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Chief executive officer (CEO) or managing director of an organization, company, or corporation

  • 21,936PODCASTS
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  • May 21, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Executive director

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Latest podcast episodes about Executive director

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg
Philadelphia Prisons Commissioner Speaks out on Allegations of Prison Crisis

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 60:35


The Philadelphia Prisons have been at the forefront of the news for the past couple of months. KYW's Racquel Williams sits with the Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Prison Society on their investigation of allegations towards Philadelphia Prisons and how the crisis continues to brew. You will hear from Philadelphia Prison Commissioner Blanche Carney as she addresses those allegations and highlights how the pandemic impacted their operations and staff shortages. The Newsmaker of the week pays tribute to our community moms raising children in the midst of the violence nationally and locally. KYW's Shara Dae Howard speaks with North Philly mother Yolanda Sydnor on her efforts in keeping her 3 sons out of trouble and her family on track from the struggle. Our Philly Rising Changemaker is Myon Butler, whom the Philadelphia School District recently highlighted as the Student of the Month. Earlier this year Butler found himself at the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Center, and he's now on his journey to finish school and become the first in his family to graduate college. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Out Of The Blank
#1110 - James Hughes

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 60:24


James Hughes is an American sociologist and bioethicist. He is the Executive Director of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies and teaches health policy at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut in the United States. He is the author of Citizen Cyborg: Why Democratic Societies Must Respond to the Redesigned Human of the Future and is currently writing a book about moral bioenhancement tentatively titled Cyborg Buddha: Using Neurotechnology to Become Better People. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/out-of-the-blank-podcast/support

Death in The Garden
#38 Anders Oskal - Those Who Follow Reindeer

Death in The Garden

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 52:19


On this episode of "Death in The Garden," we speak to Anders Oskal, the Secretary General of the Association of World Reindeer Herders and the Executive Director of the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry in Guovdageaidnu/ Kautokeino, Norway. Anders speaks to us about Sámi culture, explaining the way of his people, the agreement they have made with the reindeer, the importance of their indigenous knowledge in the Arctic landscape, and how the "best available knowledges" must be combined if we ever have a hope of adapting to climate change in our ecosystems. We speak about the encroachments on Sámi lands from industrial development, wind farming and mining, and discuss the unique speed of climate change in the Arctic and these encroachments are making it even more difficult for their people to adapt to the variability in climate, not to mention destroying their ancestral lands.  To learn more about how industry is impacting reindeer herding and Sámi culture, check out these articles below:  - Føsen Case - Oyfjellet wind plant - Gallok mine Please, if you enjoy the podcast and want to support the film, consider joining our Patreon community or subscribing to our Substack. If you can't support financially, a rating, review, or share of the podcast goes a long way! Editing: Jake Marquez

Smarter Markets
Systems at Risk Episode 2 | Bob Anderson, Executive Director, Committee of Chief Risk Officers

Smarter Markets

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 40:11


Bob Anderson, Executive Director of the Committee of Chief Risk Officers, joins us to share his perspectives on improving risk management for today's energy markets. We'll discuss what's on the CCRO's agenda: from the need for better tools and techniques to value LNG, to managing liquidity pressures from margin calls, to building stronger and more collaborative relationships with FCMs and other members of the market ecosystem.

The Pod: Ocean Swimming
Ocean swimming... and seaweed textiles

The Pod: Ocean Swimming

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 27:36


Professor Peter Ralph is Executive Director of the Climate Change Cluster in the Faculty of Science at UTS, and is partnering with Australian surf brand Piping Hot to develop textiles made from seaweed for surfwear. Nature-derived alternatives for the fashion industry have the potential to revolutionise products and vastly reduce their impact on the oceans. Apologies for a little bit of building noise in the background! Songs in this episode - all licensed under a Creative Commons License: Seaweed - Offkey Lifestyle Sea-weed - Martin Williamson Sapphire - Tobu Image from UTS

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast
Now available! WGN Chicago's Very Own Golden Lager from Metropolitan Brewing, Seipp Brewing & Chicago Brewseum

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022


WGN Radio's Dave Plier and Lauren Magiera talk to Tracy & Doug Hurst, Co-Founders & Head Brewer at Metropolitan Brewing, Liz Garibay, Executive Director at The Chicago Brewseum and Laurin Mack, Owner of The Conrad Seipp Brewing Company LIVE from the Chicago's Very Own Golden Lager release party!

Clean and Sober Radio
EPISODE 052022

Clean and Sober Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 57:51


On this edition of Clean and Sober Radio, host Gary Hendler and cohost Mark Mark Sigmund talk with Sarah Laurel, the Executive Director of Savage Sisters, a non-profit organization whose mission is to attack addiction ferociously with radical love through tireless work to promote love, safeness, acceptance, and most importantly resources that will promote healing and empower the recovery community. Sarah is giving back from her own life of addiction and homelessness.

Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses by James Joyce

In this special bonus episode Lex Paulson speaks with Daniel Mulhall, author of Ulysses: A Reader's Odyssey and Ireland's ambassador to the USA.Buy Ulysses: A Reader's Odyssey here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/I/9781848408296/ulysses-a-readers-odyssey*Marking the centenary of Ireland's – and possibly the world's – most famous novel, this joyful introductory guide opens up Ulysses to a whole new readership, offering insight into the literary, historical and cultural elements at play in James Joyce's masterwork.Both eloquent and erudite, this book is an initiation into the wonders of Joyce's writing and of the world that inspired it, written by Daniel Mulhall, Ireland's ambassador to the United States and an advocate for Irish literature around the world.One hundred years on from that novel's first publication, Ulysses: A Reader's Odyssey takes us on a journey through one of the twentieth century's greatest works of fiction. Exploring the eighteen chapters of the novel and using the famous structuring principle of Homer's Odyssey as our guide, Daniel Mulhall releases Ulysses from its reputation of impenetrability, and shows us the pleasure it can offer us as readers.*Daniel Mulhall was born in Waterford. He has spent more than 40 years in Ireland's diplomatic service, and is currently Ireland's ambassador in the United States. He has written and lectured around the world on the subject of Irish literature, and in particular the work of James Joyce, and has worked tirelessly throughout his career to further the impact and reach of Irish writing around the world. In between fits of Joycean nerdery, Dr. Lex Paulson is Executive Director of the School of Collective Intelligence at Université Mohammed VI Polytechnique in Morocco. An adopted Parisian, he teaches at Sciences Po-Paris and writes on the past and future of democracy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mornings on the Mall
5.20.22 - Hour 1: Loudoun County panicking as grand jury digs deeper, Heritage Foundation opposes the Ukraine aid bill

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 35:04


In the first hour of The Vince Coglianese Show, Vince speaks with Ian Prior, Executive Director of Fight for Schools about Loudoun County's new efforts to block what they call an "unconstitutional" special grand jury looking into the sexual assault cover up. AOC has some wild views on abortion.  Dr. Kevin Roberts, President of The Heritage Foundation joins the program to discuss why his organization is opposing the $40B in Ukraine aid. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tech Humanist Show
Does the Future of Work Mean More Agency for Workers?

