Podcasts about Ethics

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Branch of philosophy that discusses right and wrong conduct

  • 10,723PODCASTS
  • 29,556EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 13, 2022LATEST
Ethics

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    Best podcasts about Ethics

    Show all podcasts related to ethics

    Latest podcast episodes about Ethics

    Hillsdale Dialogues Podcast
    Hillsdale Dialogues 08-12-22: Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life, Part VIII

    Hillsdale Dialogues Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 34:28


    Hillsdale Dialogues 08-12-22: Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life, Part VIII

    Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
    5026 What Gives Me Hope! Friday Night Live 12 Aug 2022

    Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 126:57


    Well, don't we all need it?Help support philosophy!https://www.freedomain.com/donate

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    I Want to Avoid My Mom

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 4:22 Very Popular


    Denise is thinking of quitting her job as a nurse now that her estranged mother took a job at the same hospital. - Dr. Laura: "Leaving a position you enjoy gives her power she doesn't deserve."To what lengths would you go to avoid a hurtful family member? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    My Brother-in-Law is Making a Mistake

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 7:42 Very Popular


    It's only been a year since Jill's sister died, and she's upset that her brother-in-law is now marrying a woman he just recently met online. - Dr. Laura: "Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com"To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    We Need Space From Our Friends

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 7:42 Very Popular


    Leslie and her husband are ready to move on from traveling with their long-time friends, but what's the right way to let them know? - Dr. Laura: "You cannot constrain your life in order to avoid hurt feelings."Have you outgrown a friend relationship? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    I'm Being Bullied At Work

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 5:09 Very Popular


    Samantha's co-worker is upset that she was passed over for a promotion and is taking her anger out on Samantha who is up for the job. Dr. Laura: "Publicly encourage her to file a complaint with Human Resources."How's your relationship with your co-workers? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Sex and Psychology Podcast
    Episode 118: Our Biggest Sex Secrets Revealed

    Sex and Psychology Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 30:24


    We keep a lot of things about our lives secret--but especially sexual things. People may hide their sexual thoughts, behaviors, and even feelings. And, sometimes, these secrets interfere with our pursuit of sexual and relationship happiness. So why do we hide so much about our sex lives in the first place? And if you want to let your partner in on a sexual secret, what do you need to know? Today's episode is a deep dive into sexual and relationship secrets. Michael Slepian returns to the show to help us lift the curtain. Michael is an Associate Professor of Leadership and Ethics at Columbia University and author of the book The Secret Life of Secrets: How Our Inner Worlds Shape Well-Being, Relationships, and Who We Are. He previously appeared on Episode 117 to talk about the broader psychology of secrets, so be sure to check that out if you haven't already. Some of the topics we discuss include: Why our secrets focus disproportionately on sex. The most common things we hide about our sex lives. How technology is making it harder to keep sex secrets. Whether we should confess infidelity. The effects of keeping a romantic relationship secret. How to share intimate secrets with a partner. Check it out! To learn more about Michael, check out his website at michaelslepian.com, take the secrets survey at keepingsecrets.org, and check out The Secret Life of Secrets. Thanks to The Handy (thehandy.com) and the Kinsey Institute (kinseyinstitute.org) for sponsoring this episode! The Handy, made by Sweet Tech, is an automatic stroker designed for self-pleasure. Pair it with your sleeve of choice to mimic realistic sensations of different partnered activities with precise speed and stroke control. Visit https://link.thehandy.com/sexandpsych-1 to learn more and use my exclusive discount code (sexandpsych) to get 10% off your order. The Kinsey Institute's (kinseyinstitute.org) 75th anniversary is underway and you are invited to join in the celebration! Follow @kinseyinstitute on social media to learn more about upcoming events. Also, please consider a gift or donation to the Institute to support sex research and education. Click here to donate. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

    Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
    John Dunne & Abeba Birhane & Adam Frank & Richard Davidson & Evan Thompson & Hanne De Jaegher & Ezequiel Di Paolo & Al Kaszniak & Joan Halifax: Enaction and Ethics: Varela International Symposium 2022 (8 of 8)

    Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 51:18


    At the end of the previous Varela 2022 talk, John Dunne asks the Varela faculty, namely those coming from an enactive perspective, the questions listed below. These questions are explored here, especially in their ethical implications. Listening first to Varela 2022 Part 7 is recommended. Varela faculty explore the following questions from John Dunne: What is the purpose of enaction as […]

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
    Hillsdale DIalogues: Hillsdale Dialogues 08-12-22: Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life, Part VIII

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


    Hillsdale Dialogues 08-12-22: Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life, Part VIII

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    Where's My Life Going?

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 13:46 Very Popular


    22-year-old Connor is at a loss for direction now that his girlfriend of the past 5 years has moved away. - Dr. Laura: "You're just at the beginning of figuring out who you are and where your life is headed."At what age did you figure out what you wanted your life to look like? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Entitled
    S2E1: What Is Equality Anyway?

    Entitled

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 38:22


    Lawyers and law professors Claudia Flores and Tom Ginsburg kick off the second season of Entitled — and this time, they're focusing on one human right (and not just any right) — the right to equality. In the first episode, they explore what equality means in different contexts and to different people. Is it possible or even preferrable for every person to be equal in every way? When do we want equality? How do we get it? And what do we mean when we ask for it? This episode they speak with human rights historian and law professor Sam Moyn; public philosophy professor Elizabeth Anderson; and philosopher and professor of law and ethics Martha Nussbaum. Join the conversation this season as they try to unravel the complexity of equality and what “being equal” really means.

    CrossPolitic Studios
    The Enlightenment In America [Heavy Lifting with Uncle Gary]

    CrossPolitic Studios

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:51


    Enlightenment influences in early American history were tempered by an understanding that the world was created, as Benjamin Franklin believed, and the ability to reason was inherent in being created in the image of God. Ethics reflect God’s moral attributes such as love, goodness, and kindness. Without God, none of these attributes are rationally possible.

