Podcasts about British Academy

National academy of humanities and social sciences

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Latest podcast episodes about British Academy

Woman's Hour
The Brit Awards. Targeted adverts online. The ages of motherhood. Welsh Rugby.

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 56:27


The Brits scrapped their best male and best female awards last year in favour of gender-neutral prizes. This year no women are on the shortlist for best artist - won by Adele last year - though are nominated in other categories. Social media has been awash with fans of musicians like Charlie XCX, Florence Welch, Mabel and Ella Henderson asking why they'd been overlooked. We hear from journalist Laura Snapes the Guardian's music editor and Vick Bain who's worked in the music industry for 25 years, was the CEO of the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers & Authors and founder of The F-List directory of UK female musicians. Several former employees at the Welsh Rugby Union have told the BBC about a ‘toxic' culture of sexism at the organisation. Nuala McGovern is joined by former Wales rugby international and Labour MP Tonia Antoniazzi. Do you ever wonder why you're being shown particular adverts online? Nuala speaks to one woman, Hannah Tomes, who is being advertised egg donation banks despite having no interest in this – she wonders if she's being advertised to because of her gender – we will seek to find out if she's right and speak to the BBC's Technology Editor Zoe Kleinman. Figures from the ONS show that there are now twice as many women giving birth over the age of 40 as there are having children under the age of 20. But does the age you become a mother change the way you experience parenting? We hear from two women who had children at very different points in their lives…Lucy Baker the founder of the blog Geriatric Mum and Lauren Crosby Medlicott a freelance journalist who has written about her experience as a young mum. Presenter Nuala McGovern Producer Beverley Purcell

The History of Literature
480 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (with Ritchie Robertson)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 60:26


In 1878, critic Matthew Arnold wrote, "Goethe is the greatest poet of modern times... because having a very considerable gift for poetry, he was at the same time, in the width, depth, and richness of his criticism of life, by far our greatest modern man." In this episode, Jacke talks to Ritchie Robertson, author of Goethe: A Very Short Introduction, about the life and works of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832): scientist, administrator, artist, art critic, and supreme literary writer in a vast variety of genres. Ritchie Robertson is Taylor Professor of German in the University of Oxford. He is the author of The 'Jewish Question' in German Literature, 1749-1939: Emancipation and its Discontents (OUP, 1999), Mock-Epic Poetry from Pope to Heine (OUP, 2009), and Kafka; A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2004). He has translated several German authors into English for the Oxford World's Classics and Penguin Classics series, and has been a Fellow of the British Academy since 2004. Additional listening: 463 Friedrich Nietzsche (with Ritchie Robertson) George Eliot 111 The Americanest American - Ralph Waldo Emerson Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Arts & Ideas
Higher Education for women and working class students

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 45:14


Over the last two hundred years, working class and women students, have found a place insides universities. Anne McElvoy hears about some of the stories behind the social expansion of higher education. Joanna Bourke's new book is a history of Birkbeck, the University of London college that began life as the London Mechanics' Institution in 1823 and is now a leading centre of research in many areas. Iona Burnell Reilly has been looking at the lives of working class academics and Ann Kennedy Smith has considered women's pursuit of education at the University of Cambridge. And Clare Bucknell discusses the history of one educational resource, the anthology. Joanna Bourke is Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London, and a Fellow of the British Academy. She is the author of Birkbeck 200 years of radical learning for working people. Dr Clare Bucknell is a fellow of All Souls College, University of Oxford and author of a social history of poetry anthologies, The Treasuries: Poetry Anthologies and the Making of British Culture. Dr Iona Burnell Reilly is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Education and Communities at the University of East London and she is the author of The Lives of Working Class Academics: Getting Ideas Above your Station Dr Ann Kennedy Smith is an independent scholar and literary critic. She was awarded a Women's History Network Independent Researcher fellowship in 2021-22, and her blog about Cambridge women is called ‘The Cambridge Ladies' Dining Society 1890-1914'. Producer: Ruth Watts You might be interested in other content exploring the history of education including BBC AHRC New Generation Thinker Eleanor Lybeck's Essay on social attitudes to Victorian women pioneers: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09v64pk

Learn English Through Listening
What Opportunities Can You Unlock With UK Business English? Ep 607

Learn English Through Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 14:15


English Phrases: Learn the Nuances of UK Business Vocabulary If you're looking to become a global professional, mastering Business English is an absolute must. Learning UK specific business vocabulary can open up a world of opportunities, both professionally and personally. With this English language learning lesson, you'll be able to start to gain the skills needed to effectively communicate and work with UK businesses. Don't let the language barrier hold you back from reaching your goals - learn UK business English today! If you feel we have helped you please consider supporting us https://adeptengli.sh/donate This English language learning lesson is also designed to be beneficial for those who are looking to work in the UK, or for those who engage with UK businesses. Whether you're looking for a job in the UK, or if you need to communicate with a UK-based company, this lesson will give you the tools to navigate the world of UK business English with confidence. With this knowledge, you'll be able to communicate effectively and make sure your message is understood. At Adept English, we use a system of language learning based on language acquisition, just as children learn their first language. This method has been proven to be more effective than traditional language learning. With this system, you can enjoy the cognitive benefits of language learning such as higher standardised test scores, improved analytical skills, and enhanced memory and multitasking abilities. Learn more today and unlock the opportunities that come with mastering UK business English. ✔Lesson transcript: https://adeptenglish.com/lessons/english-phrases-master-uk-business-english/ Numerous studies have demonstrated the cognitive benefits of language learning. For example, a study conducted by the British Academy showed that learning a second language increased critical thinking skills, creativity, flexibility of mind and empathy. A 2007 study in Harwich, Massachusetts, also showed that students who studied a foreign language in an articulated sequence outperformed their non-foreign language learning peers on the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test after two-three years. Additionally, a study conducted in Canada with young children showed that those who are bilingual developed the concept of “object permanence” at an earlier age.

Keen On Democracy
Julia Hobsbawm: Why the 2022 Trend of the Year Was Working From Home and How This Probably Won't Change in 2023

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 29:44


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Julia Hobsbawm, author of The Nowhere Office: Reinventing Work and the Workplace of the Future. Julia Hobsbawm is an entrepreneur, writer, and consultant who addresses the challenges of the hyper connected age, in particular remedies of what she has called Social Health for organizations. She is Chair of The Workshift Commission and is Founder and Chair of the content and connection business Editorial Intelligence. Her bestselling book The Simplicity Principle: Six Steps Towards Clarity in a Complex World was published in 2020 and won the American Book Fest Best Book Award 2020 – Business: General and the NYC Big Book Award 2020 – Self-Help: General. Awarded an OBE for services to business, her articles are amongst the most downloaded on the Strategy + Business site and she is an adviser to the British Academy's Future of the Corporation project. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dental Leaders Podcast
#167- What Doug Watt Did

Dental Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 62:50


You can watch the video of this podcast here: https://www.prav.com/podcasts/doug-watt-dentist/ Doug Watt has carved a niche as one of the most engaging voices on the subject of digital dentistry.   In this week's episode, Doug chats with Prav about the ups and downs of public speaking in the constant shadow of imposter syndrome.   Doug also gives advice to those just starting in digital dentistry, chats about his love of the guitar and talks about his involvement with the BACD.   Enjoy!  In This Episode 01.39 - Imposter syndrome and anxiety 15.00 - Digital dentistry 19.41 - Backstory and playing the guitar 29.48 - Discovering dentistry 32.40 - Student life and VT 36.40 - Mentors 39.35 - BACD 43.08 - Practice ownership 47.00 - Partnerships and valuation 57.08 - Blackbox thinking 01.02.09 - Last days and legacy 01.04.33 - Fantasy dinner party About Doug Watt Doug Watt graduated from Birmingham University in 2003 and is now a partner at a practice in Royal Leamington Spa.   Doug is a prolific lecturer on digital dentistry and mentors dentists on its application in treatment.   He is a member of the board of the  British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry.

DISRESPECTFUL NAJA_SORRY NOT SORRY!
This talk originally took place on 25 November 2020, part of the series The British Academy 10-Minute Talks, where the world's leading prof

DISRESPECTFUL NAJA_SORRY NOT SORRY!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 0:54


Frontline IB: Conversations With International Business Scholars

Stephanie Decker is a professor of strategy at the University of Birmingham Business School. Previously she worked at the University of Bristol, Aston Business School, and the University of Liverpool Management School. She is currently joint editor-in-chief for Business History and serves on the editorial board of Organization Studies, Accounting History, and  Journal of International Business Studies. She is also co-Vice-Chair for Research & Publication at the British Academy of Management. As a historian working at a management school, most of Decker's research is concerned with the connection between the social sciences and history, specifically organization studies and history. She is interested in how to theorize from historical research and in developing archival and historical methods for organization studies. Her historical research focuses on the history of organizations, entrepreneurs and the wider political economy in sub-Saharan Africa. Visit https://www.aib.world/frontline-ib/stephanie-decker/ for the original video interview.