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:07


This week, we look at a few of the macro trends shaping both the labor market today and the future of work — such as the Great Resignation and collective bargaining — and examine how tech-driven business has both brought them about and potentially given workers more freedom and leverage. We also consider what all of that means for you if you're the one tasked with managing workers or leading a workplace forward, as well as what these trends might mean overall for humanity. Guests this week include Giselle Mota, Christopher Mims, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Dorothea Baur, John C. Havens, and Vanessa Mason. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Kate: The global workforce is experiencing an unprecedented level of change. The Great Resignation may look like a direct result of the COVID Pandemic, but the drivers behind this large-scale trend come from deep-rooted and centuries-old issues in employer-employee dynamics that have been amplified by evolving technology. So in this episode, we're exploring the lessons we've learned from the technologization — the impact of technology on work, as well as how the changing work landscape is pushing people to crave and demand more agency over our work and our lives. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Giselle Mota, Principal Consultant on the Future of Work at ADP, who offered some insight into the emotional human factor behind these changes. Giselle: “I think it's more about us realizing that work is not all that we are. Some people have left their very high-paying roles because they had stress about it, or because they need to be at home caregiving, or now they have issues with their own healthcare or mental health that came up, and they're prioritizing self over this idea of ‘I live to work I live to work I live to work,' right? The value system of humanity globally has shifted a lot, and people have been reassessing, ‘how do I want to spend my time?' ‘How do I want to live my life?' Work should not be driving all of that, our lives should be driving work experience. The ability to think about choosing when you're gonna work, ability to work from different places, how long is my work week, can I come in and out of my shifts throughout the day, can I work on projects, can I destructure and break down what work is and work at it my way? I think that's what we've been seeing.” Kate: Before we can fully understand why this is happening, we have to look at where we are and how we got here. Trends like the Great Resignation follow many years of jobs being automated or shipped overseas. Fewer people are needed to fill the remaining roles, so demand for workers in certain markets is disappearing, while in other markets, the supply of workers for a given job is so high that people aren't paid a living wage. With the rise of the ‘gig economy,' it's becoming less clear what level of education is needed to attain a well-paying job that will still be around in 5 years. Not that this is an entirely new phenomenon. Since at least the dawn of the industrial era, automation caused certain jobs to go out of favor while other jobs sprang up to fill the void. In the 21st century, with the advent of the Internet, algorithms, and ‘big data,' this cycle has been significantly accelerated. More jobs have been “optimized” by technology to prioritize maximum efficiency over human well-being, which is part of what's causing—as I talked about in our last episode—a global mental health crisis. And while the overview sounds bad, there is good news. As long as we can stay open-minded to change, we can work together to design solutions that work for everyone. And if we can do that, the future of work has the potential to be much brighter than the realities of today. To get there, we have to ask ourselves, what assumptions were made in the past to create the modern work environment, and which of those no longer serve us? Rahaf: “If we're gonna move to a more humane productivity mindset, we have to have some uncomfortable conversations about the role of work in our lives, the link between our identity and our jobs and our self-worth, our need for validation with social media and professional recognition, our egos…” Kate: That's Rahaf Harfoush, a Strategist, Digital Anthropologist, and Best-Selling Author who focuses on the intersections between emerging technology, innovation, and digital culture. You may have heard the extended version of this quote in our last episode, but her insight into how questioning our assumptions about work is playing into the changing work landscape felt equally relevant here. Rahaf: “We really have to talk about, ‘growing up, what did your parents teach you about work ethic?' how is that related to how you see yourself? Who are the people that you admire? You can start testing your relationship with work, and you start to see that we have built a relationship with work psychologically where we feel like if we don't work hard enough, we're not deserving. We don't ever stop and say, ‘does this belief actually allow me to produce my best possible work, or is it just pushing me to a point where I'm exhausted and burnt out?” Kate: Outside of our own personal assumptions about our relationship with work, there's also the relationship businesses and technology have with us as consumers, and how their assumptions about what we want are equally problematic. John: “I've read a lot of media, where there's a lot of assumptions that I would call, if not arrogant, certainly dismissive, if not wildly rude… You'll read an article that's like, ‘This machine does X, it shovels! Because no one wants to shovel for a living'!” Kate: That's John C. Havens, Executive Director of the IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. Here he's talking about the current belief held by a lot of the people creating modern technologies that everything can be automated, no matter the cost. John: “We've all done jobs that, elements of it you really don't like and wish could be automated, but usually that's because you do the job long enough to realize, this part of my job I wish could be automated. I've done a lot of, y'know, camp counseling jobs for the summer where I was outside, y'know I was doing physical labor… it was awesome! That said, you know, I was like, ‘this is great for what it was, I kind of don't want to do this for my whole life.' Yeah, a lot of people would not be like, ‘give me 40 years of shoveling!' But the other thing there that I really get upset about when I read some of those articles is what if, whatever the job is, insert job X, is how someone makes their living? Then it's not just a value judgment of the nature of the labor itself, but is saying, from the economic side of it, it's justified to automate anything that can be automated, because someone can make money from it outside of what that person does to make money for them and their family. We have to have a discussion about, y'know, which jobs might go away. Why is that not brought up? It's because there's the assumption, at all times, that the main indicator of success is exponential growth. And a lot of my work is to say, I don't think that's true.” In many ways, our society has failed to question the assumption ‘if something can be automated, automate it.' But as the great Ian Malcolm said in Jurassic Park, “your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.” While automation of jobs is frequently thought of in a manufacturing context, more and more we're seeing automating creep into other areas as well, like decision-making and workplace management. The same factories where machines are replacing physical human labor have now been optimized to replace human thought labor and managers as well. Christopher Mims, tech columnist at the Wall Street Journal and author of Arriving Today, on how everything gets from the factory to our front door, calls this phenomenon “Bezosism.” Christopher: “Bezosism, it's like the modern-day version of Taylorism or Fordism… the bottom line is, this is how you optimize the repetitive work that people do. This isn't just Amazon, Amazon is just the tip of the sphere. Amazon is the best at doing this, but every other company that can is trying to do the same thing: make workers more productive by managing them with software and algorithms, kind of whatever the consequence is. Emily Gindelsberger talks about how, whether it's an Amazon warehouse, or any fast-food restaurant you can name, or a call center… all of these places are now managed by algorithm, and the workers are monitored by software. Instead of a boss telling them to work faster, it's the software cracking the whip and being like, ‘you're not working fast enough, you need to pick packages faster' in this Amazon warehouse, or ‘you need to flip burgers faster' if you work at a McDonald's. But this is becoming the dominant way that work is organized if you don't have a college degree, if you're an hourly worker. You know, the whole phenomenon of the gig economy, the rise of part-time work, subcontracting, the so-called ‘fissured workplace'—all of that is, as one person put it, do you work above the API, like, are you a knowledge worker who's creating these systems? Or do you work below the API, where, what's organizing your work and your life—it's a piece of software! I mean, it's designed by humans, but your boss is an algorithm. And that is becoming, other than wealth and income inequality, one of the defining characteristics of, almost a neo-feudalism, ‘cause it's like, ‘hey! we've figured out how to organize labor at scale, and extract the most from people and make them work as efficiently as possible… we'll just let the software do it!'” Kate: The acceleration of this style of management is a big part of the driver pushing people to question our assumptions about work and begin to demand more agency. If you've been following my work for a while, you've heard me say, “the economy is people”, and that means we can't talk about the future of work without talking about the future of the worker. The idea that people, especially those doing what is considered ‘unskilled' labor, have little agency over how they work isn't new. AI may have exacerbated the issue, but the problem goes back as far as labor itself. Labor unions arose in the early 19th century in an attempt to level the playing field and allow workers to express their needs and concerns, but as we've seen with the recent Starbucks and Amazon unionization stories, the battle for human rights and agency in the workplace is far from decided. And it isn't just factories and assembly lines—it's happening in every industry. In the tech industry, there's a subset of people known as “Ghost Workers,” a term created by anthropologist Mary L. Gray and computer scientist Siddharth Suri to describe the usually underpaid and unseen workers doing contract work or content moderation. They frequently work alone, don't interact with one another, and often aren't even aware who they're working for, so the idea of collective bargaining feels farther out of reach. Dorothea Baur, a leading expert & advisor in Europe on ethics, responsibility, and sustainability across industries such as finance, technology, and beyond, explains some of the human rights issues at play in this phenomenon. Dorothea: “If you look at heavily industrialized contexts or like, heavy manufacturing, or like, textile industry, the rights we talk about first are like the human rights of labor, health and safety, etc. But I mean, trade unions have come out of fashion awhile ago, a lot of companies don't really like to talk about trade unions anymore. So when we switch to AI you think, ‘oh, we're in the service industry, it's not labor intensive,' but the human factor is still there. Certainly not blue collar employees, at least not within the own operations of tech companies, and also maybe not as many white collar employees, in relation to their turnover as in other contexts, but there's a lot of people linked to tech companies or to AI, often invisible. We have those Ghost Workers, gig economy, or people doing low-payed work of tagging pictures to train algo—uh, data sets, etc., so there is a labor issue, a classical one, that's really a straightforward human rights case there.” Kate: Algorithms have worked their way into the systems that manage most of our industries, from factory workers to police to judges. It's more than just “work faster,” too. These algorithms are making decisions as important as where and how many police should be deployed, as well as whether bail should be set, and at what amount. The logical (but not necessarily inevitable) extreme of this way of thinking is that all decisions will be relegated to algorithms and machines. But if people with the ability to make decisions continue to give these types of decisions to machines, we continue to lose sight of the human in the equation. What little decision making power the workers had before is being taken away and given to AI; little by little, human agency is being stripped away. The question then becomes, what if an algorithm tells a worker to do something they think is wrong? Will they have the freedom to question the algorithm, or is the output absolute? Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Director of the Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency, and Accountability team at Twitter, elaborates. Rumman: “So if we're talking about, for example, a recommendation system to help judges decide if certain prisoners should get bail or not get bail, what's really interesting is not just how this affects the prisoner, but also the role of the judge in sort of the structure of the judicial system, and whether or not they feel the need to be subject to the output of this model, whether they have the agency to say, ‘I disagree with this.' A judge is a position of high social standing, they're considered to be highly educated… if there's an algorithm and it's telling them something that they think is wrong, they may be in a better position to say, ‘I disagree, I'm not going to do this,' versus somebody who is let's say an employee, like a warehouse employee, at Amazon, or somebody who works in retail at a store where your job is not necessarily considered to be high prestige, and you may feel like your job is replaceable, or worse, you may get in trouble if you're not agreeing with the output of this model. So, thinking about this system that surrounds these models that could actually be a sort of identically structured model, but because of the individual's place in society, they can or cannot take action on it.” Kate: The jury — if you'll pardon the expression — is still out on these questions, but we do know that in the past, worker agency was a key element in the success of our early systems. In fact, in the early days of creating the assembly line, human agency was fundamental to the success of those systems. Christopher Mims again. Christopher: “The Toyota production system was developed in a context of extreme worker agency, of complete loyalty between employer and employee, lifelong employment in Japan, and workers who had the ability to stop the assembly line the instant they noticed that something was not working, and were consulted on all changes to the way that they work. Honestly, most companies in the US cannot imagine functioning in this way, and they find it incredibly threatening to imagine their hourly workers operating this way, and that's why they all—even ‘employee-friendly' Starbucks—uses all these union busting measures, and Amazon loves them… because they just think, ‘oh, god, the worst thing in the world would be if our ‘lazy' employees have some say over how they work. It's nonsense, right? There's an entire continent called Europe where worker counsels dictate how innovations are incorporated. You know, that's how these things work in Germany, but we have just so destroyed the ability of workers to organize, to have any agency… Frankly, it is just disrespectful, it's this idea that all this labor is “unskilled,” that what you learn in this jobs has no real value… I think companies, they're just in this short term quarter-to-quarter mentality, and they're not thinking like, ‘how are we building a legacy? How do we retain employees, and how do we make productivity compatible with their thriving and happiness?' They all give lip service to this, but if you push as hard as Starbucks for instance against a labor union, honestly you're just lying.” Kate: Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Unions were an imperfect but necessary solution to ensuring workers had access to rights, freedoms, and safety in certain workplaces. According to a 2020 report from the Economic Policy Institute, Unionized workers earn on average 11.2% more in wages than nonunionized peers, and Black and Hispanic workers get an even larger boost from unionization. However, it looks like the changing nature of work is changing unionization as well. Unlike the Great Depression, which expanded the reach of labor unions, the Great Recession may have ushered in a period of de-unionization in the public sector. From the 1970s to today, the percentage of U.S. workers in a union has fallen from 25 to just 11.7 percent. In a piece of good news for Amazon employees in New York, they successfully voted for a union in their workplace on April 4th of this year, marking the first victory in a years-long battle for Amazon employee rights and agency. Looking forward, it's hard to say whether unions will be the best solution to worker woes. As more jobs become automated and fewer humans are needed in the workplace, there may be a time when there are only a few employees in a given department, which makes it harder to organize and empower collective