anders and her husband Gene Dowers. Right now, it's the only licensed child care facility in Pateros.   But when Dowers and Anders started talking about retiring from that business a few years ago, the news sent panic waves through the households of ABC parents. So Anders and Dowers started working with parents to find a way to continue their work.   Tanneberg, a native of Tonasket, was recruited onto the board of The Treehouse child care nonprofit that Dowers and Anders envisioned as a way to continue and expand child care opportunities in the community. She now serves as president and has been at the forefront of handling the administrative paperwork for the organization.   Tanneberg was drawn to becoming involved partly out of her commitment to having a quality place for Palmer to receive care and further develop as a youngster and partly out of a sense of service to the community.   The Treehouse will serve infants to school-age children, thereby expanding the types of services that are available for families. Every study has shown that early childhood learning is essential for the development of young minds. Children who start out in school behind other students almost invariably complete their K-12 journey behind their peers.    That's what makes projects like the Treehouse early learning effort so crucial.    The economics of child care in our country are such that it's difficult for businesses to make ends meet. Child care tuition doesn't cover the costs of running most businesses, so most child care facilities rely on fundraising to balance their budgets.   So the Pateros Treehouse Early Education Organization will accept state funding, so parents who are eligible for tuition assistance will be able to participate. That's great news because without that commitment, families on the lower end of the income scale would be hard pressed to afford child care for their kids.   Tanneberg said being president of the board has been a great learning experience and has given her a new appreciation for how creative one must be to get things done.   So far, the Treehouse has raised $760,000 out of an initial goal of $780,000. You can support this work by visiting paterostreehouse.com.   Now, some history -    Did you know that Bridgeport was settled in the late 19th century and originally named Westfield? Developers purchased the town in 1892 and renamed it Bridgeport after their former home in Connecticut. Officially incorporated in 1910. The biggest economic boom to come to the city came from the building of the Foster Creek Dam, later renamed the Chief Joseph Dam, just upstream from the city limits   Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Saturday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local law enforcement adapts to new state laws on police policies; "The Sound of Music" in Leavenworth; A new addition to Pybus Public Market

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 10:57

    Good Morning it's Tuesday August 3rd and this is Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - There are new state laws in place pertaining to police policies… And one of them places tight guidelines on when officers can pursue a vehicle. So how have authorities been adapting?   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   Now our feature story…    On July 24, a yellow school bus belonging to Osprey Rafting was stolen in Leavenworth. Deputies from Chelan and Douglas counties attempted to stop the bus in their jurisdictions... but each ended their pursuits after about 10 minutes.   The suspect drove the bus to Moses Lake and then hitchhiked to Spokane then Chewelah where he allegedly stole a front-end loader, drove it through a house and flipped a vehicle into the home before he was arrested.   The incident was likely the first example of new state laws pertaining to police policies. One of them places tight guidelines on when officers can pursue a vehicle.   In April state lawmakers passed several police reform bills that changed when and how police respond to calls. Most of these took effect on July 25th.   Officers treated the pursuit as if the new regulations were already in effect.   Why? Because the incoming policies allow for uses of force to be re-examined retroactively.   Wenatchee Police Chief, Steve Crown, explained that the bills change how officers approach law enforcement.   He said that they're bound by these laws, and quite frankly, they're the type of reform measures that really do restrict law enforcement… and in some cases, their effective ability to solve crimes quickly.   So what exactly are the the new laws?   First, there's House Bill 1267. It creates an Office of Independent Investigations to investigate all uses of deadly force.   There's also House Bill 1310 which requires more de-escalation, sets new standards for uses of force and requires police establish probable cause for an arrest before detaining a suspect.   House Bill 1054 bans neck restraints, no-knock warrants, military equipment and requires four-prong authorization before pursuing a vehicle.   Senate Bill 5051 makes it easier for officers to lose their certification.   Senate Bill 5066 requires officers to intervene when they witness other officers using excessive force or misconduct.   And finally, Senate Bill 5259 requires collection of data related to deadly uses of force.   Sgt. Brent Frank oversees part of the training division at the Chelan County Sheriff's Office — patrol tactics, in particular. He explained that House Bill 1310 mandates that police must have probable cause to make an arrest before detaining a suspect for questioning. That's a stark contrast from the previous standard when police were allowed to stop people for questioning in order to build probable cause.   He explained that what that means is that it allows a suspect to flee the scene and there's no way to prevent them from leaving.   