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Best podcasts about Mississippi

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Latest podcast episodes about Mississippi

American History Tellers
The Great Mississippi Flood | Dirty Water | 2

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 40:16


Early in the morning on April 22nd, 1927, flood waters from a break in the Mound Landing levee entered the town of Greenville, Mississippi. Within hours, the town was submerged in 10 feet of water. Thousands of residents fought to reach higher ground, desperately clinging to tree tops and floating houses.The flood inundated 27,000 square miles in seven states. Soon, President Calvin Coolidge appointed Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover to manage relief efforts for the Red Cross. But Hoover's decision to decentralize relief would have unintended consequences – especially in towns like Greenville, where thousands of Black sharecroppers were virtual prisoners, detained in brutally policed refugee camps.Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/historytellersPlease support us by supporting our sponsors!Peloton- Want strength, endurance, flexibility? Visit onepeloton.com to learn more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Detroit is Different
S3E2 -Engineering, Design, Rock, & Rap ... all Creativity by Volcano

Detroit is Different

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 90:55


Engineering is a very creative discipline. Volcano's work to the masses for years was Hip-hop Artist & Rock & Roll Emcee. For over 15 years The Fillmore, CroFoot, The Emerald, are only a few venues in the area crushed by Volcano. As a recording engineer, rapper, music producer, and musician he's touched thousands. As an engineer and designer, he's changed the way we move in cars, planes, and even barbeque food. In this interview, we explore his family's roots from Mississippi to Detroit and the unique perspective of his family during America's Reconstruction era. Learn how Volcano has a niche in manual machining, 3d design, and building solutions to technical challenges. Check out how www.volcanicengineering.com is a staple and flagship for providing needed experience and knowledge for Black engineers.  Detroit is Different is a podcast hosted by Khary Frazier covering people adding to the culture of an American Classic city. Visit www.detroitisdifferent.com to hear, see and experience more of what makes Detroit different. Follow, like, share, and subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes, Google Play, and Sticher. Comment, suggest and connect with the podcast by emailing info@detroitisdifferent.com Find out more at https://detroit-is-different.pinecast.co Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/detroit-is-different/98d39b24-3214-46df-baa2-0be68f926a8d

Midnight Train Podcast
What Happened to the Sodder Children?