bargaining. At the same time, being the only person working in your department may in fact give you more power to influence decisions in your workplace, as Christopher Mims explains. Christopher: “If you reduce the number of humans that work in a facility, it's like a tautology—the ones that remain are more important! Because in the old days, you could hire thousands of longshoreman to unload a ship, if one of them didn't show up, like, who cares? But if you're talking about a professional, today, longshoreman who's making in excess of 6 figures, has these incredibly specialized skills, knows how to operate a crane that can lift an 80,000 lb. shipping container off of a building-size ship, and safely put it on the back of a truck without killing anybody—that person doesn't show up to work, you just lost, y'know, a tenth of your productivity for that whole terminal that day. This is also an example of this tension between, like, it's great that these are good-paying blue-collar jobs, there aren't that many left in America, however, their negotiating power is also why the automation of ports has really been slowed. So that is a real genuine tension that has to be resolved.” Kate: So far in this episode, we've talked a lot about factory workers and the types of jobs that frequently unionize, but the future of work encompasses everyone on the work ladder. In the past, all of the problems regarding lack of worker agency has applied to ‘white collar' jobs as well. The modern office workplace evolved in tandem with factories, and the assumptions about how work should be organized are just as present there. Vanessa: “Our work environments, with who was involved with it and how they were constructed, is something that has been done over a long period of time. And the people who have been involved in that who are not White men, who are not sort of property owners, who are not otherwise wealthy, is a really short timeline.” Kate: That's Vanessa Mason, research director for the Institute for the Future's Vantage Partnership. Here she's explaining how workplace culture evolved from a factory mindset—and mostly by the mindset of a particular subgroup of people. Offices may feel like very different places from factories, but when you look at the big picture, the organizational structures are guided by many of the same ideas. Vanessa: “I think that a lot of organizations and offices are fundamentally sort of command and control, kind of top-down hierarchies, unfortunately. You know, the sort of, ‘the manager does this! Accountability only goes one direction! There's a low level of autonomy depending on what level you are in the chart!' All of those treat humans like widgets. I think that we have to keep in mind that history and that experience, like I still bring that experience into the workplace—basically, I'm in a workplace that was not designed for me, it's not meant for me to succeed, it's not meant for me to even feel as socially safe and as comfortable. There's a lot of research about psychological safety in teams. Like, our teams are not meant to be psychologically safe, they're set up to basically be office factories for us to sort of churn out whatever it is that we're doing in an increasingly efficient manner, productivity is off the charts, and then you receive a paycheck for said efforts. And it's only right now (especially in the pandemic) that people are sort of realizing that organizational culture 1) is created, and 2) that there's an organizational that people didn't realize that they were kind of unintentionally creating. And then 3) if you want your organizational culture to be something other than what it is, you need to collectively decide, and then implement that culture. All of those steps require a sort of precondition of vulnerability and curiosity which people are really frightened to do, and they're trying to escape the sort of harder longer work of negotiating for that to occur.” Kate: And that's what's needed from our managers and leaders as we navigate to a brighter future of work: vulnerability and curiosity. The vulnerability to admit that things could be better, and the curiosity to explore new ways of structuring work to allow more room for agency and decision-making to bring out the best in everyone. If the idea of a union sounds scary or expensive, perhaps there are other ways to allow employees the have more agency over how they work. A world in flux means there's still room to test new solutions. Lately, one of the changes business leaders have tried to make to their organizations is to bring in more diversity of workers. Women, people of color, neurodivergent minds, and people with disabilities have all been given more opportunities than they have in the past, but as Giselle Mota explains, just bringing those people into the workplace isn't enough. Giselle: “I read a study recently that was talking about, even though a lot of diverse people have been hired and promoted into leadership roles, they're leaving anyway. They don't stick around an organization. Why is that? Because no matter what the pay was, no matter what the opportunity was, some of them are realizing, this was maybe just an effort to check off a box, but the culture doesn't exist here where I truly belong, where I'm truly heard, where I want to bring something to the forefront and something's really being done about it. And again it has nothing to do with technology or innovation, we have to go back to very human, basic elements. Create that culture first, let people see that they have a voice, that what they say matters, it helps influence the direction of the company, and then from there you can do all these neat things.” Kate: If you're managing a workplace that has functioned one way for a long time, it may not be intuitive to change it to a model that is more worker agency-driven. How can you change something you may not even be aware exists? Vanessa Mason has a few tips for employers on what they can do to help bring about a new workplace culture. Vanessa: “And so what you can do, is really fundamentally listening! So, more spaces at all hands for employees to share what their experience has been, more experience to share what it is like to try to get to know co-workers. You know, anything that really just surfaces people's opinions and experiences and allows themselves to be heard—by everyone, I would say, also, too. Not just have one team do that and then the senior leadership just isn't involved in that at all. The second thing is to have some kind of spaces for shared imagination. Like all the sort of popular team retreats that are out there, but you certainly could do this asynchronously, at an event, as part of a celebration. Celebrating things like, y'know, someone has had a child, someone's gotten married, someone's bought a house—all of those things are sort of core to recognizing the pace and experience of being human in this world that aren't just about work and productivity. And then some way of communicating how you're going to act upon what you're hearing and what people are imagining, too. There's a bias towards inaction in most organizations, so that's something that certainly senior leadership should talk about: ‘How do we think about making changes, knowing that we're going to surface some changes from this process?' Being transparent, being accountable… all of those sort of pieces that go along with good change management.” Kate: A 2021 paper in the Journal of Management echoes these ideas, stating that communication between employers and their workers need to be authentic, ongoing, and two-directional, meaning that on top of listening to employee concerns, managers also needed to effectively communicate their understanding of those concerns as well as what they intended to do about them. A professional services firm analyzing a company's internal messaging metadata was able to predict highly successful managers by finding people who communicated often, responded quickly, and were action-oriented. Of course another thing many workplaces have been trying, especially in the wake of the COVID pandemic, is allowing employees to work remotely. Giselle Mota again. Giselle: “I think all we're seeing is we're just reimagining work, the worker, and workplace. Now that the pandemic happened, we learned from like Zoom, ‘wait a minute, I can actually work remotely, and still learn and produce and be productive, on a video!' But now, we can add layers of experience to it, and if you so choose to, you can now work in a virtual environment… people are flattening out the playing field. Companies that used to be die-hard ‘you have to work here in our office, you have to be here located right next door to our vicinity,' now they've opened it up and they're getting talent from across the pond, across the globe, from wherever! And it's creating new opportunities for people to get into new roles.” Kate: Although COVID and Zoom accelerated a lot of things, the idea of people working from home instead of the office isn't actually a new one. AT&T experimented with employees working from home back in 1994, exploring how far an organization could transform the workplace by moving the work to the worker instead of the other way around. Ultimately, they freed up around $550M in cash flow by eliminating no longer needed office space. AT&T also reported increases in worker productivity, ability to retain talent, and the ability to avoid sanctions like zoning rules while also meeting Clear Air Act requirements. As remote work on a massive scale is a relatively new phenomenon, the research is still ongoing as to how this will affect long-term work processes and human happiness. It is notable that working remotely is far less likely to be an option the farther you drop down the income ladder. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 9.2% of workers in the bottom quartile of wage-earners have the ability to work remotely. The availability also varies depending on the job you're doing, with education, healthcare, hospitality, agriculture, retail, and transportation among the least-able to work remotely, and finance and knowledge workers among the most-able. Because we aren't entirely sure whether remote work is the best long-term solution, it's worth looking at other ways to attract high-value workers—and keep them around. One idea? Invest in career planning. Technology is making it easier than ever for employers to work with their employees to plan for a future within the company. AI has made it possible to forecast roles that the company will need in the future, so rather than scramble to fill that role when the time comes, employers can work with a current or prospective employee to help prepare them for the job. In my conversation with Giselle Mota, she explored this idea further. Giselle: “A lot of companies are now able to start applying analytics and forecast and plan, ‘okay, if this is a role for the future, maybe it doesn't exist today, and maybe this person doesn't yet have all the qualifications for this other role. But, they expressed to us an interest in this area, they expressed certain qualifications that they do have today, and now AI can help, and data can help to match and help a human, you know, talent acquisition person, career developer, or manager, to help guide that user to say, ‘this is where you are today, this is where you want to be, so let's map out a career plan to help you get to where you should be'.” Kate: She went on to explain that employers don't need to think about jobs so rigidly, and rather than looking for one perfect person to fill a role, you can spread the tasks around to help prepare for the future. Giselle: “I was talking to someone the other day who was saying, ‘y'know, we have trouble finding diverse leadership within our organization and bringing them up,' and I was talking to them and saying, ‘break down a job! Let people be able to work on projects to be able to build up their skillset. Maybe they don't have what it takes today, fully, on paper to be what you might be looking for, but maybe you can give them exposure to that, and help them from the inside of your organization to take on those roles.” Kate: All of these changes to work and the workplace mean that a lot of office workers can demand more from their jobs. Rather than settle for something nearby with a rigid schedule, people can choose a job that fits their lifestyle. As more of these jobs are automated, we are hopefully heading for an age where people who were relegated to the so-called “unskilled” jobs will be able to find careers that work for them. Because it is more than the workplace that is changing, it's also the work itself. I asked Giselle what types of jobs we might see in the future, and she had this to say. Giselle: “As we continue to explore the workplace, the worker, and the work that's being done, as digital transformation keeps occurring, we keep forming new roles. But we also see a resurgence and reemergence of certain roles taking more importance than even before. For example, leadership development is on the rise more than ever. Why? Because if you look at the last few years and the way that people have been leaving their workplaces, and going to others and jumping ship, there's a need for leaders to lead well. Officers of diversity have been created in organizations that never had it before because the way the world was going, people had to start opening up roles like that when they didn't even have a department before. As we move into more virtual experiences, we need creators. We're seeing organizations, big technology organizations, people who enable virtual and video interactions are creating layers of experience that need those same designers and that same talent—gamers and all types of creators—to now come into their spaces to help them start shaping the future of what their next technology offerings are gonna look like. Before, if you used to be into photography or graphic design or gaming or whatever, now there's space for you in these organizations that probably specialize in human capital management, social management… To give you a quick example, Subway! Subway opened up a virtual space and they allowed an employee to man a virtual store, so you could go virtually, into a Subway, order a subway sandwich down the line like you're there in person, and there's someone that's actually manning that. That's a job. And apart from all of that side of the world, we need people to manage, we need legal counsel, we need people who work on AI and ethics and governance—data scientists on the rise, roles that are about data analytics… When Postmates came out and they were delivering to people's homes or wherever it was, college campuses, etc., with a robot, the person who was making sure that robot didn't get hijacked, vandalized, or whatever the case is—it was a human person, a gamer, it was a young kid working from their apartment somewhere, they could virtually navigate that robot so that if it flipped over on its side or whatever, it would take manual control over it, set it right back up, and find it and do whatever it needed to do. So that's an actual role that was created.” Kate: While many people fear that as jobs disappear, people will have to survive without work — or rather, without the jobs that provide them with a livelihood, an income, a team to work with, and a sense of contribution — the more comforting truth is that we've always found jobs to replace the ones that went out of fashion. When cars were invented, the horse-and-buggy business became far less profitable, but those workers found something else to do. We shouldn't be glib or dismissive about the need individual workers will have for help in making career transitions, but in the big picture, humans are adaptable, and that isn't something that looks like it will be changing any time soon. Giselle: “Where we're seeing the direction of work going right now, people want to have more agency over how they work, where they work, themselves, etc. I think people want to own how they show up in the world, people want to own more of their financial abilities, they want to keep more of their pay… If you just wade through all of the buzzwords that are coming out lately, people want to imagine a different world of work. The future of work should be a place where people are encouraged to bring their true full selves to the table, and that they're heard. I think we've had way too much of a focus on customer experience because we're trying to drive profitability and revenue, but internally, behind the scenes, that's another story that we really need to work on.” Kate: The more aware we are of the way things are changing, the better able we are to prepare for the future we want. Even in the face of automation and constantly-evolving technologies, humans are adaptable. One thing that won't be changing any time soon? Workers aren't going to stop craving agency over their jobs and their lives, and employers aren't going to stop needing to hire talented and high-value employees to help their businesses thrive. Hopefully you've heard a few ideas in this episode of ways to lean into the change and make your business, or your life, a little bit better. Even more hopeful is the possibility that, after so much disruption and uncertainty, we may be entering a moment where more people at every stage of employment feel more empowered about their work: freer to express their whole selves in the workplace, and able to do work that is about more than paying the bills. That's a trend worth working toward. Thank you so much for joining me this week on The Tech Humanist Show. In our next episode, I'm talking about why it behooves businesses to focusing on the human experience of buying their product or service, rather than the customer experience. I'll see you then.

