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Reform This!
Ep 129 | The Free Aafia Movement tells us everything about Muslim Radicalization

Reform This!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:36


Don't miss this weeks podcast as Dr Jasser explains why the January 15 terror incident at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville Texas committed by Islamist terrorist Malik Faisal Akram highlights how deep the radicalization of Muslims by so-called "mainstream" American Islamist organizations runs in the West. Before this weekend many Americans hadn't heard of Aafia Siddiqui and Zuhdi explains why if we are to ever defeat Jihad we should understand why militants and radicals like Alfiah Siddiqui become cause celebre for so-called mainstream Islamic groups that want to thrive on conspiracy theories and separatism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That's NOT Christian
EP 137: Pastor Wipes Spit On Man's Face, Drake's Hot Sauce Trick, & Kanye Drama

That's NOT Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 93:27


A famous pastor out of Oklahoma got very literal in his sermon this weekend about seeing God's hazy vision for ourselves in 2022 -- needing to hawk one to make his point. Michael Todd, who leads the Transformation Church in Tulsa, conjured up grossed-out reactions from his congregation Sunday during his service -- which was being streamed for the folks at home. The reason ... he wiped his own spit all over the face of his brother who was up there volunteering for the yuck fest. An Instagram model is accusing Drake of getting a little too spicy during a recent romantic encounter, which allegedly took place at the rapper's hotel a few weeks ago. The model claims that the self-proclaimed Certified Lover Boy - born Aubrey Drake Graham - added a packet of hot sauce into a used condom in order to kill his sperm after the two had sex. Kanye West is taking aim at Pete Davidson while using his music to speak out about his divorce. In a new song with The Game entitled "Eazy," the rapper, 44, makes his feelings about the 28-year-old Saturday Night Live star, who is currently dating West's estranged wife Kim Kardashian. In the track, released Friday, West references his near-fatal car crash from 2002 and raps, "God saved me from that crash/ just so I can beat Pete Davidson's ass." After Davidson's name is mentioned, a woman's voice, which sounds a lot like his estranged wife's, is sampled and says "Who?". That's NOT Christian is a podcast by four urban believers who discuss current events and push the envelope on traditional religious subjects with a touch of humor. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK28... ►Merch Store: https://thatsnotchristian.com​​​ ►Donate: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/thats... ►Listen to That's NOT Christian Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3tGrB3G... Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... ► Telegram: https://t.me/thatsnotchristian​​​ ► Music by Ryan Little SPOTIFY: https://spoti.fi/2MmjRru​​​ ►Follow the Squad ANT: https://www.instagram.com/aptop25/​​​ JAY: https://www.instagram.com/jayacosta/​​​ JIMMY: https://www.instagram.com/jaeisla/​​​ SWITCH: https://www.instagram.com/switch_in_h... ►Podcast Equipment Canon M50: https://amzn.to/2NP7s3G​​​ Logitech C920: https://amzn.to/36odZJ9​ Samson​​ Q2U: https://amzn.to/3tcv2aW​​​ Ring Light: https://amzn.to/3tbxApJ​ Light​​ Stand: https://amzn.to/2NKbg69​​​ Smart Lights: https://amzn.to/3aeU5kW​ Gaming​​ Chair: https://amzn.to/36nnFn0​​​ DISCLAIMER: This video and description may contain affiliate links which allow us to receive a small commission when you click on a product links. This helps support the podcast and allows us to continue to make videos like this. Thank you for the support! #thatsnotchristian #miketodd #hotsaucedrake --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thatsnotchristian/message

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Poddin' Next Door
#106 - "Won't He Do It"

Poddin' Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 98:00


On this episode: The ”Poddin' Next Door" crew opens with the usual banter and slappers for your head tops. The guys hit on Jesus cheaters, Tik Tok education, Hall of Fame Sport's Bar, Fun facts, working as a cashier, investing in Hellcats, a crashing economy, racist glasses, struggle meals, putting horses down, and other misinformation. Listen on most Digital Streaming Platforms. Apple, Amazon, Spotify, Google…… Follow + Subscribe: Instagram - @poddinnextdoor YouTube - Poddin' Next Door

time comedy family food discussion culture social voting japan management jre weed california fighting mexico reflecting spotify music gentrification amazon apple christmas drink shot strippers dating relationships marriage political state sports champs game feelings netflix glasses picking space brothers world west social media theory energy texas single hip hop testing friend stories mother donald trump fun ios variant cons fake news mental health hulu border sugar religion education holidays drugs gaming workplace guns economy cancer emotional hobbies outdoors bar driver baby bros rings school bullying afghanistan thanksgiving rip amish horses exotic ai phone sauce toxic dates body tradition chefs investing mexican haitian after effects disabilities struggle girlfriends abortion helen keller closer whites shooting scams drip pod shopping cleveland browns goldmine palestine trucker fishing dj screw 1985 kanye west lies bill cosby thrifting pros plastic arab bitcoin nonbinary black friday strip clubs facetime hiv how to meals conspiracy theory tendencies goat joe biden scammers historians attention capitol ye ancestry astro followers racist mania stocks jesus christ dangers showering rotten tomatoes industrial chakra wet kwanzaa headphones jeff bezos cheaters nascar arctic vibes incident gamble banking alec baldwin unrest astroworld extravaganza hoover life hacks dave chappelle beans russ jargon eats mike pence graduation fossils adoptions whataburger takeover us military nra cashiers energy drinks 1987 joe rogan colorism defensive finesse boyfriends hug fun facts hall of fame expressing 21savage shaming noobs lacking taco tuesday right to die caitlyn jenner bob saget impacts jay electronica questioning randomness podding eaters baby jesus burning bush influenza alerts winter storms rifles golfing atf donating gangland graduates 23andme j balvin el salvador traits phonetic homies gang culture nfts misinformation ebt muslim brotherhood nextdoor sleepers finish line gamestop picky nicknames king richard dream girl verdict blue origin enforcements bday doja cat hbic couponing ebonics taco truck tiktok sideburns arranged marriages pnd debacle surroundings reconnecting wealth gap summer walker pfas coke cola homesharing misogynist 2022 jbp gun laws terrenos more words dababy child tax credit pimp c alone time panhandling onlyfans birthday gifts hellcats partynextdoor thin blue line taco stand fat pat creosote drink champs poddin ivermectin criminal psychology coronavirus shoes off fifth ward false hope covid-19 ahmaud arbery contact tracing fast 9 delta variant
Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Missouri Woods & Water - Helping Veterans Get Out West

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 99:27


This week on the Missouri Woods & Water podcast we get to talk with Chad Parsons and Stephen Brinkley with the Veterans Help Foundation of Wyoming about the great things their organization is doing for veterans around the country.  Their organization is dedicated to allowing vets, wherever they may live, to enjoy everything the great state of Wyoming has to offer when it comes to the outdoors. Chad and Stephen discuss what exactly they do, how a vet from another state may be able to participate, and how to get involved.  We also hear a few awesome stories they have experienced since starting this organization.  Check them out and see if there is a veteran in your life that may benefit! Show Links & Partners:Veterans Help Foundation of Wyoming Facebook PageMidwest Gun Works: Use Code MWW5 for 5% offCuddeback:  Use code MOWW21 for 10% offMWW Facebook PageMWW Instagram Page Missouri Woods & Water is Powered by Simplecast

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
The Media Has lost All Credibility with the American People: Sebastian Gorka with Douglas Murray

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:43


Sebastian Gorka speaks with Douglas Murray about his book, The War on the West,  gender confusion, Americans lost faith in media, the Left works for free to correct behavior on Social Media, and Title IX complications.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jigs and Bigs
Ep. 97: Local Ice Shenanigans, MAKB West Trail Stops, IG Giveaway Tips, and Cody Jennings from Jigmasters Returns!