    FiLiA Podcasts
    #179 “He Chose Porn Over Me” with author Melinda Tankard Reist

    FiLiA Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 67:27


    FiLiA Spokeswoman Raquel Rosario Sánchez speaks to author and activist Melinda Tankard Reist about pornography's desensitisation of male sexuality and its traumatic effect on women and girls. Hear also about Melinda's work with children and teenagers in schools, her campaigning work with Collective Shout, and the way forward out of a culture of sexualised violence against women and girls.Melinda Tankard Reist is an author, speaker, campaigner, and advocate for women and girls. She is best known for her work addressing sexualisation, objectification, the harms of pornography, sexual exploitation, trafficking, and violence against women. She has recently been appointed Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Culture and Ethics, Notre Dame University, Sydney. She is the Founder and Movement Director of the campaigning organisation Collective Shout. She is the editor of six books including Getting Real: Challenging the Sexualisation of Girls (Spinifex Press, 2009), Big Porn Inc: Exposing the harms of the global pornography industry (Spinifex Press, 2011, co-edited with Dr Abigail Bray), Prostitution Narratives: Stories of survival in the sex trade and Broken Bonds: Surrogate mothers speak out (Spinifex Press, 2019, co-edited with Jennifer Lahl and Renate Klein).Recently, Melinda published He Chose Porn Over Me, a collection of essays written by 25 women who share their stories of broken relationships and enduring abuse by porn-obsessed male partners. He Chose Porn Over Me was launched in early August 2022 during a global event hosted by Collective Shout. The book is available from the FiLiA Bookshop and at bookstores worldwide and via its publisher Spinifex.You can learn more about Melinda's work against a culture of sexualisation and objectification of women and girls on her website.  You can learn more about the campaigning work of Collective Shout on their website. Melinda can also be found on social media such as Twitter and Instagram.

    The Cone of Shame Veterinary Podcast
    COS - 154 - The Ethics Of Behavioral, Convenience And Economic Euthanasia

    The Cone of Shame Veterinary Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 44:35


    Dr. Mary Gardner is on the podcast to discuss the ethics of behavioral and economic euthanasia. We talk about what makes some euthanasia cases more ethically difficult than others, and the 4 types of euthanasia generally seen in practice: 1) Imminent Euthanasia 2) Non-Imminent Euthanasia 3) Non-Medical Euthanasia 4) Convenience Euthanasia Dr. Gardner walks us through a series of challenging decisions and tells stories that bring her points to life. This is an outstanding episode that you will not want to miss! LINKS: Lap of Love Pet Hospice: https://www.lapoflove.com/ GSD Shorthanded Virtual Conference: https://unchartedvet.com/gsd-shorthanded/ Dr. Andy Roark Exam Room Communication Tool Box Course: https://drandyroark.com/store/ What's on my Scrubs?! Card Game: https://drandyroark.com/training-tools/ Dr. Andy Roark Swag: drandyroark.com/shop All Links: linktr.ee/DrAndyRoark ABOUT OUR GUEST: "There is nothing better to Dr. Gardner than a dog with a grey muzzle or skinny old cat! Her professional goal is to increase awareness and medical care for the geriatric veterinary patient and to help make the final life stage to be as peaceful as possible, surrounded with dignity and support for all involved. A University of Florida graduate (AND ANDY'S CLASSMATE!), she discovered her niche in end-of-life care and is the co-founder and CIO of Lap of Love which has over 300 veterinarians around the country dedicated to veterinary hospice and euthanasia in the home. Dr. Gardner and Lap of Love have been featured in Entrepreneur Magazine, The New York Times, the Associated Press, The Doctors and numerous professional veterinary publications. She is co-author of the textbook “The Treatment and Care of the Veterinary Patient”, co-author of a children's activity book focused on saying goodbye to a dog called “Forever Friend”, and the author of a book dedicated to pet owners “It's Never Long Enough: A practical guide to caring for your geriatric dog”. Dr. Gardner also won VMX Small Animal Speaker of the year in 2020!"

    The John Maxwell Leadership Podcast
    A New Kind of Diversity with Tim Elmore

    The John Maxwell Leadership Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 35:25 Very Popular


    Podcast family, we are so excited to have our good friend Tim Elmore back on the podcast to talk about his new book, A New Kind of Diversity. Tim is an expert in leading different generations and teaching others how to create healthy works environments in multigenerational teams despite the gaps that often come with age differences. If you recognize Tim Elmore's name, that's because he was on our podcast back in August of 2021. Not only is Tim one of our thought leaders, he is one of our stellar main stage speakers at our Live2Lead annual leadership conference in Atlanta, GA––one of the largest leadership events in the world. Click here to register for Live2Lead! In this episode, Tim is going to share what's in his new book, which releases in October, and how we can create healthier, collaborative work environments that close the gap between generations of working professionals. Instead of our regular PDF worksheet that we offer each week, our BONUS resource for this week is the New Kind of Diversity free leadership assessment, which will help you understand your own awareness off generational diversity within your own organization. Visit NewDiversityBook.com to take the assessment and to pre-order the book! References: Watch this episode on YouTube NewDiversityBook.com Register for Live2Lead! Register for IMC! Relevant Episode: Eight Paradoxes of Great Leadership with Tim Elmore

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    My Mom Wants Me To Forgive Her Affair

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 5:44 Very Popular


    How should Michelle respond to her mother who just confessed that she cheated on Michelle's father? - Dr. Laura: "You are her child, not her friend. Don't let her burden you with her drama." What do you wish your parents would refrain from sharing with you? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Disruptors for GOOD
    The Regenerative Finance Industry and the Massive Potential to Change the Way We Look at Money and Environmental Assets - Gregory Landua // Co-founder and CEO of Regen Network