Bloomberg Businessweek
Recession Warnings Mount for U.S. Economy

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:24


Bloomberg News Economics Reporter Rich Miller explains that US economy is starting to show signs of strain under the weight of decades-high inflation and climbing interest rates -- raising the risk of a downturn. Mario Cordero, Executive Director at Port of Long Beach, discusses port traffic and the potential for import overload when China lifts lockdowns. Bloomberg Businessweek Editor Joel Weber and Bloomberg News Global Business Executive Editor Brian Bremner share the details of Brian's Businessweek Magazine story Future of Humanity in Peril if We Ignore Message of the Microbes. Rob Frasca, Managing Partner at Cosimo Ventures, talks about the institutional adoption of cryptocurrencies. And we Drive to the Close with Alan Zafran, Founding Partner and Co-CEO at IEQ Capital. Hosts: Tim Stenovec and Katie Greifeld. Producer: Paul Brennan.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Next Gen Personal Finance
NGPF Podcast: Richard Ellis of my529 on the benefits of college savings plans

Next Gen Personal Finance

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 50:04


Richard Ellis, Executive Director of my529, a 529 plan established by the State of Utah joins Yanely to talk college savings plans. Listen to this conversation and you will learn about Richard's career leading up to his role at my529, the benefits of saving early and often, and how to analyze 529 plans. Richard also shared some great resources so you can learn more more about 529 plans. Enjoy! 

Practical Horseman Podcast
Roxane Durant, Executive Director of the IEA

Practical Horseman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 35:00


In this episode, brought to you by Troxel, the Executive Director of the Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA), Roxane Durant, shares everything you need to know about the student-athlete organization. She discusses the disciplines and divisions in the IEA, how the team atmosphere of IEA riding contributes to growth and relationship building and how she thinks the organization has impacted kids across the country. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

This Week in XR Podcast
This Week In XR 5-20-2022 ft. Ori Inbar

This Week in XR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 22:52


This week the hosts are joined by Ori Inbar, co-founder and Executive Director of AWE. Thank you to our sponsor, Virbela!Don't forget to like, share, and follow for more! Follow us on all socials @ThisWeekInXR See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patients Rising Podcast
Can Mark Cuban Deliver Cheaper RX?