Jigs and Bigs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 179:34


www.jigsandbigs.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jigsandbigs/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jigsandbigs/support

Anik and Florian
EP. 332: UFC 270 Preview and Ngannou v. Gane Picks featuring Ray Longo and James Krause

Anik and Florian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 106:11


Ep. 332 – All hands on deck, as Anik and Florian get you primed for the UFC first's pay-per-view offering of 2022, UFC 270: Ngannou v. Gane, coming up this weekend from Anaheim, California. James Krause and Oddsshark.com's Joe Osborne give you their predictions for the two title fights. Plus, it's fight week for Team Serra-Longo, as Ray Longo checks in for his weekly “Ray Longo Minute' before heading West. https://bit.ly/OddsShark-UFC ON TODAY'S SHOW (00:01:00) - OPENING - #AnikFlorianPodcast (00:02:30) - HEADLINES: @Jon_Anik & @KennyFlorian (00:19:28) - RAY LONGO MINUTE: Featuring @RAYLONGOMMA (00:44:05) - PRONUNCIATION OF THE WEEK: Producer @CodyMerrow (00:48:09) - MAIN-EVENT CHALLENGE: @THEJAMESKRAUSE (01:19:37) - PICK TO CLICK: UFC 264 Best Bets with @JTFOZ/@PAPERCHASERJO (01:32:10) - OUTRO OFFICIAL WEBSITE: Promo Code 'AF10' for 10% off merchandise https://www.anikflorianpodcast.com/

Birdies & Bourbon
The American Express Fantasy Picks & Predictions | PGA Tour Betting Strategy | PGA West Course in La Quinta, CA | 1883 Recap

Birdies & Bourbon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 62:22


The American Express Fantasy Picks & Predictions | PGA Tour Betting Strategy | PGA West Course in La Quinta, CA | 1883 Recap Congrats to Hideki Matsuyama on winning the The Sony Open in Hawaii. Hideki and Russell Henley went into a playoff to decide the tournament. Hawaii was amazing and a great start to the season. We're heading to PGA West Course in La Quinta, CA for the The American Express. The field is full of great players on the PGA Tour including Jon Rahm, Patrick Cantlay, Scottie Scheffler, Tony Finau, Sungjae Im, Talor Gooch, Seamus Power, Corey Conners, Will Zalatoris, Russell Henley, Cameron Triangle, Patrick Reed and Justin Rose. Can Jon Rahm continue on his hot play and gain a victory? Can Sungjae Im bounce back from his recent play and gain another victory? Will Corey Connors continue his strong play and kick off the season with a victory? We break down the field and predictions on the show. The Birdies & Bourbon team chat The American Express Fantasy strategy and predictions at PGA West Course in La Quinta, CA. We chat through the PGA DFS strategies for the event using Fantasy National stats. We first chat PGA West Course in La Quinta, CA conditions, history, weather and everything you need to know about the strategy for the tournament. We chat strategy for DraftKings, FanDuel and Sportsbook picks. The tournament has a strong field with top players teeing it up. We had a blast chatting through the field and strategies. Cheers. Apparel for the show provided by turtleson. Be sure to check them out online for the new season lineup at https://turtleson.com/ Thanks to Fantasy National Golf Club for providing the stat engine for the show. They can be found at https://www.fantasynational.com The Neat Glass. Be sure to check out The Neat Glass online at theneatglass.com or on Instagram @theneatglass for an improved experience and use discount code: bb10 to receive your Birdies & Bourbon discount. Thank you for taking the time listen to the Birdies & Bourbon Show for all things PGA Tour, golf, gear, bourbon and mixology. Dan & Cal aim to bring you entertaining and informative episodes weekly. Please help spread the word on the podcast and tell a friend about the show. You can also help by leaving an 5-Star iTunes review. We love to hear the feedback and support! Cheers. Follow on Twitter & Instagram ( @birdies_bourbon) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/birdies-bourbon/support

The C.S. Lewis podcast
#37 CS Lewis, mental health and the meaning crisis

The C.S. Lewis podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 21:05


Alister McGrath and Justin Brierley continue their conversation on the 'meaning crisis' in the West and how Lewis' wisdom applies to today's world and the modern mental health crisis. For more from the podcast http://www.cslewispodcast.com 

104.5 ESPN
West Weeks talks transferring to LSU

104.5 ESPN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 8:42


Virginia LB West Weeks announced on Saturday that he is transferring to LSU. Weeks joins Matt to discuss the process. The post West Weeks talks transferring to LSU appeared first on 1045 ESPN.

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad
My Chat with Bestselling Author Heather Mac Donald (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_355)

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 87:33


Topics covered include meritocracy, academia, identity politics, racism, the police, white supremacy, idea pathogens (e.g., feminism, postmodernism), wokeism, progressivism, the scientific method, the importance of evidence, truth, deontological versus consequentialism, the conservative vs. liberal divide, the thought police, cancel culture, the West's implosion, and the psychology of regret. _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This clip was posted earlier today (January 17, 2022) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1363: https://youtu.be/ldSk0Lfc6Ys _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________    

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Commentary Magazine Podcast: A Crisis of General Incompetence

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


On today's podcast, we lay out a veritable smorgasbord of depressing developments. From the reaction to the Texas hostage crisis to horrifying violence in New York City to the West's inability to prepare for and deter a Russian attack on Ukraine, the news is going from bad to worse.

Commentary Magazine Podcast
A Crisis of General Incompetence

Commentary Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 63:19


On today's podcast, we lay out a veritable smorgasbord of depressing developments. From the reaction to the Texas hostage crisis to horrifying violence in New York City to the West's inability to prepare for and deter a Russian attack on Ukraine, the news is going from bad to worse.