The 80s Movie Podcast
The War of the Roses

The 80s Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 17:54


On this actual final episode of 2022, we take a look back at our favorite Christmas movie of the decade, Danny DeVito's 1989 film The War of the Roses. ----more---- TRANSCRIPT   Hello, and welcome to The 80s Movies Podcast. I am your host, Edward Havens. Thank you for listening today.   Before we get started, yes, I said our previous episode, on Michael Jackson's Thriller, was going to be our last episode of 2022. When I wrote that, and when I said that, I meant it. But then, after publishing that episode, I got to thinking about Christmas, and some of my favorite Christmas movies, and it reminded me I have considering doing an episode about my favorite Christmas movie from the 1980s, and decided to make myself an unintentional liar by coming back one more time.   So, for the final time in 2022, this time for real, I present this new episode of The 80s Movie Podcast. This time, we'll be talking about Danny DeVito's best film as a director, The War of the Roses.   The genesis of War of the Roses was a novel by American author and playwright Warren Adler. After graduating from NYU with a degree in English literature, in a class that included Mario Puzo, the author of The Godfather, and William Styron, who won the 1968 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for his novel The Confessions of Nat Turner, Adler paved an interesting road before becoming a novelist. He worked as a journalist at the New York Daily News, before becoming the editor of the Queens Post, an independent weekly newspaper devoted to all things happening in that New York City borough.    He would buy four radio stations and a television station in New York City, before opening his own advertising and public relations firm in Washington D.C.   Adler would create ads for politicians, businesses and communities all across the nation. In fact, it was Warren Adler who would create the name of the DC complex whose name is now synonymous with high crimes: Watergate. In 1974, he would sell the firm, and the stations, after the publication of his first novel, Undertow.   The War of the Roses would be Adler's seventh novel to be published in as many years, and the first of four to be published in 1981 alone. The novel follows Jonathan and Barbara Rose, who, initially, seem to be the perfect couple. He has a thriving career as a lawyer, she is an up-an-coming entrepreneur with an exceptional pâté recipe. Their extravagant home holds a collection of antiquities purchased over the years, and they enjoy their life with their children Evie and Josh. One day, Jonathan suffers what seems to be a heart attack, to which Barbara responds by asking for a divorce. Very quickly, their mutual love turns to a destructive hatred, especially after Jonathan, trying to save his marriage despite his wife's de facto declaration of lost love for her husband, decides to invoke an old state law that allows a husband to remain in his house while in the process of divorce.   The novel became an immediate sensation, but Hollywood had already come knocking on Mr. Adler's door seven months before the book's publication.   Richard D. Zanuck, the son of legendary Fox studio head Daryl Zanuck, and his producing partner David Brown, would purchase the movie rights to the book in September 1980 through their production deal at Fox. The producers, whose credits included The Sting and Jaws, would hire Adler to write the screenplay adaptation of his novel, but they seemingly would let the film rights lapse after two years.    James L. Brooks, the television writer and producer who created The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Taxi, was transitioning to movies, and purchased the movie rights to the book, which he would produce for Polly Platt, the former wife of filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich who had made a name for herself as an art director, costume designer, screenwriter and producer, including as the production designer and on-set sounding board for Brooks on Terms of Endearment.   At the time, Brooks was working at Paramount Pictures, but in 1986, he would end his association with that studio when Fox would offer Brooks the opportunity to create his own production company at the studio, Gracie Films. When the transfer of Brooks' properties from Paramount to Fox was being worked on, it was discovered that Brooks didn't actually own the movie rights to War of the Roses after all.    In fact, Arnon Milchan, an Israeli businessman who had been making a splash in the film industry financing movies like Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy, Ridley Scott's Legend and Terry Gilliam's Brazil, had actually purchased the movie rights to the novel before the Zanuck/Brown option seemingly lapsed, which would require Brooks to enter into a new round of negotiations to secure the rights once and for all. Milchan would sell them to Gracie Films for $300k and a producer credit on the final film.   Once the rights were finally and properly secured, Brooks would hire Michael Neeson, a writer Brooks had worked with on The Mary Tyler Moore, Rhoda and Taxi, to write the screenplay. But instead of spending time getting ready to make her directorial debut, Platt instead took a job as the production designer on George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's The Witches of Eastwick. In fact, Miller was so keen on getting Platt involved in his production that he would consider shooting a good portion of the movie in Platt's hometown of Hingham, Massachusetts, although they would eventually spend most of the location shoot in nearby Colhasset, which had more of the historical buildings Miller wanted for the film.   Platt would finish her work on Witches before Brooks would begin shooting his Terms of Endearment follow-up, Broadcast News, on which Polly would serve as an executive producer, but her leaving Brooks for several months to work on someone else's film would begin a fracture between the two that would lead to Platt leaving Gracie Films in a few years.   But not before she helped with the creation of The Tracy Ullman Show, one of the earliest shows on the then-brand new Fox television network, which included a short animated segment each week about a quirky family in a town called Springfield.    The Simpsons.   While Platt was in New England working on Witches, James L. Brooks would visit an old friend, Danny DeVito, who was shooting his feature directing debut, Throw Momma From the Train. DeVito had known about The War of the Roses for years, and really wanted to make it as a director, but knowing how important the project was to Platt, he would defer his interest in the film.    In a July 2020 episode of Karina Longworth's excellent podcast You Must Remember This, Danny DeVito tells Longworth that he only became involved in the film when Brooks told him the project was not going to move forward with Polly Platt.    And sidebar, if you aren't familiar with Polly Platt or her importance to cinema and pop culture, I highly encourage you to listen to Ms. Longworth's entire season about Ms. Platt. Polly Platt was an amazing, complicated woman who deserves a better legacy. Just trust me on this. Please.   Okay, so now were at the end of 1986. Polly Platt was out as the director of The War of the Roses, even if she didn't know she was out at the time.   So what could DeVito bring to the project that Platt could not?   DeVito had just finished his first feature film as a director. And while Momma wasn't a big hit when it was released in December 1987, it was successful enough at the box office, and the film would garner an unlikely Oscar nomination for Anne Ramsay, the actress who played the film's diminutive title character. But more importantly, DeVito could bring in Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner, his co-stars on Romancing the Stone and The Jewel of the Nile, to play the now Oliver and Barbara Rose. The three actors had had spent years looking for another project unrelated to that other series they could make together. Douglas would sign on to the project before his amazing fall and winter 1987 run, first as the star of the mega-hit Fatal Attraction, and then as the star of Wall Street, which would garner him an Academy Award for Best Actor.   Turner had been taking some time off from acting after finishing Peggy Sue Got Married in July 1985, and was pregnant with her daughter Rachel when DeVito approached her about The War of the Roses. Turner was already working on a comedy called Switching Channels, which had to finish shooting by early July 1987, as Turner's pregnancy would be rather visible if shooting lasted any longer. She had also committed to being a featured actor in Body Heat director Lawrence Kasdan's The Accidental Tourist, which would also re-team Turner with William Hurt.    But she would agree to star in The War of the Roses if they could give her some time being a new mom before shooting began.   DeVito and Leeson would continue to work on the script. As there was no character in the novel that would work for the compact actor/director, the two would create a framing device for the story. DeVito would play Gavin D'Amato, a divorce lawyer who was friends with Oliver Rose, who tells the story of Oliver and Barbara Rose to a potential client, played by Dan Castellaneta, the voice of Homer Simpson, as a way of trying to get his client to reconsider splitting with his wife. The character of Gavin D'Amato would take the place of Murray Goldstein in the novel, an overweight former rabbi who would only meet Oliver Rose during the course of the story.   Sean Astin, who had made a splash a few years earlier as the lead in The Goonies, would be cast as the Rose's teenage son Josh, while newcomer Heather Fairfield would get her first major movie role playing the Roses' daughter Evie, who would be renamed Carolyn for the movie.   The other major change DeVito and Leeson would make to the story would be to change the Roses' sitter from a teenager to a fortysomething woman, as they would be able to get German actress Marianne Sägebrecht, who had just found international stardom as the star of Percy Adlon's surprise global hit Baghdad Cafe, to come aboard.   Although the $26m film took place on the East Coast, the scenes not shot on the sound stages at Fox Studios in Los Angeles were filmed in Coupeville, WA, a small town on Whidbey Island, about forty miles north of Seattle, which had never been used as a filming location before.   Filming would begin on Stage 6 on the Fox lot, which was set up as the main living area for the Roses' house, on March 21st, 1989. The production would shoot as much of the film on the soundstages until April 7th, which was the first day they would be allowed to shoot in Coupeville. The evening of April 6th, though, would be spent on the backlot of Universal Studios, which was the only available space in Los Angeles at the time to accommodate shooting a massive, snowy Christmas Eve scene standing in for Cambridge, MA.   Two days after arriving in Coupeville, DeVito would discover a note on his rental car parked at the hotel where the production had its base, stating that thieves had stolen the dailies from the first day of location shooting, and demanded a ransom to have the footage returned. But DeVito was quickly able to find the dailies had not been stolen, and just laughed the note off as a prank.   After several weeks in Washington State, the production would return to Los Angeles to finish the remainder of the set shooting on the Fox Lot, as well as a few additional shots of homes in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Hancock Park, standing in suburban Washington D.C. Shooting would finish on July 25th, which would give DeVito and his team less than four and a half months to get the film ready for its planned December 8th release date.   Because the editing team lead by Lynne Klingman had been putting together an assembly cut for DeVito during production, the director was able to screen his first cut of the film for Fox executives in mid-August. That cut would run three hours and four minutes. But that's what an assembly cut is for. You get to see all the stuff you shot put together, and see what you need to whittle down, what you need to move around, and what you need to get rid of completely.   Over the course of the next few months, DeVito and the editors would get the movie down to a tight one hour and fifty six minutes. And unlike many movies then and now, there were very few scenes that needed to be reshot or added in. One shot that would be added after the audiences at several test screenings was horrified at the suggestion that Barbara's pâté may have been made with the family dog. DeVito would later state that he always meant to have a shot of the dog later in the movie, but it was definitely a late addition after the first few test screenings.   The War of the Roses would hold its world premiere at Century Plaza Cinemas in Century City, about a mile from the Fox lot, on December 4th, 1989. It would be a star-studded affair that included DeVito, Turner, and Douglas, who brought his father Kirk along with him, along with Courtney Cox, Olivia Newton-John, Kelly Preston, Mimi Rogers, Christian Slater and Samantha Morton, Oliver Stone, and Jennifer Tilly, followed by a New York City premiere two days later at the Gotham Theatre. The film would open in 1259 theatres on Friday, December 8th, and would be the highest grossing film in the nation, taking in $9.5m, knocking the previous week's #1 film, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, out of the top spot. It would fall to second place in its second week, as Christmas Vacation retook first place, and it would fall to third place during the long Christmas weekend. However, in its fourth week of release, the long New Years weekend, The War of the Roses would retake the top spot for the second and final time. At the end of the year, after 25 days of release, the film had grossed $43.85m, or the equivalent of $105m in 2022 dollars. The film would continue to stay strong for several more weeks, staying in the top ten until mid-February, before ending its run in theatres in the spring with $86.89m.   The reviews were pretty good, with particular praise heaped upon Douglas and Turner's performances as well as DeVito's direction. But, sadly, there would be little awards love for the film.   The Golden Globes would nominate the film for Best Comedy, and both Turner and Douglas for lead comedy performances, and the British Academy would nominate Michael Leeson for his screenplay, but would be completely shut out at the Academy Awards.   I love the movie. It was one of the first movies I bought on Laserdisc back in the early 1990s, and when I call it a box set, I mean it was actually two discs and a four page booklet about the movie not in an album-like slipcover but an actual box. The movie was on the first disc, with roughly an hour on each side, which included a separate audio track for DeVito's commentary and a personal introduction to the film by DeVito, while the second disc featured deleted scenes, theatrical trailers, a copy of the shooting script, production stills, and a gallery of the theatrical posters. For a guy who had spent years building an enviable VHS videotape collection, this was next level stuff most people wouldn't get to experience for nearly another decade.   More than thirty years after Warren Adler published The War of the Roses, he would release a sequel to his novel, entitled The Children of the Roses. Josh and Evie are now adults. Josh is married with two children himself, a boy and a girl, Michael and Emily. Much like his parents' marriage, Josh's marriage to Victoria seems to be picture perfect on the outside, but after their son gets caught up in a caper at his elite private school involving stolen Milky Way bars, Josh finds himself in his own War of the Roses.   Evie, who still copes with her depression by eating, comforts her niece and nephew with loads of food, since to Evie still, food is love, while Michael and Emily decide for themselves that their parents will stay together no matter what.   While the book was not a best seller like the first book, it would still sell quite well, as did almost every one of the other 43 books Adler would write and publish until his passing in 2019 at the age of 91.   Thank you for joining us for this year's Christmas episode of The 80s Movie Podcast. We'll talk again in early 2023, when Episode 98, about Neil Diamond's sole attempt at movie acting, The Jazz Singer, is released.   Remember to visit this episode's page on our website, The80sMoviePodcast.com, for extra materials about The War of the Roses.   The 80s Movies Podcast has been researched, written, narrated and edited by Edward Havens for Idiosyncratic Entertainment.   Thank you again.   Good night.