    Disruptors for GOOD

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 61:17


    Powered by: ReFi Jobs - ReFi jobs curates the best new regenerative finance jobs at leading companies and startups - Learn more News - The World Food Bank is Combating Worldwide Food Insecurity with a Sustainable System that Elevates the Small Farmer - Read more---> Check out the Causeartist Partners here.---> Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.In Episode 150 of the Disruptors for Good podcast, I speak with Gregory Landua, Co-founder and CEO of Regen Network, on the regenerative finance industry and the massive potential to change the way we look at money and environmental assets.Gregory is co-founder and co-Chief Regeneration Officer of Regen Network. Regen Network is land ecological commons management platform and the backbone for a new approach to ecosystem service markets based on verified ecological state. Gregory Landua, co-author of the pioneering book, Regenerative Enterprise, the Levels of Regenerative Agriculture Whitepaper, and the Regen Network Whitepaper. He is the co-founder and former CEO of Terra Genesis International.Terra Genesis International (TGI) is now lead by a dynamic global team of Permaculture and Regenerative Agriculture and Business practitioners and leaders working to support leading companies to transform their negative impact into regenerative effects, and leading cutting edge agro-forestry business planning around the world.Gregory has studied marine and terrestrial ecology and evolutionary biology in the Galapagos Islands, translated for Amazonian rainforest guides, fought wildfires in the wilderness of Alaska, lived in established ecovillages, founded a successful work-live cooperative, and studied the nuances of ecology and ethics.Gregory has B.S. in Environmental Science and Ethics from Oregon State University, and a M.Sc in Regenerative Entrepreneurship and Design from Gaia University.About Regen NetworkRegen Network is a full-stack blockchain software development company best known for the deployment of Regen Ledger and the set of tools used for Regen Network.Regen Network is a community of actors engaging with ecological regeneration, ecological monitoring, verification, distributed computing, and technology development, centered around Regen Ledger. Network members track specific changes in land, oceans, and watersheds.By improving our understanding of ecosystems and enabling rewards for verified positive changes, Regen Network catalyzes the regeneration of the earth's ecosystems.Using distributed ledger technology, satellite remote sensing, and Ecological State Protocols, Regen Network monitors on-the-ground conditions and generates trusted attestations about the ecological state.Regen Network provides an open platform designed specifically to run diverse applications such as Regenerative Carbon Credits, Supply Chain Transparency, Reforestation Monitoring, and investment vehicles such as Ecological Bonds.There may be nothing of more critical importance than the regeneration of global ecosystems. Regen Network brings together the tools and communities needed to incentivize actions aligned with planetary health.Powered by: ReFi Jobs - ReFi jobs curates the best new regenerative finance jobs at leading companies and startups - Learn more---> Check out the Causeartist Partners here.---> Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.Listen to more Causeartist podcast shows hereFollow Grant on Twitter and LinkedInFollow Causeartist on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram

    In the Moment
    Noem ethics complaints, plus empowering the next generation of native youth

    In the Moment

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 57:58


    The Dakota Political Junkies bring analysis of the race for governor. We'll check in on the ongoing ethics violations investigations for Gov. Kristi Noem and we'll look at a website the governor says outlines the weaknesses of her Democratic opponent. Plus, we bring you part two of a Pulitzer Center project that looks at Indigenous education in South Dakota schools. SDPB's Jordan Rusche reports.

    Issues, Etc.
    2221. Protecting Children from Online Transgender Predators – Clare Morell, 8/10/22

    Issues, Etc.

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 24:52


    Clare Morell of the Ethics and Public Policy Center Parents, If You Don't Get A Grip On Your Kids' Social Media, Trans Activists Will The Ethics and Public Policy Center

    New Books Network
    Minh-Ha T. Pham, "Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Social Media's Influence on Fashion, Ethics, and Property" (Duke UP, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 51:26


    In 2016, social media users in Thailand called out the Paris-based luxury fashion house Balenciaga for copying the popular Thai “rainbow bag,” using Balenciaga's hashtags to circulate memes revealing the source of the bags' design.  In Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Social Media's Influence on Fashion, Ethics, and Property (Duke UP, 2022), Minh-Ha T. Pham examines the way social media users monitor the fashion market for the appearance of knockoff fashion, design theft, and plagiarism. Tracing the history of fashion antipiracy efforts back to the 1930s, she foregrounds the work of policing that has been tacitly outsourced to social media. Despite the social media concern for ethical fashion and consumption and the good intentions behind design policing, Pham shows that it has ironically deepened forms of social and market inequality, as it relies on and reinforces racist and colonial norms and ideas about what constitutes copying and what counts as creativity. These struggles over ethical fashion and intellectual property, Pham demonstrates, constitute deeper struggles over the colonial legacies of cultural property in digital and global economies. Lakshita Malik is a doctoral student in the department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her work focuses on questions of intimacies, class, gender, and beauty in South Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in Anthropology
    Minh-Ha T. Pham, "Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Social Media's Influence on Fashion, Ethics, and Property" (Duke UP, 2022)

    New Books in Anthropology

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 51:26


    In 2016, social media users in Thailand called out the Paris-based luxury fashion house Balenciaga for copying the popular Thai “rainbow bag,” using Balenciaga's hashtags to circulate memes revealing the source of the bags' design.  In Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Social Media's Influence on Fashion, Ethics, and Property (Duke UP, 2022), Minh-Ha T. Pham examines the way social media users monitor the fashion market for the appearance of knockoff fashion, design theft, and plagiarism. Tracing the history of fashion antipiracy efforts back to the 1930s, she foregrounds the work of policing that has been tacitly outsourced to social media. Despite the social media concern for ethical fashion and consumption and the good intentions behind design policing, Pham shows that it has ironically deepened forms of social and market inequality, as it relies on and reinforces racist and colonial norms and ideas about what constitutes copying and what counts as creativity. These struggles over ethical fashion and intellectual property, Pham demonstrates, constitute deeper struggles over the colonial legacies of cultural property in digital and global economies. Lakshita Malik is a doctoral student in the department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her work focuses on questions of intimacies, class, gender, and beauty in South Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

    Great Women in Compliance
    Shannon Walker - A Holistic Approach to Raising Concerns