Hidden Forces
The Kazakhstan Protests & Russia's Standoff With the West | Joanna Lillis

Hidden Forces

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:34


In Episode 228 of Hidden Forces, Demetri Kofinas speaks with Kazakhstan-based journalist Joanna Lillis, author of “Dark Shadows: Inside the Secret World of Kazakhstan,” about the recent protests and unrest that unfolded in Kazakhstan over the past two weeks and how this ties into the larger geopolitical chess match currently underway in Eastern Europe. This is the multi-polar world in action. It's no longer some theoretical thing that we've read about or that we're moving towards—we are in it. This is the world we live in, and in this world, everything is up for grabs. Every crisis, every border skirmish, every negotiation is an opportunity for any and all of the major powers to change the status quo and to change the rules of the game to their advantage. And this starts with taking control of the story and telling a narrative about events before the facts emerge and before people have had a chance to even begin to form an educated opinion about whatever it is that's happening. Today's episode is meant to provide you with a sense of where and how the events in Kazakhstan fit into this new global disorder of nation states, non-state actors, mercenaries, agitators, hackers—pretty much everyone interested in exercising influence on an international stage that is fluid and where power is constantly up for grabs. The world is becoming ever more complex and if you want to exercise a level of agency over your own sense of reality and be anything other than a spectator in someone else's story you need to step back from all the noise and all the hustles and exercise a level of informed skepticism without simply resorting to questioning everything and therefore believing in nothing. This is what Hidden Forces is all about. You can access the full episode, transcript, and rundown to this week's conversation by going directly to the episode page at HiddenForces.io and clicking on "premium extras." All subscribers gain access to our premium feed, which can be easily added to your favorite podcast application. If you enjoyed listening to today's episode of Hidden Forces you can help support the show by doing the following: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | CastBox | RSS Feed Write us a review on Apple Podcasts & Spotify Subscribe to our mailing list at https://hiddenforces.io/newsletter/ Producer & Host: Demetri Kofinas Editor & Engineer: Stylianos Nicolaou Subscribe & Support the Podcast at https://hiddenforces.io Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @hiddenforcespod Follow Demetri on Twitter at @Kofinas Episode Recorded on 01/11/2022

Locked On Nuggets - Daily Podcast On The Denver Nuggets
Game 41 and 42: The Vibes Are Back But The Jazz Are Better

Locked On Nuggets - Daily Podcast On The Denver Nuggets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 52:15


The Nuggets destroy the Lakers in Denver in a Saturday Night party, but fall back to Earth in the back to back vs. Utah. Have the Nuggets turned a corner, spiritually? Bones shows out vs. LA. The bench gets eradicated vs. the Jazz. Can you make adjustments in a regular season game to the rotation? Is Jokic an MVP sleeper and is the West suddenly open? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Informationen am Morgen - Deutschlandfunk
Wo alles begann - Eindrücke von der Wiege der Proteste in West-Kasachstan

Informationen am Morgen - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 5:29


Beer, Andreawww.deutschlandfunk.de, Informationen am MorgenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Dunc'd On Basketball NBA Podcast
15 in 60 (Western Conference 1.17.22)

Dunc'd On Basketball NBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 98:51


A look at the 15 teams in the West in roughly reverse order of record, from Houston to Phoenix.  Topics include HOU/SAC, LAC/SAS, DEN/LAL, plus why KAT turns it over so much on postups, why the Warriors struggle without Steph on the floor, Devin Booker's reduction in efficiency inside the arc, and whether the Mavs' improved defense is for real. 4 Episodes per week are available exclusively on Dunc'd On Prime! Take advantage of our sale for a yearly Total Access membership at 35% off the monthly price! DuncdOn.SupportingCast.FM/join Subscribe to our new weekly mailing list for free bonus content and all the info you need to keep up with the latest from Nate and Danny!  With Nate Duncan (@NateDuncanNBA) and Danny Leroux (@DannyLeroux).   

I Saw It On Linden Street
Fantastic Voyage (1966)

I Saw It On Linden Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:43


To save a brilliant scientist who defected to the West, a crew of doctors load into an experimental submarine and shrink down to cure him from the inside. Tune in as Chris talks Disney Channel, wire work, and Raquel Welch as the LSCE screens the Richard Fleischer 1966 cult classic “Fantastic Voyage.” Join Us! Check us out at www.lscep.com Subscribe, Like, & Review. Twitter: @LSCEP Instagram: @LSCE_PODCAST Facebook: Linden Street Cinema Experience Did you know that we are on Amazon Music Now? I KNOW! Awesome, right? Works Cited: Crowther, Bosley "Screen: 'Fantastic Voyage' Is All That". The New York Times. September 8, 1966. p.0. Accessed 1/12/2022 https://www.nytimes.com/1966/09/08/archives/screen-fantastic-voyage-is-all-thatsciencefiction-movie-opens-at-2.html?searchResultPosition=6 “Fantastic Voyage.” Boxoffice. Vol 89, (16). New York: Boxoffice Media LP. (1966): p.a11. Hodgens, R. M. “Fantastic Voyage.” Film Quarterly 20, no. 2 (1966): 61–61. https://doi.org/10.2307/1210712. Juanes Méndez, Juan A. 2013. «“Amazing Journey” (1966): An Attractive Approach to the Study of Anatomy, Through a Journey Through the Interior of the Human Body». Journal of Medicine and Cinema 9 (3). Salamanca:125-30. https://revistas.usal.es/index.php/medicina_y_cine/article/view/13656. Murf. “Film Reviews: Fantastic Voyage.” Variety (Archive: 1905-2000), vol. 243, Penske Business Corporation, Los Angeles, 1966, p. 6. Scheuer, P. K. (Mar 14, 1965). "Submarines in blood stream!". Los Angeles Times. P.B10. accessed on 1/14/22 https://www.proquest.com/docview/155145991 Van Parys, Thomas. “A Fantastic Voyage into Inner Space: Description in Science-Fiction Novelizations.” Science-fiction studies 38, no. 2 (2011): 288–303. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lsce/message

Informationen am Morgen - Deutschlandfunk
Soziale Ungleichheit als Triebfeder für Proteste - Unterwegs in West-Kasachstan

Informationen am Morgen - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 3:37


Beer, Andreawww.deutschlandfunk.de, Informationen am MorgenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Informationen am Morgen - Deutschlandfunk
Soziale Ungleichheit als Triebfeder für Proteste - Unterwegs in West-Kasachstan

Informationen am Morgen - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 4:17


Beer, Andreawww.deutschlandfunk.de, Informationen am MorgenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

LEAVE YOUR MARK
Tamara Miller on How to Crush a Career in Sales and Why Persuasive Writing and Speaking Up in Meetings is the Key to Remote Work Success

LEAVE YOUR MARK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 48:06


Would you ever take a risk and consider me? That was the question Tamara asked the hiring manager when she knew she did not have the qualifications for her first-ever job. Now, Tamara is an award-winning sales account executive. At Google, she leads cloud growth and adoption for Omnicom, a leading high-value agency where she is a strategic and effective partner to some of the world's most recognizable brands. She has built her reputation by driving business results by developing holistic data-driven solutions, a stellar personality, and the ability to understand that the secret to sales success lies in relationships. In this episode, Tamara shares her journey from ground zero with no experience but the will and motivation to do whatever it takes. She shares her insider tips on how to excel in sales and her tactics to effectively communicate, pitch a client, and unlock your customer's challenges. *** This episode of LEAVE YOUR MARK is brought to you by Ever/Body, a New-York based cosmetic dermatology business that exists to thoughtfully support every body along their beauty journey. Ever/Body is revolutionizing the cosmetic dermatology industry with a personalized, tech-driven approach that prioritizes client education and natural-looking results. Their curated service menu includes a variety of medically-tested face and body treatments such as Botox, filler, body contouring, laser facials, micro-needling and more. Their medically-trained team provides expert care and an experience you can trust - always uniquely tailored to you. Ever/Body's mission is to thoughtfully support everybody along their individual beauty journey. Book a complimentary consultation on everbody.com and follow them on instagram @everbody. They are currently located in NYC in SoHo (453 West Broadway) and Flatiron (16 West 17th St.). Start your beauty journey with a free consultation at everbody.com and use my personal discount code, Aliza10 for 10% off your first treatment.