Patients Rising Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 31:09


A shark has entered the prescription drug waters. Entrepreneur and ABC Shark Tank investor Mark Cuban founded the ‘Mark Cuban Cost Plus Drug Company' which aims to slash prices, improve transparency, and provide greater convenience to patients. How? It cuts out the middlemen, pharmacy benefit managers, from the supply chain. Plus, as ALS Awareness Month continues, field correspondent Kate Pecora speaks with Giulia, who lost her boyfriend to ALS, about his journey fighting the disease and who received access to a new treatment through compassionate use. And what does the formula supply shortage mean for the rare disease community? Terry and Bob discuss.Hosts: Terry Wilcox, Executive Director, Patients RisingDr. Robert Goldberg, “Dr. Bob,” Co-Founder and Vice President of the Center for Medicine in the Public InterestKate Pecora, Field CorrespondentGuest: Giulia Diguglielmo, ALS Advocate Links: Mark Cuban enters online prescription market 'nibbling at the edge of transparency'Abbott says deal reached to restart baby formula plant | The HillCost Plus DrugsALS Awareness Month: How our fight continues | The ALS AssociationNeed help?The successful patient is one who can get what they need when they need it. We all know insurance slows us down, so why not take matters into your own hands? Our Navigator is an online tool that allows you to search a massive network of health-related resources using your zip code so you get local results. Get proactive and become a more successful patient right now at PatientsRisingConcierge.orgHave a question or comment about the show, or want to suggest a show topic or share your story as a patient correspondent?Drop us a line: podcast@patientsrising.orgThe views and opinions expressed herein are those of the guest(s)/ author(s) and do not reflect the official policy or position of Patients Rising.

Mat Talk Podcast Network
Mat Stats 9: The unique role of the NCWA in college wrestling – SOW21

Mat Talk Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:37


Welcome to the NWCA's latest venture to help our favorite sport. Glenn Gormley, Jason Bryant and Kevin Hazard outline their effort to bring statistical analysis to wrestling. MatStats is the NWCA's attempt to bring wrestling up to speed with so many other sports by incorporating stats. The MatStats crew investigates ideas to help Grow our sport.  In this new monthly episode the MatStats crew is joined by the Founder and Executive Director of the National Collegiate Wrestling Association, Jim Giunta.  This episode is a statistical primer to help educate wrestlers and fans on the 3rd governing body of national collegiate organizations - The National Collegiate Wrestling Association (NCWA). Accompanying Slides: Click here About Mat Stats & State of Wrestling Welcome to the NWCA's latest venture to help our favorite sport. Glenn Gormley, Jason Bryant and Kevin Hazard outline their effort to bring statistical analysis to wrestling. Mat Stats is the NWCA's attempt to bring wrestling up to speed with so many other sports by incorporating stats.  It is the same sport, the wrestlers are just older and better.State of Wrestling by the NWCA is a monthly podcast by the National Wrestling Coaches AssociationApple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeartRadio | Podcast Addict | Castbox | RSS

The Will To Change: Uncovering True Stories of Diversity & Inclusion
E214: An Inclusive Approach to Reproductive Health with WRRAP Executive Director Sylvia Ghazarian and JBC Vice President Adrienne Lawrence

The Will To Change: Uncovering True Stories of Diversity & Inclusion

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 57:48


This episode was originally recorded as an Advocacy in Action session and features a conversation between Women's Reproductive Rights Assistance Project (WRRAP) Executive Director Sylvia Ghazarian and JBC Vice President Adrienne Lawrence. Discover how reproductive health is a business issue that will impact an organization's bottom line, how a number of organizations are approaching this issue in the current climate, and what tools are available to inclusively support women and birthing people in the workplace.

State of Wrestling by the NWCA
Mat Stats 9: The unique role of the NCWA in college wrestling - SOW21

State of Wrestling by the NWCA

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:37


Welcome to the NWCA's latest venture to help our favorite sport. Glenn Gormley, Jason Bryant and Kevin Hazard outline their effort to bring statistical analysis to wrestling. MatStats is the NWCA's attempt to bring wrestling up to speed with so many other sports by incorporating stats. The MatStats crew investigates ideas to help Grow our sport. In this new monthly episode the MatStats crew is joined by the Founder and Executive Director of the National Collegiate Wrestling Association, Jim Giunta. This episode is a statistical primer to help educate wrestlers and fans on the 3rd governing body of national collegiate organizations - The National Collegiate Wrestling Association (NCWA).About Mat Stats & State of WrestlingWelcome to the NWCA's latest venture to help our favorite sport. Glenn Gormley, Jason Bryant and Kevin Hazard outline their effort to bring statistical analysis to wrestling. Mat Stats is the NWCA's attempt to bring wrestling up to speed with so many other sports by incorporating stats.  It is the same sport, the wrestlers are just older and better.


Common Good Podcast
Common Good Science - Astrophysicist Paul Wallace Explains Black Holes

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 56:17


Astrophysicist, Pastor, Professor Paul Wallace talks with Doug Pagitt of Vote Common Good about the black hole at the center of our galaxy, gravity, spacetime, and... UFO's?   Paul Wallace is an astrophysicist, professor, pastor, and avid birder. He writes and speaks at the intersection of faith and science and holds a PhD in physics from Duke University and an MDiv from Emory University's Candler School of Theology. facebook.com/Paul.Matthew.Wallace   /   twitter.com/paulmwall  / pwallace.net   Doug Pagitt is the Executive Director and one of the founders of Vote Common Good. He is also a pastor, author, and social activist.  @pagitt   Daniel Deitrich is a singer-songwriter, former-pastor-turned-activist, and producer of The Common Good Podcast. @danieldeitrich   Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

Gold Digger Show: Finding God's Gold in Every Story
Transformation Requires Belonging

Gold Digger Show: Finding God's Gold in Every Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 30:14


When it comes to true and lasting inner transformation, context is critical. If we want to stay open to growth, trust and safety are necessary and those components are found in the context of belonging. Join me in transformational conversation with Loren Romeus, Executive Director of the T & T Project, a prison ministry focused on helping the incarcerated transform and transition into the healthiest and truest versions of themselves, as we discuss the role belonging plays in lasting inner change. 

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Serving Those in Remote Regions of Canada

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 14:17


Rev. Dr. Steven Schave, Executive Director of LAMP, joins Andy to talk about the work of LAMP in remote regions of Canada, the people who LAMP is able to serve, opportunities to volunteer, and how these volunteers make a difference in the lives of people in Canada. Learn more and apply to volunteer at lampministry.org.

Leaders in Customer Loyalty, Powered by Loyalty360
Customers Flip Over IHOP Loyalty Program

Leaders in Customer Loyalty, Powered by Loyalty360

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:49


Nathan Casey is the Executive Director, CRM, Loyalty, Digital at IHOP, a chain of casual restaurants founded in Toluca Lake, Los Angeles, California, made famous for its imaginative pancake creations.Loyalty360 CEO Mark Johnson met with Nathan Casey to discuss the brand's first loyalty program, the International Bank of Pancakes, and how changes in the dining landscape have impacted brand loyalty.

GovLove - A Podcast About Local Government
#518 Troubling Signs at the Supreme Court with Amanda Karras, Lisa Soronen, & Brian Connolly

GovLove - A Podcast About Local Government

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 61:20


Three guests joined the podcast to discuss the City of Austin v. Reagan National Advertising Supreme Court case. They provided in-depth analysis of the case and how the decision will impact local government sign regulations. Amanda Karras is the Executive Director and General Counsel for the International Municipal Lawyers Association. Lisa Soronen is the Executive Director of the State and Local Legal Center. Brian Connolly is a land use Attorney at Otten Johnson. Host: Dan Bolin

MAKE PODS GREAT AGAIN
K&C Ep 44: Mason Alberts, Executive Director of Forging Youth Resilience

MAKE PODS GREAT AGAIN

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 41:54


Mason Alberts is the executive director of Forging Youth Resilience and joined the show to discuss what is FYR and their evolution over 15 years as well as current goals. We chatted about mental strength, and the impetus for her work at FYR, CrossFit's role in FYR and how to get involved if you are interested. We also discussed her role on the CF DEI council, CF Indigenous as well as the current FYR Ignite campaign. It was a really interesting discussion with a group dedicated to helping and serving youth that need us the most.