The Great Women Artists
Mary Beard on Classical Women (100th episode special!)

The Great Women Artists

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 47:18


THIS WEEK on the GWA Podcast, for the very special 100th EPISODE, we interview one of the world's leading cultural commentators and most important voices in Classics, Professor Dame MARY BEARD!! A specialist in Roman history and art, Mary Beard is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Newnham College, where she has been since 1984. She is also Professor of Ancient Literature at the Royal Academy, Classics editor of the TLS and a Fellow of the British Academy and International Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. One of the most important writers of our age, Mary Beard has written groundbreaking scholarship, books, documentaries and articles on the subject such as The Parthenon, Pompeii: Life in a Roman Town, Laughter in Ancient Rome, and SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome, And more recently, Women and Power: A Manifesto and Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern about Roman Emperors in Renaissance and later art, two books which shifted my understanding of the perception and role of women in society today and the nature of power in our Western word … and I couldn't be more honoured to have her on for this very special episode of the Great Women Artists Podcast. In this episode we discuss the women artists in the ancient world, the perception of women from ancient times to the present day – looking at Livia, Melassina, Agrippina, and Cleopatra – and the effect of the depictions of women from the ancient world – Venus, Medusa, Athena, Lilith – and how they filter into society today. -- Twelve Caesars (2021): https://www.waterstones.com/book/twelve-caesars/mary-beard/9780691222363 Women & Power (2017): https://www.waterstones.com/book/women-and-power/professor-mary-beard/9781788160612 Lecture by Mary Beard on women of the 12 Caesars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iB7W0UzVP24 Edmonia Lewis The Death of Cleopatra (completed 1876) https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/death-cleopatra-33878 Detail from The House of the Surgeon, a panelled painting in Pompeii (c.50-79 AD) - shows a woman in front of a painted canvas holding a paintbrush and mixing her paints: https://www.theancientartblog.com/post/women-painters-in-antiquity Women artists in antiquity: https://www.theancientartblog.com/post/women-painters-in-antiquity -- ENJOY! Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Research assistant: Viva Ruggi Sound editing by Nada Smiljanic Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/ -- THIS EPISODE IS GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY CHRISTIES: www.christies.com

The Danny Diess Show
Christine McVie Tribute With Music by Stevie Nicks, Cocteau Twins, Modern English & More

The Danny Diess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 86:46


This vinyl mix Danny pays tribute to the late singer songwriter Christine McVie with music by Stevie Nicks, Cocteau Twins, Modern English, and more. Christine Anne McVie (/məkˈviː/;[1] née Perfect; 12 July 1943 – 30 November 2022) was an English musician and songwriter. She was principally known as a vocalist and keyboardist with the band Fleetwood Mac.A member of several bands on the mid-1960s British Blues scene, notably Chicken Shack, she began playing with Fleetwood Mac in 1968, initially as a contract session player, before formally joining the band in 1970. She started to emerge as a songwriter by 1971, with her first compositions appearing on her fourth album with the group, Future Games. She would remain with the band through many lineup changes for the next several decades, generally writing and performing lead vocals on about half of the tracks on all of their subsequent studio albums (though she had partially retired in 1998, and only appeared as a session musician on the band's last studio album, Say You Will. She also released three solo studio albums. Steve Leggett of AllMusic described her as an "unabashedly easy-on-the-ears singer/songwriter, and the prime mover behind some of Fleetwood Mac's biggest hits". Eight songs written or co-written by her, including "Don't Stop", "Everywhere", and "Little Lies", appeared on Fleetwood Mac's 1988 Greatest Hits album.As a member of Fleetwood Mac, McVie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music in 1998. The same year, after almost 30 years with the band, she opted to leave and lived in semi-retirement for nearly 15 years. She released a solo album in 2004. She appeared on stage with Fleetwood Mac at the O2 Arena in London in September 2013, before rejoining the band in 2014 prior to their On with the Show tour.McVie received a Gold Badge of Merit Award from BASCA, now The Ivors Academy, in 2006.[9] She received the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement from the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors in 2014 and was honoured with the Trailblazer Award at the UK Americana Awards in 2021. She was also the recipient of two Grammy Awards.