Bethel Church of Fargo, ND Sermons
From Exile to Emmanuel - The Big Picture

Bethel Church of Fargo, ND Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


ONE THING “You have made us for Yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in You” (Augustine, Confessions). Listen to someone's story this week, and give them your undivided attention.

Old Time Radio Westerns
Horizons West Trailer

Old Time Radio Westerns

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 0:38


Horizons West was a fascinating, thirteen-installment docudrama which traced the movements of the famous Lewis and Clark expedition from 1803 to 1806. President Thomas Jefferson's charter to Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark was to trace the origination point of the Missouri River, from St. Louis, Missouri to the Great Falls of Montana--and eventually beyond.

HistoryBoiz
Wyatt Earp's Wild West Part 1

HistoryBoiz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 89:15


Join us for this epic series on the Wild West as it occurred to Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Doc Holliday, and all the myths and legends in between!Sources:Boessenecker, John. Ride the Devil's Herd: Wyatt Earp's Epic Battle against the West's Biggest Outlaw Gang. Hanover Square Press, 2021. Clavin, Thomas, and Ellen J. Lehman. Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West. St Martin's Paperbacks, 2019. Gwynne, Samuel C. Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History. Scribner, 2011. Roberts, Gary L. The Life and Legend of Doc Holliday. Wiley, 2006. ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The FOX News Rundown
FOX NEWS Rundown EXTRA: Rep. McCaul On Why We Need Take "Tough Action" Toward Russia

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 21:22


The NATO-Russia talks aimed at resolving the escalating situation on the Ukrainian border reached a dead end earlier this week, with National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan saying, "We believe the threat of invasion is real."  After a week of diplomacy between the West and Russia coming up with no resolution, what should the U.S. and the Biden Administration do next? Ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX) joined host Jessica Rosenthal this week to discuss how to navigate the situation with Russia. Rep. McCaul discussed our options and what actions would be effective and which ones would not.  Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the interview in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire conversation with Rep. McCaul and hear more of his analysis of our tensions with Russia. Plus, he discusses recent threats from North Korea and his own recent bout with COVID.

RT
Sputnik Orbiting the World: Kazakhstan uprising and Rolling Stones' stories

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 25:53


Kazakhstan was a name neither on the lips or even on the radar of most in the West – that is, until just over a week ago. Given it shares a 1,700km border with Russia, and its neighbor on the other side is China, you can see just what attracted certain powers to take an interest in the vast, landlocked nation. A giant country with a tiny population, it's mineral rich, abounding in both oil and gas. It's not the first time there's been an uprising in Kazakhstan, however, although last time, Tony Blair was hired to help the regime spin its way out of it. Now the tables have turned and the tectonic plates have shifted. We invited Bryan McDonald, a journalist based in Moscow, to help make sense of it all. She's survived being marooned on an island with adventurer Bear Grylls, but probably more remarkably, she survived a long and eventful rock'n'roll marriage to a Rolling Stone. Jo Wood was fast-living guitarist Ronnie's wife from the 1970s until about a decade ago – a story she documents in her memoir, ‘Stoned'. It's full of photographs and memories of a life on the road, offering a behind-the-scenes look at a legendary rock band on tour. She now lives a far quieter life and joined Sputnik to tell us more.

Soul Anchor Podcast
153 Apatheism 2 Causes of Apatheism Part 1

Soul Anchor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 26:33


So how do we reach our family and friends when they just don't care about God. We are finding that in the West, more and more individuals subscribe to Apatheism. What is apatheism and how can we as believers reach people who believe in it? Join me as we cover Kyle Beshears' book Apatheism: How we share when they don't care. Beshears will give us practical advice on how to reach our loved ones and friends. In this episode, Beshears begins to lay out the root causes of Apatheism: secularism and pluralism.Here is the link to the book:https://www.amazon.com/Apatheism-Share-When-They-Dont/dp/1535991526/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Apatheism&qid=1637701214&qsid=146-5609350-0204618&sr=8-1&sres=1535991526%2CB074FH3TFD%2CB07G214BW8%2CB074F9ZVCF%2CB079VTSYFM%2C9004317538%2CB00281TTE2%2CB01HFKL0KG%2C1633572161%2CB07DY46JY9%2CB07DBLFNRW%2CB00V3MNRX6%2CB073RNPT8K%2CB015G0EWLG%2CB07S2ZZB9G%2CB01KYKAR62&srpt=ABIS_BOOK

Life on Planet Earth
THE PERSECUTED: CASEY CHALK's True Stories of Courageous Christians Living their Faith in Muslim Lands. Open Doors estimates 340 million Christians suffer high levels of persecution for their faith

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 36:30


Casey J. Chalk is a contributing editor at the New Oxford Review, a senior contributor for the Federalist, and a frequent contributor to the American Conservative and Crisis Magazine. He holds a B.A. in history and a master's in teaching from the University of Virginia, and a master's in theology from the Notre Dame Graduate School of Theology at Christendom College. He lives with his wife, Claire, and their four children in his native Northern Virginia. For 2,000 years, the persecution of Christians has taken place wherever the Church has been present — essentially, in every corner of the world. More than 260 million Christians around the globe are facing some form of persecution right now, and that number continues to climb each year. The Persecuted is an astonishing book that tells the real-life stories of brave Christians who are suffering intimidation, oppression, and violence right now as they resolutely live out their Faith in Muslim lands. The author, Casey Chalk, shocked by what he saw as a journalist living overseas, presents with skill and sensitivity these riveting stories that he witnessed firsthand. This global tour of Christian persecution will take you from the slums of Karachi, where Islamic extremists harass and kill beleaguered Christians, to the bustling, exotic streets of Bangkok, where Christians hide in fear while awaiting adjudication of their refugee applications. You'll meet brave Christians who escaped Muslim persecution to make a new life in the Netherlands, and others who slipped away only to become trapped in Russia. Casey tells the stories of Christians who were tortured and, in some instances, killed in Muslim nations — and then lays out a strategic plan for rescuing as many as possible from their plight. Chalk also addresses other fundamental issues, explaining why Islam's radicals feel they must declare war on Christianity and why they persist in enslaving the Christians in their midst. He also explains how they have managed to get away with this appalling conduct in the face of powerful international organizations—and the Catholic Church herself—spotlighting the persecution and calling for its end. These harrowing stories bring you face-to-face with fellow Christians enduring the ultimate test in distant lands. They will strengthen your faith and also prepare you for what may lie ahead here in the West if we fail to heed the advice given in this timely and important book. Source: Sophia Institute Press To order the book: https://www.amazon.com/Persecuted-Stories-Courageous-Christians-Living/dp/1644135507/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