    Great Women in Compliance

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 32:01


    Welcome to the Great Women in Compliance Podcast, co-hosted by Lisa Fine and Mary Shirley. A critical topic for any ethics and compliance program is the ability for employees to raise concerns - from the initial speak-up process to the interview to the potential for retaliation: Shannon Walker, the founder, and CEO at WhistleBlower Security, Confidential Ethics Reporting & Case Management Solutions. Shannon started in communications for large organizations in the US and Canada. She founded WhistleBlower Security with a vision to make the process easier and more comfortable for reporters while protecting organizations.  Lisa and Shannon have a wide-ranging conversation about the differences between telephone and online reporters, a provider's responsibility to reporters and how that relates to their responsibilities to an organization and different ideas about how organizations can best "triage" in all parts of the investigation cycle. Shannon has always been committed to diversity and ESG, and she also talks about how becoming a "B Corp" has been a great learning process and an excellent accomplishment. Are you planning on heading to the SCCE CEI in Phoenix in October?  Check out Lisa and Mary's speaking sessions on the agenda and sign up!  We invite you to say hello and introduce yourself during the conference – it's going to be a great time. The Great Women in Compliance Podcast is on the Compliance Podcast Network with a selection of other Compliance-related offerings to listen to.  If you enjoy this episode, please rate it on your preferred podcast player to help other like-minded Ethics and Compliance professionals find it.  You can also find the GWIC podcast on Corporate Compliance Insights, where Lisa and Mary have a landing page with additional information about them and the podcast's story.  Corporate Compliance Insights is a much-appreciated sponsor and supporter of GWIC, including affiliate organization CCI Press publishing the related book, “Sending the Elevator Back Down, What We've Learned from Great Women in Compliance” (CCI Press, 2020). You can subscribe to the Great Women in Compliance podcast on any podcast player by searching for it, and we welcome new subscribers to our podcast. Join the Great Women in Compliance community on LinkedIn here.

    New Books in Sociology
    Minh-Ha T. Pham, "Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Social Media's Influence on Fashion, Ethics, and Property" (Duke UP, 2022)

    New Books in Sociology

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 51:26


    In 2016, social media users in Thailand called out the Paris-based luxury fashion house Balenciaga for copying the popular Thai “rainbow bag,” using Balenciaga's hashtags to circulate memes revealing the source of the bags' design.  In Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Social Media's Influence on Fashion, Ethics, and Property (Duke UP, 2022), Minh-Ha T. Pham examines the way social media users monitor the fashion market for the appearance of knockoff fashion, design theft, and plagiarism. Tracing the history of fashion antipiracy efforts back to the 1930s, she foregrounds the work of policing that has been tacitly outsourced to social media. Despite the social media concern for ethical fashion and consumption and the good intentions behind design policing, Pham shows that it has ironically deepened forms of social and market inequality, as it relies on and reinforces racist and colonial norms and ideas about what constitutes copying and what counts as creativity. These struggles over ethical fashion and intellectual property, Pham demonstrates, constitute deeper struggles over the colonial legacies of cultural property in digital and global economies. Lakshita Malik is a doctoral student in the department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her work focuses on questions of intimacies, class, gender, and beauty in South Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

    Office of Rabbi Sacks
    The Right and the Good (Rabbi Sacks on Va'etchanan, Covenant & Conversation)

    Office of Rabbi Sacks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 8:44


    Welcome to Rabbi Sacks' commentary on the weekly Torah portion. This series of Covenant & Conversation essays examines the ethics we can derive from the Torah, week-by-week, parsha by parsha. You can find the full written article on Va'etchanan available to read, print, and share, by visiting: www.rabbisacks.org/covenant-conversation/vaetchanan/the-right-and-the-good/ For more articles, videos, and other material from Rabbi Sacks, please visit www.RabbiSacks.org and follow @RabbiSacks. The Rabbi Sacks Legacy Trust continues to share weekly inspiration from Rabbi Sacks. This piece was originally written and recorded by Rabbi Sacks in 2015. Covenant & Conversation on Ethics is kindly supported by the Maurice Wohl Charitable Foundation in memory of Maurice and Vivienne Wohl z”l.

    Your Best Day Yet
    Values and Ethics: How to Know Yours w/ Loriann Putzier

    Your Best Day Yet

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 18:14


    In this episode, CVO Eric Guy talks with Loriann Putzier to talk about the building awareness around knowing your values and ethics. Loriann is the Chief People Officer and founder of IntegraCare, and she provides us great insight on knowing values and ethics.

    Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

    This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2022.08.08 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/JQi4IqE9jQM. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

    Sex and Psychology Podcast
    Episode 117: The Secret Life of Secrets

    Sex and Psychology Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 34:58 Very Popular


    Think about a secret you're keeping right now. Odds are, it shouldn't take long for something to come to mind. We all keep secrets. In fact, the average person is keeping roughly 13 secrets at any given point in time! So what exactly are we hiding, and why are we hiding so much? Today's episode offers a deep dive into the psychology of secrets. We'll explore why secrecy is such a pervasive part of our lives, the psychological effects of secrecy, how to deal with the burdens of secrecy, and much more. My guest today is Michael Slepian, an Associate Professor of Leadership and Ethics at Columbia University. His latest book is titled The Secret Life of Secrets: How Our Inner Worlds Shape Well-Being, Relationships, and Who We Are. Some of the topics we discuss include: The difference between secrecy and privacy. The difference between secrecy and lying. The most common things people keep secret (hint: sex and relationships are pretty high on the list!). How your personality affects the number of secrets you keep--and how good you are at keeping them. The potential positive and negative effects of secrecy on our mental health. How keeping other people's secrets is different from keeping your own secrets. What to do when secrecy becomes really burdensome. Check it out! To learn more about Michael, check out his website at michaelslepian.com, take the secrets survey at keepingsecrets.org, and check out The Secret Life of Secrets. Thanks to FirmTech (myfirmtech.com) and the Modern Sex Therapy Institutes (modernsextherapyinstitutes.com)  for sponsoring this episode! FirmTech's Performance Ring is designed to boost your sexual stamina and give you harder, longer-lasting erections, while also enhancing pleasure. Their Tech Ring has the added benefit of tracking your erectile health. Visit myfirmtech.com and be sure to use my exclusive discount code Justin20 to save 20% off your purchase.  *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: Jonathan Raz Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    I'm Sad That My Threesome Is Over - Part 1

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 7:27 Very Popular


    Allison says she is sad and having a hard time moving on after breaking off a three-way love affair. - Dr. Laura: "You've successfully avoided the risk of a one-on-one relationship."Have you ever been involved in a love triangle? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day
    I'm Sad That My Threesome Is Over - Part 2