When Science Speaks
An Inside Look at Science Policy at the Federal and State Level with Donna Gerardi Riordan

When Science Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 26:49


This week's episode features Donna Gerardi Riordan, a nonprofit leader and innovator with more than three decades of experience bridging the gap between science and policy at the national and state levels.  Donna's most recent role is as Executive Director of the Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS). She previously served in similar roles in California at the California Council on Science & Technology, where she was the co-architect of the first state-level Science & Technology Fellows Program, and at the US National Academy of Sciences, where she founded and directed its Office of Public Understanding of Science.  Donna also has consulted with national and state level organizations on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, she founded Research Northwest, a non-profit organization devoted to generating the best available science for policy decisions.  Donna is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and lives in Seattle. On this week's episode, Donna shares insights about similarities and differences between working in science policy at the state and federal levels. We discuss topics such as: - How Donna recommends people interested in science policy approach opportunities at the state and federal level - Donna's role and responsibilities at the WSAS well as the organization's mission and goals - What Donna means by the “pull” and “push” modes the WSAS employs in its interactions within the policymaking process in Washington State - How scientists and engineers can have an impact at the state level and a specific example of how Donna and the WSAS operated within a particular policymaking process - How scientists can remain objective when it comes to the science while still advising elected officials on policy issues involving scientific topics - Donna's approach to storytelling as a tool for communicating complex information to policymakers  

The Indy
Ep. 51: Taste of Santa Barbara & Local Officials on the Ukraine-Russia Conflict

The Indy

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:31


On this week's episode of The Indy, Host Molly McAnany and reporter Jennifer Yoshikoshi cover this week's Taste of Santa Barbara which runs March 16-22. We sat down with Executive Director of the Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and the Culinary Arts to talk about this week's events as well as two local chefs Pascale Beale and Sally Ruhl who were both greatly impacted by Julia Child's legacy. Reporter Alexandra Goldberg then launches her two-part series covering the Ukraine-Russia conflict through a local lens. She sits down U.S. Congressman Salud Carbajal and Santa Barbara County Supervisor Das Williams to discuss local and national legislation regarding this issue.

A Nun's Life Ministry
Challenge and hope for change at the Permian Basin

A Nun's Life Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 2:47


Sister Joan Brown, Executive Director of New Mexico Interfaith Power and Light, talks about politics, jobs, and other challenges to change in the use of fossil fuels. Hear the full In Good Faith episode IGF045 at aNunsLife.org.  Subscribe to our newsletter   Check out lots more podcasts Let us know your thoughts about the podcast by taking this short survey! Your input helps us shape the future of our podcasts! Click HERE to take the survey. Thank you!

The Kids Table: Presented by Pond
Where Does Your Money Sleep At Night?

The Kids Table: Presented by Pond

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 47:05


Today we're talking with Cory Donovan, Executive Director of Impact PHL. Cory founded ImpactPHL on the fundamental assumption that most people want to do good in the world- but they might be unwittingly approaching it the wrong way- especially when it comes to their investments. Cory challenges people to re-think the idea of doing good with one hand, while investing with the other- and instead challenges people to think about investment as a fundamental vehicle to do good (AND create value). Pull up a chair- and maybe be inspired to re-think where your money sleeps at night. 

Young Catholics Respond
Young Catholics Respond - Alicia Hartle & Msgr. Joseph Malagreca

Young Catholics Respond

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


 Bill Snyder talks with Alicia Hartle, Executive Director of Pentecost Today USA, and Msgr. Joseph Malagreca, Coordinator of the CHARIS National Service of Communion for the USA about how Charis is helping to breathe new life into the Catholic Charismatic...

Stories for Action
Life in the Land: Seeley Swan, Caryn Miske, Clearwater Resource Council

Stories for Action

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:41


In this episode we are in the community of Seeley Lake, in Western Montana. We hear from Caryn Miske, the Executive Director of the Clearwater Resource Council, a locally-led entity that works to engage the community and facilitate efforts that enhance, conserve, and sustain the natural resources and rural lifestyle of the Clearwater Watershed for present and future generations. Caryn shares with us about what holistic, community-led work around climate, equity, and environmental quality can look like, the realistic challenges to starting and sustaining a local nonprofit, and as pressures on small towns and wild places increase, why the efforts are always worth it. She also shares an example of a collaborative process that did not go so well, so there's a lot of information in here for folks in other regions who are looking to embark in collaborative or locally led work in their own community or work.  LINKS: Clearwater Resource Council You can also find them on Instagram and Facebook. Montana Legacy Project This episode is part of the Life in the Land project, which is a series of films and podcasts produced by Stories for Action, which hears from folks that interact with the complexities of Montana's landscapes, speaking to the value of locally-led work and the holistic approaches needed for healthy communities and ecosystems. Find out more about the project and watch the films at  LifeintheLand.org Stories for Action holds a mission to use the power of storytelling to create human connection and advance a thriving planet for all. StoriesforAction.org Follow along on our Instagram and Facebook: @StoriesforAction

Rise Up
Community Owned Solar

Rise Up

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 46:42


MREA Executive Director Nick Hylla hosts Shimekia Nichols, Executive Director of Soulardarity, an environmental non-profit based in Highland Park, Michigan. Soulardarity's mission is to build community power in Highland Park through community-owned solar streetlights. In their talk, Shimekia explains the origins of Soulardarity, how she came to be involved, and highlights the work Soulardarity has done and continues to do in its community. Get your tickets to the 2022 Energy Fair being held between June 24, 2022 - June 26, 2022 in Custer, Wisconsin at https://www.theenergyfair.org/. ----------- Show notes: (1:40) - The history of Highland Park and the origins of Soulardarity (8:40) - Shimekia's background and how she came to be involved with Soulardarity (15:01) - How Soulardarity has helped and inspired its community (23:15) - Shimekia's vision for the future of Soulardarity (29:00) - Shimekia's words of advice for other organizations (36:44) - How Soulardarity works to be more inclusive ----------- MREA links: The Energy Fair MREA's website Volunteer Opportunities at MREA Soulardarity links: Soulardarity's website Soulardarity's Blueprint for Energy Democracy (BFED) Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition (MEJC)

KVMR News
Evening News - Thu May 19th, 2022

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 23:45


ICE is in the hot seat due to their surveillance and data collection tactics. The California Report get's the lowdown from Dan Bateyko, Research Coordinator at the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy & Technology. The shortage of baby formula in the country has state health officials warning Californians not to dilute what they have and warn against home-brew concoctions of the human milk substitute. Diana Gamzon, Executive Director of The Nevada County Cannabis Alliance explains what a new cannabis industry license could do for local farmers. We close with and essay by Molly Fisk.

KVMR News
AB-2691 Cannabis: Temporary Event Cultivator Retail License

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 7:41


California Assembly Bill 2691, a bill that would create a new cannabis license type could help small farmers survive in the fiercely competitive legal market and is slowly working its way through the legal process in Sacramento. Diana Gamzon, Executive Director of the Nevada County Cannabis Alliance explains what it is and what it could mean for Nevada County's Cannabis farmers.

Mornings on the Mall
5.19.22 - Hour 2: Biden's energy failures, Abortion activists testify on Congress

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:09


In the second hour of The Vince Coglianese Show, Vince speaks with Daniel Turner, founder and Executive Director of Power the Future about Biden's energy failures.  There was a hearing on Capitol Hill with pro abortion activists.  Congressman Mike Johnson who questioned the activists joins the show. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 3-6pm. To join the conversation, check us out on social media: @WMAL @VinceCoglianese See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Ways West Seattle
A Storied History: The Log House Museum's Past and Future

All Ways West Seattle

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 30:00


In this episode we check in with Maggie Kase, the newly-named Executive Director of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, who shares her journey into that role and her vision for the organization. And with the Log House Museum's 25th anniversary this year, we explore the history of this storied structure before it became a museum. Plus, the People of West Seattle reveal what a museum of their own lives might look like.

LeGaL LGBT Podcast
The Trump Alumni Group Goes After Trans Rights

LeGaL LGBT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 45:35


Eric Lesh, Executive Director of the LGBT Bar of NY and Professor Art Leonard of New York Law School, discuss three important cases from the May edition of LGBT Law Notes.  U.S. District Court Rules Against Defense Department in Cases of HIV-Positive Service Members  Federal District Court Refuses to Dismiss Mother's ACA Discrimination Claim Against Insurer That Won't Cover Her Transgender Son's Gender-Affirming Care Trump Alumni Group Engineers Challenge to Bostock Application Outside of Title VII.

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast
#132 - Down Syndrome Diagnosis Network (with Jen Jacob)

Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 20:34


Jen Jacob, Founder and Executive Director of the Down Syndrome Diagnosis Network (DSDN) joined the podcast to talk about their work in the area of information and resource sharing for families. You can get connected to DSDN by going to https://www.dsdiagnosisnetwork.org.   If you have any topics that you would like us to cover on the podcast, please reach out to me via e-mail at downsyndromecenter@chp.edu. If you would like to partner with the work of the Down Syndrome Center, including this podcast, please visit https://givetochildrens.org/downsyndromecenter. 