Pratt on Texas
Episode 2849: Ignore media scare on absentee ballot request denials | Guv race | Midland vs. Lubbock’s UMC – Pratt on Texas 1/14/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 42:25


The news of Texas covered today includes:Our Lone Star story of the day: Beware the current scare over voter absentee ballot requests being denied in huge numbers. This is little more than a political propaganda attack from Democrat election officials and their media allies much like we had time and again over voter I.D.Our Lone Star story of the day is sponsored by Allied Compliance Services providing the best service in DOT, business and personal drug and alcohol testing since 1995.About that poll showing Abbott at 32% and West higher – and much more from the GOP gubernatorial race.Vaccine mandate news. UMC in Lubbock vs. Midland Health shows a real difference on standing up for hospital employees over the vaccine mandate.Despite Abbott claim, pay issues remain for national guard at the border.And, other news of Texas.Listen on the radio, or station stream, at 5pm Central. Click for our affiliates.www.PrattonTexas.com

Fornever News
Fornever News Ep 204- Shocking Boruto News, Invincible Lawsuit, Attack on Titan Leaves FANS SPEECHLESS, Fire Force Author SAD Message, New My Hero Academia Console Game, Jujutsu Kaisen 0 West Release

Fornever News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 57:56


The Stories We Covered In This Episode of #FORNEVERNEWS Season 2! (Episodes Covered Through the Week of 1/10-1/14) 0:00 Prologue 0:29 Fornever News Season 2 Announcement 2:18 Boruto News SHOCKS Everyone 8:52 One Piece Creator Makes Fans Dream Come True 10:27 Jujutsu Kaisen 0 Movie North American Release Date 11:48 Massive Invincible Lawsuit 16:18 Nasty Nagatoro Drama In The Anime Community Attack on Titan LEAVES EVERYONE SPEECHLESS - Dragon Ball Super Manga Surprising Update - Shonen Jump Plus New Manga Coming - Jujutsu Kaisen 0 Movie Strange Announcement - Fire Force Author's Sad Message In Author Comment - Demon Slayer Anime New Arc UNBELIEVABLE News - Static Shock Artist Wants To Do Batman Beyond - Toonami Makes a BOLD MOVE - The State of Boruto - How You Can Help Get Your Favorite Manga An ANIME - Fullmetal Alchemist Author's New Manga - Jujutsu Kaisen Takes More WINS - Something BIG Is Coming For WORLD TRIGGER - New My Hero Academia Console Game Ultra Rumble - Mashle Takes Over Jump - Wrap-Up --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/forneverworld/support

ESPN Podcasts
Super Wild Card Weekend Preview

ESPN Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 25:53


Jalen & Jacoby debate which teams will win on Super Wild Card weekend, plus they discuss the impact weather will have on Patriots-Bills game, Giannis' total destruction of the Warriors, D-Wade says people will forget about Michael Jordan, Big Ben's chances against the Chiefs, are Ja's Grizzlies legit contenders in the West, plus Jacoby's secret gambling strategy.

Jalen & Jacoby
Super Wild Card Weekend Preview

Jalen & Jacoby

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 25:53


Jalen & Jacoby debate which teams will win on Super Wild Card weekend, plus they discuss the impact weather will have on Patriots-Bills game, Giannis' total destruction of the Warriors, D-Wade says people will forget about Michael Jordan, Big Ben's chances against the Chiefs, are Ja's Grizzlies legit contenders in the West, plus Jacoby's secret gambling strategy.

KQED’s Forum
Reparations Task Force Sheds Light on History of Slavery in California

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 55:29


Conversations about the history of slavery are often confined to the North and the South, with the West viewed as a free “promised land.” But California passed laws, like the Fugitive Slave Act of 1852, that reinforced the institution of slavery, and otherwise allowed coerced, unpaid labor in the state. And the laws impacted more than just Black people, too. Historian Stacey L. Smith writes in her book “Freedom's Frontier” that “ diverse forms of American Indian servitude, sexual trafficking in bound women, and contract labor involving Latin Americans, Asians, and Pacific Islanders all kept the slavery question alive in California during the 1850s.” This history has been brought to the fore in recent weeks as the state's Reparations Task Force continues to hear testimony about the impacts of slavery on African Americans. We take a closer look at this part of California's past and why it matters.

Givs and the Bank
On The Road Again: Tales from Texas and Florida

Givs and the Bank

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 51:46


It has been a busy couple of weeks here at BuckeyeScoop as we have spent time in both Florida and Texas on the recruiting trail. Our very own Bill Greene made his way down to the Sunshine State to check out many of the top talents from the southern part of the state as part of the South Florida Express tryout event. We also bumped into a recent Ohio State commit for the class of 2023 at the same event and got some more information on his ultimate decision. While Greene was working on his golf game in Florida, our Marc Givler and Kevin Noon went to San Antonio to check out the All-American Bowl, checking in on several Ohio State commitments and even a few targets who are still left on the board. While not everyone had the chance to play as roster numbers quickly depleted, we had the chance to check out several commits from both the East and West squads, talk to a couple of players who either recently committed or are still on the board and have a full evaluation of everything that we saw. It is a special edition of Givs and the Bank from the road as we wrap up everything that we saw on the heels of some major coaching shakeup within the Ohio State staff.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Iran and Foreign Policy Realism w/ Shireen Hunter