BAJ Podcast
All That Glitters with Tianne Simmons

BAJ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 16:58


With the second series of the BBC's popular jewellery competition 'All That Glitters' only recently crowning its second winner, Sofie catches up with our very own BAJ graduate Tianne Louise-Simmons. They discuss what it was like to take part in the show, and what Tianne has in store for the future, reflecting on the importance of her educational journey for her confidence, and what it was like to get started in the industry. Following in her father's footsteps, Tianne is a jewellery industry professional who graduated from the British Academy of Jewellery in 2020. Trained as a goldsmith she has gained experience in education and industry, and her work is known for its technical excellence, exampled by having won the award for surface finishing by 77 diamonds at BAJ's Final Show 2021. In 2022 she was selected to participate in the renowned BBC jewellery competition 'All that glitters' season 2, where she demonstrated her passion for geometric lines. Following the show, she is focussing on the creation of bespoke custom commissions in her studio where all jewellery is handmade to order. To gain further experience, Tianne also continues to work as a jobbing goldsmith completing fine jewellery repairs. As her style is developing, her jewellery is often made using traditional techniques but with a modern mechanical and engineering inspired background and theme.

Dental Leaders Podcast
#162- Conversations from the BACD Conference - Part One

Dental Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 75:09


From 10-12 November, dentistry's great and good gathered at the International Conference Centre in Newport in Wales for the British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry's 18th annual conference.   This was our cue to catch up with old friends and hear from new voices, and we've captured the highlights for a BACD conference special.   Enjoy!    In This Episode 00.57 -  Ali & Zoh 06.54 - Chris McConnell 16:18  - Dipesh Parmar 29.54 - Gina Vega 51.11 - Kailesh Solanki

New Books Network
On Boethius' "The Consolation of Philosophy"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:56


For much of his life, the Roman philosopher Boethius was exceptionally fortunate. But towards the end of his life, his luck ran out. He was accused of treason, thrown in jail, and sentenced to death. While he was awaiting execution, he began to reflect on his life and how luck had played such an important part. He wrote his thoughts in what would later become one of the most influential philosophical works in history, The Consolation of Philosophy. John Marenbon is a Fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow, and Honorary Professor of Medieval Philosophy at Trinity College in the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, among other works. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Italian Studies
On Boethius' "The Consolation of Philosophy"

New Books in Italian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:56


For much of his life, the Roman philosopher Boethius was exceptionally fortunate. But towards the end of his life, his luck ran out. He was accused of treason, thrown in jail, and sentenced to death. While he was awaiting execution, he began to reflect on his life and how luck had played such an important part. He wrote his thoughts in what would later become one of the most influential philosophical works in history, The Consolation of Philosophy. John Marenbon is a Fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow, and Honorary Professor of Medieval Philosophy at Trinity College in the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, among other works. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/italian-studies

New Books in European Studies
On Boethius' "The Consolation of Philosophy"

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:56


For much of his life, the Roman philosopher Boethius was exceptionally fortunate. But towards the end of his life, his luck ran out. He was accused of treason, thrown in jail, and sentenced to death. While he was awaiting execution, he began to reflect on his life and how luck had played such an important part. He wrote his thoughts in what would later become one of the most influential philosophical works in history, The Consolation of Philosophy. John Marenbon is a Fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow, and Honorary Professor of Medieval Philosophy at Trinity College in the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, among other works. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Ancient History
On Boethius' "The Consolation of Philosophy"

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:56


For much of his life, the Roman philosopher Boethius was exceptionally fortunate. But towards the end of his life, his luck ran out. He was accused of treason, thrown in jail, and sentenced to death. While he was awaiting execution, he began to reflect on his life and how luck had played such an important part. He wrote his thoughts in what would later become one of the most influential philosophical works in history, The Consolation of Philosophy. John Marenbon is a Fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow, and Honorary Professor of Medieval Philosophy at Trinity College in the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, among other works. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Intellectual History
On Boethius' "The Consolation of Philosophy"

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:56


For much of his life, the Roman philosopher Boethius was exceptionally fortunate. But towards the end of his life, his luck ran out. He was accused of treason, thrown in jail, and sentenced to death. While he was awaiting execution, he began to reflect on his life and how luck had played such an important part. He wrote his thoughts in what would later become one of the most influential philosophical works in history, The Consolation of Philosophy. John Marenbon is a Fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow, and Honorary Professor of Medieval Philosophy at Trinity College in the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, among other works. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Inside The War Room
Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are

Inside The War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 49:34


How much can we blame or praise genetics? Today, Dr. Robert Plomin comes on to chat about the role of genetics in areas such as alcohol addiction, obesity, and schizophrenia.Links from the show:* Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are* Subscribe to the newsletterAbout my guest:Robert Plomin is MRC Research Professor in Behavioural Genetics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London. In 1994 after positions in the US at the University of Colorado and Pennsylvania State University, he came to the Institute to help Professor Sir Michael Rutter launch the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre. The goal of the Centre is to bring together genetic and environmental strategies to understand individual differences in behavioural development, which characterises his research.  In 1995, Professor Plomin began the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS), which has followed 10,000 pairs of UK twins from infancy through early adulthood and has been continuously funded for 25 years as a programme grant from the Medical Research Council. He has published more than 800 papers and is the author of the best-selling textbook in the field as well as a dozen other books. His most recent book is Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are (Allen Lane, October 2018; paperback by Penguin, June 2019). Blueprint describes how the DNA revolution is transforming science, society and the way we think about ourselves.  Professor Plomin has been elected the youngest President of the international Behavior Genetics Association and has received lifetime research achievement awards from the major associations related to his field (Behavior Genetics Association, Association of Psychological Science, Society for Research in Child Development, International Society for Intelligence Research), as well as being made Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, British Academy, American Academy of Political and Social Science, and Academy of Medical Sciences (UK).   Get full access to Dispatches from the War Room at dispatchesfromthewarroom.substack.com/subscribe

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Why do people voluntarily hand over authority to a government? Under what conditions should they do so? These questions are both timeless and extremely timely, as modern democratic governments struggle with stability and legitimacy. They also bring questions from moral and political philosophy into conversations with empirically-minded social science. Margaret Levi is a leading political scientist who has focused on political economy and the nature of trust in government and other institutions. We talk about what democracy means, its current state, and how we can make it better.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Margaret Levi received her Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. She is currently Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Center for Democracy, Development and Rule of Law at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University. She is also co-director of the Stanford Ethics, Society and Technology Hub, and the Jere L. Bacharach Professor Emerita of International Studies at the University of Washington. She is the winner of the 2019 Johan Skytte Prize and the 2020 Falling Walls Breakthrough. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the British Academy, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Association of Political and Social Sciences. She served as president of the American Political Science Association from 2004 to 2005. In 2014 she received the William H. Riker Prize in Political Science, in 2017 gave the Elinor Ostrom Memorial Lecture, and in 2018 received an honorary doctorate from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid.Web pageStanford web pageGoogle Scholar publicationsAmazon author pageWikipediaTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Keen On Democracy
Ian Kershaw: The Eleven Men (and One Woman) Who Authored 20th-Century Europe

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 42:33


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Ian Kershaw, author of Personality and Power: Builders and Destroyers of Modern Europe. Ian Kershaw, author of To Hell and Back, The End, Fateful Choices, and Making Friends with Hitler, is a British historian of twentieth-century Germany noted for his monumental biographies of Adolf Hitler. In 2002, he received his knighthood for services to history. He is a fellow of the British Academy, the Royal Historical Society, the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung in Bonn, Germany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HRchat Podcast
The Science of Stress in the Workplace with Professor Sir Cary Cooper, CBE

HRchat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 22:54


In this episode of the HRchat podcast, we focus on wellbeing in the workplace and ways to recognize and tackle stress. Our guest this time is Professor Sir Cary Cooper, CBE, the 50th Anniversary Prof of Organizational Psychology & Health at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester. Sir Cary is the author and editor of 125+ books and one of Britain's most quoted business experts. He is a founding President of the British Academy of Management, a Companion of the Chartered Management Institute and one of only a few UK Fellows of the (American) Academy of Management, past President of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy and President of RELATE. Cary is Chair of the Academy of Social Sciences. He was awarded the CBE by the Queen in 2001 for his contributions to organizational health and safety, and in 2014 he was awarded a Knighthood for his contribution to the social sciences. He was born in the USA, but lives in England and has dual nationality. Questions For Sir Cary Include:At a high level, how can HR leaders help build a culture of employee wellbeing within their org? Your latest book is called Occupational Health and Wellbeing: Challenges and Opportunities in Theory and Practice. The book covers a wealth of topical and relevant themes that include defining wellbeing in a modern world, toxic leadership, mental health first aid, the application of positive psychology, and what the ‘new normal' might look like. Tell me about the book and hoped-for learning outcomes.Stress has been a fundamental element for your research. What are some of the biggest causes of stress and anxiety and how can stress manifest itself in the workplace?Can Stress ever be a positive? We do our best to ensure editorial objectivity. The views and ideas shared by our guests and sponsors are entirely independent of The HR Gazette, HRchat Podcast and Iceni Media Inc.   

Crystals for Spirituality and Wellbeing
Euphoralite: Midnight Sky Supernova: A spiritual Adventure, marrying the energy and physical worlds

Crystals for Spirituality and Wellbeing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 23:13


Are you ready for a real life Spiritual Adventure ?This podcast is the information I received when meditating and connecting my consciousness with the spirit of Father Time and White Dwarf through the vibration of Midnight Supernova , another member of the Euphoralite family. It details a Spiritual Adventure to help raise the collective consciousness.Unbeknown to me a White Dwarf can turn into a supernova, which I found to be  quite incredible. When I researched the information I received in the meditation and it was backed up with information from the Nasa website I was amazed at how closely linked the energy world and the physical worlds are. Science really is marrying with spirituality. I was told , during meditation that a White Dwarf is a union of ancient celestial stars that are dying and that this is when they shine the brightest. Whilst ingesting the light from the celestial energy body I was told to begin a Spiritual Mission of gridding the Earth so that the White Dwarf could use it's 350,000 times stronger gravitational pull to help align the Earth with the lighter dimensions.Ley Lines or Dragon Lines will show the way and help create a more heart based reality.If you would like to join us please email jackie.winters@yahoo.co.uk ref White Dwarf and we can send you details on how to connect in your area, or join us on one of our workshops to unite with us.British Academy of Crystal Healing: Leading the way in Vibrational Medicine https://www.britishacademyofcrystalhealing.comCrystal Classes, Retreats, Spiritual Adventures, Pre recorded videos, free advice, consultations plus much more. If you want to learn from the best you will love what we have to offer!

Social Science Bites
Will Hutton on the State of Social Science

Social Science Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 21:48


Political economist and journalist Will Hutton, author of the influential 1995 book The State We're In, offers a state of the field report on the social sciences in this Social Science Bites podcast. Hutton, who was appointed in 2021 to a six-year term as president of Britain's Academy of Social Sciences, addresses various critiques of modern social science – especially in its British incarnations -- from host David Edmonds. As defined by the academy that he now heads, “social science is the understanding of society in all its dimensions,” and encompasses the societal, economic, behavioral and geospatial sciences. Despite that broad remit, the first question posed is whether social and behavioral sciences take a back seat to the natural sciences in the public imagination. Hutton, for his part, says no – although he does see them not always getting their due. He notes that in combatting the COVID-19 pandemic, yeoman's work was conducted by social and behavioral science. “It wasn't called social science, but it was driven by social science.” The same, he continues, is happening as Britain confronts its economic demons. “Academic prowess is a kind of team,” he details. “You need your humanities, you need your physical scientists, your natural scientists, your medical scientists and your social scientists on the pitch. Sometime the ball falls to their feet and you look to them to make the killer pass.” One thing that might help in achieving that overdue recognition, he explains later, would be if the social sciences themselves shared their commonality as opposed to denying it. “[T]he Academy of Social Science was established 40 years ago, because we felt that good as the British Academy is, it couldn't represent humanities and social science co-equally. Social science needed its own voice. Four decades on, I would say that social science's standing in the world is higher than it was 40 years ago. But if [a score of] 100 is what you want to get to, we probably haven't gotten beyond 20 or 30.” Impacting society, meanwhile, is how the sciences must improve their score (although Hutton acknowledges the vagaries of what impact looks like by saying “I'm not willing to castigate people if it looks as if what they are immediately doing is not impactful or having an impact.”) Asked what he sees as the “most fundamental issue” social science should tackle straightaway, Hutton offers four broad avenues to move down: Economics, governance, change behavior to keep the planet in good shape, and constructing a civil society of institutions that serve both individual and community needs.  Among those, he concludes, “I think combining ‘the we and the I' is the most important thing that social science can do.” Hutton's wide-ranging answers follow from a wide-ranging career. He served as editor-in-chief of The Observer newspaper, was chief executive of the then Industrial Society, was principal of Hertford College, Oxford from 2011 to 2020, and has authored a number of bestsellers since The State We're In: Why Britain Is in Crisis and How to Overcome It. Those books include 2008's The Writing on the Wall: China and the West in the 21st Century, 2011's Them and Us, 2015's How Good We Can Be, and 2018's Saving Britain: How We Can Prosper in a New European Future (written with Andrew Adonis).

Crystals for Spirituality and Wellbeing
Euphoralite: Red Dragon: Delving deep into the subconscious

Crystals for Spirituality and Wellbeing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 23:02


Red Dragon is another member of the Euphoralite family. This experience was extra ordinary, a real visit into the energy world meeting whale and red dragon and having deep conversations with both spirit animals. I share my experience and conversations with you as whale reminds me that the only thing to fear is my own mind and Red dragon shows me the destructive forces of the element of fire and the illumination that can occur as well.The more I shift my awareness into the world of spirit and connect with these incredible spirit forms the more I witness the weaving together of the 2 worlds. I hope that you enjoy the experience as much as I did and it aids illumination for you too. British Academy of Crystal Healing: Leading the way in Vibrational Medicine https://www.britishacademyofcrystalhealing.comCrystal Classes, Retreats, Spiritual Adventures, Pre recorded videos, free advice, consultations plus much more. If you want to learn from the best you will love what we have to offer!

STAGES with Peter Eyers
‘Pencils and Powders and Paint' - Drag Performer, Make-up Artist and Trailblazer; Strykermeyer

STAGES with Peter Eyers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 61:44


Strykermeyer is a drag performer of unique powers and enormous skill. His work has enamoured audiences around the world. His ability to conjure a crowd is harnessed with immense theatricality; drawn from the combination of idiosyncratic invention in performance; and the greasepaints that contribute to the creation of an arresting and hypnotic aesthetic. Migrating to Australia as a boy from the UK, his family found residence in the Goldfields town of Kambalda in Western Australia. The contrast of geography and climate built a resilience in the young Stryker and forced avenues to escape - in imagination and by train! Landing in Perth in the 70s he entered his first nightclub - Matches on William street. The lure of the stage called and his place in the world was found. This was the time of a different drag scene. Experimental and exciting, it drew a queer community together and launched the careers of a bounty of burgeoning artists. Established performer Audrey Woodstock-Rose guided Stryker in the early days providing lessons in stagecraft and an appreciation of Asian theatre styles such as Kabuki, Noh, and Butoh; influences that resonate in Stryker's performance repertoire. Early song choices that supported his developing style included Gary Numan's Are Friends Electric? and Iggy Pop's I'm Bored, which he performed in ‘boy drag'. Considered one of the best make-up artists in Australia, Stryker contributed to the drag aesthetic on the film Priscilla - Queen of the Desert; ultimately being awarded the British Academy of Film and Television Award for Best Make-up and Hair Design in 1994. Today he continues to contribute a vivid artistic and considered temperament to queer and art spaces around W.A. Collaborations with fellow performer Ash Baroque inspire his creativity and ensure we continue to be enthralled by his vast talents. Stryker the man, is a modest gentleman who possesses years of experience and knowledge; whilst retaining a passion for his art and craft. He is a treasured and gifted artist who has been an avant-garde presence on the queer scene for several decades. What a treat that he shares all of that in this riveting episode of the STAGES podcast. The STAGES podcast is available to access and subscribe from Spotify and Apple podcasts. Or from wherever you access your favourite podcasts. A conversation with creatives about craft and career. Recipient of Best New Podcast at 2019 Australian Podcast Awards. Follow socials on instagram (stagespodcast) and facebook (Stages). www.stagespodcast.com.au

Arts & Ideas
British Academy Book Prize 2022

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:02


Deafness and communication, writing Chinese, women as killers in Chile, German postwar history, testimony from a Swedish village and a global history of science are the topics explored in the books shortlisted for this year's prize for Global Cultural Understanding run by the British Academy. Rana Mitter talks to the six authors about their findings. The books are: The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell's Quest to End Deafness by Katie Booth Aftermath: Life in the Fallout of the Third Reich by Harald Jähner Osebol: Voices from a Swedish Village by Marit Kapla Horizons: A Global History of Science by James Poskett When Women Kill: Four Crimes Retold by Alia Trabucco Zerán Kingdom of Characters: A Tale of Language, Obsession and Genius in Modern China by Jing Tsu The prize of £25,000 will be awarded on October 26th 2022. You can find interviews with writers shortlisted in previous year's on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00106pn and https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000n0bv Producer: Tim Bano

Storiavoce
Existe-t-il une identité méditerranéenne ? avec David Abulafia

Storiavoce

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 28:00


Mare Nostrum pour les Romains, mer blanche pour les Turcs, mer du Milieu pour les Allemands : les noms de la mer Méditerranée nous disent l'extrême richesse de cet espace et de ses perceptions. Dans un entretien exclusif enregistré aux Rendez-Vous de l'Histoire de Blois, le grand historien David Abulafia explique en quoi il se démarque des travaux de Braudel. Comment écrire une histoire de la Méditerranée ? Quelles sont les grandes périodes de cette histoire ? La Méditerranée est-elle un monde avant tout masculin ? Existe-t-il une identité méditerranéenne ? Ou bien l'identité méditerranéenne est-elle le reflet d'une utopie tant sa diversité et sa pluralité (ethnique, linguistique, religieuse et politique) est réelle ? Notre invité : Professeur émérite d'histoire méditerranéenne à l'université de Cambridge, David Abulafia en a présidé la faculté d'histoire. Son travail porte sur l'Espagne, l'Italie et la Méditerranée médiévales. La Grande mer. Une Histoire de la Méditerranée et des Méditerranéens a reçu le prix de la British Academy ainsi que le Mountbatten Maritime Award. Le livre vient d'être publié aux Belles Lettres (35€, 744 pages).

Mark Leonard's World in 30 Minutes
The Clash of Orders with Rana Mitter on China

Mark Leonard's World in 30 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 39:49


Many Europeans see the war in Ukraine as an attack on the ‘rules-based order'. But to many people in other parts of the world, there is no consensus on a set of rules to govern global affairs – and no sense of order. In this mini-series, Mark Leonard will go on an intellectual tour of the world talking to key thinkers about how order is being defined by different powers. He explores how the clash between these different notions plays into the big shocks facing the world – from climate change and future pandemics to geopolitical struggles and technological disasters – and what this means for national and global politics. -- In this first episode, Leonard is joined by Rana Mitter, vice-president of the British Academy and professor of the history and politics of modern China at the University of Oxford, to talk about the Chinese understanding of order. How are economic inequalities and covid-19 challenging Chinese stability? What is the role of multilateralism in the international system? And finally, how do narratives of the past shape understandings of ‘order' today? Bookshelf •“China's Good War: How World War II Is Shaping a New Nationalism” by Rana Mitter • “Is the Growing Pessimism About China Warranted?” (2016) ChinaFile Conversation • “In the Name of the People” (2017) TV series

Extreme Health Radio
Otto Haddad – How To Use Sound To Unravel The Many Layers Of True Healing

Extreme Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 97:45


Today we had Otto Haddad on the show talking about sound therapy. Talk about a very interesting concept indeed. He actually uses the vibrational frequencies in sound to help tune specific organs in order to function properly. Isn't that a wild concept? How do our organs get out of balance? How does sound affect the cells and the organs themselves? Otto covers all of this in this particular show. He's a very interesting fellow and I think there's a lot of truth to what he's saying. Even in the bible it says, "God said let there be light". So even in the bible there was sound before there was light. I read a quote during the show that all physical matter and that which makes up our world is the dance between two things and two things only. Matter is the physical manifestation of the dance between sound and light. Personally I think there's much more to what Otto was saying than we can ever know. Perhaps in 100 years or so we'll be able to scientifically verify everything he was saying. Why wait 100 years? If it resonates with you then you might want to see if he can help you out. He does see people over Skype and long distance. We hope you enjoyed our interview with Otto Haddad as much as we did and if you did would you consider clicking "like" and "share" on this page to let your friends and family know about the work he is doing? Kate and I would greatly appreciate that! :) Show Notes For This Episode: The Vitamix Blender Yeast Infection No More The Bellicon Rebounder Tristan Truscott episode about Qigong - Qigong Dr. John Bergman episode Kerri Rivera on autism - see books Transforming color into sound Jim Humble episode on MMS - see books Bo Wong Lyz Cooper - see books Elaine Thompson The Artist's Way British Academy of Sound Therapy Sharry Edwards - see books Lessons From The Miracle Doctors by Jon Barron Fabien Maman - see books Tibetan Singing Bowls Crystal Bowls Stay Notified of New Shows: [hcshort id="16"] Commercials During This Episode: Commercial #1 Commercial #2 Commercial #3 Find Extreme Health Radio On: [include file=showpage-itunes-soundcloud-stitcher.html] Please Subscribe: Subscribe To Our Radio Show For Updates! Other Shows: [include file=show-links.html] Listen to other shows with this guest. Show Date: Monday 4/21/2014 Show Guest: Otto Haddad Guest Info: I spent many years working in IT offices and have experienced what it is like to have terrible nightmares and wake up in the middle of the night in sweat and panic. I have tried a few holistic disciplines which helped in bringing more awareness and mindfulness to my process. However the biggest shift in my life happened when I discovered Sound! Sound Therapy has given me clarity in the toughest moments and allowed me to go deeper into myself in a very gentle and natural way to transform my nightmares into positive experiences. I also find it easy to go into a state of mindfulness with sound. I closely analyze cutting-edge scientific research on the healing benefits of Sound, am a member of Sound Therapy Association and studied Sound Therapy treatments with groups and one-to-one in British Academy of Sound Therapy with Lyz Cooper, a pioneer in the field; and the cutting-edge Vibrational Retraining with the world class Sound Therapist Elaine Thompson at SoundTherapyUK. Show Topic: Frequency, sound, vibration, energy, acoustics, and healing of the body Guest Website(s): http://www.ottosoundtherapy.com/ Social Websites: Facebook http://facebook.com/ottosoundtherapy Twitter http://twitter.com/soundofotto Others http://google.com/+Ottosoundtherapypage https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1B7SDborc_P-l2ZQ8lUkQ Guest Product(s): Please Support Us If You Are Able: (Opens in a new window - Every bit helps us to keep delivering even better shows that help you heal & thrive!)