    Dr. Laura Call of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 5:13 Very Popular


    In part 2 of this call, Allison continues to explore with Dr. Laura how her childhood could have led to her interest in being “the other woman” in a threesome. - Dr. Laura: "Negative childhood experiences can drive poor decision making in adulthood."What's something you'd like to change about your current approach to love? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Audio Dharma
    Ethics Discussion

    Audio Dharma

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 34:55 Very Popular


    This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2022.08.08 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/JQi4IqE9jQM. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
    Hillsdale DIalogues: Hillsdale Dialogues 08-05-22: Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life, Part VII

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022


    Hillsdale Dialogues 08-05-22: Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics: How to Lead a Good Life, Part VII

    Aphasia Access Conversations
    Episode #88: Everyone's an Expert: Person-Centeredness in the Clinic and Research -- A Conversation with Jackie Hinckley

    Aphasia Access Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 35:21


    During this episode, Dr. Katie Strong, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Strong Story Lab at Central Michigan University talks with Dr. Jackie Hinckley from Nova Southeastern University about stakeholder engaged research and Project BRIDGE.   Dr. Jackie Hinckley is Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program at Nova Southeastern University. She is Board Certified in Neurogenic Communication Disorders by the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS) and Fellow in Person-Centered Care. Dr. Hinckley is currently a Board Member of Aphasia Access and the National Aphasia Association. She is Executive Director Emeritus of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. She is Project Lead for Project BRIDGE, formerly funded by two PCORI Engagement Awards and now supported by NSU. She is the author of two books, Narrative-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, and What Is It Like to Have a Communication Impairment?  Simulations for Family, Friends, and Caregivers. She is an Editor for The Qualitative Report, and on the Editorial Board of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation and Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders.        In this episode you will:  Learn about the importance of including people with aphasia and clinicians in the research process to make the research better. Find out what stakeholder engaged research is and its importance in developing relevant evidence for clinical practice Hear how Project BRIDGE has enhanced stakeholder engagement in research related to aphasia. Be empowered to embrace your own expertise and the expertise of your clients and their family members. KS: Jackie, Welcome back to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I believe you were first interviewed on our podcast in 2016 – Episode #2! We now have over 86 episodes that are available! Who knew the series would have such staying power. It's really amazing! Thanks for joining me today. I'm really excited about this conversation with you and having our listeners hear about what you've been up to lately and how that is impacting our clinical practice and the people with aphasia that we work with. JH: Well, thank you, Katie, for the introduction, and thank you to you and Aphasia Access for the opportunity to be on this podcast. I'm really excited to talk about these issues and talk about them with you. KS: Well, let's dig in. So, today's topic is “everyone's an expert”. How does that relate to our clinical work and our research?  JH: Well, you know, Carl Rogers, the famous psychologist said that we are the best experts on ourselves. And I think that we all have that thought in our minds, but it really hits at the core of person-centeredness. An expert is someone with authoritative knowledge. So that has two parts, the authority and the knowledge. And an expert comes about when people agree that an individual has high performance or high knowledge in an area. I think that the idea of person-centered care in our clinical work is that we acknowledge that our clients are the best experts on themselves. And I think most of us who are practicing speech pathologists would certainly acknowledge that and agree with that. But in reality, in a normal clinical process, it's actually kind of hard to do. Because the clinician is, by definition, an expert, and has a certain degree of authority in the clinical interaction. So, for example, clinicians need to do an assessment and a diagnosis. And the client really can't self-diagnose, so there's an issue of authority and knowledge from the point of view of the clinician. But now that authority tends to seep into other areas like goal setting, where really the client needs to bring forward their own expertise about themselves. When we continue to exercise authority over what the goal should be,  and yet, evidence shows that collaborative goal setting like goal attainment scaling significantly improves not just the immediate outcomes of therapy, but also how active the client is after they are discharged home. So, there's a tension around expertise. It has to shift back and forth during the clinical process. And a lot of times, it starts with the clinician having a lot of authority, but we have to know how to give our client that authority about themselves. So, it's only in the last decade or so that the idea of who's an expert and person-centeredness really has been applied to research.  For example, if we think about a traditional research process, the researcher reads the literature and identifies the knowledge gap comes up with the experiment or whatever study that can contribute to that gap. And the researcher determines the design, the method, the measurement, does the research, publishes it and gets it out in a way that the researcher basically is crossing their fingers is going to have the impact that they hoped for. The problem is that it this ignores who is going to be affected by the research. So, aphasia in, our specialty in our world here, is, is always existing in persons. It's not something that we can be that we can study in a petri dish. So anytime we do research that has to do with aphasia, we need to be acutely aware that we're creating knowledge that is going to actually affect somebody's life. And so maybe this knowledge is going to affect how the aphasia is assessed or treated, or what we do to support people with aphasia, but whatever it is, it's the lives of people with aphasia that are being affected by this research.  So, you know, let's step back a minute. And let's say I invented some new kitchen gadget, or a shoe or something, right. So. I'm the researcher of this new gadget. If I want to be successful in selling the product and having the product being used, I would have incorporated the views of people who might use it by trying out the products way before I ever try manufacturing and selling it because I need that feedback. I need to know if there are potential customers out there and whether they're actually going to use it.  And the same thing really applies to research. So, if I'm a researcher and I create a new research product (a.k.a = knowledge, or study to create knowledge). If I create some research product, but I'm not an expert user of that knowledge, in other words I'm a researcher who doesn't do assessments every day or treatment every day, then I run the very great risk that I'm creating a product that can't quite be used by the people was originally intended for. If we really embraced person-centeredness in research, then we would start by thinking about who are the people who are going to end up being affected by this research product or this research outcome. And we would incorporate people living with aphasia, and also clinicians into our research, and that would make the research better. KS: Powerful stuff! I remember the Disability Rights initiative using a slogan, “Nothing about us without us.” JH: Yes, that is a great slogan that has been around for a while. And that definitely reflects the idea of person-centeredness. And I think we need to remember that slogan and everything we do, whether it's our clinical practice, but also in our research. And that's a little bit of a new way of thinking about research. So, research is not just about the people with aphasia, sometimes it is, but a lot of times it's also about what are the best practices in clinical activities. So, we need to include both people with aphasia, their families, clinicians, maybe policymakers, other people who are really the stakeholders who are affected by the research products that we make, and they need to be involved in planning and doing the research and saying what kind of research would be most helpful. KS: I'm thinking a lot about researchers out there, Jackie, you and I included. We have clinical experience. So maybe they have a good idea of what clinicians need to know from research.  