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 74:24


On this edition of Parallax Views, Shireen Tahmaaseb Hunter, an Honorary Fellow at Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding (ACMCU) at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and author of Iran Divided: Historic Roots of Iranian Debates in Identity, Culture and Governance in the 21st Century, joins Parallax Views to discuss her Responsible Statecraft article "Time to look inward: Not all of Iran's problems are caused by the West". This differs from previous interviews about Iran in that the focus is not on the U.S. role in the problems of getting back into the JCPOA, but the problems Hunter sees with Iran's hardline elements from a realist foreign policy perspective. Hunter argues that Iran should be taking a realist approach to its foreign policy that puts the Iranian people before its relationships with other countries. Additionally, we have a discussion about what realism is and the misunderstandings about it. In this conversation we discuss Iran and the anti-imperialist struggle, Iran and Assad's Syria, Henry Kissinger and his association with realism (and why Hunter questions the categorization of Kissinger as a realist), the "Axis of Resistance" (also: the "Axis of Rejection"), Iran and Israel/Palestine, power relationships as shaping international relationships whether we like it or not, lack of education and understanding about international affairs, Iran and Saudi Arabia, the unresolved question of Palestine and its use by various political forces, hardliners vs. moderates in Iran, hardliners in the U.S. like Mike Pompeo and John Bolton (and the almost symbiotic relationship between U.S. hardliners and Iran hardliners), the devastating impacts of sanctions on Iran, Clinton and Iran, similarities between what we are seeing now with the tensions between the U.S. and Iran and the tensions of the Cold War, the American tendency to ignore history, the weight of history and the implausibility of totally clean "restarts", the accomplishment of the Iran Deal under Obama, negotiations between the U.S. and Iran going forward, structural impediments to Iran negotiations from the U.S. end of things (including lobbying efforts against U.S.-Iran reconciliation), Russia and U.S.-Iran reconciliation,  reconciliation will be based on compromise, the principles of international relations, Teddy Roosevelt's maxim "speak softly and carry a big steak", Iran and its proxies, the Yemen issue in regard to talks between Saudi Arabia and Iran, why Obama was able to get the Iran deal through and his understanding of the dynamics of the third world, the need to rescue the realist school, the damage caused by extreme idealists, military intervention and the way it can impeded democracy, the greatest security theats today are climate change and pandemics, and much, much more!

The Lawfare Podcast
Trouble in Ukraine and Kazakhstan

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 58:45


There's a lot going on in Russia's near-abroad, the countries on the periphery of the Russian Federation. There's a war brewing in Ukraine, with talks in Geneva between Russia and the West seeming to fail this week. There are also Russian troops in Kazakhstan, there at the invitation of the autocratic Kazakh government in response to protests over fuel prices.To check in on the situation, Benjamin Wittes sat down on Lawfare Live with Alina Polyakova of the Center for European Policy Analysis; Alex Vindman, the Pritzker Military Fellow at Lawfare; Ambassador William Courtney, who served as ambassador to Kazakhstan; and Dmitri Alperovitch, the founder of the Silverado Policy Accelerator. They talked about what's going on in Kazakhstan, the failure of the diplomatic process in Geneva, and the war that seems to be coming in Ukraine.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Your Weekly Sports Pod
Ep 65: Future Mt Rushmore of The NBA's West

Not Your Weekly Sports Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:06


The Western Conference landscape has seen a changing of the guard over the last decade. Not Your Weekly Sports Pod discusses this new class of elite teams that we expect to dominate the top of the standing for years to come. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/notyourweeklysportspod/message

David Gornoski
OSHA Mandate Defeated in Court - A Neighbor's Choice

David Gornoski

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 25:13


The Mises Institute's Tho Bishop calls in to talk about the supreme court's ruling on the OSHA mandate, whether we should hope for structural reforms, the spiritual decline of the West, why Biden is proving to be worse than George W. Bush, why Democrats will ramp of persecution of political opposition, and more. Visit the A Neighbor's Choice website at aneighborschoice.com

MTR Podcasts
Bettina Perry of Charmington Holistics

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 36:42


Brief summary of episode:Originally from the West coast Bettina has called Baltimore, Maryland home for more than 18 years now with her husband, Matt. She made her mark early on in Baltimore with her culinary skills as one of the city's top pastry chefs. In 2014 life moved her back to the direction of natural living and all things holistic as she embarked on a new journey.  Charmington Holistics was born.  It started with a vegan potluck group and learning how to make diy body butters, then grew to taking a course after course in aromatherapy, herbalism, cosmetic formulation, good manufacturing practices, CO2 compounds, herbal medicine making, natural perfumery and holistic nutrition.The Tonics were launched in 2017 as a core staple product line that Bettina was ready to share with the world.  The tonics are the perfect combination of Bettina's years as a skilled culinarian and her passion for herbal medicine making. Bettina personally enjoys and engages in energic modalities such as Crystalline Consciousness Technique and Shamanism.Charmington Holistics is her multidisciplinary project aimed at sharing Bettina's knowledge of holistic living and it's benefits to our mind, body and soul as well as living in harmony with the Earth & her magic.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episode:Charmington HolisticsTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

The David Knight Show
Thr 13Jan22 Italians Pay $150 to get Covid Instead of TrumpShots as Body Count Increases

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 181:38


* EMP Scare? Did FAA ground planes on the west coast at the time North Korean missile launch b/c they were concerned about ElectroMagnetic Pulse?* Government hides Pfizer data showing DOUBLING of cardiovascular deaths of vaccinated* Rather than get the TrumpShot, Italians are paying up to $150 for Covid parties to get virus and certification of natural immunity* NEXT GLOBAL TREND: at least 5 jurisdictions hit unvaxed with continuous “significant” fines* McPfizer: McDonalds refuses service even at takeout kiosk w/o a vaccine passport and Ronald McDonald house kicks out unvaxed families with terminally ill children* BoJo “PartyGate”: listen to his the excuse as he's been caught violating his own dictates for the 7th time and facing calls to resign* Trump said DeSantis was gutless, ashamed to tell people he got a booster.  Why is Trump unashamed of what he's done? * Even Pfizer's CEO admits 2 shots are worthless, so get a booster!* Have you heard about “herd immunity” lately?  Remember when 70-80% was going to set us free?* GoatTree, tested positive & was diagnosed by staff as having Omicron, checks in to tell us how it's going* Supply chain problems: will they help or hurt the globalists?Hr 1 Seg 1: * Trump attacks DeSantis for being “gutless” because he tried to avoid saying whether he had a booster. Trump is right about that, but Trump is shameless in his promotion of his bioweapon* Pfizer CEO Bourla has a Freudian slip, says first 2 shots do NOTHING, then tries to make the case that 3rd one is what you need. Pfizer tries to block the video using bogus “copyright” claim* People Pay $150 to GET Covid, Avoid TrumpShots. Everything taken from those who refuse the genetic code injection — unless they test positive and get natural immunity. People believe Covid is FAR less dangerous than Trump's shots. * Pfizer's data showed TWICE as many cardiovascular deaths in vaccinated* Family speaks out when 26 yr old. His mother is a nurse and and had not heard of adverse cardio effectsSeg 2: begins approximately 00:31:44* 25 yr old die from vaccine. Murdered* More pro athletes with cardio illness and sudden death* Gain of Function is BIGGER Than Fauci: GOP Won't Talk About THAT. The Trump shot is more dangerous than anything that came out of the lab — so far. Rule by bureaucracy was something that Rand and others used to talk about. But that is ALSO being ignored* McDonalds Bans Unvaxed From Ordering Food, Staying at Ronald McDonald House. You can't even order food to go on a kiosk at McDonalds if you're unvaxed in Israel. And critically ill children and their families are getting thrown of Ronald McDonald House if unvaxed. You want fries with that?Seg 3: begins approximately 01:00:34* Rand Paul asks if government can force vaccines that are not effective against the current strain (as they admit)* Quebec and at least 4 other jurisdictions have moved one step closer to dragging people out of their house and jabbing them — continuous financial punishment until you get the jab. Stopping a “pandemic” is no longer even talked about. Just 100% vaccination* Have you heard about “HERD IMMUNITY” lately? Here's what they were telling us April 2021. * Washington DC will require VaccinePassport and PhotoID to leave your house. GOP Senator plays with fire by offering a bill that would require VoterID if VaccinePassport is required. How about just protecting the Constitution without playing games of “Chicken”?* Biden tasks an obscure bureaucracy with keeping records on those who file religious exemptions. What will he do with it? C2PASeg 4: begins approximately 01:29:47* Listener letter, nurse, on how the pandemic and mandates have unfolded. THIS is why nurses refuse the jab. Why aren't we listening to them?* Canadian Mountie (RCMP) letter: death didn't change 2019, 2020, 2021. So why the mandates?* Pilots are refusing in massive numbers to take a 3rd jab and speaking out. They CAN bring airlines to their knees* Boris Johnson, caught a 7th time violating his rules while he partied. He responds to calls for resignation by saying he thought the party was work. Nice job, huh?* Horrific tales of the millions of minions in China who will do whatever they're told to do to their fellow man, without question. Milgram experiment proven againSeg 5: begins approximately 02:01:16GoatTree joins with an update on his Omicron case and his treatmentSeg 6: begins approximately 02:17:59Globalism is all about the supply chain. But are disruptions their Achilles Heel or part of the plan?Seg 7: begins approximately 02:33:05* Govt to Limit Charging of EV's. It was NEVER about ending emissions. It was always about ending private cars* EMP (ElectroMagnetic Pulse) Scare From North Korean Missiles? West coast flights haven't been grounded like this since 9/11. FAA & NORAD aren't giving answers* Outrage about insider trading at Fed. But will Fed be audited? Will FBI investigate?* Inflation takes off, supply chain and oil shortages blamed. But creating this was the #1 priority of Biden. Here's why…* Listener letter about FEMA camps* Pedophile statue at the entrance of BBC's building attacked by a man with a hammer. The artist was an admitted pedophile, the statue is a display of child sexualized but BBC has left it in place for nearly 90 years* CNN & Democrats beg Hillary to run again* Biden play the race card — ridiculously — to push for a complete takeover of elections by the federal governmentFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail:         David Knight         POB 1323         Elgin, TX 78621