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
The Official Do Good Better Podcast Season Six Ep19 ND Women's Network Executive Director Kristie Wolff

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 16:07


Kristie Wolff is the Executive Director of the ND Women's Network. Kristie has an extensive background in marketing, grassroots education, advocacy, and coalition work. Kristie found her true passion when she began working in the nonprofit sector, where she has spent over half of her career. Prior to working a the ND Women's Network, she managed a tobacco prevention program at a statewide nonprofit, where a primary focus of her work was public education and policy regarding emerging tobacco products and nicotine use among youth. Kristie was instrumental in the passing of a state law in 2015 that restricted North Dakota minors from purchasing electronic cigarettes.Kristie currently serves as a board member Central Dakota Forensic Nurse Examiner's, the board president for Keeping the Promise, and is a member of the Governor's Task Force on Autism.Kristie lives in Mandan with her husband Jeremy, her two sons and her fur babies. Kristie loves music and rarely passes up an opportunity to see a rock show.Learn More About ND Women's Network:  http://www.ndwomen.org/Upcoming ND Women's Network Events: http://www.ndwomen.org/events/Support This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterSpecial THANK YOU to our sponsors:Donor Dock - The best CRM system for your small to medium sized nonprofit, hands down! Visit www.DonorDock.com and use the Promo Code DOGOODBETTER for a FREE month!Brady Martz - The Nonprofit Audit Specialists! Visit www.BradyMartz.com to connect with folks to make your fiscal life a heckuvalot easier!About The Official Do Good Better Podcast:Each episode features (fundraising expert, speaker, event creator and author) Patrick Kirby interviewing leaders and champions of small & medium nonprofits to share their successes, their impact, and what makes them a unicorn in a field of horses. Patrick answers fundraising questions and (most importantly) showcases how you can support these small nonprofits doing great big things!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate#dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable through Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1072070359

American Birding Podcast
06-20: Gardening for Birds in Ohio with Julie Zickefoose

American Birding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 41:15


Julie Zickefoose scarcely needs an introduction. A prolific artist and an award-winning writer, much of her work is inspired by her home in southeast Ohio. It's the topic of a piece she has written for the May special issue of Birding magazine, Wildlife Gardening in Appalachian Ohio. She joins us talk about the satisfactions and frustrations that come from building a wildlife sanctuary and a little bit about the return of BWD.  Also, we've got a new Executive Director! And some thoughts on the Biggest Week American Birding has seen in 3 years.  Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, and please leave a rating or a review if you are so inclined! We appreciate it!

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
The Official Do Good Better Podcast Season Six Ep20 Sing Me A Story Executive Director Austin Atteberry

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 15:37


Today Patrick welcomes Austin Atteberry, Executive Director & Co-Founder of Sing Me A Story.  Austin hails from the great city of Chicago where he was raised and where he attended school at Northwestern University (06'). After completing his degree, he released a record as a singer-songwriter and was persuaded to move to Music City - Nashville, TN in 2008.  A few years into his time in Nashville, a beautiful girl named Sara moved in next door to Austin and changed the course of his life forever. The idea for Sing Me a Story was born in 2011 and started to take shape in May of 2012 after Austin resigned his position at his day job in Nashville. Austin carries an MBA from Pinchot University in Seattle and was married to that beautiful girl next door, Sara, in 2013. They have two dogs (Fat Sam and Coli) and currently reside in the great state of Wisconsin. Austin makes a mean Texas bar-b-que and enjoys the relationships he shares with those he loves the most. Learn More About Sing Me A Story:  https://singmeastory.org/about/how-it-worksDonate To Sing Me A Story:  https://singmeastory.org/donateSupport This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterSpecial THANK YOU to our sponsors:Donor Dock - The best CRM system for your small to medium sized nonprofit, hands down! Visit www.DonorDock.com and use the Promo Code DOGOODBETTER for a FREE month!Brady Martz - The Nonprofit Audit Specialists! Visit www.BradyMartz.com to connect with folks to make your fiscal life a heckuvalot easier!About The Official Do Good Better Podcast:Each episode features (fundraising expert, speaker, event creator and author) Patrick Kirby interviewing leaders and champions of small & medium nonprofits to share their successes, their impact, and what makes them a unicorn in a field of horses. Patrick answers fundraising questions and (most importantly) showcases how you can support these small nonprofits doing great big things!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate#dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable through Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1072070359

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success
WSH374 - Scott Sandland on Hypnotic Legacies

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 80:43


Scott Sandland has been a hypnotherapist since 1998. Throughout his career, he has worked on the Drug Rehabilitation Center's clinical teams as well as inside dentists and doctors offices while running a private hypnosis clinic. He is the Clinical Hypnotherapist and Executive Director of Goal Oriented Hypnotherapy - The Newport Clinic as well as the Founder and CEO of Hypnosummit and the Hypnothoughts LIVE conference. Scott has been featured multiple times in publication, including the LA Times, The Orange County Register, and has made guest appearances on hypnosis podcasts, including multiple appearances on the Work Smart Hypnosis podcast.  Scott joins me today to discuss the power of creating hypnotic legacies. We discuss what inspired Scott to create the HypnoThoughts LIVE conference and community and the important factors for staying relevant and creating lasting value in the hypnosis industry. We discuss what Scott believes our true legacy is as hypnosis professionals and the moments that Scott is most proud of since he began hosting the conference. We also discuss what you can expect at HypnoThoughtsLIVE 2022, the fun new networking events taking place this year, and how his early experiences with impostor syndrome and self-doubt impacted the way he plans the conference. Join me at HypnoThoughts LIVE 2022 in Las Vegas, July 29-31. Head over to www.HTLive.net to grab your tickets and register to attend! And don't miss my pre-convention ICBCH Hypnosis Certification event with Richard Nongard as well as my post-convention class – Content is King: Your Six-Figure Hypnosis Business Plan…In One Day! Head over to https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/vegas2022 to grab your tickets for both events. Join the Work Smart Hypnosis Facebook Community for more live content, interaction, and hypnosis training. “The professionals who we inspire is much more our legacy than anything else.” - Scott Sandland ●      Scott's background and what led him to create the HypnoThoughts community and conference●      Important factors for staying relevant and creating lasting value in the hypnosis industry●      Debunking the idea that your popularity has a merit●      Why 20% of HypnoThoughtsLIVE presenters are first-time presenters●      What to expect at HypnoThoughtsLIVE 2022●      How the HypnoThoughtsLIVE conference has evolved over the last decade●      The turning point in Scott's hypnosis career that changed the way he thought about his hypnosis sessions●      What's new at HypnoThoughtsLIVE 2022●      The moments that Scott is most proud of since he began hosting the HypnoThoughtsLIVE conference●      Scott's experience with ‘imposter syndrome' early in his career and how it impacted the way he plans the HypnoThoughtsLIVE conference●      The value of building relationships with other hypnotists and the importance of asking for advice●      Taking ownership of where you are in your hypnosis career and the value of being coachable Resources Mentioned:●      Session #35 - Scott Sandland's Origin Story●      Session #37 - Scott Sandland on Learning Hypnosis●      Session #113 - Scott Sandland on Hypnotic Evolution●      Session #175 - Scott Sandland on Scriptnosis or Hypnosis●      Session #235 - Scott Sandland on Hypnosis for Teens●      Session #258 - Scott Sandland's HypnoThoughts Platinum Keynote - LIVE from San Diego●      The Ultimate Medical and Dental Hypnosis Pain Control Specialty Training with Michael Ellner and Scott Sandland Streaming Video Series - Roger Moore Institute●      ICBCH Professional Hypnosis Training & Certification with Jason Linett & Richard Nongard●      Session #301 - Wendi Friesen on How to Be Memorable●      Session #122 - How to Be a Good Hypnosis Student Connect with Scott Sandland:●      HypnoThoughts LIVE●      Hypnothoughts LIVE on Instagram●      Hypnothoughts LIVE on Facebook●      Scott Sandland on Twitter Join our next online certification course… wherever you are in the world!●      https://WorkSmartHypnosisLIVE.com/  Get an all-access pass to Jason's digital library to help you grow your hypnosis business: ●      https://www.hypnoticbusinesssystems.com/ Get instant access to Jason Linett's entire hypnotherapeutic training library:●      https://www.hypnoticworkers.com/ If you enjoyed today's episode, please send us your valuable feedback! ●      https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/itunes ●      https://www.facebook.com/worksmarthypnosis/ Join the new WORK SMART HYPNOSIS COMMUNITY on Facebook!●      https://www.facebook.com/groups/worksmarthypnosis/  Want to work with Jason? Check out:●      https://www.virginiahypnosis.com/call/