JH: You know, I have heard this from some people saying, “Well, I've been a clinician, so I know.” And maybe that's true. I think that people like you and I, who have been spent a good amount of time being clinicians in our past, probably are ahead of the game. In a sense, we might have a better sense of what we don't know, right? Because we've been out there doing it. But I will, in my opinion, I think researchers who aren't actively out in clinical settings, and they mostly aren't, still aren't quite totally up to date with the current challenges that are being faced by people. Anthony Bourdain, the celebrity chef said, “Just because I like sushi doesn't mean I can make sushi.” So, I think we may think that…but if we're not right in the thick of it, we may not know as much as we think. And we need to bring in the experts who actually do know what it's like to do that daily clinical work. KS: Point well taken. This leads us to the idea of stakeholder-engaged research. What is it? JH: The term stakeholder engaged research is an umbrella term. It covers a lot of different approaches to the idea of bringing in individuals who are going to be affected by the research to actually help can plan, conduct, and disseminate the research. So, there are various ways that stakeholders can be involved in research. They could be consultants, or they could be co-researchers, and full collaborators. In the case of a co-researcher, they help come up with research questions, help design the research, pick the outcome measure, help with data analysis, or interpretation, and even contribute to dissemination of the research results. We have found that people, family members, clinicians, other stakeholders, and people with aphasia can participate it fully as collaborators in all of these things if they so choose. KS: Amazing. I know there are a few examples of this kind of research in Ireland. For example, Ruth McMenamin …. and also, in Denmark Jytte Isaksen is doing interesting work, and of course there is Ciara Shiggins in Australia….what about in the US? JH: Yeah, so in other places, like in Europe, as you say, in Australia, I, you know, I think they've been a little ahead of the United States in terms of understanding that they need to bring in the people who are affected by research into the actual conducting of research. And that also brings up the point that I said, stakeholder engaged research is an umbrella term. There are many different terms and in some other countries, they also use different terms for this. But I'm using stakeholder engaged research here, because as you point out, it really is the term that's coming to the forefront here in the United States. So, in the United States, and in our all of our ASHA journals, we unfortunately have very few examples of stakeholder engaged research, where clients and family members are fully engaged collaborators are involved. There's only a handful of studies. So, it hasn't been a widely used approach in our field yet, but I think it's growing quickly. KS: What makes you think it will grow quickly? JH: There are three broad reasons why I think this is changing fast. First, I think the idea that people who are being affected by something – whether it be a policy, regulation, legislation – is taking a broader hold in certain areas of our lives. For example, in academics where we have student-centered learning. Second, research funding agencies in the United States are starting to value, and therefore reward with funding, research projects in which stakeholders play an important role and make a substantial contribution to the research project. The most important landmark in terms of funding agencies in the United States is the creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, called PCORI. It was created as part of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and it was charged with funding comparative effectiveness research – in other words, research that would help patients and clinicians what is the best treatment for them. Their slogan is “Research Done Differently”, and I think that captures that the research they are producing is not at all the kind of traditional research that we mentioned earlier. PCORI is funding all kinds of health research across many disciplines in innovative ways. This is really changing the landscape of research and research funding, because other funding agencies are starting to follow their lead. The third reason why I think stakeholder-engaged research will grow quickly in our field is the experience we've had with Project BRIDGE. KS: I've been a Regional Coordinator and also a member of a few research teams for Project BRIDGE. Honestly, it's been a gamechanger for me in how I think about approaching research. Can you tell us about how Project BRIDGE got started? JH: Sure. So, 10 years ago, I was at a conference called the Clinical Aphasiology Conference. And for anyone who's not familiar with that conference, until the last couple of years, the only people who could attend the conference were people who submitted presentations. So, this means the conference in that sense rather exclusive, and that the audience, the people who are present at the conference, were really only researchers. So, 10 years ago, I was at this conference, listening to three days of presentations, all about aphasia treatment and I suddenly realized that we're all researchers talking to other researchers about aphasia treatment, but no one at the conference was either using the treatment as a clinician or receiving the treatment as a client. So, I said to some of the folks at the meeting, “There should be some people with aphasia at this conference. We're talking about their treatment.” And the response I got 10 years ago was, “Well, they don't really belong here.” The timing of that was one year after PCORI, became really active and started funding initiatives.  Around the same time, we had done a project with the Sarasota Aphasia Community Group, which is a fabulous group, if anyone needs a referral in that area. They run themselves. The group is really great. We asked their members to come up with ideas about what research they think would be important. We talked to them about research, and we set them off. So, they were off on their own and we did not interfere with this. They had their own group meetings and came up with the research ideas. So, they came up with 22 ideas.  Now most of their research, and by the way, these were really good questions. And most of them, you know, were formulated pretty close to how we would normally formulate research questions. I mean, they did a fabulous job with very little information about research. Most of their research questions were about the best treatment for different kinds of language issues. For example, “What's the best treatment for being able to produce sentences?” But then they came up with some really special questions that I don't think that you or I even despite all of our clinical experience, and our research experience, I'm not sure we would come up with these questions.  For example, they wanted to know, “How can the speech pathologist engage the person with aphasia, not just do rote exercises, but rather connect with the aphasic as a personality, tailor the therapy to the individual needs?” KS: Wow, that's mind blowing. And that's 10 years ago, right?  JH: Yeah, yeah, maybe even more than that. And by the way, I said aphasic. I'm reading what they wrote, so I just wanted to let everyone know that those are their words. Another question they came up with was, “What is the effect on the person with aphasia if they do not like their speech pathologist? or ‘The speech pathologist doesn't understand the patient's needs or doesn't customize the therapy towards them?'” Wow. I think as clinicians, we probably know, in our hearts that when we don't have a good match in terms the rapport between the clinician and client, it probably doesn't go that well. It's not the best outcome. We all know this. But we don't know very much about it from a research point of view. And then another question they came up with was “What makes a speech pathologist excellent?” These are from their point of view. It was just people with aphasia and family members coming up with these questions. KS: Wow, well I'm certain that I wouldn't be able to come up with those types of questions. They are so meaningful and important. They really get right down to what's important, don't they? JH: Yeah. I'm really pleased that we were able to publish that paper with the founders of the Sarasota Aphasia Community Group. They were co-authors. They were equal collaborators with us in the project. That was published in 2014.  And then two years later, in 2016, we submitted a proposal to PCORI, when I was the Executive Director of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. And although that first proposal was not funded, we got great feedback. When I read the feedback, I thought, you know, if we make this actually a little bit bigger, maybe it's going to be successful, which is not always the way you go. But we partnered with the University of South Florida. So, it was Voices of Hope for Aphasia and University of South Florida. And that was funded, and that proposal created Project BRIDGE.  The first two years of funding allowed us to create a working conference. The goal was to bring together people with aphasia, family members, clinicians, and researchers to form collaborative research teams. One challenge with this kind of work and you know, it's this is not just in the world of aphasia, this is any health domain that uses this kind of stakeholder engaged research. So, one challenge is that researchers know about how to do research but other people who aren't researchers don't know so much about research. On the other hand, researchers are not experts on daily clinical processes, nor are they experts on living with aphasia. So, we created some video trainings, and some of them were for people with aphasia and family members to learn more about the research process, and some were for researchers about communication supports role dynamics, and plain language. Because, you know, most researchers have never been trained in doing this kind of collaborative research. So that conference was held in October 2018. And after a two-day meeting, 11 research teams were formed. And you were there, Katie. KS: Yes! Project BRIDGE was a career changing experience for me. I had invited two of our Lansing Area Aphasia Support Group members, Chris and Ruby, to join me, and we flew down to Florida together. I think from that beginning of travelling together to a conference set a stage for something different. Actually, Chris's sister, who lived in Florida joined us at the conference too. None of us really knew what to expect, but from the very beginning, we all knew this was different. At the conference, I remember just having my mind blown that there were over 100 people attending the conference- many who had aphasia or were family members whose lives were impacted by aphasia. One of my favorite parts was when we were in our teams, I had a team about storytelling and aphasia, and everyone was brainstorming on research questions. The training, the collaboration, the energy, it was really impactful. I'd love for you to tell our listeners more about Project BRIDGE. JH: So, after that conference, we were very happy that these research teams were formed and there was so much energy. And I want to say that, you know, from the very beginning, before we even got funding, we had an advisory team that was made up of people with aphasia, families, clinicians, and researchers. And so, after the conference and a little bit of follow up with our teams. The whole advisory team was so excited, and we there was so much momentum, and we knew we wanted to keep Project BRIDGE going.  So, we applied for a second round of funding from PCORI. And with the second round of funding, we created what we call a research incubator. And we were able to create four regional centers around the United States because we knew there are many people who wanted to participate, but who cannot travel across country to a conference. So, we started Project BRIDGE as a research incubator in January 2020. Our mission was to train 48 people with aphasia, family members, clinicians, and researchers on stakeholder engaged research and get them connected to a collaborative multistakeholder research team. Katie, you are one of the regional coordinators in Michigan yourself for the Midwest, so you know how busy we got! KS: Oh yes, busy is an understatement. Suma Devanga from Western Michigan University and I were the Midwest Bridge Regional Coordinators. We had so much interest we just kept meeting with various stakeholders, holding trainings, connecting people with research teams. Definitely Project BRIDGE was the place to be!  JH: All the regional centers were very busy. At the end of two years, we had three times as many people sign up to participate than we planned, and we trained 25% more people than we planned. Many more stakeholder-engaged research teams have been formed, and they're studying topics like the effects of yoga on aphasia. The yoga team actually started in the original 2018 conference. And, you know, check it out, maybe we can share some links to a couple of their publications, because it's a very productive team. KS: Absolutely , we'll put we'll put the links to that and some of the other things you've mentioned in the show notes.  JH: Great. Another team that has been influenced by Project BRIDGE is aphasia games for health. There's more than one team now working on mental health interventions for people with aphasia. We also have a couple of teams working on different aspects of friendship and aphasia. One team is a collaborative team working on how to run aphasia groups. I mean, isn't that great? Get the people with aphasia to run a study on the best way to run the aphasia groups, right? It makes total sense.  We've got lots of teams working, and we've had several different presentations at various conferences. And, you know, please stay tuned in the coming months and, and years, because more and more the work will get to a point where it'll be out in different publications.  When I look back at the work that we did with the Sarasota Aphasia Group, and the questions that they came up with, I'm so overjoyed that many more of them are now being addressed because people with aphasia, care partners, clinicians are being involved in not just coming up with the questions but planning and actually doing the research. KS: Powerful stuff! This is all very exciting. But there must be some challenges…  JH: Definitely, there's definitely challenges. First of all, you know, most researchers who are active today have not been trained in this kind of research. They were not trained in their doctoral program, to sit down with people who have expertise in a completely different area. They may have been trained to collaborate with people who are more or less like them. But that is a very different game. So, one thing that I think we'd like to do in the future is help foster the incorporation of the skills needed to do this kind of research into doctoral training programs. When we talk to researchers who have gotten into this, like you. We find that this is a recommendation that many people come up with. Another challenge of this kind of work is that it takes more time. It is time consuming. It takes time to involve people who come from a different background. And it doesn't matter if they are people with aphasia, a community partner, whoever they are, when they have a different background, then an academic researcher, that's going to take more time, and it's really, truly an investment. That is an issue for this kind of work. Another challenge or risk is as there are more incentives for in involving stakeholders of different types into the research process, there's always a risk of tokenism. So, if that starts becoming rewarded in some way, like through funding, then there's a risk that, you know, stakeholders are up serving on advisory boards, so it looks like they're involved, but they're not really, truly collaborators or really involved. So that is a risk I think that we're going to run, especially in the future.  