The REAL David Knight Show
Thr 13Jan22 Italians Pay $150 to get Covid Instead of TrumpShots as Body Count Increases

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 181:38


* EMP Scare? Did FAA ground planes on the west coast at the time North Korean missile launch b/c they were concerned about ElectroMagnetic Pulse?* Government hides Pfizer data showing DOUBLING of cardiovascular deaths of vaccinated* Rather than get the TrumpShot, Italians are paying up to $150 for Covid parties to get virus and certification of natural immunity* NEXT GLOBAL TREND: at least 5 jurisdictions hit unvaxed with continuous “significant” fines* McPfizer: McDonalds refuses service even at takeout kiosk w/o a vaccine passport and Ronald McDonald house kicks out unvaxed families with terminally ill children* BoJo “PartyGate”: listen to his the excuse as he's been caught violating his own dictates for the 7th time and facing calls to resign* Trump said DeSantis was gutless, ashamed to tell people he got a booster.  Why is Trump unashamed of what he's done? * Even Pfizer's CEO admits 2 shots are worthless, so get a booster!* Have you heard about “herd immunity” lately?  Remember when 70-80% was going to set us free?* GoatTree, tested positive & was diagnosed by staff as having Omicron, checks in to tell us how it's going* Supply chain problems: will they help or hurt the globalists?Hr 1 Seg 1: * Trump attacks DeSantis for being “gutless” because he tried to avoid saying whether he had a booster. Trump is right about that, but Trump is shameless in his promotion of his bioweapon* Pfizer CEO Bourla has a Freudian slip, says first 2 shots do NOTHING, then tries to make the case that 3rd one is what you need. Pfizer tries to block the video using bogus “copyright” claim* People Pay $150 to GET Covid, Avoid TrumpShots. Everything taken from those who refuse the genetic code injection — unless they test positive and get natural immunity. People believe Covid is FAR less dangerous than Trump's shots. * Pfizer's data showed TWICE as many cardiovascular deaths in vaccinated* Family speaks out when 26 yr old. His mother is a nurse and and had not heard of adverse cardio effectsSeg 2: begins approximately 00:31:44* 25 yr old die from vaccine. Murdered* More pro athletes with cardio illness and sudden death* Gain of Function is BIGGER Than Fauci: GOP Won't Talk About THAT. The Trump shot is more dangerous than anything that came out of the lab — so far. Rule by bureaucracy was something that Rand and others used to talk about. But that is ALSO being ignored* McDonalds Bans Unvaxed From Ordering Food, Staying at Ronald McDonald House. You can't even order food to go on a kiosk at McDonalds if you're unvaxed in Israel. And critically ill children and their families are getting thrown of Ronald McDonald House if unvaxed. You want fries with that?Seg 3: begins approximately 01:00:34* Rand Paul asks if government can force vaccines that are not effective against the current strain (as they admit)* Quebec and at least 4 other jurisdictions have moved one step closer to dragging people out of their house and jabbing them — continuous financial punishment until you get the jab. Stopping a “pandemic” is no longer even talked about. Just 100% vaccination* Have you heard about “HERD IMMUNITY” lately? Here's what they were telling us April 2021. * Washington DC will require VaccinePassport and PhotoID to leave your house. GOP Senator plays with fire by offering a bill that would require VoterID if VaccinePassport is required. How about just protecting the Constitution without playing games of “Chicken”?* Biden tasks an obscure bureaucracy with keeping records on those who file religious exemptions. What will he do with it? C2PASeg 4: begins approximately 01:29:47* Listener letter, nurse, on how the pandemic and mandates have unfolded. THIS is why nurses refuse the jab. Why aren't we listening to them?* Canadian Mountie (RCMP) letter: death didn't change 2019, 2020, 2021. So why the mandates?* Pilots are refusing in massive numbers to take a 3rd jab and speaking out. They CAN bring airlines to their knees* Boris Johnson, caught a 7th time violating his rules while he partied. He responds to calls for resignation by saying he thought the party was work. Nice job, huh?* Horrific tales of the millions of minions in China who will do whatever they're told to do to their fellow man, without question. Milgram experiment proven againSeg 5: begins approximately 02:01:16GoatTree joins with an update on his Omicron case and his treatmentSeg 6: begins approximately 02:17:59Globalism is all about the supply chain. But are disruptions their Achilles Heel or part of the plan?Seg 7: begins approximately 02:33:05* Govt to Limit Charging of EV's. It was NEVER about ending emissions. It was always about ending private cars* EMP (ElectroMagnetic Pulse) Scare From North Korean Missiles? West coast flights haven't been grounded like this since 9/11. FAA & NORAD aren't giving answers* Outrage about insider trading at Fed. But will Fed be audited? Will FBI investigate?* Inflation takes off, supply chain and oil shortages blamed. But creating this was the #1 priority of Biden. Here's why…* Listener letter about FEMA camps* Pedophile statue at the entrance of BBC's building attacked by a man with a hammer. The artist was an admitted pedophile, the statue is a display of child sexualized but BBC has left it in place for nearly 90 years* CNN & Democrats beg Hillary to run again* Biden play the race card — ridiculously — to push for a complete takeover of elections by the federal governmentFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail:         David Knight         POB 1323         Elgin, TX 78621