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 113:28


Welcome aboard for another crazy episode! Today on the train we step into a familiar world…or should we say .. Worlds? A couple episodes ago we did some mass disappearances and you know we love some true crime so today we sort  of combine the two. You see, for the mass disappearances episode there was one case that kept popping up. Now this was interesting to us because we've had that particular case on our list of shows to do for some time now. We figured this would be a good time to go ahead and finally do it. Today we are talking about the disappearance of the Sodder children.  The incident happened on Christmas Eve in 1945 in Fayetteville, West Virginia. George and Jenny Sodder lived with 9 of their 10 children. At the time, the oldest son was off fighting in WW2. The night of the incident, Jennie was awoken three times.   First, at 12:30 a.m., she was awoken by a phone call during which she could hear a woman's voice she didnt recognize asking for a name she didn't know, as well as glasses clinking in the background. Jennie told the caller she had reached the wrong number, later recalling the woman's "weird laugh". As she did, she noticed that some of the lights were still on and the curtains hadn't been closed, two things the children normally did when they stayed up later than their parents. Marion had fallen asleep on the living room couch, so Jennie assumed the other children ,who had stayed up later, had gone back up to the attic where they slept. She closed the curtains, turned out the lights, and returned to bed. She then went back to bed only to be startled by a loud bang and a rolling noise on the roof. She soon dozed off again and finally awoke an hour later at around 130, to see the house engulfed in smoke. She found that the room George used for his office was on fire, around the telephone line and fuse box.   Those are pretty much the facts that can be proven for the most part. Everything else…well it's strange to say the least.   George and Jennie made it out of that fire, as did Sylvia, just a toddler at the time. Also two of their teenage children, Marion and George Jr, made it out. 23 year old John rounded out the kids that made it out alive. Or did he? John said in his first police interview after the fire that he went up to the attic to alert his siblings sleeping there, though he later changed his story to say that he only called up there and did not actually see them. The children remaining inside were Maurice 14 , Martha 12, Louis 9, Jennie 8, and Betty 5. According to accounts, Marion, ran to the neighbors house to call the fire department because their phone was not working. A driver on the nearby road had also seen the flames and called from a nearby tavern; they too were unsuccessful either because they could not reach the operator or because the phone there turned out to be broken. It was Christmas Eve and I've read that the police chief sent everyone home to their families. She couldn't get an answer so another neighbor went to find the fire chief and let him know what was happening.    While this was going on, George, who climbed an outside wall, barefoot, to get to the attic and Jennie tried desperately to save their other children. This is where some of the strange things happen. First off neither of the Sodders trucks would start, despite having worked perfectly during the previous day.. Then their ladder was found to be mysteriously missing. Because of the family not being able to get help from the neighbor and their trucks oddly not starting when they tried to leave to look for the fire chief, help didn't arrive until 8am, almost 7 hours later. The fire department is just 2 miles from the home. The fire department was low on manpower due to the war and relying on individual firefighters to call each other. Chief F.J. Morris said the next day that the already slow response was further hampered by his inability to drive the fire truck, requiring that he wait until someone who could drive was available. Because he was fucking drunk; partying at a local pub, celebrating Christmas Eve. Oh, and one of the firefighters was Jennie's brother, their children's uncle.   The fire was initially blamed on faulty wiring, even though the Sodders claim there had never been any kind of issues with the electrical wiring before. In fact, A visitor to the house, seeking work, went around to the back of the house and warned George that a pair of fuse boxes would "cause a fire someday." George was puzzled by the observation, since he had just had the house rewired when an electric stove was installed, and the local electric company had said afterwards it was safe.   During the investigation something happened that makes this case the crazy thing that we are talking about. 5 of the Sodder children allegedly perished in the fire but the body's were never found. The fire chief told them the fire had cremated the bodies. Jennie asked a crematorium worker if that was possible, the worker told Jennie that bones remain even after bodies are burned at 2,000 degrees for two hours. The Sodder home only took 45 minutes to burn to the ground. So we did a little fact checking about this and there is a lot of argument about whether a house fire can burn bones to ash, but, it seems like those who have degrees and a bunch of letters after their name all agree that a house fire typically will not burn hot enough to get rid of bones. Also another thing we found is that even during cremations bones do not actually turn to dust. In fact after being incinerated at usually between 1800-2000°f, for about 2 hours, the bones are the only thing left. Now, the bones are not the same, granted, as with all the heat, it destroys the structure of the bone but does not turn it to ash. The ashes you receive are actually the bones of the deceased that have been put into what is essentially a big mixer, to pulverize them into dust. So enjoy that thought.    At any rate, due to what the experts said, the family did not believe that the other children simply burned up in the fire. They believed something else happened to the kids. But what else could have happened?   What else would lead one to think something possibly nefarious happened? Well according to some reports, some strange things happened in the lead up to the fire. One strange thing that happened was that in the months before the fire a "ominous drifter, hinted at doom '' We're assuming it was like Friday the 13th…the guy just points and goes…you're all dooooooomed, doomed! Whatever happened it sounds funny.    A few weeks earlier, not too far out from the incident, an angry insurance salesman berated George, telling him that his house was going to go up in smoke and his children would be destroyed as a retaliation for his criticisms of Mussolini in the mostly Italian immigrant community. Actually he said "the dirty remarks you have been making about Mussolini." If it was a sales tactic, it definitely needs work, otherwise, it's oddly specific! Also a bus driver came forward and spoke of how she saw "fireballs" being thrown into the roof of the house, could that be the noise she heard?   In the weeks before Christmas that year, George's older sons had also noticed a strange car parked along the main highway through town, its occupants watching the younger Sodder children as they returned from school.   What about the man who cut off the telephone lines at the Sodder residence? Someone witnessed him taking away a block and tackle used to remove car engines during the fire. He admitted to the theft but answered that he had no part in starting the fire; he had just wanted to cut off the power lines but instead clipped the telephone line. He was let go, and no records exist identifying him or questioning why he wanted to cut lines to steal a block and tackle.    Then on top of that you have the incidents on the night of the fire. There was the phone call and then the noise on the roof and she woke up to smoke in the house. Put all that together, and one could see where people may start to form some theories that this was more than just a tragic house fire.  You know we love a good conspiracy theory as much as the next folks…well at least Moody does.    Not only that, sightings of the children started almost immediately. For starters, locals reported seeing the 5 children in a car that was driving past and watching the fire. Then the next morning a woman operating a truck stop claimed she saw the children come in for breakfast with 4 Italian speaking adults.  Once pictures began to circulate, more sightings came in. a woman said that she saw four of the children (where was the fifth?) in the company of four adults at a hotel in South Carolina.  Which could lend credence to the truck stop story, which also mentioned 4 adults.    Armed with all these facts, George and Jennie went back to the police and demanded to have the fire further investigated. But the police refused, claiming that the coroner's inquiry determined that no crime had been committed.   This is when George and Jennie decided they would continue the search on their own.   George would constantly go and dig through the rubble trying to find something. At one point his searching seemed to find the first evidence of the children. He found what appeared to be an internal organ and also some small pieces of bone. They were sent for testing and the tests revealed that the "organ" was a cow's liver, and that the bones were from someone older than any of the missing children. The small bone fragments that were unearthed were determined to have been human vertebrae. The bone fragments were sent to Marshall T. Newman, a specialist at the Smithsonian Institution. They were confirmed to be lumbar vertebrae, all from the same person. "Since the transverse recesses are fused, the age of this individual at death should have been 16 or 17 years", Newman's report said. "The top limit of age should be about 22 since the centra, which normally fuse at 23, are still unfused". Thus, given this age range, it was not very likely that these bones were from any of the five missing children, since the oldest, Maurice, had been 14 at the time (although the report allowed that vertebrae of a boy his age sometimes were advanced enough to appear to be at the lower end of the range). Also the bones show no sign of being affected in any way by the fire. It was speculated that the bone fragments were mixed in with some dirt brought in to help fill in the basement. Later, Tinsley supposedly confirmed that the bone fragments had come from a cemetery in nearby Mount Hope, but could not explain why they had been taken from there or how they came to be at the fire site. The Smithsonian returned the bone fragments to George in September 1949, according to its records; their current location is unknown.  As far as the liver, it is said that a private investigator found out that the liver was put there by the fire chief at some point in hopes the family would find it and accept the idea that the kids perished in the fire.  George sometimes made his own sightings. On one occasion, George saw a magazine photo of a group of young ballet dancers in New York City, one of whom looked like his missing daughter Betty. He drove all the way to the girl's school, where his repeated demands to see the girl himself were refused.   The investigation and its findings attracted national attention, and the West Virginia Legislature held two hearings on the case in 1950. Afterwards, however, Governor Okey L. Patteson and state police superintendent W.E. Burchett told the Sodders the case was "hopeless" and closed it at the state level. The FBI decided it had jurisdiction as a possible interstate kidnapping, but dropped the case after two years of following fruitless leads.   After this second official investigation ended, George and Jennie continued their search.   George followed up on many leads on his own including heading to St Louis where a woman claimed Martha was being held in a convent but nothing came of that. Another woman in Texas claimed that she overheard two other patrons making incriminating remarks about a fire that happened on Christmas Eve in West Virginia several years before. Again nothing here proved significant.    At one point George heard that a relative of Jennies who lived in Florida had children that looked exactly like his had. He went down there to check it out and only when the relative was able to prove the children were his that George would leave it alone.         In 1967, George went to the Houston area to investigate another tip. A woman there had written to the family, saying that Louis had revealed his true identity to her one night after having too much to drink. She believed that he and Maurice were both living in Texas somewhere. However, George and his son-in-law, Grover Paxton, were unable to speak with her. Police there were able to help them find the two men she had indicated, but they denied being the missing sons. Paxton said years later that doubts about that denial lingered in George's mind for the rest of his life.   That same year the family would receive something pretty crazy. A photo showed up in the mail one day. The photo showed a man that appeared to be around his early 30s with strikingly similar features as their son Louis had had.    Written on the back of the photo was this:               Louis Sodder I love brother Frankie Ilil boys A90132 or 35   Interesting…. Very interesting.    The photo was in an envelope postmarked central city Kentucky. There was no return address.    The Sodders hired a private detective to go to Central city and try and track down where this letter came from and follow this lead. The private detective headed to Central city and guess what he fucking found….. well no one will ever know because after he left he was never heard from again. He never reported back to the Sodders and they were unable to ever locate him. Did he disappear with their money or was he made to sleep with the fishes?   Unfortunately, this took a pretty heavy toll on George. He said in an interview the following year that the lack of information had been "like hitting a rock wall—we can't go any further". "Time is running out for us", he admitted in another interview around that time. "But we only want to know. If they did die in the fire, we want to be convinced. Otherwise, we want to know what happened to them".   George would pass a year later in 1969 believing that his children were never killed in that fire and they were still out there someplace.    After this the rest of the family would continue to search and publicize the case. The only one that would not get involved was John. John believed that the family should accept what happened and all move on with their lives. Jennie stayed in the family home and built a fence around it and added rooms. She wore black for the mourning for the rest of her life and tended the garden at the site of the former house.    These are basically the facts as we know them. Since there's not much in the way of actual forensic evidence in this case, there's no way of telling for sure what happened as far as the children's bodies being burned. Obviously the investigation was quick, taking only 2 hours, and there wasn't a ton of forensic detective work back then. Plus DNA testing wasn't a thing. And just in general investigating wasn't generally as thorough as it is these days.   The surviving Sodder children, joined by their own children, along with older Fayetteville residents, have theorized that the Sicilian Mafia was trying to extort money from George and the children may have been taken by someone who knew about the planned arson and said they would be safe if they left the house. They were possibly taken back to Italy. If the children had survived all those years and were aware that their parents and siblings had survived too, the family believes, they may have avoided contact in order to keep them from harm.   Sylvia Sodder Paxton, the youngest of the surviving Sodder siblings, died in 2021. She was in the house on the night of the fire, which she said was her earliest memory. "I was the last one of the kids to leave home", she told the Gazette-Mail in 2013. She and her father would stay up late, talking about what might have happened. "I experienced their grief for a long time". She believed that her siblings survived that night, and assisted with efforts to find them and publicize the case. Her daughter said in 2006: "She promised my grandparents she wouldn't let the story die, that she would do everything she could".   George and Jennie passed out flyers and put up a billboard on route 16 in Fayetteville. The Sodders purchased the billboard in 1952. It featured black-and-white photographs of each missing child and an account of the fire with a $5000 reward that was increased to $10,000. It was taken down shortly after Jennie's death in 1989. It read:  “After thirty years, it's not too late to investigate. So what happened to the children if they didn't die in the fire? Well there's a few  theories but nothing solid.   One of the biggest questions is how someone could abduct 5 children with nobody being woken up. Well truecrimefiles.com say of that question:             "One of the most puzzling questions is how the actual alleged abduction took place. How did the kidnapper(s) get the five children out of the house, considering that the eldest sister was asleep on the sofa in the living room and the parents were asleep in a bedroom less than 20 feet away? Surely at least one of the children would have made some noise had a stranger (or even someone known to the family) come into the house and taken them away. There is at least one scenario that may have happened that would solve this specific puzzle. One of the chores the two boys were told to do was to attend to the family's handful of farm animals.”   On a side note, Marion, the oldest daughter, had been working at a dime store in downtown Fayetteville, and she surprised three of her younger sisters—Martha, Jennie, and Betty—with new toys she had bought for them. The younger children were so excited that they asked their mother if they could stay up past what would have been their usual bedtime.   At 10 p.m., Jennie told them they could stay up a little later, as long as the two oldest boys who were still awake, 14-year-old Maurice and his 9-year-old brother Louis, remembered to put the cows in and feed the chickens before going to bed themselves.    ”It is possible that all five of the children left the house to perform these chores (the three girls went along to watch) and were taken once they were outside and away from the house."   But an even bigger question would be why would someone do this. Many people believe that it had to do with George's and his background.    George immigrated from Italy and changed his last name from Soddu to Sodder upon arrival. Nobody really knows why he came to America or the circumstances behind his immigration. He would never discuss the issues and whenever it was brought up he would change the conversation. So that's kind of strange. Also George owned a coal trucking business, and at that time the coal industry was under a lot of pressure from the mafia. That plus his little known about past, have lead many people to speculate about mafia involvement in the crime.    Another theory suggests the kids were abducted by an illegal child-selling agency similar to Georgia Tann's with help from the local police. And remember that insurance guy George argued with, the guy that warned that their house would burn and the children would vanish. He was also a member of the coroner's jury which ruled the fire accidental. Leading many to suspect foul play.   For those of you wondering, For more than 20 years, Georgia Tann ran the Tennessee Children's Home Society, where she and an elaborate network of co-conspirators kidnapped and abused children to sell them off to wealthy adoptive parents at a steep profit. This is too crazy a story to not talk about a little here because if there was a network similar to this operating in that area, it seemed like another plausible theory.    Beulah George "Georgia" Tann was born in 1891 in Philadelphia, Mississippi. Named for her father, a powerful judge, she hoped to follow in his footsteps and practice law. Instead, her domineering father forbade it, and she instead pursued a career in social work — one of the few socially acceptable positions for a woman of her means.   She first went to work in Mississippi, but she was soon fired for inappropriately removing children from impoverished homes without cause. She made her way to Texas, where it's believed she adopted her daughter, June, in 1922. Later, in 1923, she adopted Ann Atwood Hollinsworth, a woman believed to be Tann's longtime same-sex partner. It was common at the time for same-sex couples to use adult adoption as a means of transferring property or inheritances.   Tann then moved on to Memphis, where her father used his political connections to secure a new job for her as executive secretary at the Memphis branch of the Tennessee Children's Home Society in 1922.   By 1929, she had staged a takeover and named herself executive director.   Tann's scheme coincided with a sharp increase in families looking to adopt kids In the 1900s and 1910s, formalized adoptions were fairly rare, but in the 1920s adoption began to be marketed as a shortcut to societal improvement. According to one ad from the National Home Finding Society, adopting would "reduce divorces, banditry, murder, and control births, fill all the churches and do real missionary work at home and abroad, exchanging immigrants for Americans and stopping some of the road leading to war."   At the time, the theory of eugenics — that is, the controlling of the reproduction of genetically "inferior" people through sterilization — was popular. The movement claimed that people of better genetic endowment were subject to greater infertility. It became important in adoption not just to get babies but to get the best babies. A campaign to explain the superiority of adoption was launched.   This new outlook, along with the popularization of baby formula, helped Tann's baby-trafficking business grow. Suddenly, nonnursing mothers could easily and affordably feed their babies. The demand for adoptable infants rose, especially among busy, successful women.   Tann was calculated in her approach and targeted the rich and famous, who paid premium prices for their adopted children. Actors, authors, and entertainers, including Dick Powell and June Allyson, Lana Turner, Pearl S. Buck, Smiley Burnette, and New York Gov. Herbert Lehman, all adopted Tann babies. In 1947, Joan Crawford adopted twins, Cathy and Cindy, from Tann.   Stealing children wasn't a small side business. During the 21 years Tann ran the Children's Home Society, it's believed she made more than $1 million from taking and selling children — about $11 million in today's money. And she didn't do it alone.   Tann's extensive child-trafficking operation required connections, and she quickly linked up with E.H. "Boss" Crump, who ran a powerful Tennessee political machine. Crump offered Tann protections in exchange for kickbacks.   To kidnap and traffic her victims, Tann paid off a network of social workers, police officers, doctors, and lawyers. Some kidnapped children from preschools, churches, and playgrounds for her. Kidnappers preyed on poor children and families who didn't have the means to fight back. Tann's coconspirators were authority figures — people not to be contradicted — so children often went with them willingly. Sometimes, Tann would approach families and offer medical or other help. Tann would tell parents she could get their children into a clinic at no cost, but if they came along as well they'd be charged a large bill.   In the era before internet and with few phones, Tann relied on her network of spotters. They alerted Tann to children on riverbanks, in shantytowns, or walking home from school. She drove up in her big black car and offered them rides.   Tann was also in cahoots with a local judge who helped procure children, specifically from impoverished single or widowed mothers. One of her most high profile coconspirators was Judge Camille Kelley, who presided over the juvenile court in Shelby County, Tennessee, for 30 years.   "She had a stooge down in the welfare department when someone would apply for assistance, this person would get their name, and get in touch with Camille Kelley," Robert Taylor, an investigator, said in a 1992 interview with "60 Minutes."   In 1950, Taylor, a local lawyer, was asked by newly elected Gov. Gordon Browning to do an in-depth investigation into Children's Home Society and Tann. "Camille Kelley would send a deputy out to pick them up and award custody to Georgia Tann," he added.   Tennessee law required children to be adopted in state for a fee of $7, about $75 in today's money. But Tann moved her "merchandise" at $1,000 per head — $10,000 today. When the state finally investigated, the report on the Children's Home Society, the Browning report, found that Tann conducted "private" adoptions and pocketed up to 90% of the fee. She would gouge prospective parents on everything from travel costs, to home visits, and attorney's fees.   The report also detailed how children were then spirited away from the Home Society in the middle of the night to avoid detection by authorities who weren't in the know or others who might ask too many questions. Her "nurses" had regular circuits to New York and California, though she shipped to all US states and Great Britain.   Elaborate backstories were added to stolen children's files to make them more "marketable." Their files said they came from "good homes" with "very attractive" young mothers. Fathers were described as "intelligent" and often in medical school.   Tann also knew how to capitalize on opportunities in the adoption market. Few agencies adopted to Jewish families, and Tann saw her chance. A few pen strokes turned a Southern Baptist child into a baby from a "good Jewish" family. As the Children's Home Society scandal was exposed, the scenario played out in the adoption records over and over again.   If parents, biological or adoptive, asked too many questions about children, Tann threatened to have them arrested or the child removed. She was known for "repossessing" children whose adoptive parents couldn't make full payments on time. And she wasn't above blackmailing customers for more money later.   Often she would return to adoptive parents months later and say relatives of the child had come around asking for a baby's return. But for a hefty fee she had lawyers who could make the situation go away.   Homes for unwed mothers, welfare hospitals, and prisons were targeted. Doctors, working with Tann, told new mothers their babies had died during birth. Those children were "buried" at no cost to the families.   Other mothers were coerced into signing their children away while still under sedation from labor. Tann preyed on women's desperation, their poverty, and their sense of shame.   "If they were unsedated and tried to hold on to the babies after the baby was born, then Georgia Tann would step in and say, 'Well, you don't want people in your home town to know about [your pregnancy], do you?'" Robert Taylor, a lawyer who investigated the Tennessee Children's Home Society scandal for Gov. Gordon Browning, said in his 1992 "60 Minutes" interview.   By the 1930s, as a result of Tann's scam, Memphis had the highest infant mortality rate in the US.   Archives at the Benjamin Hooks Library, in Memphis, reveal some of the cruelties children were subjected to. Babies were kept in sweltering conditions, and some children were drugged to keep them quiet until they were sold. Other children were hung in dark closets, beaten, or put on starvation rations for weeks at a time. Drug addicts and pedophiles were hired to watch over them.   According to "The Baby Thief: The Untold Story of Georgia Tann, the Baby Seller Who Corrupted Adoption," sexual abuse was a common occurrence at the home.   Tann was brutally unsparing in her cruelty. Former Home Society employees revealed to Taylor that if an infant was deemed too weak, it might be left in the sun to die. If a child had a congenital disability or was considered "too ugly" or "old" to be of use, Tann had people get rid of them. Many were buried on the property, though about 20 children were buried in an unmarked plot of land within Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis.   In the 1940s, Tann developed a new publicity stunt.   "They would raffle 20 or 30 babies off every year in the 'Christmas Baby Give Away' in the newspaper," Wingate said. "How did anyone ever think that was all right?"   For $25 a ticket — about $350 today — purchasers could buy as many raffle tickets as they liked.   Tann pocketed thousands of dollars that ticket holders assumed went to the Home Society, and had to give away just a fraction of her "merchandise" in the process.   Tann's baby-selling scheme carried on unabated for over two decades. But in 1949 things took a turn. Tennessee elected a new governor, Gordon Browning. Weakened, E.H. Crump, Tann's crony, lost his hold on Memphis politics.   On September 12, 1950, Gov. Browning held a press conference during which he revealed Tann and her network managed to amass more than $1 million from her child-selling scheme — again, nearly $11 million in today's money.   But Tann was never held accountable. Three days later, she died at home after slipping into a mysterious coma from untreated uterine cancer.   On November 11, 1950, Judge Camille Kelley, who had worked so closely with Tann, quietly resigned. It took until late November or early December to find safe homes for the remaining children. Somewhere in the waning days of 1950, the doors to the Tennessee Children's Home Society were closed for good.   No one was ever prosecuted for their roles in the black-market baby ring.   Holy fuck…. So we know that was a tangent but you got a 2 fer here with that crazy tale, and again the reason we went into the  details on this are because there is speculation that the Sodder children could have been victims of a similar scheme. I mean.. If it happened on that scale in one place who's to say it didn't happen here as well. https://www.ranker.com/list/best-movies-about-kidnapping/ranker-film