Frank added that officers aren't sure yet how to follow all of the changes and are worried that, with the confusion, they could lose their certification or possibly end up in jail.   He noted that officers want so badly to keep criminal behavior out of our communities, to hold criminals accountable, to keep people safe, to respond in the most heinous of circumstances, and to essentially provide a service on the worst day of someone's life. But Crown is optimistic about some of the changes...   He said he thinks that there is some benefit that can come out of this. For example, slowing down the pace of our contacts with suspects or subjects that we received calls on is a good thing.   The Chelan County Sheriff's Office is hosting meetings with the public to explain new policing laws and how they'll impact the public.   In fact, there's one today at 6pm in Cashmere at Riverside Event Center.   For the full list of meetings visit our full story at wenatcheeworld.com   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Here's what else you need to know today.   It's in with a new restaurant and out with a body care shop at Pybus Public Market. Wenatchee's newest entry to the culinary scene will be a spot named The Huck, operated by Angie and Eric Decker, who also own The Wild Huckleberry. The new restaurant is to open on September 1st.   The Huck is offering modern American cuisine - think eggs benedict, omelets, pork chops and pastas.   They'll be serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. And for those of you looking for a late-night drink, you can also expect to see cocktails, wines and beers on the menu.    The Huck will open where Pybus Bistro previously was located, which closed in June.   And moving out of Pybus is the goat-milk body care shop, Farm to Face & Body. The store was a part of the Anderson Family Farm and first sold goods at Pybus back in 2015.   Pybus Market is aiming to fill that vacancy by the end of October.   Finally,   After a year away, "The Sound of Music" once again echoes throughout the hills of Leavenworth.   It's an annual event, but this year's run has more significance than usual. Not only were last year's performances canceled, but this year also marks the 25th anniversary of the first show. And this year's play is the only production of the Leavenworth Summer Theater. For those who don't already know, typically they only do three different shows a summer.   Tiffany Mausser, this year's director, told us that people are so ready to perform again, the joy in this cast is absolutely tangible. The first time they were able to have an audience up there at the ski hill, it was just electric.   The musical tells the story of Maria Rainer, who is training to be a nun, but becomes a nanny for the von Trapp family. And after bringing the joy of music to the family, Rainer works with the family to escape from Nazi-occupied Austria.   So what can you expect at the show? Well, keep in mind there are several adaptations as a result of the pandemic. Expect fewer actors... This means several actors have taken on multiple roles in the performance. For example, a chorus of nuns that includes 14 to 18 in a typical year was reduced to 12. The set was also altered to allow more space between the performers.   And with cast members coming from across the country, even the auditions were different.   They were actually conducted completely virtually through actor-submitted videos of prepared music. And after the cast was selected, the initial rehearsals happened before the state's COVID-19 guidelines were relaxed, which meant the performers sung while wearing masks.   It turns out breath control is critical when singing, which is challenging to do with a mask on.   But Mausser said the show's outdoor venue is beneficial for the audience and the performers.   She said she's glad that people are able to feel safe, and to feel comfortable, in an outdoor theater setting. It has been such a challenging time to get through for the Leavenworth Summer Theater, and really all theater companies.   Performances of Leavenworth Summer Theater's production of "The Sound of Music" are at 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays through August 21st. Tickets range from $14 to $35.   Masks are not required in the venue, but unvaccinated audience members are asked to wear one.   For information, and tickets, go to wwrld.us/SoundofMusic.   Did you know that nearby Soap Lake is quite an unusual place? The lake gets its name from the naturally occurring foam that gives its water a soapy appearance and because the lake's mineral rich waters have a slick, soapy feel. The body of water has long been thought to have medicinal value and native Americans as well as settlers ventured there to see if they could cure their illnesses. Like the Dead Sea, the high mineral content makes the water very buoyant. Only an hour away from Wenatchee, it's worth a visit.   Thanks for listening. We'd also like to thank our sponsor again, Equilus Group, Inc, a Registered Investment Advisory Firm in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Thursday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Wenatchee residents forming an art alliance; Redistricting Commission hosting public outreach today; Special levy for Three Rivers Hospital

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 6:49