But you know, honestly, I think that's a risk that we run in our clinical work, too. Sometimes we don't mean to be to be tokenistic. But I think when we ask our clients a general question, like, “What would you like to work on in therapy?” You know, our heart is there, we want to involve the client. But that's a question that the client is not really prepared to answer in that form. Most of our clients, probably, they never been in therapy, they don't know what therapy is in the first place. They don't even know how to start thinking about that question. If we don't take extra steps to seek out their perspective, and what's important to them, that that's a little bit tokenism too. You know, we don't mean it to be, but it really kind of is, I think. We need to ask specific questions; we need to use tools that we have. For example, Aphasia Access now has the Life Interests and Values cards, which is a fabulous way of getting the idea of clients' priorities for therapy, in an aphasia friendly way. I think the other thing for clinicians for our clinical work is when we do ask questions of our clients, and they give us the answer, I think we have to do a better job at taking them at their word. Because I think sometimes, if the answer is not quite what we think it should be, or we're a little surprised by the answer, we're very likely to attribute insight, problem solving issues, motivation, issues, whatever it is, into that client's response, when perhaps, that that is their answer for them. And you know, they are the experts on themselves.   KS: Yes, that's such great perspective and food for thought. I think we really need to listen and embrace what our clients put forth with ideas for how to work on goal areas and be open to receiving the goals and the ideas that they that they have. Even if it takes us a little off road from where we typically go. How can we help them explore and develop and operationalize their ideas? And I think it is challenging, it's new territory for us as clinicians and research but I think once we're open to this, I mean, honestly, sky's the limit. And the cool thing is that we as researchers get to learn and grow alongside our clients as well. Jackie, this has been such a thoughtful and great conversation. The time has just flown by. But as we wrap up today, do you have any final thoughts? JH: Well, you know, a lot of times we hear people say, “I'm no expert”, and Project BRIDGE has really taught me and showed all of us involved I think that a few things. Clinicians might not feel like experts around researchers, but they are experts about what they do and the clinical process. People with aphasia and care partners probably don't feel they don't feel like experts around researchers or clinicians, but in point of fact they are experts about themselves and their own lives and, and what's important, and what we can best do to fit into those priorities. So, I think that we've learned from Project BRIDGE that a researcher or a clinician who exudes cultural humility. You know, we might not feel like experts in front of clinicians or people with aphasia and care partners. So, I think we need to acknowledge, we're all experts on ourselves and our little corner of the world, what we do all day, and other people are experts on other things. And hopefully, we don't impose that onto other people and that we can just collaborate with each other.  When some kind of research is going on, that might potentially affect something that a clinician routinely does, or how a person with aphasia is living, or the kind of therapy they're going to get, etc. We need to be willing to step up and contribute to a collaborative team. You know, probably not every kind of research in the world is a perfect fit for this kind of stakeholder engaged research. But a lot of what we do in aphasia, I think, and especially things that are important to members of Aphasia Access, would be better, more effective and more efficiently done with a collaborative team. We need everyone's expertise to change things for the better. When we do this kind of collaborative research, it speeds up how fast the research gets used in practice settings. So, it benefits people faster, because it's more effective. So, we need people to be aware of this and get involved. Project BRIDGE, fortunately, is now supported by Nova Southeastern University. So, it's not going away just because the funding ended in this year. And we are continuing to help people, whether they be researchers, clinicians, people with communication disabilities, or family members to get going on stakeholder engaged research. We still have our video trainings, And, coming soon, we'll be offering customized research team trainings. I invite everyone to please check out our website, www.projectbridge.online  You can sign up for our newsletter and we post various resources that are helpful tools. KS: Thanks, Jackie. I'll be sure to put all of your contact information and Project BRIDGE as well as some articles on stakeholder engaged research in the show notes. Thank you, Jackie. you've given us lots of food for thought and inspiration for action during the conversation. But I also just want to say, thank you for your forward thinking and helping us in the world of aphasia get on this stakeholder engaged research train. Project BRIDGE is a great conduit for who knows what's to come. JH: Well, thank you, Katie. And, and thanks again, for this opportunity to talk about this effort. You know, there's so many people around the United States who are participating in this, I could have spent the whole podcast just probably listing their names, but that might not be too engaging. KS: It's a big posse, Project BRIDGE! JH: It's very big. Broadly, I definitely want to acknowledge them, even though I can't acknowledge everyone by name. Everyone's doing such exciting work and people are finding their own paths through this, which is what we need. I didn't say it earlier, but the idea of incorporating people living with communication disabilities into the research really springs out of my own personal experience with disability and in life. And it's such a privilege for me to meld my personal experience into things that hopefully will help others too. So, thank you very much. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org If you have an idea for a future podcast topic email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.   Resources Referenced in Episode Project BRIDGE www.projectbridge.online  Email: flaaphasia@gmail.com Twitter @ProjectBridge3 Facebook @bridgeresearch  Instagram @projectbridge2  Dr. Jackie Hinckley - Jh988@nova.edu   PCORI Engagement Resources: https://www.pcori.org/engagement/engagement-resources  Project BRIDGE (and resources) on PCORI: https://www.pcori.org/research-results/2020/building-bigger-bridge-research-incubator-network-pcor-communication-disabilities  Project BRIDGE Published Abstract: https://www.frontiersin.org/10.3389/conf.fnhum.2019.01.00030/event_abstract    Examples of Stakeholder Engaged Research Project with Sarasota Aphasia Community Group:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638288.2013.829528  Team Yoga - 1: https://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2020_PERSP-20-00028  Team Yoga  - 2: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34797684/  Aphasia Games for Health: https://www.aphasiagamesforhealth.com/    Canadian Institutes of Health Research Patient Engagement in Research Resources https://cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/51916.html  Ethics in Patient Involvement: Hersh, Israel, & Shiggins 2021 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2021.1896870    Goal Setting Resources for Aphasia Live Interests Values Cards (LIV! Cards) https://www.aphasiaaccess.org/livcards/