Les Cours du Collège de France
LES COURS DU COLLEGE DE FRANCE du jeudi 06 octobre 2022

Les Cours du Collège de France

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 58:45


durée : 00:58:45 - Les Cours du Collège de France - par : Merryl Moneghetti - A quelles conditions l'entreprise pourrait-elle devenir un foyer de la démocratie? Demande Alain Supiot. Le juriste explique pourquoi il faut "saisir la notion de fait normatif". Il s'attache à la "généalogie institutionnelle de l'entreprise", à partir de Grotius, Leibnitz, Gierke et Proudhon. Ainsi, de quelle façon le juriste Grotius, au XVIIe siècle a-t-il été l'un des premiers à faire "un usage moderne de la notion de société" et comment a-t-il posé le fondement dogmatique de la globalisation marchande, fondement aujourd'hui repris par la science économique ? Quelles sont les préconisations d'avant-garde du philosophe Leibniz en matière de droit social et quelles sont les longues racines historiques de la divergence entre les manières anglaises et allemandes de concevoir l'entreprise?Enfin, de quelle façon le philosophe politique Proudhon peut-il considérer que le droit est indispensable pour fonder une démocratie économique qui puisse faire contrepoids à la démocratie politique?Fondateur de l'Institut d'Etudes Avancées de Nantes, professeur émérite au Collège de France, titulaire de la chaire État social et mondialisation : analyse juridique des solidarités de (2012-2019), Alain Supiot est membre correspondant de la British Academy.  Il nous entraîne dans une grande réflexion autour des "Figures juridiques de la démocratie économique".Pour la deuxième année de cours, il se penche sur la question de la démocratisation de l'entreprise. Il revient sur les théories juridiques de l'entreprise et sur la généalogie de ces théories. Il nous plonge à la fois dans un passionnant regard rétrospectif à la lumière des  questions d'aujourd'hui, mais aussi dans l'histoire des mots. Alain Supiot rappelle qu' "Aux origines institutionnelles de l'entreprise se trouve l'oikos grec ou la domus romaine, c'est-à-dire la maisonnée comme communauté économique et lignagière, soumise au pouvoir du pater familias. Le patronat est ainsi une notion héritée du droit romain, où le patronus désignait l'ancien maître d'un esclave affranchi, auquel ce dernier demeurait lié par une obligation de respect (obsequium) et de services (operæ), ainsi que par des liens d'obligation alimentaire et successoraux (bona). La sphère de l'oikos, dans son sens originel comme dans le sens moderne de l'oikos- nomos, de l'éco-nomie, constitue ce que Georges Gurvitch appelle un « fait normatif » : son existence est antérieure et à certains égards indépendante de la loi de la cité et de l'hétéronomie de l'état, car elle engendre ses propres normes, elle est auto-nome."Dès lors que nous apprennent Grotius, avocat protestant hollandais, l'un des pères du droit international et Leibniz, philosophe et humaniste allemand des notions de "faits normatifs" et "d'associations économiques capables de s'auto réglementer" et quel est l'apport, au XIXe siècle, de Proudhon à cette généalogie de l'entreprise et du droit social ? Nous gagnons le CDF  le 24 novembre 2017, pour le cours d'Alain Supiot, aujourd'hui, "Faits normatifs, associations économiques et droit social".

Institute for Government
How should we govern in the digital age?

Institute for Government

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 66:01


Technology is profoundly reconfiguring our society, creating new opportunities but also new risks and inequalities. Many politicians and policymakers have a limited understanding of technology and its effects, yet government has no choice but to grapple with these issues. How do we take technology out of the box labelled 'digital policy' and give it the attention it needs at the heart of policy and public life? We were joined by Chi Onwurah, Shadow Minister for Science, Research and Innovation; James Plunkett, Executive Director at Citizens Advice; Hetan Shah, Chief Executive of The British Academy; and Jeni Tennison, Executive Director at Connected by Data. The event was chaired by Gavin Freeguard. This event was recorded at the 2022 Labour Party Conference in Liverpool.

Cities After... podcast
Climate Change Series: David Harvey on the Metabolic Relation to Nature - Pt. 5

Cities After... podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 55:52


Concurrent to the very important contributions of early Marxist eco-feminists in the 1960s and 1970s, Prof. David Harvey was amongst the first intellectuals that began to read in Marx a complex critique of capitalism's destructive metabolic relation to nature, a topic that has been constant in his writings from 1970 until today. In this episode of Cities After…, Prof. Robles-Durán speaks with Prof. David Harvey on his current views about nature in his writings, the dialectical contradictions he sees in capitalism's response to the climate crisis, and the metabolic relation to nature as a key part of the socio-political problem to be addressed. About our guest: David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Geography and Anthropology at the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. His work into the fields of anthropology, geography, marxist studies, political-economy, urban studies and cultural studies have made him one of the most influential thinkers alive. Over his lifetime, Prof. Harvey has been dedicated to the production and transfer of critical knowledge to academics and the general public alike, his online lectures on Marx's Capital volume I have been downloaded over half a million times with pending translations in over 129 languages and his co-produced animation on the Crisis of Capitalism has been watched over 3 million times. He has published 26 books, many of them widely influential in the humanities, social sciences as well as art and design fields. He is the recipient of twelve honorary doctorates. In 2019, he was granted the Leverhulme Gold Medal of the British Academy for Creative Contributions to the Social Sciences.

Inside The War Room
The Politics of Military Operations from Korea to Ukraine

Inside The War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 31:37


On today's show, Sir Lawrence Freedman visits the War Room to chat about his new book Command: The Politics of Military Operations from Korea to Ukraine.Links from the Show:Lawrence's SubstackCommand: The Politics of Military Operations from Korea to UkraineRegister for the newsletterConnect with RyanAbout my guest:Sir Lawrence Freedman is Emeritus Professor of War Studies at King's College London. He was Professor of War Studies at King's from 1982 to 2014. He was Head of the School of Social Sciences and Public Policy at King's College London from 2001 to 2003 and Vice-Principal from 2003 to 2013. Before joining King's he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London, and the Royal Institute of International Affairs, London. Elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995, he was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign in 1997 and a member of the UK Inquiry into the Iraq War from 2009 to 2016. His books include Strategy: A History and the Future of War: A History. Command: The Politics of Military Operations from Korea to Ukraine will be published in September. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit dispatchesfromthewarroom.substack.com

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders
Dr. Aditya Simha - Leadership Insights for Wizards and Witches

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 46:11 Transcription Available


Dr. Aditya Simha is an Associate Professor of Management at the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater. He obtained his Ph.D. in Business Administration at Washington State University. His research is primarily in business ethics (e.g., ethical leadership, ethical climates, and unethical behavior), healthcare ethics (e.g., moral distress, mental health, and COVID anxiety), and organizational behavior (e.g., burnout, stress, and personality). He teaches Leadership Development and Organizational Behavior at the MBA and Undergraduate levels and teaches Micro Issues in Business and Contemporary Research Methods at the Doctoral level. At the postgraduate level, he is an active doctoral dissertation chair. He also regularly presents at international conferences such as the Academy of Management, International Leadership Association, British Academy of Management, Western Academy of Management, and Midwest Academy of Management. He has published a book titled Leadership Insights for Wizards and Witches. He has also published articles in journals such as the Academy of Management Perspectives, Journal of Business Ethics, Management Decision, Nursing Ethics, Journal of Business Economics & Management, Family Medicine, and Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. He currently is an associate editor of Business Ethics, the Environment, and Responsibility serves on the editorial boards of Management Decision and the Journal of Business Ethics Education and is a regular reviewer for journals like the Journal of Business Ethics. A Quote From This Episode"I would say that Hermione is probably the better leader among the two of them. And not just because she became the Minister of Magic, even from an early age, Hermione is the one who sees injustice."Resources Mentioned in This EpisodeBook: Leadership Insights for Wizards and Witches.Book: Leaders Assemble! Leadership in the MCUAbout The International Leadership Association (ILA)The ILA was created in 1999 to bring together professionals interested in the study, practice, and teaching of leadership. Plan for ILA's 24th Global Conference online on October 6 & 7, 2022, and/or onsite in Washington, D.C., October 13-16, 2022. Register for the 24th Global Conference here!The Prometheus ProjectAbout The Prometheus ProjectFocus Series Experience - Immunity to Change workshopMy Approach to HostingThe views of my guests do not constitute "truth." Nor do they reflect my personal views in some instances. However, they are important views to be aware of. Nothing can replace your own research and exploration.Connect with Scott AllenWebsite

Arts & Ideas
Prison Break

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 14:41


Prison breaks loom large in both literature and pop culture. But how should we evaluate them ethically? New Generation Thinker Jeffrey Howard asks what a world without prison would look like. His essay explores whether those unjustly incarcerated have the moral right to break out, whether the rest of us have an obligation to help -- and what the answers teach us about the ethics of punishment today. Jeffrey Howard is an Associate Professor in the Political Science Department at University College London, whose work on dangerous speech has been funded by the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust. You can find him discussing hate speech in a Free Thinking Episode https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0006tnf New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to select ten academics who can turn their research into radio. Producer: Luke Mulhall