    Good Morning it's Saturday July 31st, and this is The Wenatchee World's newest podcast, Slices of Wenatchee. We're excited to bring you a closer look at one of our top stories and other announcements every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.    Today - A collection of Wenatchee-area residents is in the early stages of forming an art alliance. They want to be a support system for artists in the community and a resource to connect residents with artists.   Before we jump in, we're excited to let you know that Wenatchee Wine & Food Fest is back this year on August 28th at the Town Toyota Center! Ticket holders will get a chance to sample small pours of amazing local wines, local ciders and beers… and of course, enjoy tasty bites from area restaurants and caterers.   Make sure to get tickets in advance! We'll see you there!   -   Now our feature story...   A collection of Wenatchee-area residents is in the early stages of forming an art alliance. They want to be a support system for artists in the community and a resource to connect residents with artists.   Kmbris Bond, the chairperson of the group explained - looking at other cities and towns that have kind of an art hub, those centers really help people stay connected to each other. And though Wenatchee has so many rich arts available, Bond said we really don't have that connective center.   An art alliance that previously operated in Wenatchee folded decades ago, and Bond said several other groups have tried and failed to revive it. But members are confident that the time is right.   A seven-member steering team consisting of local artists, educators and activists are surveying residents to see what they're looking for.    While they don't have any financial resources yet, the group did just receive a grant through the Community Foundation for a strategic planner.    The grant didn't include money, though the group is optimistic about receiving grant money in the future.   Scott Bailey, a committee member and the director of Wenatchee Valley College's Art Program, said this group will eventually need to hire someone to run it full time.    The previous efforts to establish an art alliance were on a volunteer basis, which isn't necessarily sustainable in the long term.   For now, there's no timetable to be fully operational. Several steps will need to be taken before the alliance actually becomes a reality.   In addition to talking to a strategic planner, the group is trying to form partnerships in the region. They'll also need to be either an established nonprofit or fiscally sponsored by one.   And finally, several members said for the group to be functional long term, they'll also need to seek out other grant funding opportunities.   And as I mentioned, the group is also surveying Wenatchee residents, to see what the size and scope of the alliance should be.    More than 80 people have filled out the survey so far.   Bond says people seem passionate about this.    By establishing a support network, the group would hopefully help inspire more art in the community while also motivating artists to stay in Wenatchee.   To read more on this story visit us at wenatcheeworld.com   Also,    The state Redistricting Commission is holding an online public outreach from 1 to 3 p.m. today. It's for residents of the 8th and 10th Congressional Districts.   Washington congressional districts are redrawn every 10 years in consensus with the release of new census data.   Now, District 8 is a mix of suburban and rural areas, including East Wenatchee, Wenatchee, the Cascade Mountains and parts of King and Pierce counties. And Democrat Kim Schrier currently represents the district.    The meeting is part of the commission's efforts to better understand communities that have common interests as they weigh redistricting. It'll be streamed online through TVW's website, tvw.org, in English and Spanish.    Afterwards, the full meeting with ASL interpretation will be available on the Washington State Redistricting Commission YouTube channel.   Before we continue, a special thanks to our friends and sponsors at Confluence Health. The team at Confluence Health is grateful for the trust the community puts in them every single day. They are diligently working to improve the health and quality of life for our friends and neighbors. They are Grateful | They are Confluence Health.  Learn more by visiting them at ConfluenceHealth.com   Next,    Voters who live in the public hospital district served by Three Rivers Hospital are being asked for a one-year special levy that will raise $840,000.   The ballot measure, if approved on August 3rd, will cost property owners 33 cents per $1,000 of assessed value. It would be collected in 2022.    The hospital district, which includes areas of Douglas and Okanogan counties, provides service from Mazama to Monse to Mansfield.    Money raised from the special levy will be used to pay for healthcare services and facility expansion, maintenance and development.   Services include an emergency room, physician clinic and acute care hospital.   In order for this to be approved, it requires a 60% yes vote.    Ballots are due Tuesday.    Before we go, some local history,  Wenatchee Valley History is brought to you by NABUR [this is pronounced just like neighbor] – your trusted neighborhood community. NABUR is a free online forum you can trust to connect with your community, focus on facts & make a difference. Join the conversation! Visit wenatcheeworld.com/nabur .   Now, some history…   Did you know that nearby Quincy gets its name from Quincy, Illinois? Located on the western edge of Illinois on the Mississippi River, Quincy, IL itself gets its name from John Quincy Adams. Founded as a railroad camp during the construction of the Great Northern Railway in 1892, the town was officially incorporated in 1907.   Thanks for listening. Today's episode is brought to you by Equilus Group, Inc- Building Your Financial Success. Learn more at Equilusfinancial.com   The Wenatchee World has been engaging, informing and inspiring North Central Washington Communities since 1905. We encourage you to subscribe today to keep your heart and mind connected to what matters most in North Central Washington. Thank you for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again on Tuesday! Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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