The jake wimberly  Podcast
Judd Boswell stops in to talk Clinton Arrow football

The jake wimberly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 10:59


AUDIO: We continue around high school football spring camps in the state of Mississippi - as we swing in at Clinton and visit with Judd Boswell. The Arrows return a majority of starters and eye big things in 2022. 

Eat Y'all
67 - Chef Trace Tedde-Vega

Eat Y'all

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:14


Picture this: you're at a restaurant called Magnolia Southern Kitchen - a sought-after southern oasis plopped in the center of California - and your plate is overflowing with spicy jambalaya. It's so exceptional you start to hope to meet the creator and chef - this Trace person you've been hearing about. You finally cross paths, and you're expecting a “howdy,” a couple “y'all”s or maybe an “over yonder” from a food creator this brilliantly country, but to your surprise you hear… a thick British accent. This is Trace Tedde-Vega. Born in the UK, Trace learned the art of food from her parents at their restaurant, and became a pastry expert at a young age. She later married into a southern family, and fell in love with a whole new world of foods. She has since traveled the world with musical acts like Journey and Erykah Badhu, worked as a private chef for celebrities, and opened a southern restaurant. On today's episode, Andy and Trace talk culture comparisons, country classics, and her truly farm-to-table approach at Magnolia Southern Kitchen. A British Chef serving Southern Food in the Middle of California Trace puts Wood Colony (Modesto), California on the map - at least for us. This rural, agricultural area is known as Almond Country, and the restaurant sits between several almond farms. Trace gets all of her pork from Long Ranch (a farm located 15 minutes from her restaurant), and a few weeks ago she served a pigs' feet dish that would drum up fond memories for Yorkshire and Mississippi dwellers alike. She posted the dish on their Facebook page, and it sold out within an hour. Since California is one of the most prolific food production hubs in the world, Chef Trace gets to have genuine relationships with copious individual producers. She can even make specific requests, and many come in for lunch to see who is enjoying the final product. Her restaurant only buys a couple things from distributors - making it truly farm-to-fork. Wisdom for Young Chefs Trace says, “I always tell young chefs: culinary school is great to learn about the basics, like learning a math equation. But it's the people that have a willingness to be playful, to add passion and to try new things that find success. Put your heart-print on it.”  Maximizing Cuts/Meats In an era where everyone wants to use more parts of the animal, we value Trace's expert take on the flavor profile of different parts and cuts of beef. She teaches us about combining two or three flavors - for instance highlighting the depth of a structured part, pairing it with some gelatinous marrow, and combining those with a more common protein cut to make something new. She throws some new ideas out for less-used cuts that may have a brisket quality, a deeper flavor, or work well in a cream sauce. It's clear that Trace Tedde-Vega touts no exaggeration when she says, “We keep it economically viable, but also freaking delicious.” Connect With Today's Guest Follow Trace Tedde-Vega's amazing restaurant here: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/magnoliasouthernkitchen Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/magnoliasouthernkitchen Connect With EATYALL: https://eatyall.com Instagram - https://instagram.com/letseatyall Facebook - https://facebook.com/letseatyall Twitter - https://twitter.com/letseatyall LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/letseatyall YouTube - https://youtube.com/letseatyall Show Credits: Hosts are Andy & Marianna Chapman Graphic Design by Tyler Castleman Production provided by Easy Podcast Solutions The EATYALL Podcast is hosted by Andy Chapman, CEO and founder of EATYALL. EATYALL serves the food and farm community with effective chef outreach services.

The jake wimberly  Podcast
Terry head football coach Kris Thigpen joins the program

The jake wimberly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 10:44


AUDIO: We continue to go around high school football in the state of Mississippi as spring practice comes to a close - Kris Thigpen catches us up on all things Terry Bulldogs, rebuilding the program and his road from Taylorsville, to college football and then back to 6A football as he leads the Terry Bulldogs. 

CoramDeo - Un regard chrétien sur le monde
#260 - La fin de Roe v. Wade

CoramDeo - Un regard chrétien sur le monde

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 40:53


Dans cet épisode, nous recevons Doug Irwin (https://gemission.org/), originaire du Missouri, et bientôt implanteur avec Guillaume d'une Église à Paris sous l'égide de l'Action Biblique, pour discuter d'une récente fuite concernant un jugement imminent de la Cour suprême des États-Unis à propos de l'avortement. Le jugement qui est attendu dans l'affaire Dobbs v. Jackson pourrait renverser l'arrêt Roe v. Wade de 1973. Voici quelques questions pour mieux comprendre l'enjeu : 00:00 - Intro 02:23 - Quelle est la situation de l'avortement sur le plan légal aux États-Unis avant et après Roe v. Wade? 06:30 - L'avortement au Canada 12:15 - Peux-tu nous donner plus d'information concernant la loi adoptée par le Mississippi en 2018 et qui est maintenant devant la Cour suprême? 14:46 - La composition actuelle de la Cour suprême des États-Unis 17:01 - Originalisme vs. progressisme 19:41 - Que s'est-il passé le 2 mai dernier avec cette fuite de l'ébauche du jugement majoritaire? Pourquoi y a-t-il eu une fuite? 24:18 - Qu'arriverait-il si Roe v. Wade était renversé et que la cour affirmait la constitutionnalité de Dobbs? 28:09 - Quels sont les enjeux qui devraient préoccuper les chrétiens dans cette situation et comment devrions-nous prier? 32:22 - Hors-propos 36:58 - Bêtisier Cette émission vous est présentée en partenariat avec les éditions BLF https://www.blfeditions.com/

The New Yorker: Politics and More
The Battle After Roe v. Wade

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:24


Assuming that Justice Samuel Alito's final opinion in the Mississippi abortion case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization gets majority support, there will be profound social, political, and health-care implications across the United States. Margaret Talbot, Peter Slevin and Jia Tolentino assess the world after Roe. Opponents will surely not stop by leaving abortion at the state level but will try to ban it under federal law. Tolentino discusses fetal personhood, the legal concept that a fertilized egg is entitled to full legal rights, which severely compromises the bodily autonomy of a pregnant woman. There is already speculation that access to birth control and same-sex marriage could be challenged. “If people feel panicked about all those things, I wouldn't invalidate that,” Tolentino says. But focussing on the immediate post-Roe future, she says, presents enough to worry about. “This is a universe of panic on its own.”

In the Telling
Episode 26: Melvin Collier: It Was Always In Me

In the Telling

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 42:12


In this episode, genealogist Melvin Collier talks about how he became involved in researching his family's history. From the age of 4, Melvin enjoyed listening to stories about his family. By 1993, he was actively searching archives for family records. Learn about how a DNA test and a trip to Ghana resulted in a surprise transcontinental family reunion. Melvin has been conducting historical and genealogical research for over 25 years. He's a former civil engineer, who later earned a Master of Arts degree in African American Studies at Clark Atlanta University, in 2008, with additional graduate coursework in Archival Studies from Clayton State University. For seven years, Melvin worked as a Library Associate/Archivist at the Robert W. Woodruff Library – Atlanta University Center. He now works for the Department of Defense in the Washington, D.C. area. Melvin has appeared on the NBC show, Who Do You Think You Are, as one of the expert genealogists on the Spike Lee episode in 2010. He has given numerous presentations on genealogy, slave ancestral research, and genetic genealogy at numerous events and conferences. Melvin is the author of three books: Mississippi to Africa: A Journey of Discovery (2008), 150 Years Later: Broken Ties Mended (2011) and Early Family Heritage: Documenting Our Legacy (2016). Music by Sean Bempong

The Everything Medicare Podcast!
Episode 267: Why The Time To Buy A Medicare Supplement Is NOW!

The Everything Medicare Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:52


This is the Everything Medicare Podcast hosted by Christian Brindle. It can be found on most major platforms that podcasts can be found. Christian Brindle was raised & brought up around the insurance industry. With his dad being an insurance broker for close to 30 years, Christian had the luxury of being able to learn all about the industry from a young age. Christian has worked with people far and wide on their Medicare plans and has seen close to any situation. Christian believes in empowering people on Medicare by not just finding them a plan, but showing them and educating them on why that plan is a good fit. Christian hosts the most popular Medicare podcast on the internet called The Everything Medicare Podcast, written and published two books about Medicare, and is the founder of his own company that is dedicated to helping people on Medicare everywhere. Don't forget to like and subscribe for more videos! Helping people in Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, California, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Arizona, Nevada, Alaska, Mississippi, Kentucky, Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Indiana, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin. Visit our website for more information: www.christianbrindleinsuranceservices.com Pick up Christian's Medicare Guidance book and learn everything you need to know to make a good choice: https://www.amazon.com/Medicare-Guida...​ Follow us on social! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christianbri...​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christianbr...​ Twitter: https://twitter.com/C_E_Brindle​ #Medicare​ #Medigap​ #Insurance​ #HealthInsurance​ #Health​ #Healthcare​ #Medicaresupplement​ #MedicareAdvantage​ #Medicare2021​ #Medicarehealthplan​ #InsuranceAgent​ #MedicarePodcast Medicare, Medigap, Medicare Supplement, Insurance, Health Insurance, Health, Healthcare, HAS, Retire, Retirement, Social Security, Christian Brindle, FICA, Medicare Podcast, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, Medicare Part A, Medicare Part B, FICA, FICA Tax, Retirement, Retire

Duck Season Somewhere
Her Recipe for Connecting Food, Nature and Life

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 67:33


Lured to Ramsey's Mississippi hunting camp by the prospect of cooking black bear venison for her first time--and it was absolutely amazing--The Gatherin' Girl, Chef Tori Loomis, takes a break from the kitchen to visit. After describing the several ways she's preparing venison heart, tenderloins, backstrap and shank, Loomis tells Ramsey about recent life happenings stretching from Florida to Utah and all points in between during her 35th journey around the sun. Loomis's recipe philosophy is like a pathway connecting her to people, places, nature and ultimately, a life well-lived. Always full bellies and full hearts when she's around.   Related Links: @thegatheringgirl TheGatherinGirl.com   Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Tetra Hearing Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys Voormi GetDucks USHuntList   It really is duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries ramsey@getducks.com  

Macro Musings with David Beckworth
Josh Hendrickson on Economic Growth, National Defense, and US Monetary Policy

Macro Musings with David Beckworth

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 51:33


Josh Hendrickson is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Mississippi and Chair of the Economics Department. Josh joins David on Macro Musings to discuss US monetary policy and US defense policy. Specifically, Josh and David discuss the coordination of fiscal and monetary policy and what Milton Friedman would think of it today, the Fed's responsibility for modern inflation trends, state capacity and how it impacts economic growth, the role of national defense in the context of state capacity and economic growth, and much more.   Take the Macro Musings listener survey here.   Transcript for the episode can be found here: https://www.mercatus.org/bridge/tags/macro-musings   Josh's Twitter: @RebelEconProf Josh's Ole Miss profile: https://economics.olemiss.edu/joshua-hendrickson/   Related Links:   *Central Banks are Inflation Creators, Not Inflation Fighters* by Joshua R. Hendrickson https://www.mercatus.org/publications/monetary-policy/central-banks-are-inflation-creators-not-inflation-fighters   *Evolution, Uncertainty, and the Asymptotic Efficiency of Policy* by Brian C. Albrecht, Joshua R. Hendrickson, and Alexander William Salter https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3251917   *The Coronavirus and Lessons for Preparedness* https://www.mercatus.org/publications/covid-19-crisis-response/coronavirus-and-lessons-preparedness   *Preventing Plunder, Military Technology, Capital Accumulation and Economic Growth* by Brian C. Albrecht, Joshua R. Hendrickson, and Alexander William Salter https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3025548   David's blog: macromarketmusings.blogspot.com David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth

From The Jingweeds
Episode #98 I Was at a Waffle House in Mississippi

From The Jingweeds

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 92:58


On Today's Job Board We Have Rebranding DC Bar and Grill, Recap of Hack Attack at The Canyon, Dan's Got a Bum Wheel, Stump The Peter, Transitioning The Courses is in Full Swing,  Quail Closes For 5 Weeks, And of Course Course Happenings. Beers Reviewed:Beachwood Brewing: Cosmic Lottery, West Coast IPA (7.1%ABV, 0 IBUs)Bottle Logic Brewing: 714 Blonde Ale (4.8% ABV, 0 IBUs)Music: Free Music Archive Follow us on Twitter and Instagram Big Thanks to Our Show Sponsor: Southwest Turf Support 

The Bourbon Show
The Bourbon Show #138: Mike Paladini and Danny Polise, Co-Founders of Penelope Bourbon

The Bourbon Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 89:21


Steve, Jeremy and Renee talk to Mike Paladini and Danny Polise of Penelope Bourbon. The Bourbon Show music (Whiskey on the Mississippi) is by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Important Links: Steve Akley's New Book, Bourbon Assignments: https://amzn.to/2Y68Eoy ABV Network Shop: https://shop.abvnetwork.com/ YouTube: https://bit.ly/3kAJZQz Our Club: https://www.abvnetwork.com/club Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theabvnetwork Check us out at: abvnetwork.com. Join the revolution by adding #ABVNetworkCrew to your profile on social media.

VSiN Best Bets
Lombardi Line | May 14th, 2022 | Hour 1

VSiN Best Bets

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 45:20


In this hour of the Lombardi Line, Michael Lombardi and Patrick Meagher break down each of the 32 NFL schedules as they try to find weak spots for various teams. Carl Johnson joined the show to discuss betting handles at Beaurivag in Mississippi.    Hosts: Michael Lombardi Patrick Meagher  Guest: Carl Johnson See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Administrative Static Podcast
NCLA Files Lawsuit Against Discriminatory Fulbright Rule; Government Tracking of Charter Boats Case Garners Strong Amicus Support

Administrative Static Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 25:00


1 NCLA Files Lawsuit Against Discriminatory Fulbright Rule A complaint filed by NCLA argues the U.S. Department of Education's application process for the Fulbright-Hays Fellowship unlawfully discriminates based on applicants' nation of origin. NCLA represents the plaintiffs in Samar Ahmad and Edgar Ulloa Lujan v. U.S. Department of Education, et al., which asks the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas to declare this process unconstitutional and not authorized by the Fulbright-Hays Act of 1961.  The Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship was established to support and promote U.S. students to conduct doctoral research in foreign countries using a foreign language. The Department of Education evaluates applicants on a 105-point scale, with language proficiency counting for 15 points. Starting in 1998, the Department began to use the language-proficiency criterion to disadvantage U.S. students whom the Department deemed to be “non-native-born” by assigning them 0 out of 15 points for language proficiency if they acquired the relevant foreign language through their national heritage. Mark and Vec discuss NCLA's new case. 2 Government Tracking of Charter Boats Case Garners Strong Amicus Support The states of Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and South Carolina, and two public interest organizations are among the amici curiae who have filed briefs in support of the arguments presented by NCLA in the lawsuit challenging government agencies—Commerce, NOAA, and NMFS—forcing charter boats that take customers fishing and sightseeing in the Gulf of Mexico to purchase a vessel monitoring system (VMS) and submit to 24-7 warrantless surveillance. Vec discusses the amicus briefs in support of Mexican Gulf v. Commerce in the Fifth Circuit.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Law Talk
HR1 CONC: Brett Farve TANF case in Mississippi; Casey and Vicky White escape and capture.

Radio Law Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 51:50


"Visit: RadioLawTalk.com for information & full episodes! Follow us on Facebook: bit.ly/RLTFacebook Follow us on Twitter: bit.ly/RLTTwitter Follow us on Instagram: bit.ly/RLTInstagram Subscribe to our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UC3Owf1BEB-klmtD_92-uqzg Your Radio Law Talk hosts are exceptional attorneys and love what they do! They take breaks from their day jobs and make time for Radio Law Talk so that the rest of the country can enjoy the law like they do. Follow Radio Law Talk on Youtube, Facebook, Twitter & Instagram!"

Autzen Audibles: DuckTerritory's Oregon athletics podcast
Oregon goes into SEC country to land 4-star RB commitment

Autzen Audibles: DuckTerritory's Oregon athletics podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 20:46


The Oregon Ducks have gone into the heart of SEC country to land their most recent verbal commitment and the guys from DuckTerritory.com break down all the news around it. Four-star running back Dante Dowdell out of the state of Mississippi has given the Ducks a verbal commitment as a member of the 2023 recruiting class. What does this mean for Oregon? Where does Oregon go from here? What's the historical context of this commitment? Matt Prehm, Erik Skopil, and Jared Mack of DuckTerritory.com discuss it all on this emergency edition of the Autzen Audibles Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The New Yorker Radio Hour
The Battle After Roe v. Wade

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 20:51


The leaked opinion from the Supreme Court on the Mississippi abortion case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization seems to promise a transformation. Assuming the final opinion by Justice Samuel Alito gets majority support, there will be profound social, political, and health-care implications across the United States—not only in the states that will immediately ban abortion.  David Remnick speaks with three New Yorker writers who have been considering the future of abortion access: Margaret Talbot, Peter Slevin, and Jia Tolentino. Plus, Michael Schulman talks with the comedian Meg Stalter of HBO's hit show “Hacks,” and Helen Rosner pays a visit to the chef Andy Baraghani in Brookhaven, New York.

Queens of the Mines
Bridget “Biddy” Mason The Grandmother of Los Angeles

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 31:06


 Today we are going to talk about Bridget “Biddy” Mason, the grandmother of Los Angeles, one of the most influential Black women in California. She overcame unimaginable prejudice and inequity and was one of the first prominent landowning citizens of Los Angeles. Briget was born into slavery in Georgia on August 15 of 1818. Her parents were of mixed African American and Native American descent. She wasn't given a last name. Because of this common practice with slaves, many African Americans can only go back so far in their ancestry. Stolen. One of her several slaveholders in Georgia and South Carolina started calling her Biddy. Biddy spent much of her childhood enslaved on John Smithson's plantation in South Carolina, performing tasks in the cotton fields, the South's most important crop. Biddy was forbidden to learn to read or write but she learned about herbs and midwifery from the older enslaved women. Smithson gave her, two other female house servants, and a blacksmith as a wedding gift to his cousins, Robert and Rebecca Smith. The Smiths were successful landowners in Logtown, Mississippi. Biddy was 18. Smith was Mormon convert who cultivated cotton and traded slaves. Although, Mormons were better known as opponents of slavery.  For the Smith family, Biddy did domestic work, toiled hard in the cotton fields and performed farm labor. At other times, she worked as a midwife and house nurse — a job she liked. Biddy took care of Rebecca Smith, who was often ill and helped her during the birth of her six children.  During her years in Mississippi, Biddy gave birth to Ellen, Ann and Harriet, aged ten, four, and a newborn. It's likely that Smith himself fathered these children. Like countless other enslaved women, Biddy was almost certainly the victim of sexual violence. In 1848, Smith decided to follow the call of the church with his fellow Mississippi Saints in the great Mormon Exodus to Utah. He moved his family and his 14 slaves west to the Salt Lake Valley where Joseph Smith established a new Mormon community seventeen years prior. The area was still part of Mexico at the time but would soon become Utah.   Smith, his wife and children sat in the wagon on the journey while  Biddy, her daughters and the other slaves walked barefoot behind the 300 wagon caravan. Biddy was in charge of herding the animals for the 1,700 mile trek.   While they walked from Mississippi through Illinois and Colorado towards Salt Lake City, Biddy had a ton of responsibilities, including herding the cattle, preparing and serving the campfire meals and setting up and breaking down camp. All this while acting as the midwife and herbalist for the party, and still tending to her three young daughters. The trail must have been disturbing, frightening and strange. There were moments when surely there was a chance to escape, and for this reason, Biddy's value increased on the trail. With young children, she didn't have the option to leave. They lived in Utah for three years until Governor Brigham Young authorized another Mormon community, this time in San Bernardino. Brigham Young warned Smith that California, had been admitted to the Union as a free, non-slave state the year prior. Smith ignored his warnings and set out with his family and slaves and a 150-wagon caravan in 1851, to establish the Mormon settlement and extend the reach of his Church.  When Smith arrived in San Bernardino, he became one of the counselors to the bishop and owned a very large property. He was among the wealthiest settlers in San Bernardino. Held in bondage in the Mormon colony were dozens of African Americans as well as an untold number of local Native Americans, as well as an untold number of local Native Americans. San Bernardino was built, in part, by enslaved laborers like Biddy. Even though California was technically a free state, it was a land made up of unfree laborers of various kinds. Many indigenous people weer being forced to work in the Los Angeles "slave mart." This "slave mart" was the second most important source of municipal revenue in Los Angeles after the sale of licenses for saloons and gambling venues. On the weekends, local authorities would seek out and arrest intoxicated natives on dubious vagrancy charges. The Native Americans were thrown in a pen, and their labor for the coming week was auctioned off. If they were paid at the end of that week at all, they were usually paid in alcohol so they could get drunk, be arrested and continue the cycle.  In California, Biddy met two sets of couples who were free blacks. Charles and Elizabeth Flake Rowan and Robert and Minnie Owens. They urged her to legally contest her slave status in California. But she did not. Biddy remained enslaved in a “free” state for five more years as Smith maintained his southern way of life in California. He found himself increasingly at odds with fellow colonists and his own church who favorably disposed toward the practice of slavery. In 1855, the leaders of the Mormon colony in San Bernardino thought they were paying top dollar for 80,000 acres of land but had purchased only 35,000 acres. Fine print fuck up. When the colony sued the people who had sold them the land, they lost. The court allowed them to choose up to 35,000 acres anywhere in the larger area. The church chose Smith's ranch. It was turned over to them without any compensation and Smith was pissed. Without his property in California and in fear of losing his slaves, he sold off his cattle and conspired a plan to quietly leave the colony and move to Texas. Biddy and her fellow slaves did not trust Smith and they feared they were going to be sold and separated from their children. Smith lied to Biddy, promising her and her family's freedom in Texas. He needed her cooperation to get there and considered her valuable property. Without his land, he needed a place for them to all stay as he secured provisions for the ride east. He chose a camp of settlers originally from the American South in the Santa Monica Hills. Surely a more hospitable place for a slaveholder than Mormn san Bernardino.  One of Biddy's daughters was romantically involved with the Owens son. In December, Robert Owens and Elizabeth Rowan tipped off the local authorities. There was a group of Black Americans that were being illegally held in Santa Monica Canyon and they were about to be taken across state lines to the slave state of Texas. The sheriffs from San Bernardino and Los Angeles approached Judge Benjamin Hayes. Hayes issued a writ of habeas corpus, widely used against slaveholders in free states. Late on the night of New Year's Eve 1855, as Los Angeles residents celebrated the new year, sheriffs raided Smith's camp in the Santa Monica mountains.  Biddy's children were taken into protective custody at the city jail at the corner of Spring and Franklin Streets in downtown L.A. They let Biddy stay with the Owens family. Judge Hayes ordered Smith to bear all costs associated with the case and caring for those placed in guardianship of the sheriffs as they prepared for trial.  Los Angeles was then still a small town and the three day court hearing, starting on January 19, 1856 was a huge event.   Smith argued that Biddy and the rest of his slaves wished to go to Texas with him. Under state law, Black Americans could not testify against white Americans. Judge Hayes brought Biddy  and her eldest daughters into his chambers along with two trustworthy local gentlemen who acted as observers. Hayes asked Biddy if she was willingly leaving for Texas and Biddy told him, “I always do what I have been told, but I have always been afraid of this trip to Texas.”  Biddy also told the judge about the kind of treatment they had been subjected to over the years. Hannah, who was one of the women enslaved by Smith, gave an unbelievably damaging testimony in the courtroom. She reluctantly said that she wanted to go to Texas. There were long silences. Hannah had given birth to a baby boy only two weeks earlier and was terrified of what Smith would do to her if she refused to go with him to Texas. Hayes sent the San Bernardino sheriff up to talk with her and she said, I promised I would say in court that I wanted to go but I don't want to go. If you bring me back to court, I'll say I want to go but I don't want to go. The sheriff returned with an affidavit saying that, in fact, she did not want to go. Smith's behavior before and during the course of the hearing made it clear she had good reason to be afraid. It was awful. He threatened the Owens family, a neighborhood grocer and a doctor in the courtroom yelling “If this case isn't resolved on Southern principles, all people of color will pay the price.” A gang of Smith's sons and workers went to the jail and tried to intimidate the jailer and lure Biddy's daughters away from the jail with alcohol. Biddy's lawyer abruptly withdrew from the case after being  threatened and offered a bribe of $200.  Judge Hayes was furious with Smith, and clearly rattled by what he had heard. His family was behaving like thugs. Robert Smith was lying about trying to take them out of California and this disturbed Hayes. Smith, who was not being held, was a no-show on the last day of the trial, Monday, January 21. He ran off to Texas. He knew his reputation was ruined and was unwilling to pay court costs. Judge Hayes stated "all the said persons of color are entitled to their freedom and are free and cannot be held in slavery or involuntary servitude, unless for the punishment of crimes, shall ever be tolerated in this State. It is therefore argued that they are entitled to their freedom and are free forever."    Amasa Mason Lyman was the mayor of San Bernardino and a Mormon Apostle. Biddy was a friend of Lyman and was fond of the Lyman family. Biddy took the surname Mason. It was her first last name.  With Smith gone, her daughters were released from protective custody and Mason moved her family into the Owens family home. They were now citizens in rough-and-tumble Los Angeles, where only around 80 of its 4,000 residents were Black. Her oldest daughter, Ellen, married the Owens' son, Charles. Owing to her experience and quality of work, she became one of the most popular midwives of that state, using the skills she learned as a slave.  Judge Hayes had a brother-in-law famous for being one of the first formally trained doctors in Southern California. Dr. John Strother Griffin, the “Father of East Los Angeles”. Griffin was impressed with her nursing skills and hired her as a nurse and midwife. She made $2.50 per day. That would be about $85 dollars in 2022. About 10 bucks a day for an 8 hour day. Griffin's office was on Main Street in the same county building as the jail in which she'd taken refuge with the 13 other enslaved people fighting for freedom. She offered her services to the prisoners free of charge. Biddy delivered hundreds of babies in Los Angeles and braved a smallpox epidemic, risking her life to tend to the sick. In her big black medicine bag, she carried the tools of her trade, and the papers Judge Hays had given her affirming that she was free. Biddy Mason worked as a midwife for ten years, saving her earnings carefully. When she was 48, she purchased her own property on the outskirts of Los Angeles where there were more gardens and vineyards than paved streets. She was the first African American woman to buy property in Los Angeles. It had a water ditch, and a willow fence running around the plot. Two lots for $250. Mason initially used the land for gardening and lived with the Owens. This purchase made her one of the first pioneers of Los Angeles. A remarkable feat for a woman who had spent the first 37 years of her life enslaved.  In her home, she established the city's first child care center for working parents. The First African Methodist Episcopal Church is the oldest African American church in the city. It was established on her Spring Street property. The initial meetings were held in Mason's home in 1872. She paid taxes and all expenses on church property to hold it for her people. The permanent church was eventually erected on land she donated at Eighth and Towne. Mason was quickly beloved and “known by every citizen” as “Aunt Biddy.”   She was also well received in the Los Angeles Spanish-speaking community. She could not read or write, but had become a fluent Spanish-speaker. She befriended Pio Pico, Mexico's last governor in California. Pico, Owens and Griffin were involved in real estate and all encouraged her to invest her money wisely and purchase property. Biddy invested in real estate in what is now the heart of downtown L.A. Finally, in 1884 Mason finally moved to her own land at 311 Spring Street and what is now Broadway. On one of the two lots, she built a two-story brick building which she rented the first floor to commercial interests and lived in an apartment on the second. Los Angeles was booming, and rural Spring Street was becoming crowded with shops and boarding houses. She sold the north lot for $1,500. A gain of nearly $13,000 today. She sold a property she had purchased on Olive Street for $375 in 1868, for $2,800. $82,000 today. Basically, in 1884, Biddy had over a 100,000 year in today's numbers. There were dirt streets and unpaved sidewalks, with curbs and gutters. The drainage system was primitive. Water was still channeled through the city through open ditches and bricklaid channels. Only fifteen streets had sewers running below their surface via riveted iron pipes. Three hundred foot tall poles holding electric lights had recently been erected on the major streets, illuminating with 3,000 candle power. Early that year, storms in February of 1884 caused the Los Angeles River to swell and cut new channels and the city's streets began to flood. The Aliso Street Bridge broke in two, part of the bridge was pushed down the river with half a dozen homes and they all lodged against the First Street Bridge,  creating a dam. The water rose, the river overflowed its banks and flooded the streets. Finally, the pressure from the rising water and the piled up homes and portion of bridge was too much for the First Street Bridge.  The west bank eroded when the First Street Bridge collapsed and thirty-five more houses were carried away. Along the riverbed, people sifted through the debris. Cradles, baby wagons, doors, cupboards, fences, pigs. Looking for something. Someone. Brooms, chickens, orange trees, beds. It was a dreadful sight. People were killed. Obviously, city lighting could not slow fooding, but it would aid in the recovery from the storm that had put a third of the city under water for hours. After the flood, Biddy arranged a deal with a grocer on Fourth and Spring. All of the families who lost their home were able to sign off for all of their groceries. Biddy Mason would pay the tab. Biddy owned land on San Pedro Street in Little Tokyo and was renting to over twenty tenants on three large plots near the now Grand Central Market. For the next three decades, she continued her real estate venture,  participating in the frontier town's transformation into an emerging metropolis. She used her wealth, a fortune of $300,000, the equivalent to $9.5 million in 2022 to feed and shelter the poor. She would visit the jail to leave a token and a prayerful hope with every prisoner. She opened a foster home, an elementary school for black children and a traveler's aid center. She was charming, effective and was deeply appreciated. In so many ways, she became the backbone of society. She helped her family buy properties around the city. She deeded a portion of her remaining Spring Street property to her grandsons “for the sum of love and affection and ten dollars.” She signed the deed with her customary fancy “X.” Still, never learning to read or write. Too busy making that cash.  Her success enabled her to support her extended family for generations.  Los Angeles had become a bustling city with 50,000 residents in the late 1880's. She was so well-known, at dawn each morning, a line would form in front of Mason's gate. Swarming with people in need of assistance. Her neighborhood developed quickly around her homestead and by the early 1890s, the main financial district of Los Angeles was one block from Mason's property. As she grew old and became too ill to see visitors, her grandson Robert was forced to turn people away each morning.  On January 15, 1891 Bridget “Biddy” Mason died at her beloved homestead in Los Angeles. She was 73 years old, one of the wealthiest Black women in the country. When she was buried at the Evergreen Cemetery in Boyle Heights, her grave was left unmarked. The family held onto Mason's cherished “first homestead” until the Depression. Today the Broadway Spring Center Parking garage stands on the site.  Ninety-Seven years after her death, L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley, and members of the church she founded held a ceremony, during which her grave was finally marked with a tombstone. Biddy Mason Memorial Park in downtown Los Angeles was erected one year later in her honor. Behind the Bradbury Building near Third and Spring, a memorial on an 80-foot-long poured concrete wall shows the timeline of Biddy Mason's life. November 16 was declared “Biddy Mason Day” in Los Angeles. Jackie Broxton said this, "She showed people what could happen when they were free and could set their own destiny". Jackie Broxton is the CEO & President of the Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation. The Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation was established in 2013 and began as an outreach ministry of the church Biddy founded. The Foundation caters to current and former foster youth in the local community. It should also be noted that Biddy's success story was the exception and not the rule. I believe that she attained so much, because she gave so much. As she navigated multiple levels of oppression, Biddy advocated for her community. When it comes to movements advancing our communities, culture, and policies in more equitable directions, it seems that women have always been at the forefront. Biddy Mason once said, “If you hold your hand closed, nothing good can come in. The open hand is blessed, for it gives in abundance, even as it receives.” She is an inspiration that when given the support and opportunity, it is possible to overcome even the toughest of circumstances. Her story is one of resilience, compassion, and triumph. The fight continues today against the inherited systemic racism, sexism, and each and every intersection.  Sources: Los Angeles Almanac  Free Forever: The Contentious Hearing That Made Biddy Mason A Legend By  Hadley Meares The Life of Biddy Mason: From Slave to a Master by Fareeha Arshad Biddy Mason Collaborative National Park Service Biddy Mason: One of LA's first black real estate moguls By Hadley Meares Los Angeles Western Corral Honoring the legacy and 200th birthday of slave-turned-entrepreneur Biddy Mason by Michael Livingston Negro Trail-Blazers of California by Delilah Beasley  The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History by Dolores Hayden https://kentakepage.com/bridget-biddy-mason/ Bridget "Biddy" Mason: From Bondage to Wealth - Kentake Page Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation  

The Southern Fork
Chris Coleman: The Goodyear House, Old Town Kitchen & Cocktails (Charlotte, NC / Rock Hill, SC)

The Southern Fork

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 35:29


Chris Coleman was never far from Southern food. He spent summers on his grandparents farm in Mississippi, and was 14 when he started his first industry job at a local fish camp in a suburb of Charlotte, NC, working his way up through the ranks from busser to kitchen expediter. While a culinary student in Central Piedmont Community College's =, Chris took a job as a line cook at the McNinch House, one of Charlotte's most storied fine dining restaurants. He was quickly promoted to head chef at the age of 21, and he's continued to build on that success in the Charlotte region, now the chef and a partner at The Goodyear House in Charlotte's NoDa neighborhood, and the recently opened Old Town Kitchen & Cocktails in nearby Rock Hill, SC. He brings technique and creativity to a local food sensibility, has supported area farmers and food producers throughout his career, and his cooking is familiar yet always with a twist, like the deviled egg toast topped with smoked NC roe I mention in this episode. I'm always interested in what he's going to cook next.

Spotlight On...
Brejenn Allen

Spotlight On...

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 45:38


Whoever said that youth was wasted on the young had yet to meet this week's artist.Brejenn Allen is young, ambitious, and putting in the hard work. The Meridian-based artist uses a mixture of current culture and unconventional materials bringing texture and humor into her work. Find out all about Brejenn's inspiration and process, and then find her on social media if you haven't already.Oh, and Lowes, if you're listening, Brejenn is an artist with a passion for your store... Brand ambassador Queen... Just throwing it out there.Find Brejenn:https://brejennallen.com/https://www.instagram.com/brejennhttps://www.tiktok.com/@brejennallenFind us:www.TheLittleYellowBuilding.comwww.tlybARTMAG.comSupport the show

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
Louisiana GOP Says: Get An Abortion, Get Charged With Murder + A Conversation with Walter Masterson

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 88:10


As the GOP hardens its position on Roe v. Wade we are beginning to see the future of what Alito's draconian decision holds. In Missouri, like in Texas, if you get an abortion in another state, you could still be arrested. In Mississippi, they want to charge mothers with murder for terminating a pregnancy. If it all sounds insane, it is. Walt Masterson joins Mea Culpa to discuss what he's seeing on the ground infiltrating MAGA Rallies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends
Clydesdale Media Meet the Athletes - Hollye Henderson | The Muscle Pony

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:18


We get to Know Hollye and How she is an OG CrossFitter who likes even numbered years. She competed at the 2014 Regionals with the Rope Climb event and can't wait to smash what she did there, she get to compete with her coach Dex Hopkins at the same event and is thrilled to share in the excitement of it all. She is an affiliate owner and Nutrition expert helping people in so many ways.

Whiskey Tangent
Episode #53: The *Finally* Canadian Whisky Episode | Smell It Again Jeff!

Whiskey Tangent

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:42


Whiskeys: Gooderham & Worts Four Grain • Crown Royal Rye 16 • Alberta Premium Cask Strength Rye Tangents: Sue and Jeff join us for a whisky road trip to the Great White North! • Ed doesn't speak Canadian • Does Monty Python count as Canadian folk music?  • The Incestuous History of Canadian whisky • Canada had Prohibition too • Wow there are so many Canadian bottom-shelf dwellers • Put some Good & Plenty in your meatloaf • F**k those 9th Street Johnson's Popcorn bitches! • The History of Crown Royal • Sue's entrancing Sexy Air-Traffic Controller voice • Come on down to “Smell It Again Jeff's” for all your re-smelling needs! • We have whiskey with every meal (and also snacks) • Ca-shade-ian Whisky • Canadians have small wood • The Alberta-WhistlePig Connection • Someone is a little too fond of Martin Short • Jeff's mom is just a big butt and a smile • Don't grab below the waist in the liquor store Music Credits: Whiskey on the Mississippi by Kevin MacLeod | Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4624-whiskey-on-the-mississippi • Onion Capers by Kevin MacLeod | Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4679-onion-capers | License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license • Past Sadness by Kevin MacLeod | Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5024-past-sadness | License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Monsters Among Us Podcast
Sn. 13 Ep. 9 - Southern sasquatch, robed figures and dark watchers.

Monsters Among Us Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 65:37


Season 13 Episode 9 of Monsters Among Us Podcast, true paranormal stories of ghosts, cryptids, UFOs and more told by the witnesses themselves. SHOW NOTES: Tonight's Sponsor - BetterHelp - Visit BetterHelp.com/monstersamongus for 10% off your first month. Chatawa Monster - https://libguides.hindscc.edu/paranormalms/chatawa_monster Mysterious Creature in Mississippi - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQjsc4vi-rc&t=136s Kentucky UFO's - https://www.wlky.com/article/ufos-aliens-kentucky-bloomfield-space-1978/39139597 Dark Watchers - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnprCU0EUqI My Dark Watchers video - https://youtu.be/hcJs9XP5VXQ Betty and Barney Hill - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4N75AFeJrc&t=107s Big Bear Bigfoot - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQKEHVxmsQM --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Soundcheck
Bette Smith: Muscular Soul at a Fever Pitch (Archives)

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:49


Bette Smith was born and raised in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn – but on her debut LP called Jetlagger she draws on the gospel she sang in the church and the soul music she heard on the block on hot summer nights music growing up on the corner of Nostrand and Fulton. On the 2018 record Jetlagger, the tunes range from originals to covers of Staples Singers and Isaac Hayes classics, showcasing Smith's deep, confident, and powerful voice. Amidst rugged, muscular arrangements that hearken to the timeless sounds of Mississippi and Memphis soul and funk, Bette Smith barely contains a New York aggressiveness and passion, and piles on the sexy. Smith and her band play some of these songs, in-studio. (From the Archives, 2018.)

HLTH Matters
S2 Ep3: The Past, Present and Future of Telehealth—featuring Dr. Kristi Henderson

HLTH Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:47


Early in her career as a nurse practitioner, Dr. Kristi Henderson realized that many of her patients didn't have access to care early enough. And she set out to get healthcare to the people who needed it.Dr. Henderson found a solution in technology and launched the first telehealth program in conjunction with the University of Mississippi Medical Center in 2003.Today, Dr. Henderson is the CEO of MedExpress at Optum and SVP at the Center for Digital Health. She began her career as a nurse in emergency medicine in Jackson, Mississippi, and continued to practice for 24 years while building telehealth programs across the country. Dr. Henderson's resume also includes roles as VP of Patient Access & Healthcare Transformation at Ascension and Clinical Operations Leader at Amazon Health.On this episode of HLTH Matters, Dr. Henderson joins hosts Dr. Gautam Gulati and Dr. Jordan Shlain to discuss the challenges she faced in building and scaling that first 24-hour emergency telehealth program. Dr. Henderson describes the barriers to innovation in healthcare that lifted during the pandemic and explains how she thinks about deciding where healthcare should be delivered. Listen in to understand the role ‘speed of trust' plays in implementing new innovation and learn how technology might be used to improve efficiency, effectiveness and engagement in healthcare delivery.Topics CoveredDr. Henderson's early experience as a nurse in emergency medicine in Jackson, MSWhat inspired Dr. Henderson to launch the first telehealth programThe challenges Dr. Henderson faced in building and scaling a successful 24-hour emergency telehealth program in MississippiHow Dr. Henderson continued to work as a nurse practitioner while building telehealth programs on a national scaleThe barriers to innovation in healthcare that lifted during the pandemicHow Dr. Henderson thinks about deciding where healthcare should be deliveredCreating a hybrid model that balances virtual and in-person careThe role speed of trust plays in implementing new technology in the healthcare systemThe relationship between improved outcomes and lower healthcare costsUsing tech to capture the doctor-patient interaction vs. entering info in EMR systems Connect with Dr. Kristi Henderson OptumDr. Henderson on TwitterDr. Henderson on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Gautam Gulati & Dr. Jordan ShlainHLTHDr. Gulati on TwitterDr. Gulati on LinkedInDr. Shlain on TwitterDr. Shlain on LinkedIn ResourcesAscensionAmazon CareHarvard Study on Workplace HarassmentNightHawk Radiology Introductory Quote[14:29] “What can we NOT do via telehealth? That's what needs to be in a clinic. And then you can kind of work backwards. Let's try to solve everything with the most convenient and less costly solution.”

Deeper Than Most
Shortstuff Bonus Ep: Flynt Lee, A Mississippi Mystery|FNC pt 23|

Deeper Than Most

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 10:07


Welcome Cosmonites! We are bringing you another shortstuff bonus. Todays FNC is actually part 23 (even though we said 22)

The Friars Golf Podcast
Sand Valley and Mississippi Friars Cup Recap

The Friars Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 68:39


Brandon Carter from the Sand Valley Golf Resort joins us to help us preview the upcoming Friars trip to the resort and give us insight into the new courses coming soon to the resort. Also, we recap the recent Friars Cup trip held at Old Waverly and Mossy Oak.

The Jake Feinberg Show
The Sid Herring Interview

The Jake Feinberg Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 83:58


Mississippi guitarist and band leader talks about his infatuation with The Beatles and how that manifested in his own career early on touring with The Animals.

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 224: How Amherst came to value community college transfers

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 104:31


In this episode you will hear:   (16:05) In this segment of “In the News” Mark and Dave discuss a March 23rd, 2022 article by that appeared in “Inside Higher Ed” entitled, “How Amherst College Became a Champion for Community College Transfer Students”. Dave does a great summary of the article and Mark points out his seven take-aways from the article and then Mark and Dave have a spirited discussion about the article.     (39:45) Question from a listener-   Mark starts out by sharing another thing he thinks would surprise you if you were to be an admissions officer. Next he asks Lisa a follow up question from her two part series on why are teen so sad; it is a question Mark wished he had asked last week.   Question about hooks for the podcast: Do schools view Leadership as a hook? My daughter is a participant in a regional youth leadership program that is selective and well-regarded. She will have 3 years of escalating experience in Leadership activities by the time she graduates. We are not aiming for an exclusive school, but rather are hoping for significant merit aid.  Bobbi from Ohio       (01:01:10) Our Interview is with Dr. Roger Parrott, the President of Belhaven University in Jackson, Mississippi   Topic "Understanding Belhaven University" Part 1 of 1   Roger shares the 4 C's that Belhaven prioritizes Roger shares what their unique curriculum offers Roger talks about the chapel experience at Belhaven Roger talks about the capstone course experience at Belhaven Roger talks about Belhaven's exceptional arts programs in all four areas of the arts Roger describes the campus and the faculty Roger answers the question, does someone need to be a professing Christian to attend Belhaven Roger discusses experiential education opportunities Roger talks about the exceptional creative writing program and the film program Roger makes a passionate case for parents letting students pursue their passion. Roger shares the incredible programs that Belhaven offers freshman students that Mark has never seen any other college offer to their freshman Of course, Mark puts Roger on the hot seat   Our Belhaven interview is our College Spotlight   (01:27:28) Our recommended resource for episode 224 is a really second interview with Tim Fields, the Senior Associate Dean of undergraduate admissons at Emory University and Shereem Herndon Brown of Strategic Admissions Advice, two people Mark has known for some time. Tim and Shereem discuss their new book and their new podcast that are targeting black families. The book is called, “The Black Family's Guide to Colleg Admissions: A Conversation about Education, Parenting, and Race” and their new podcast is called, “Application to Admission”   To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you subscribe to our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Talk Story w/ Gaven Sugai
KSP #14 - Keali'i Kane Talks About His Experience Away From Hawaii

Talk Story w/ Gaven Sugai

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 89:56


On today's episode, we have one of my good friends from back in the day, Keali'i Kane, open the show. Within the past couple of years, him and his family returned back to Hawaii. Before he returned to Hawaii, him and his family moved to Mississippi for an extended period of time. They experienced a culture shock, and it was a great learning experience for them. We talk about our ghost chili pepper adventures, starting a Hawaii catering business in the states, how people in the mainland don't know how to eat spam, the differences between a "mushubi" and a "musubi," and much more. One of the biggest topics in Hawaii is how families are beginning to move away from Hawaii due to the high cost off living. If you're someone who is planning to move to another state or country, this is a good episode for you to check out. Thank you Keali'i for sharing your experience with us! Follow Keali'i on IG @teamavatarfilms. Hang out with us and post yourself with your favorite drink using the hashtag #noticemekampai.

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show
5/11/22 Wednesday, Hour 1: The Cycle of Hate Continues

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 60:00


Karine Jean Pierre is a wicked female…; Pelosi's house protested…; 57 years of misery…; Josh from Georgia says he can't correct himself. He defines correction as being aware and in that sense, he does correct himself. Rob from Mississippi asks Jesse what it means to be still. —- Back to Rob… Tony from California

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show
5/11/22 Wednesday, Hour 1: The Cycle of Hate Continues

Jesse Lee Peterson Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 60:00


Karine Jean Pierre is a wicked female…; Pelosi's house protested…; 57 years of misery…; Josh from Georgia says he can't correct himself. He defines correction as being aware and in that sense, he does correct himself. Rob from Mississippi asks Jesse what it means to be still. —- Back to Rob… Tony from California

Rich Zeoli
Biden and The Democrats Are More Concerned About Fighting Climate Change Than Fighting For You

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 184:43


6:04-NEWS 6:09-Pennsylvania Republicans attempting to stop Doug Mastriano as nominee for Governor  6:25-Justice for celebrity chef Mario Batali  6:40-Republicans fear Mastriano can't win in the general election in November  6:52-Elon Musk says he will restore Donald Trump to Twitter  7:02-NEWS 7:10-NBA announces it will host games in Abu Dhabi  7:23-Speed cameras are against the right to face your accuser  7:30-Candidate for Governor, Joe Gale, joined Rich to discuss his campaign for Governor and the breaking story of Republicans trying to get candidates to drop out to defeat leader Doug Mastriano as the GOP nominee.  7:45-CUT SHEET  | Biden knows people are frustrated with inflation | Biden blames inflation on the MAGA conservatives | Biden thinks Americans are too distracted in recognizing what he's done for inflation | Truck driver tells a news station he's paying $1000 to fill up his truck | CNN says Biden's claim of reducing the deficit is 'bizzaro world'.  8:10-Democrats have no winning issues to run on  8:13-Biden announces another bill to send aid to Ukraine  8:17-Governor Reeves of Mississippi wants to make adoption easier in his state  8:23-NEWS 8:38-PA Republicans trying to get all  Republican Gubernatorial candidates to unite behind 1 candidate to stop Doug Mastriano.  8:52-No charges against Mike Tyson after fight with fellow passenger on airplane  9:01-NEWS 9:05-Republican candidate for Pennsylvania Governor Bill McSwain joined Rich to discuss the latest polls in the primary election and the reports that establishment Republicans are asking candidates to drop out and endorse a candidate to defeat frontrunner Doug Mastriano.  9:10-The profitability of conservative entertainment on streaming services is a huge success.  9:26-New Jersey Supreme Court orders the release of man convicted of murdering a State Trooper in 1973 has caused bi-partisan outrage of the decision  9:41-CUT SHEET | Elon Musk would reverse the ban on Trump if he does get to own Twitter | James Cromwell super-glued his hand to a Starbucks counter in protest of paying extra for vegan milk | Passenger lands plane successfully after emergency landing | Texas man steals a lawnmower but mows the grass of the owner first  9:55-Final Thoughts 

Beards & Bible Podcast
Roe vs. Wade, Abortion, and a Question of Logic- is Abortion Murder and an Unborn Child a Human?

Beards & Bible Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 75:16


On May 2, 2022, Politico published a leaked draft opinion authored by Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, appearing to be the majority opinion for the case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. The case deals with the constitutionality of a 2018 Mississippi state law that banned abortion operations after the first 15 weeks of pregnancy. If the ruling stands, it would overturn Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which would allow U.S. states to determine the legality of abortions for themselves. Analysts predict that abortion would immediately be banned in 23 states and territories if this happens. Meanwhile, the debate surrounding abortion seems to have been re-sparked. The issue for many has less to do with the life of unborn children, and has more to do with concepts, “women's rights”, or “reproductive choice”. In fact, the issue of abortion itself has been so reframed that honest, productive, logical dialogue about the issue itself becomes almost impossible. To oppose abortion is to be anti-woman, or even pro-rape. But if we just stripped away all the controversy, vitriol, and red herring arguments- logically speaking, what are the ethics of terminating a pregnancy? Is an unborn fetus a human being? Why are so many Christians against abortion? And why are so many other folks for it?

Rich Zeoli
Mississippi's Governor Wants to Make Adoption Easier for Everyone

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 42:29


Zeoli Show Hour 3:  In the third hour of the Zeoli Show, Rich discussed the Mississippi Governor's goal to show that being pro-life is not just being anti-abortion. Giving pregnant women better access to care they need and making the adoption easier for adoptive parents in the state 8:10-Democrats have no winning issues to run on  8:13-Biden announces another bill to send aid to Ukraine  8:17-Governor Reeves of Mississippi wants to make adoption easier in his state  8:23-NEWS 8:38-PA Republicans trying to get all  Republican Gubernatorial candidates to unite behind 1 candidate to stop Doug Mastriano.  8:52-No charges against Mike Tyson after fight with fellow passenger on airplane  Photo: Getty Pool / Pool

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing
May 11, 2022: Inside SCOTUS, and Trump's first 2022 loss

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 4:02


Former President Donald Trump goes 1-for-2 on primary day in Nebraska and West Virginia.  And new reporting from inside the Supreme Court, via Josh Gerstein, Alexander Ward and Ryan, as the nine justices are set to gather Thursday for the first time since POLITICO published the draft opinion overturning Roe: “Justice Samuel Alito's sweeping and blunt draft majority opinion from February overturning Roe remains the court's only circulated draft in the pending Mississippi abortion case, POLITICO has learned, and none of the conservative justices who initially sided with Alito have to date switched their votes. No dissenting draft opinions have circulated from any justice, including the three liberals. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

Inner Hoe Uprising
S9 Ep10: Hoe v. Wade

Inner Hoe Uprising

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 58:33


This episode we're talking about cyborg sex hands, the constitutions of men who wrote the constitution, a song about masturbation, HSV2 and an open relationship, abortion safe havens, trans affirming health care becoming a straight up felony,  and much more.   RELEVANT LINKS AND NOTES With the Supreme Court Set to Overturn Roe, New York Prepares to Become an Abortion Safe Haven: https://www.thecity.nyc/2022/5/3/23056076/supreme-court-overturn-roe-v-wade-new-york-abortion-safe-haven  Boom Lawyered Podcast: https://pod.link/1282116646/episode/2b8ca45c2bf955ec25742a87fed2ec3f  Sisters in Law Podcast: https://pod.link/1551206847/episode/7438cbac2ff541a00f14f3874aa0aa6c  IHU on the link between the movement to dismantle Repro Rights & Trans Rights:https://pod.link/1057045285/episode/19dfa1cb6e07deb47a8734c0dfe667cb Segment begins at 1:10:20 The Christian Legal Army Behind the Ban on Abortion in Mississippi: https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/alliance-defending-freedom-dobbs/  Anti Trans Hate Machine Podcast: https://translash.org/antitranshatemachine/  List of Abortion Funds: https://donations4abortion.com/  MERCH  https://inner-hoe-uprising.creator-spring.com/ PAY A HOE  Paypal.me/innerhoe https://www.patreon.com/InnerHoeUprising  EMAIL ihupodcast@gmail.com VOICE MAIL (404) 491-9158 MUSIC Love and light to the artists who have lent their music to the pod!  Our opening is a remix of “Queen S%!T” by SheReal (https://soundcloud.com/shereal/04-queen-s-t-produced-by) We also play  “Everyday”  “Cat Comics” and “Yeah Yeah” wavghxst (https://twitter.com/wavghxst) SOCIAL MEDIA & HASHTAGS Use #InnerHoeUprising  to keep up with this conversation on social media and let others know that you are listening.  Inner Hoe Uprising | IG: @InnerHoeUprising | Twitter: @InnerHoeUprisin  Akua | IG & Twitter: @heyyakuagirl  Sam | IG & Twitter: @slamridd   #black #woman #sex #feminist #womanist #Comedy #raunchy #queer #pride #quiltbang #sexuality #lgbtq #lgbt #funny #agender #transgender #nonmonagamy #feminism #intersectionalfeminism #kink #porn #BDSM #dating #love #relationships #blackwomen #blackpeople #podcast #sexualwellness #sexualhealth