Chat with Leaders Podcast
The 6 Main Drivers Of Employee Engagement

Chat with Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 25:00


In today's episode, Jeff chats with Fred Jewell to explore the dynamics of employee engagement and the six categories of engagement drivers that he identified in his research article published here in the Jabian Journal. Fred shares some fantastic insights that will help you better understand organizational psychology as a leader who wants to give their team the very best support to keep them engaged with your mission. After listening, we hope this helps you learn How to be a better leader, or a happier person, or both. About Fred Jewell Fred Jewell is a consultant, executive coach, speaker, and author of the book, "We Can't Do It Alone: Building Influence with Simple Strategies." As an Executive Director and Senior Strategic Advisor at Jabian Consulting, he spends most of his time working with his clients on strategy, transformation, culture, communication, change management, and organization design. He is also regular contributor to the Jabian Journal, where he has written extensively on engagement, culture and leadership. RESOURCES RELATED TO THIS EPISODE Read the full article at https://journal.jabian.com/exploring-the-dynamics-of-employee-engagement/ Follow https://www.linkedin.com/in/fredjewell/  Purchase Fred's book at https://www.amazon.com/We-Cant-Alone-Influence-Strategies/dp/0999640402  CREDITS Theme Music

Inspired Nonprofit Leadership
168: Values Revealed: A Leadership Principle

Inspired Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 8:59


In this episode, Mary discusses another principle of effective leadership. This one is related to values and how you can reflect on yours and even discover them. Mary has over 40 years experience in the nonprofit sector: 26 as an executive and 18 as a board member. She knows your day-to-day challenges first hand and brings experience and expertise to help you have the greatest possible impact. Be sure to subscribe to Inspired Nonprofit Leadership so that you don't miss a single episode, and while you're at it, won't you take a moment to write a short review and rate our show? It would be greatly appreciated!   Mary's book is available on Amazon or wherever books are sold: Love Your Board! The Executive Directors' Guide to Discovering the Sources of Nonprofit Board Troubles and What to Do About Them. Let us know the topics or questions you would like to hear about in a future episode. You can do that, and follow us, on Facebook. To learn more about our previous guests, listen to past episodes, and get to know your host, go to: Hiland Consulting Connect with Mary! To schedule your free consultation with Mary go to: Talk With Mary.  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maryhiland Inspired Nonprofit Leadership Facebook Group: https://tinyurl.com/inspirednonprofitleadership Website: https://www.hilandconsulting.org/ Company Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hilandconsulting

Plant Your Seed
Chris Fuller-Wigg: Co-Founder and Executive Director of Austin Farm Sanctuary

Plant Your Seed

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 34:35


Chris Fuller-Wigg is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of Austin Farm Sanctuary. He is also the VP of Services for Motiv, a SaaS implementation company. Over the last 5 years, in addition to working at Motiv and building a life with his wife Angela, Chris has worked to build Austin Farm Sanctuary from a 1/2 acre micro-sanctuary to the blossoming non-profit it is today.

Rocking It Grand with Chrys and Shellie

Chrys and Shellie interview author, speaker Jenny Dean Schmidt. Jenny is an award-winning TV reporter and is currently the Executive Director of ChanelMom. Listen in and discover the mom's call to action Jenny writes about in her new book, Mom, You're Amazing.

The Jackson Hole Connection
Episode 190 – Creating Public Art in Jackson Hole featuring Carrie Geraci

The Jackson Hole Connection

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 41:13


Carrie Geraci is the Executive Director of Jackson Hole Public Art, Jackson's only non-profit dedicated to commissioning public art in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.  In this episode, Carrie tells the story of how she made her way out to Jackson over 30 years ago. She goes into how she transitioned into the non-profit world when she became the founding director at the Center of Wonder. Carrie shares her love for art and the incredible talent Jackson has to offer. Stephan and Carrie then talk about some of the beautiful installations that Jackson Hole Public Art has helped create, such as the giant troll installation at R Park, Mama Mimi. Follow Jackson Hole Public Art on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/jhpublicart/ (@jhpublicart) Find out more about Jackson Hole Public Art at https://jhpublicart.org/ (JHPublicArt.org) This week's episode is sponsored in part by Compass Real Estate, the region's largest and most dynamic real estate company in the valley. For more information and to view current listings visit https://www.compass.com/homes-for-sale/jackson-wy/ (COMPASS.com) or at https://www.instagram.com/compassjacksonhole/?hl=en (@compassjacksonhole) Support also comes from Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling, announcing the new commercial Curb to Compost Program for restaurants and other commercial food waste generators. More athttps://tetoncountywy.gov/1459/Compost ( TetonCountyWY.gov) or athttps://www.instagram.com/roadtozerowaste.jh ( @RoadToZeroWaste.JH on Instagram) Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support byhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelmoeri ( Michael Moeri) (http://michaelmoeri.com/ (michaelmoeri.com),https://www.instagram.com/thatsamoeri/ (@thatsamoeri)).

Common Good Podcast
Common Good Faith - How These Conservative Evangelicals Became Progressive Pastors

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 74:38


Pastors Josh Scott and Colby Martin join Doug Pagitt to talk about the journey from conservative Evangelicalism to Progressive Christianity. Josh Scott is pastor at Grace Point Church in Nashville, TN GracePointe.net   Colby Martin is pastor at Sojourn Grace Collective in San Diego, CA Sojourngrace.com   Doug Pagitt is the Executive Director and one of the founders of Vote Common Good. He is also a pastor, author, and social activist.  @pagitt   Daniel Deitrich is a singer-songwriter, former-pastor-turned-activist, and producer of The Common Good Podcast and Livestream. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   See full episodes and sharable short clips on YouTube: youtube.com/votecommongood   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

Species Unite
Lori Marino: Intelligent Life On Earth

Species Unite

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:52


Species Unite will be back on June 2nd with a brand new season. Until then, we are re-sharing some of our favorite episodes. This week's is a conversation with Lori Marino. “In a natural setting, these animals would be swimming maybe a hundred miles a day, diving deep. They have their social lives, their social networks, roles to play in very tightly-knit family groups. They raise their children. They have cultures, different ways of doing things in different populations. They can explore and play and come together.  None of that is available in the concrete tank. None of it. They don't have any place to go. They don't have any place to dive… what you see is a lot of mortality, a lot of sickness, a lot of behavioral abnormalities. Everything that makes life worth living for a dolphin or whale is absent in marine parks and concrete tanks. None of it is available.” – Lori Marino     Lori Marino is a neuroscientist and an expert in animal behavior and intelligence. Much of her work is focused on whales and dolphins. She's currently the president of the Whale Sanctuary Project, which will be a seaside sanctuary for former performing orcas and belugas that have spent their entire lives in concrete tanks. Lori is also the founder and Executive Director of the Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy, an organization that bridges the gap between academic research and on the ground animal advocacy efforts.  She has appeared in several films and television programs, including the documentaries Blackfish, Unlocking the Cage, and Long Gone Wild, which is a 2019 documentary that picks up where Black Fish left off, and is also where the Whale Sanctuary Project begins. The Whale Sanctuary Project is going to change the world for the lucky orcas and belugas that will end up there. They will also be a model for future sanctuaries for cetaceans – as we need a ton of them, there are way too many of these animals living in captivity.  It stuns me that even after documentaries like Blackfish, people all over the world (including many in the US) still visit marine mammal parks. Mostly, people go because they don't know. They don't know how miserable life is for the whales and dolphins and they don't know how intelligent and emotionally complex these animals are. Keeping them in tanks is cruel, inhumane, unjust, and it needs to stop.  Lori has made it her life's work to not only study their intelligence but to advocate and fight for their lives. This conversation is an important one, after listening to Lori, I think it'd be very difficult for anyone to give another dollar to a marine park anywhere on Earth.  I hope that you learn as much as I did. Learn More About The Whale Sanctuary Project Like The Whale Sanctuary Project on Facebook Follow The Whale Sanctuary Project on Twitter Learn More About The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: #PRC: Ignoring the NPT. Henry D. Sokolski Executive Director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC). Henry #Sokolski @NuclearPolicy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 6:55


Photo: 2/2: #PRC: Ignoring the NPT. Henry D. Sokolski Executive Director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC).  Henry #Sokolski  @NuclearPolicy https://npolicy.org/stop-blinking-at-chinas-npt-misbehavior-real-clear-defense/

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #PRC: Ignoring the NPT. Henry D. Sokolski Executive Director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC). Henry #Sokolski @NuclearPolicy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 13:45


Photo: 1/2:  #PRC: Ignoring the NPT. Henry D. Sokolski Executive Director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC).  Henry #Sokolski  @NuclearPolicy https://npolicy.org/stop-blinking-at-chinas-npt-misbehavior-real-clear-defense/