Speaking of Writers
John Willis- Nagasaki: The Forgotten Prisoners

Speaking of Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 11:07


Speaking of Writers Part 3 of a series on Victory in Japan Day (VJ Day 8/15/45. This is one of the most remarkable untold stories of the Second World war. At 11.02 am on an August morning in 1945 America dropped the world's most powerful atomic bomb on the Japanese port city of Nagasaki. The most European city in Japan was flattened to the ground 'as if it had been swept aside by a broom'. More than 70,000 Japanese were killed. At the time, hundreds of Allied prisoners of war were working close to the bomb's detonation point, as forced labourers in the shipyards and foundries of Nagasaki. These men, from the Dales of Yorkshire and the dusty outback of Australia, from the fields of Holland and the remote towns of Texas, had already endured an extraordinary lottery of life and death that had changed their lives forever. They had lived through nearly four years of malnutrition, disease, and brutality. Now their prison home was the target of America's second atomic bomb. In one of the greatest survival stories of the Second World War, we trace their astonishing experiences back to bloody battles in the Malayan jungle, before the dramatic fall of Fortress Singapore, the mighty symbol of the British Empire. This abject capitulation was followed by surrender in Java and elsewhere in the East, condemning the captives to years of cruel imprisonment by the Japanese. Their lives grew evermore perilous when thousands of prisoners were shipped off to build the infamous Thai-Burma Railway, including the Bridge on the River Kwai. If that was not harsh enough, POWs were then transported to Japan in the overcrowded holds of what were called hell ships. These rusty buckets were regularly sunk by Allied submarines, and thousands of prisoners lived through unimaginable horror, adrift on the ocean for days. Some still had to endure the final supreme test, the world's second atomic bomb. The prisoners in Nagasaki were eyewitnesses to one of the most significant events in modern history but writing notes or diaries in a Japanese prison camp was dangerous. To avoid detection, one Allied prisoner buried his notes in the grave of a fellow POW to be reclaimed after the war, another wrote his diary in Irish. Now, using unpublished and rarely seen notes, interviews, and memoirs, this unique book weaves together a powerful chorus of voices to paint a vivid picture of defeat, endurance, and survival against astonishing odds. John Willis, author of Nagasaki: The Forgotten Prisoners, is one of Britain's best known television executives. He is a former Director of Programmes at Channel 4 and Director of Factual and Learning at the BBC. He was Vice-president of National Programs at WGBH Boston. In 2012 he was elected as Chair of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). He is currently Chair of Mentorn Media, producers of Question Time for BBC and he also chairs the Board of Governors at the Royal Central School for Speech and Drama. He divides his time between London and Norfolk. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steve-richards/support

Network Capital
Deconstructing Democracy and Divorce with Dr. Saumya Saxena

Network Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 58:03


Saumya Saxena's research focused on family law and religion in India. She is interested in the interface between law, policy, and society and was part of the Law Commission of India (2016-2018) where she researched on amendments to religious personal laws in India. She was part of the research team that assisted the Justice Verma Committee (2013) on amendments to rape laws in India. She has taught subjects related to gender, social movements, and Indian politics. Saumya Saxena is a legal historian specialising in family law, religion and gender politics in India. She writes on women's rights movements, religion and law in late 20th and 21st century South Asia. Her research brings into conversation a number of archives and analyses how issue of religious personal law contributed to the unique evolution of both, the rule of law, and the doctrine of secularism in India. She is a British Academy postdoctoral fellow 2018-2021.

High Theory
Social Psychoanalysis

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 18:55


Ankhi Mukherjee talks about that looks at the subject of psychoanalysis as a product of social and cultural processes, and thereby reorients concepts of parental and familial bonds, trauma, coping mechanisms and so on. The conversation focuses on her recent book on the subject, Unseen City: The Psychic Lives of the Urban Poor, which studies community-based psychiatry and how it serves the working classes in three global cities. Ankhi Mukherjee is Professor of English and World Literatures at the University of Oxford and a Fellow in English at Wadham College. Her most recent book is Unseen City: The Psychic Lives of the Urban Poor, published by Cambridge University Press in December 2021. Her second monograph, What Is a Classic? Postcolonial Rewriting and Invention of the Canon (Stanford, 2014) won the British Academy prize in English Literature in 2015. Mukherjee's other publications include Aesthetic Hysteria: The Great Neurosis in Victorian Melodrama and Contemporary Fiction (Routledge, 2007) and the collections of essays she has edited, namely A Concise Companion to Psychoanalysis, Literature, and Culture (with Laura Marcus, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015) and After Lacan (Cambridge UP, 2018). Mukherjee has published in competitive peer-reviewed journals, including PMLA, MLQ, Contemporary Literature, Parallax, and the Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, and sits on the editorial boards of several international journals. At present, Mukherjee has two books under contract. She is writing A Very Short Introduction to Postcolonial Literature in the widely circulated VSI series (Oxford UP, 2023) and co-editing (with Ato Quayson) a collaborative volume titled Decolonizing the English Literary Curriculum (Cambridge UP, 2022). Image: © 2022 Saronik Bosu Music used in promotional material: ‘Avec Toi' by Dana Boulé. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Byzantium & Friends
76. Exploring the monuments of Byzantine Constantinople, with Sergey Ivanov

Byzantium & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 65:52


A conversation with Sergey Ivanov (Alexander von Humboldt fellow at the University of Munich; corresponding member of the British Academy) on the monuments, buildings, and ruins of the Byzantine phase of the City's history. We talk about how to explore them, how to access their history, and even get a feel for the lingering presence of the events that took place in them. We ponder what has been lost and what might yet be found. The conversation is based on Sergey's recent book In Search of Constantinople: A Guidebook through Byzantine Istanbul and Its Surroundings, tr. by Sara Buzadzhi and D. Hoffman, ed. David Hendricks (Istanbul: The Swedish Research Institute in Istanbul, 2022).

Dental Leaders Podcast
#142- Both Sides of the Coin - Neil Gerrard

Dental Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 112:37


Neil Gerrard got an early start in dentistry, helping out at his dad's lab, where he first started making models aged just 13.   But after spending some time as a clinical dental technician, Neil enrolled in dental school to scratch his itch to work more closely with patients and see the fruits of his labour pay off first-hand.   And dentistry is still very much a family affair for Neil. He now practices alongside his wife and brother, who continues their dad's CDT legacy.   Neil chats about how it all started, the origins of his hard work ethic and gives his perspective on technical and clinical dentistry drawn from his years of unique experience in both disciplines.   Enjoy! In This Episode 02.55 - Backstory and work ethic 12.39 - Switching to clinical 24.50 - Business culture and structure 31.57 - Team training and motivation 42.53 - Neil's patients 52.55 - Clinical-technical tension and tech 01.05.50 - Guarantees 01.13.41 - Surprise and delight 01.19.21 - Black box thinking 01.26.47 - On employees and associates 01.39.54 - Charm Vs clinical skills 01.44.37 - Fantasy dinner party 01.47.39 - Last days and legacy About Neil Gerrard Neil Gerrard is a former clinical dental technician turned dentist and one of only a handful of UK dentists to hold British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (BACD) accreditation, for whom he is also an examiner.   Neil is the author of There is No Perfect Dentist—a consumer guide to choosing dental professionals.

Mind-Body Solution with Dr Tevin Naidu
Chris Frith: The Neural Basis of Consciousness, Biological Bayesian Brains & Interacting Human Minds

Mind-Body Solution with Dr Tevin Naidu

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 93:07


WATCH: https://youtu.be/80jTPjAOzeY Chris Frith is Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London (UCL), Visiting Professor at the Interacting Minds Centre at Aarhus University, Research Fellow at the Institute of Philosophy and Quondam Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. A Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences from 1999, Chris was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2008 and an Honorary Fellow of the British Science Association in 2010. He has won numerous medals and awards for his significant contributions to neuroscience, including the 2009 European Latsis Prize alongside his wife, the developmental psychologist Uta Frith — also a Fellow of the Royal Society. CONNECT: - Website: https://tevinnaidu.com - Instagram: https://instagram.com/drtevinnaidu - Facebook: https://facebook.com/drtevinnaidu - Twitter: https://twitter.com/drtevinnaidu - LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/drtevinnaidu TIMESTAMPS: (0:00) - Introduction (0:36) - Consciousness definition (level vs content) (3:57) - Function of consciousness (evolution) (6:52) - Consciousness & AI (11:31) - Effects of consciousness on interacting with others (18:13) - Self vs consciousness, delusion vs belief, perception vs hallucination (29:59) - Evolutionary psychiatry (33:27) - The source of consciousness (40:20) - Theories of consciousness (50:08) - Interacting minds & future minds (59:01) - Religious/Spiritual views (1:01:27) - Altered states of consciousness (1:09:35) - Quantum consciousness & other minds (1:17:12) - Virtual realities, brains in vats, augmented bodies & sensory substitution (1:22:47) - Free will (1:26:44) - Chris' book recommendations (1:32:03) - Conclusion Website · YouTube