Runnin' Plays: A Golden State Warriors Podcast
Klay looking great early on, Steph's prolonged slump, Wiseman expectations

Runnin' Plays: A Golden State Warriors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 36:28


Grant Liffman is joined by Josh Schrock and Dalton Johnson to discuss their impressions of Klay Thompson's return to the court, if fans should be concerned about Steph Curry's recent shooting lull and expectations for James Wiseman when he returns to the Warriors' lineup. Plus, what team in the West should Golden State watch out for?(1:48) First impressions of Klay's return (7:50) How will Klay's return affect Wiggins? (13:14) Should fans be concerned about Steph's shooting lull? (19:26) What West teams should the Warriors keep an eye on? (27:21) Looking ahead to Wiseman's return See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

First Take
Hour 1: Miraculous Morant

First Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 47:40


Jay Williams and Monica McNutt join the show to debate just how exciting Ja Morant and this Memphis Grizzlies team are following their win over the Warriors, and if these Warriors are still the team to beat in the West. Plus Marcus Spears, Kimberley Martin and Harry Douglas join to discuss how appealing the New York Giants head coach opening really is, and is it Super Bowl or bust for the Cowboys. The crew also discusses whether the 2017 Warriors would beat he 1996 Bulls, and the impact of Alabama Wide Receiver Jameson Willams torn ACL.

The Daily
Russia and the U.S. Face Off Over Ukraine

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 27:46


The diplomatic talks in Geneva this week are of a kind not seen in a long time: an effort to defuse the possibility of a major war in Europe.President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia has amassed military equipment and personnel on the border with Ukraine.President Biden has warned that there will be consequences if Mr. Putin decides to invade, but what can Washington do to impel the Kremlin to back down?Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Russia and the United States expressed some optimism after negotiations in Geneva, but they did not break an impasse over Moscow's demand that Ukraine never become a member of NATO.Can the West stop Russia from invading Ukraine? Here's a guide to what's at stake.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedailyTranscripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

Sharon Says So
77. The Oregon Trail from Westward Expansion to Computer Game with Sharon McMahon

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 28:04


In this solo episode, Sharon dives into some of the myths vs. facts about Manifest Destiny and the Oregon Trail. What did it really look like, in the mid-1800s, for a family to travel the trail from Independence, Missouri to the beautiful Willamette Valley region of Oregon? All-in-all, about 400,000 people traveled along the Oregon Trail in the mid-1800s, hoping to move from crowded Eastern communities to work the riches of the land out West. Much of what we know was probably gleaned from playing the computer game, The Oregon Trail. Chances are, it was one of the first games you played in your youth on a computer, but do you know its humble Minnesotan history? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The JJ Redick Podcast
Welcome Back Klay, Real Ones in the West, and the Ben Simmons Trade Machine

The JJ Redick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 72:11


Verno and KOC discuss Klay Thompson's exciting return to the hardwood over the weekend (00:56). With Klay back, the guys debate which teams in the West are for real (11:27). The Raptors are riding a six-game win streak entering Tuesday night's game versus the Suns, so the guys discuss the Raptors' turnaround and Fred VanVleet's All-Star season (21:42). The Joel Embiid superstar experience is here, as he's helped the 76ers win eight of their past nine games (27:46). The Hawks are the latest team to be linked to Ben Simmons, so the guys debate what would be the right trade to benefit both franchises (34:06). With the trade deadline a few weeks away, they take a look at where Myles Turner could go and debate whether the Kings are going to have a fire sale or make a push for a playoff spot (47:02). Hosts: Chris Vernon and Kevin O'Connor Producer: Jessie Lopez Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Savage Nation Podcast
The Decline of the West: Will China Take Over?

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 73:19


Will China dominate the world? Did a century old book predict the end of Western civilization? Savage explores these questions and more as he offers a rare glimpse behind the scenes of the Savage Nation. Savage speculates whether World War I commenced the end of Western civilization. NY mayor allows immigrants voting rights. Savage reads from Spengler's The Decline of the West. Spengler wrote about Caesar-ism. Savage takes comments from staff. Spengler states that we belittle eastern history. Will China rule the world? Are they already ruling the world? Savage has staff join him. More Americans believe in violence against the government. Crime soars in the us. Even liberals arm themselves. Chinese teaching young to defend. America is destroying its own young. Savage talks about servitude and freedom in the decline of the west. Conservatives stand up to Macron in france. Marjorie Taylor Greene removed from Twitter for stating there are breakthrough cases of Covid. Savage reads from Spengler about Jews. Savage explains why Jews are important. Jews are the cornerstone of major religions Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The MeidasTouch Podcast
Cults and the Rise of Far Right Authoritarianism with Dr. Steven Hassan, Olga Lautman & Monique Camarra

The MeidasTouch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 101:24


On today's special edition of The MeidasTouch Podcast, we have two really incredible interviews lined up. The first interview is with author, educator, PhD and mental health counselor specializing in destructive cults, Dr. Steven Hassan. During this interview, Dr. Hassan details his own personal experience as a former cult member in The Moonies, his learnings/deprogramming techniques and what we can expect to hear from his new podcast, THE INFLUENCE CONTINUUM. Following this conversation, we head right into another fantastic and in-depth interview with Olga Lautman & Monique Camarra as they provide insights into the latest news involving Russia. Olga & Mo are the top experts in their fields who have devoted their lives to understanding Russia, Ukraine, Caucasus, and their effects on US national security and dangers posed to the West. To learn more please be sure to subscribe to their show, KREMLIN FILE, available anywhere you download your podcasts. If you enjoyed today's podcast please be sure to rate, review and subscribe! As always, thank YOU for listening. DEALS FROM OUR SPONSORS: BLINKIST: blinkist.com/meidas ATHLETIC GREENS: athleticgreens.com/meidas HOW WE WIN: Subscribe to Swing Left's Podcast, “How We Win” Remember to subscribe to ALL the Meidas Media Podcasts: MeidasTouch: https://pod.link/1510240831 Legal AF: https://pod.link/1580828595 The PoliticsGirl Podcast: https://pod.link/1595408601 The Influence Continuum: https://pod.link/1603773245 Kremlin File: https://pod.link/1575837599 Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen: https://pod.link/1530639447 Zoomed In: https://pod.link/1580828633 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices