Podcasts about City council

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  • 2,255PODCASTS
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  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
City council

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Best podcasts about City council

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Latest podcast episodes about City council

The Ben Joravsky Show
"Smollettgate Returns!" & Dave Glowacz--aka, Mr. City Council

The Ben Joravsky Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 84:29


The Jussie Smollettage trial begins. Ben riffs. And Dave Glowacz, of Inside Chicago Government, returns to break down the latest City Council meetings. Topics include ward redistricting, policing and Alderman Walter Burnett's masterclass on how to butter up to the mayor.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Seattle News, Views, and Brews
2022 Episode 44: Budget Aftermath, City Land Swap, No Homeless Count, New Sheriff, New Council Regulations

Seattle News, Views, and Brews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 29:52


Learn about the latest in local public affairs in about the time it takes for a coffee break! Brian Callanan of Seattle Channel and Kevin Schofield of Seattle City Council Insight take a final look at the approved 2022 city budget, and an impending land swap between the city and King County. Plus, a look at why the new King County Regional Homelessness Authority will not be doing a "point-in-time" count of homeless residents, a new sheriff selection process, and a new set of regulations for the City Council. Also: a reflection on the deliciousness of tartlet season. If you like this podcast, please support us on Patreon! 

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 27, 2021 - Anne-Charlotte Patterson, Austin Music Commission

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 70:20


Anne-Charlotte Patterson is the Chair of The Austin Music Commission, and we discuss the state of the industry here in Austin and how your tax dollars are being used to support it. @sthrncombustion @demdollarsatx @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

Speaking Municipally
I made my greenfield developers disappear

Speaking Municipally

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 34:30


Here are the relevant links for this episode:Elks clean house'Significant on and off-field problems': Edmonton Elks fire president, general manager and head coachAnimal cruelty unitWith Canada's first animal cruelty unit, Edmonton police aim to curtail other criminal behaviourCannabis over EPLEdmonton Public Library loses appeals to shut down cannabis storesFamily homeless sheltersEdmonton needs a shelter for homeless families, outreach worker saysGreenfield land Tweet thread from Michael Janz Troy's tweet Anti-racism initiatives City of Edmonton awards nearly $215K to 16 community anti-racism initiatives in first instalment of grant program Uncovering deeper layers: Art projects funded to confront racism across the city BudgetCalgarians to face nearly 4% tax hike as council approves 2022 budgetCouncillor introductions Andrew Knack Erin Rutherford Speaking Municipally is a proud member of the Alberta Podcast Network: locally grown, community supported.This week we talked about ATB Financial. ATB has a history of doing what's right for its clients, especially when times are tough—because ATB was Built to help Albertans. We also highlighted The Well Endowed Podcast from the Edmonton Community Foundation which explores the impact of passionate people who are working to make Edmonton a strong, vibrant city to live in.Speaking Municipally is produced by Taproot Edmonton, a source of curiosity-driven original stories, curated newsletters on various topics, and locally focused podcasts, all in the service of informing Edmontonians about what is going on in their community. Sign up to get The Pulse, our weekday news briefing. It's free!★ Support this podcast ★

Chapo Trap House
Will Interviews Hugo Soto-Martinez, Candidate for L.A. City Council

Chapo Trap House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 31:24


Will talks to Hugo Soto-Martinez, who is running for City Council in LA's 13th district. They discuss Hugo's personal history, housing justice, and organizing to build political power. Donate to Hugo's campaign through our custom link: bit.ly/hugochapo Follow Hugo on social media at @hugoforcd13

Tabletop Cyberpunk
Tarot Cards DLC and Community Questions - Night City Council 6 With James Hutt

Tabletop Cyberpunk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:27


https://talsorianstore.com/ https://rtalsoriangames.com/ https://rtalsoriangames.com/2021/10/2... Join our community discord! https://discord.gg/vxrYWCd www.patreon.com/jonjonthewise Follow me on Social Media (Instagram, Tik Tok, Twitter, Facebook) @jonjonthewise Timestamps: 00:00 Intro 08:56 Night City Tarot DLC 23:20 Do Attachments Gain Modifiers? 25:17 Metal Gear Helmet Cost 26:56 How Many Free Hands For Grappling? 33:38 Can A Tech Split Their Work? 34:34 Can You Upgrade Nomad Armor Chassis to SP14? 43:09 Lore Information On Metal Storm Night Club 47:59 Any Plans For A 4d6 Autofire Weapon? 50:07 Advice On Running Narrative Campaign For Many Players 1:00:51 Outro --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jonjonthewise/support

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 24, 2021: Unite the Right organizers owe millions in damages; Former City Manager Richardson sues the city over disparagement clause

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 15:27


Is there a name for the day before Thanksgiving? Feast’s Eve? Blackout Wednesday? Drinksgiving? Food Prepageddon? What about "I hope I didn't forget anything at the store because I'm not going back Day?” In any case, even though it is a holiday week, there’s still time for Charlottesville Community Engagement. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. On today’s program:A jury has found that the organizers of the Unite the Right rally guilty of a civil conspiracy and awarded damages, but did not reach a verdict on other claims Governor Northam and the Virginia Service Commission honor two area churches for their COVID testing work since the pandemic began Former City Manager Tarron Richardson is suing the city Albemarle County will revisit its 21 year old policy on cell tower placementAlbemarle says goodbye to long-time budget chief, and a Dean at the UVA School of Architecture takes a new jobSines v. Kessler verdict After a month-long trial, a jury has awarded more than $25 million in damages to the plaintiffs of a civil lawsuit against organizers and participants of the Unite the Right Rally in August 2017. The jury in Sines v. Kessler held that plaintiffs proved their civil conspiracy case under Virginia law as well as their claim that the defendants engaged in racial, religious, or ethnic harassment. Under the conspiracy count, twelve defendants must pay $500,000 each in damages and five organizations must pay a million each. On the harassment count, five individuals must $250,000 each to two plaintiffs $250,000 in compensatory damages. However, the jury did not reach a verdict on a count claiming the defendants “engaged in a conspiracy to commit racially motivated violence in violation” of federal code. (42 U.S. Code § 1985 - Conspiracy to interfere with civil rights) They also deadlocked on a second count on the defendants failure to prevent the conspiracy. The jury also found that James F. Fields owes damages for an assault and battery claim to specific victims of his deliberate decision to drive into a crowd of people on 4th Street SE on August 12, 2017, as well as another count for intentional infliction of emotional distress. Fields is currently serving time for a criminal conviction on those charges. Read the full verdict on Court Listener. Former City Manager sues CharlottesvilleAnother former Charlottesville official is seeking legal action against the City of Charlottesville. The Daily Progress reports that Dr. Tarron Richardson has filed a federal lawsuit against City Council and four individuals for entering into an agreement that prevented his ability to publicly critique the city after he left his position as City Manager in September 2020. “The First Amendment expressly forbids government bodies — including city councils — from engaging in viewpoint discrimination and retaliating against people based on the content of their speech,” reads the Nature of the Case section of the suit. Richardson wants a jury trial. The civil rights suit seeks damages as well as a declaration that a non-disparagement clause in his severance agreement is not enforceable. The suit also individually names City Councilors Heather Hill and Nikuyah Walker as well as City Attorney Lisa Robertson and former interim City Manager John Blair. The suit revisits Richardson’s tenure as city manager including his enactment of a policy to regulate use of city-issued credit cards and claims some Councilors sought to usurp his authority. “Because of ridiculous demands and the ongoing chicanery and obstructionism from Walker and Hill that would eventually prevent him from adequately performing his job, Dr. Richardson was constructively terminated,” the suit continues. The narrative claims that Councilors did not hold up their end of the severance agreement and disparaged him in social media posts and one interview that was later removed from a local media outlet. This past January, Dr. Richardson asked to publish an op-ed in the Daily Progress on race-relations in Charlottesville, but Robertson said the city would keep open the option of suing to compel Richardson to return the severance payment of $205,000. In all, the suit has four counts including violation of the First Amendment and breach of contract. He’s represented by the Haley Law Firm of Greenville, South Carolina, Keith B. French Law of Pearland, Texas, and Brand Law of Dallas. Earlier this month, former Police Chief RaShall Brackney announced she was filing a wrongful termination claim with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. That’s the first step toward a potential lawsuit. After Richardson left, Council appointed John Blair to serve as interim city manager before naming Chip Boyles this past January. Boyles resigned in October, six weeks after firing Brackney. Marc E. Woolley will become the next interim city manager on December 1. (view the suit on Court Listener)Richmond HUD awardThe agency that owns and operates public housing in Richmond has been awarded a planning grant for the revitalization of a property in Historic Jackson Word. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded $450,000 to the Richmond Redevelopment and Housing Authority for revitalization of Gilpin Court as part of HUD’s Choice Neighborhoods Initiative. “Known as “the Harlem of the South," the neighborhood’s once vibrant main street was filled with thriving theaters, stores, and medical practices,” reads a description in a HUD press release. “The historical heart of the neighborhood was all but destroyed by its bifurcation for the construction of Interstate 95/64.” The intent is for the process to be led by residents, a process already underway at the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. The CRHA had applied for a planning grant in 2010 but was not selected. The agency has not applied since. (list of 2010 applicants)Outgoing budget chief The government of Albemarle County is in transition with many long-time staffers having already retired or about to do so. One of them is Lori Allshouse, who served for many years leading up the county’s budget preparation each year. Nelsie Birch joined Albemarle’s executive leadership in the summer of 2020 as Chief Financial Officer and had this to say about Allshouse at the Board of Supervisors meeting on November 17, 2020.“She’s been the face of all things budget, all things capital projects, capital planning, five-year financial planning, financial policies,” Birch said.  Birch thanked Allshouse for preparing her and the rest of the staff for all of the various budget challenges that have come during the past two years. Allshouse has worked for the county since 2000. Her last job title was Assistant Chief Financial Officer for Policy and Partnerships in the finance and budget department. Her last presentation dealt with cost allocations for partner organizations in next fiscal year. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and it’s time now for another subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement. Since the pandemic began, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society has been offering virtual presentations on all manner of topics. This Sunday at 4 p.m. they’ll present an important topic to the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society. The ACHS is working on a Race and Sports initiative to tell the story of the “Desegregation of Central Virginia Public High School Athletics.” Dr. Shelly Murphy and other participants will update the Richmond groups on local efforts to collect stories from those who lived through the transition away from segregated schools, when institutions such as Jackson Burley High School vanished. This is part of the Sunday Sit-In series put on by the Richmond groups. Register online for the event, which begins at 4 p.m. this Sunday. (register)A-School moveAn associate dean at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture is moving on to take a position at Georgia Tech. Ellen Bassett will become the Chair of the College of Design at the Atlanta-based university. Bassett is currently the associate dean for research at the School of Architecture. She’s also served as the chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning and the director of the School of Architecture’s Real Estate Design and Development.*Service awardsTwo Charlottesville-area churches are among the recipients of Governor Ralph Northam’s Volunteerism and Community Service Awards for 2021. Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church and Church of the Incarnation have been honored as Outstanding Faith-Based Organizations for their offering of free COVID-19 testing in their respective neighborhoods.“Located within highly populated neighborhoods, the majority of those tested have been members of the community’s most vulnerable populations who would otherwise be unable to receive free, consistent, and timely testing,” reads the press release for the awards. Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church is located in the city’s Ridge Street neighborhood and the Church of Incarnation is located off of Hillsdale Drive in Albemarle County. Albemarle wirelessAlbemarle County will review the rules by which cell towers are regulated. A previous Board of Supervisors adopted a policy in December 2000 which among other things requires tall towers to be as invisible to the eye as possible. Several supervisors since then have asked for the policy to be revisited to increase the availability of voice and data service throughout the county. The Board has authorized $100,000 for a study, and Development Process Manager Bill Fritz checked in elected officials on November 17. (2000 Wireless Policy)“Staff wants to ensure that we put out a [request for proposals] that meets the Board’s expectations for the scope of work in the review of these regulations,” Fritz said. “The policy has never been revisited and changes in the regulations have been largely limited to keep up with changing federal regulations, court decisions, and changes in technology.” Fritz said the consultant would be charged with taking potential changes through a community engagement process eventually resulting in a public hearing before the Board of Supervisors. Changes might include elimination of some permits having to go to the Board for approval.“It could include revisions to the ordinance to eliminate the need for special exceptions that have been routinely approved,” Fritz said. “It could include allowance of facilities at greater height or lesser design standard in areas of poor coverage. These are just some ideas.”Supervisor Diantha McKeel has been asking for the policy to be revisited for many years. She suggested going right to making changes in the county code. “The policy is so old that to be honest with you I would just start over with an ordinance,” McKeel said. “And let’s get to the meat of it and let’s not worry about this old outdated policy.” McKeel said the new policy needed to put more emphasis on what she said were the positive benefits of more cell towers, including public safety. Supervisor Ann Mallek said there are other ways to provide more voice and data service that would not require a wholesale change to the policy. “This is taking the mantra of the sales people that this is the way to achieve broadband,” Mallek said. “The county has made a dedicated investment and will continue to make a dedicated investment that broadband is delivered through fiber.” Supervisor Donna Price said the county should explore any methods to expand data service. “We need to update our policy and acknowledge the changes in technology as well as the needs, not the desires, but the needs for connectivity through all of the mechanisms that are available,” Price said. The request for proposals has not yet been issued. END NOTES:Thanks to Becky Calvert and Jennie More for their assistance in coming up with names for the day. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross
City Council; “Adaptation”; “The Korean Vegan Cookbook”; What's Good Wednesday

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 53:04


City Council; “Adaptation”; “The Korean Vegan Cookbook”; What's good Wednesday

Real College Podcast
Minneapolis 2021 Election Recap

Real College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


In this special episode of Real College Podcast reporter Isaac Maruyama takes the reins once again to bring you a breakdown of the election results! Coming up we have a look at which ballot measures passed, how ranked choice voting played out in the mayoral election, a look at each ward's City Council election results, and a rundown of the Board of Estimate and Taxation, and Park Board's election results!

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 11.24.21 - Sexual Assault in Schools

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:37


Hour 2 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including: The Loudoun County sheriff accused the school district's superintendent of taking actions that enabled a male student who had sexually assaulted a girl in a girls' restroom to go on to assault another student in another public school. The sheriff also questioned the superintendent's promised investigation into the assaults. President Biden's Department of Education will no longer ask school districts for data pertaining to teacher-on-student sexual assault allegations. Candidates for Springfield's City Council can now be prosecuted for falsely swearing an oath that they are eligible to hold office.

KIRO Nights
Hour 1 : Ellensburg Medicine

KIRO Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:36


Jack is joined by KIRO's own Hannah Scott to discuss how SPD's budget shrinks a little more after final vote from City Council. // Jack is joined by his good buddy Dr. William Zinnanti MD Ph.D to discuss how a Doctor out of Ellensburg  helped workers dodge vaccine mandate. // Jack spoke at his college to future NPR employees. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KRBD Evening Report
Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021

KRBD Evening Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:24


On tonight's KRBD Evening Report:Ketchikan's City Council discusses port and infrastructure project funding – plus, two upcoming events to remember those we've lost this year – and a Christmas tree from Wrangell will adorn the governor's mansion this year.

The LA Report
Public camping ban, Stray bullet kills Pasadena boy, "Follow home" robberies, Unvaxxed holiday guests – The P.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:24


What's happening today: L.A. City Council sends poverty commission a measure to ban public camping; Pasadena PD looking for clues in death of 13-year-old boy; "Follow home" robberies on the rise; When is Mayor Garcetti heading to India?; How to deal with unvaccinated holiday guests. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 23, 2021 - Don't Let The Door Hit You, Samsung

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:50


Samsung chose Taylor over Austin Tesla robotics program; Tesla Bot (Turns out its old news... shame on me.) Australia is going full 1984 and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

San Diego News Matters
Asylum seekers remain in limbo

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:45


Foreign citizens who are vaccinated can now cross the US-Mexico border. But asylum seekers still cannot cross, even if they are vaccinated, because a controversial Trump-era public health order remains in place. Meanwhile, students at UCSD are hoping the latest City Council redistricting proposal will be changed. It would split the school's east and west campuses into two separate districts. Plus, in 2025, Universal preschool will begin across the state of California but some believe it would do more harm than good.

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 22, 2021 - VaxGiving Strikes Again

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:31


New York Times back at pitting us agains each other this holiday season Man seemingly uses SUV to plow through parade Media is dying to have McConaughey run for Gov and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

The LA Report
Kaiser Permanente boosters available for all; High winds cause power cuts for some; Supply chain woes affect small restaurants; Drive-thru pantry for families in need – The A.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:15


Here's your morning news: Kaiser Permanente now offering boosters to all adult members; SoCal Edison cuts power for some customers due to high winds; Supply chain crisis affecting small restaurants; L.A. City Council holding drive-thru pantry for families in need. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

Tell Me What to Google
Jailing Political Opponents: Abraham Lincoln and Habeas Corpus

Tell Me What to Google

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:40


Abraham Lincoln is known as "The Great Emancipator." But not many people know that during the Civil War, he jailed as many as 2,000 political opponents without charges or trial. The story in this episode revolves around what happened in Baltimore, Maryland in 1861 and why it led to the Mayor, the Police Chief, the entire City Council and many more being jailed indefinitely in a suspension of the writ of Habeas Corpus. Then we chat with entertainer Brandon Anderson and play the quick quiz! Review this podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-internet-says-it-s-true/id1530853589 Bonus episodes and content available at http://Patreon.com/MichaelKent For 15% at SCOTTeVEST, visit http://scottevest.cwv7.net/a3VBZ

817 Podcast
Are we thankful for the Fort Worth Way?

817 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 48:42


Jimmy and EJ share updates on dates to participate in redistricting and the new city council schedule. Aaron Dean's trial is finally set but some believe the trial should be held outside of Tarrant County. The big story is about elites coming to Hotel Dryce and causing a ruckus.

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 19, 2021 - Election Season is Upon Us, Teddy Cohosts, Brad on KLBJ

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 47:40


Teddy Brosevelt cohosts and we talk about lot... Will Brad run for office? Vaccine boosters approved Brad on the Todd and Don Show (@37:42) and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

Speaking Municipally
From 0% we won't Budge-it

Speaking Municipally

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:10


Here are the relevant links for this episode:Dodgeball ChampionshipsEdmonton to host 2022 World Dodgeball ChampionshipsChild careOttawa, Alberta reach deal for $10-a-day child careLegislature AnnexDemolition begins for Alberta's historic — and problem-plagued — Legislature Annex buildingHomelessness Funding News Release: Protecting vulnerable Albertans this winter Alberta announces $21.5 million to help homeless, domestic violence shelters this winter Enough beds expected in Edmonton's shelter system this winter following $21.5-million investment from Alberta government, Commonwealth Stadium to open as 24-7 shelter News Release: Task force to develop homelessness action plan Earlier: 'Significant gap in services:' City of Edmonton anticipates need for 350 additional shelter beds heading into winter, Sohi calling on province to fund Commonwealth Stadium 24-7 shelter Earlier: 'We are facing a crisis:' Edmonton shelter occupancy hits 97% as province poised to announce additional funding supports Wednesday Earlier: Edmonton shelters wait for province to step up as funds dry up Budget 2022 City of Edmonton proposing 1.8% property tax increase for 2022, projecting COVID-19 shortfall of $96.7 million Keith Gerein: Eager new council should avoid making waves while diving into Edmonton's budget City Council Non-Statutory Public Hearing - Budget - Nov. 29, 2021 City of Edmonton reverses decision to privatize bus cleaning, saving more than 100 jobs Urban Park Edmonton to move forward with exploring a potential national urban park Parks Canada to consider Edmonton-area river valley for national urban park network Councillor Introductions Anne Stevenson Jo-Anne Wright Speaking Municipally is a proud member of the Alberta Podcast Network: locally grown, community supported.This week we talked about YourForest, a podcast about the natural world that shares stories about the environment, renewable resources, conservation, forestry, hunting, fishing, and more. We also highlighted fellow APN member Let's Find Out, a podcast about history in Edmonton from Chris Chang-Yen Phillips. Episode 50 offers a peek into his day to day life studying to be a historian at the University of Alberta.Speaking Municipally is produced by Taproot Edmonton, a source of curiosity-driven original stories, curated newsletters on various topics, and locally focused podcasts, all in the service of informing Edmontonians about what is going on in their community. Sign up to get The Pulse, our weekday news briefing. It's free!★ Support this podcast ★

Off Topic/On Politics
Could Jumaane Williams be New York's next governor?

Off Topic/On Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 32:47


Fresh off his reelection victory to be New York City's Public Advocate, Jumaane Williams is jumping into the crowded Democratic race for governor. Meanwhile, Mayor Bill de Blasio continues to flirt with a possible candidacy, launching a new statewide education plan. NY1's Zack Fink, Juan Manuel Benítez and Courtney Gross explain why many are interpreting this move as the unofficial launch of de Blasio's gubernatorial campaign. They also discuss what Williams's announcement means for the other two Democratic candidates in the race: Gov. Kathy Hochul and state Attorney General Letitia James. And now that Democrat Justin Brannan has retained his Brooklyn City Council seat, they also weigh in on the state of the race for City Council speaker and the role Mayor-elect Eric Adams is likely to play in the decision.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 18, 2021: Public housing agency preparing annual plan; State of the James measures the health of the big river

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:25


Let’s begin with a Patreon-fueled shout-out. Colder temperatures are creeping in, and now is the perfect time to think about keeping your family warm through the holidays. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s program: The overall health of the James River has dropped slightly The Food and Drug Administration approves focused ultrasound to treat some symptoms of Parkinson’s diseaseArea transportation officials want your input tonight on the region’s transit futureAn update on planning for Smart Scale’s fifth round The Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority prepares its annual plan to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentWhile the number of vaccinated Virginians has increased due to the extension of shots into people between the ages of 5 and 11, the number of cases has been up slightly over the past two days. However the Virginia Department of Health reports Wednesday figure of 2,592 new cases as a technical error that includes counts from previous days. The seven day average is now at 1,475 a day and the percent positivity is at 5.5 percent today. The Blue Ridge Health District reports another 49 new cases today and the fatality count is at 309. Do you have something to say about how our area bus systems should work? Tonight you’ll have your chance to weigh in on a Regional Transit Vision that could guide the future. Lucinda Shannon is a transportation planner with the Thomas Jefferson Planning District who briefed a technical committee of the Metropolitan Planning Organization on Tuesday.“I’m really hoping you guys will all sign up for the public meeting which is Thursday night at 6:30 p.m.,” Shannon said. “There’s also surveys on both of the TJPDC transit projects.”The TJPDC is also conducting a separate study of the expansion of transit in Albemarle County.Changes to the Charlottesville Area Transit system have been studied and presented to the public this year, but there is no schedule for when they may go into effect as there are more procedural steps to go through. (story map) (presentation)This week, the Norfolk City Council adopted a resolution approving a plan called Multimodal Norfolk that seeks to increase frequency of some buses. “The Recommended Network focuses 70 percent of resources on service that will maximize access to opportunity for most residents and are likely to get high ridership relative to cost,” reads the resolution adopted Tuesday night. “The other 30 percent of resources are focused on service that is not likely to get high ridership but will provide service in areas where there is relatively high need.”Service in Norfolk is provided by Hampton Roads Transit, which that city pays about $20 million a year to operate service.  That includes the Tide light rail system. Meanwhile, work continues to prepare the next round of applications for the Virginia Department of Transportation’s Smart Scale funding process.  Chuck Proctor is a planner with VDOT’s Culpeper District and he’s assisting Albemarle and the MPO come up with potential submissions.“Most of them are bike-ped related, a lot of them are multimodal projects like Avon Street, 5th Street, the 29-250 bypass,” Proctor said. Other projects that could be submitted include the intersection of Old Trail and Crozet Avenue, a recommendation from the ongoing North 29 corridor study, projects on Pantops, as well as various intersections of U.S. 250 east of Pantops. The Thomas Jefferson Planning District can submit up to four applications on behalf of localities. Proctor said he was not aware of what applications the city of Charlottesville might advance. Jeannete Janiczek, the city’s urban construction initiative. In most cases, Charlottesville administers its own projects without involvement from VDOT. “I just want to remind everyone this is still early in the process,” Janiczek said. “We have a new City Council coming online. The city does plan to apply for Smart Scale but we haven’t yet decided which projects.” In four rounds, Charlottesville has been awarded millions for various streetscape projects, none of which has yet gone to construction. In September, Council indicated they would no longer support contributing a local match for funds received for the first two phases of West Main Streetscape. VDOT has not yet been formally informed of any decision, according to spokesman Lou Hatter. Janiczek said potential Charlottesville projects for Round 5 a fourth phase of West Main Streetscape, or in the East High Street, Rose Hill, and the Preston Avenue corridors. There is no information about any of these potential projects available on the city website. In contrast, Albemarle and the TJPDC have been discussing potential projects since the spring. In recent years, Albemarle County has increased its capacity to design and build non-vehicular transportation projects. Kevin McDermott is a chief of planning.“We are now finally after many years in the construction phase for a lot of sidewalk improvements including new sidewalks out on Avon Street Extended, both north and south of the Mill Creek intersection,” McDemott said. The others are:New sidewalk along U.S. 250 near the Harris Teeter including a pedestrian crossing New sidewalk along Rio Road East from John Warner Parkway heading east and south toward CharlottesvilleNew crosswalk at Mountain View Elementary School on Avon Street ExtendedNew sidewalk and shared-use path on Lambs Road to the Lambs Land CampusNew sidewalk on Ivy Road between city limits and the UVA Musculoskeletal CenterThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of focused ultrasound to treat patients with Parkinson’s disease, according to a release from the University of Virginia Health System. Specifically, medical device regulators have authorized medical centers to use something called Exablate Neuro by the company Insightec to treat mobility problems associated with tremors caused by Parkinson’s disease. “Prior to the approval, available treatments for the Parkinson’s symptoms included drugs, which not all patients respond to, and invasive deep-brain surgeries,” reads the release.” Focused ultrasound, in comparison, does not require incisions or cutting into the skull.” During the procedure, highly focused sound waves are used to target faulty brain cells and used together with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), treatment can help ease symptoms. The releases stresses that this is not a cure. The medical technology has been pioneered at UVA and shepherded by the Focused Ultrasound Foundation. Other potential uses include treatment for essential  tremors, uterine fibroids and some forms of cancer.. Research is ongoing. For more information visit the UVA Health website or watch videos on the Focused Ultrasound Foundation’s YouTube page. Water quality in the James River has declined slightly over the past two years, according to a report card issued this week by an advocacy group that seeks to promote practices to reduce pollution. Since 2007, the James River Association has issued the State of the James and this year’s B- is based on a score of 61 percent. Every two years that score is factored by looking at 18 indicators split into the two categories of River Health and River Restoration Progress. In 2017 the grade was 63 percent. “The decline that has occurred since 2017 reflects the impact of abnormally high rainfall experienced across the watershed in recent years causing increased polluted runoff throughout the James,” reads the press release. “While oysters and tidal water quality showed promising resilience over the past year by bouncing back from the surge of rainwater and pollution, the river also revealed stalled progress in phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment pollution reductions, as well as stream health.” Among the indicators are gauges of how healthy various wildlife populations are. The good news is that the bald eagle scores at 100 percent due to an increase in breeding pairs to 352, indicating the ban on DDT as well as passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973 has led to the resurgence. The bad news is that American shad are rated at zero and efforts to stock the James River watershed with hatchery shad have not worked because of the presence of dams, water intakes for water supply, invasive catfish, and fishing nets intended for other species. “Given the dire situation, Virginia must develop an emergency recovery plan that clearly identifies restoration actions,” reads the report card. “But it will take a long-term and sustained effort to bring American shad back from the brink of collapse in the James.” To look through all of the indicators, visit the State of the James website and explore their story map. What are you most interested in? Let me know in the comments. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and it’s now time for a second Patreon-fueled shout-out. The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!The Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority’s Board of Commissioners will hold a closed meeting today to discuss a personnel matter. Last week, the appointed body held a work session on a report the CRHA must turn in to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Kathleen Glenn-Matthews is the deputy director of the CRHA. (FY20-FY21 adopted plan) (FY21-22 draft plan) (FY22-23 draft plan)“The public housing authority PHA plan is a pretty comprehensive guide to all of our agency’s policies and programs,” said Glenn-Matthews. “We spent a lot of time on our goals.”There are two parts to the plan, one of which is a five-year review that won’t be due until 2023. The second part is an annual plan with details about what will happen in the next fiscal year. The fiscal year for the CRHA runs from April 1 to March 30, a different calendar than the city, state, and federal government.  HUD classifies CRHA as a “troubled agency” based on the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) and the Section Eight Management Assessment Program (SEMAP). Glenn-Matthews said that means CRHA has to give more information in its annual plan. One of the first items in the draft plan is a listing of the number of public housing units and the number of housing choice vouchers. The number of units has dropped from 376 to 324 due in part to the temporary closure of Crescent Halls due to renovations. The number of housing vouchers has increased due to their use to provide temporary places for temporarily displaced residents. Those vouchers are separate from a program funded directly by the City of Charlottesville but administered by CRHA to increase their number. The city has had a line item of $900,000 a year in the capital budget for this supplemental program. Highlights from the past year include the adoption of policies on security cameras as well de-concentration of poverty.“The PHA’s admission policy is designed to provide for de-concentration of poverty and income mixing by bringing higher income tenants into lower income communities and lower income tenants into higher income communities,” reads a statement in the plan.Glenn-Matthews said the CRHA wants to build a homeownership program as well as augment the family self-sufficiency program.“We don’t have funding for it and we’re penalized by being troubled but we are looking at alternate sources for that and it’s definitely a big priority for us,” Glenn-Matthews said. The draft plan indicates that the CRHA will continue to engage in “mixed finance modernization or development” as well as “demolition and/or disposition” in the coming year. One project is development of between 39 and 50 units at Sixth Street SE. There is also a pending demolition and disposition application for the second phase of South First Street, which would replace 58 existing units with a larger project. Planning for redevelopment of Westhaven is expected to begin in the next fiscal year. “We want to make sure everything in this plan is there that we want to do this year because if not we’ll have to do an amendment, and nobody wants to go through the process,” Glenn-Matthews said. The plan also explains how nonprofit companies have been formed to serve to secure funding for redevelopment. There’s also data on who lives in the units. As of August 31, 76 percent of households had incomes below 30 percent of the area median income, 14 percent are between 30 and 50 percent, and three percent are between 50 and 80 percent. Six percent of households do not have their income data available. Only one percent of residents are classified as Hispanic or Latino, three percent are classified as Asian, 21 percent are white, and 75 percent are Black.There are a total of 736 people living in Charlottesville public housing and the average household size is 2.6 percent. The public hearing on the annual plan will be held on Monday, December 20. Thanks to Ting for their support in helping this program be produced each day. Today the newsletter ends with a limerick from show supporter Harry Landers honoring Ting for their commitment to match your initial payment to a paid Substack subscription!There once was a writer from C-ville,Who sought to shine light upon evil.He did his own thing,With some help from Ting.If there's news to report, we know he will.Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown Mall This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 18, 2021 - 55 Years Until Pfizer Data Released?

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 23:49


Central Health a scam on the tax payers? (Documentary) Updates to the Workers Defense Project story The FDA has asked a judge to grant it until 2076 to provide all the Pfizer vaccine data and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

The Fran Spielman Show
Ald. George Cardenas (12th)

The Fran Spielman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:05


Sun-Times City Hall reporter Fran Spielman is joined by Mayor Lori Lightfoot's City Council floor leader Ald. George Cardenas (12th) to discuss his plan to study the feasibility of the city to purchase the Chicago Bears as well as the current state of crime and whether or not to give CPD Supt. David Brown more time as top cop. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

On the Record with Michael Mulgrew
Reducing Class Size: Making it Happen

On the Record with Michael Mulgrew

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:28


If teaching during this pandemic has taught us anything, it's that lowering class size is integral to keeping education sustainable for us and our students. We have always known that reducing class size is fundamental to student achievement, teacher retention and equitable schools, but it's now also become an issue of public health. At last, the City Council is considering a proposed landmark bill that would reduce classroom occupancy limits — and lower class sizes in every school in the years to come. On this special edition of 'On The Record With Michael Mulgrew', we're sharing highlights from the UFT's Class Size Town Hall on November 15th, 2021.

The Hopper in the Morning Show
Episode 714 - 11-18-21 - Christina Clausen - Porterville Chamber of Commerce

The Hopper in the Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 18:26


On this episode, Hopper talks with Christina Clausen at the Porterville Chamber of Commerce. She talks about the Porterville Christmas Parade getting approval from the City Council. She also talks about other events coming up.

You Decide with Errol Louis
Eli Valentin: New York's new Latino population

You Decide with Errol Louis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 43:12


While there's a changing of New York's political guard next year, Latinos are notably absent in the upper ranks of city and state government — even as the population is growing. Errol explores the city's changing political dynamics with professor and author Eli Valentin. They talk about the Latino vote in other cities, the competitive race for City Council speaker, and the challenges that Mayor-elect Eric Adams faces.   JOIN THE CONVERSATION Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 17, 2021 - OSHA Not Enforcing!

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 25:54


OSHA has decided not to enforce the Emergency Temporary Standard (mandate) due to legal battles Fauci: political divide hurting covid response  Workers Defense Project gets APD "raid" and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

Max & Murphy
Episode 274: Gale Brewer On Her Tenure As BP, Running For City Council Speaker, & More

Max & Murphy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:10


Episode 274: Gale Brewer On Her Tenure As BP, Running For City Council Speaker, & More by Max Politics

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Oroville City Council declares itself ‘Constitutional Republic' | Documentary ‘Sharing Butte Creek' explores environmental change in Northern Sacramento Valley | Blues artist Katie Knipp performs live in Placerville

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Oroville City Council declares itself a “Constitutional Republic” in response to COVID-19 health orders. KVIE documentary “Sharing Butte Creek” explores the environmental change in the Northern Sacramento Valley. Blues artist Katie Knipp performs in Placerville. Today's Guests Leslie Jacobs, Anthony Kennedy Professor of Law at McGeorge School of Law, on the constitutional legalities following the Oroville City Council's resolution to declare itself a “constitutional republic” and not enforce COVID-19 health orders issued by Governor Newsom or the federal government.  Lisa Pruitt, Martin Luther King, Jr., Professor of Law at UC Davis, on this tension between rural and urban California — and its relationship with the State of Jefferson movement. Documentary filmmaker Kit Tyler, on his new film “Sharing Butte Creek,” exploring environmental change in the Northern Sacramento Valley, which premieres on KVIE's ViewFinder series Wednesday 11/17 at 7 p.m.  Blues artist, Katie Knipp, on her new record "The Well" ahead of her live performance at The Green Room Social Club for the recording of her live album in Placerville on November 19th at 8pm.

Illinois News Now
Sterling City Council Update

Illinois News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 27:26


Sterling City Council Update by Regional Media

KRBD Evening Report
Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021

KRBD Evening Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 14:24


COVID-19 hospitalizations hit a record high last night – plus, Ketchikan's school board will propose modifications to its COVID-19 plans on the fly at tomorrow's meeting – Ketchikan's City Council will hold an emergency meeting to discuss internet access following a recent outage – and what Skagway is doing with a $2 million donation from Norwegian Cruise Line.

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 16, 2021 - ¡Robert O'Rourke!

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:00


Beto has announced his candidacy for Governor of Texas Austin breaks its record for most traffic fatalities Another shooting on 6th and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

City Cast Denver
Denver on Shrooms: It's Been a Trip!

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 14:47


Way back in the spring of 2019, Denver became the first American city in the country to decriminalize psilocybin, or magic mushrooms, with 50.56% of voters in favor. That left many Denverites worried about where decriminalization could lead — like Jeff Hunt, who said this to CBS4: “What I'm afraid we're going to see happen now is people go, ‘Denver is a place where I'm not going to get prosecuted, so we're going to increase the use of these drugs.'” Well, Jeff, the first batch of numbers are in! Today on the show, host Bree Davies sits down with Kevin Matthews, the former West Point cadet who led the decriminalization campaign. He's been working with the city to monitor the situation and last week he presented a report and some interesting recommendations for next steps to City Council.  To see Matthews' whole presentation to City Council last week, click here: http://denver.granicus.com/player/clip/14561?view_id=180&redirect=true For more on the push toward legalization across the country, Matthews was quoted in this recent New York Times piece about veterans leading the charge: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/11/health/veterans-psychedelics-ptsd-depression.html?referringSource=articleShare Subscribe to our newsletter for more news and cool events! https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ Follow our twitter account for nonsense and memes! @citycastdenver

MPR News Update
Recount set for Minneapolis Ward 2 City Council race

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 4:17


The city of Minneapolis will start a recount Friday of ballots in the Ward 2 City Council race. Candidate Yusra Arab lost the race to Democratic Socialists of America candidate Robin Wonsley Worlobah by just 19 votes in the final round of ballots. Arab has said she wants to make sure that all votes are counted. Wonsley Worlobah has said she is confident of her win.  This is an MPR News morning update for Tuesday, November 16, 2021. Hosted by Cathy Wurzer. Our theme music is by Gary Meister.

Houston Matters
Certifying the municipal election, and Council Member Letitia Plummer (Nov. 16, 2021)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:01


On Tuesday's Houston Matters: Harris County Commissioners held two votes on Monday we think you'd be interested in. One was unanimous, calling for an independent review of planning for outdoor concerts at NRG Park in the wake of the deadly crowd surge at Travis Scott's Astroworld festival concert ten days ago. The other vote was simply to confirm this month's local election results — it was not unanimous. News 88.7's politics and government reporter Andrew Schneider joins us with more. Also this hour: City Council Member Letitia Plummer answers questions about issues affecting the city. Then, there are charities and research organizations and support groups and specialists for all kinds of diseases. The more common they are, generally, the more attention they receive. And that's understandable. But what about those rare cases where patients grow increasingly sicker and no one has any idea why? That's where the Undiagnosed Diseases Network comes in. We learn more. And we learn about a photography exhibit called Celebrate Buffalo Bayou: River of Life, which includes some rare images of life along the bayou from around the turn of the last century.

Go Time in Fort Worth with Mayor Mattie Parker
Fort Worth Focus: Understanding the purpose of newly-restructured City Council Committees

Go Time in Fort Worth with Mayor Mattie Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 6:28


What are City Council Committees, and what do they do? In today's quick Go Time episode (only six minutes!), I am explaining how Council Committees play an important role in moving Fort Worth forward on key issues like mobility, neighborhood quality, and supporting entrepreneurship and innovation.The new Council Committees structure begins in December. Learn more here...A podcast hosted by Mayor Mattie Parker, Go Time takes a look at current city issues, innovative Fort Worth residents, and how we are moving the 13th largest city in the nation forward....Learn more about Go Time and nominate a future Go Time guest at fortworthtexas.gov/gotime. Listen to the show wherever you get your podcasts. Go Time is produced by staff here at the City of Fort Worth: Bethany Warner, Katy Holloway, and John-Michael Perkins.Katy and John-Michael also produce our Water Utility's podcast H2OMG, give it a listen.

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 15, 2021 - Vax-giving!

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 17:30


NYT promotes changing the rules of Thanksgiving this year (A shorter show today, so that's all... will be back tomorrow to talk Beto, etc!) @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross
City Council at-large election; 'Misfire: Inside the Downfall of the NRA'; Local sports; Vinyl shortage

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 53:05


City Council at-large election; 'Misfire: Inside the Downfall of the NRA'; Local sports; Vinyl shortage

The WTF California Podcast
Antioch Set to Discuss Everything But Crime as Shootings Increase

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 55:07


On this episode of WTF California Podcast,  we give the City of Antioch a good kick in the butt which it needs after three shootings in the past week as the City Council is set to discuss a bunch of gibberish on Tuesday. California gas prices hit record high. A warning is actually given after string of vehicle thefts with children still inside. City of Oakland has more shootings while Los Angeles Police investigate more than a 100 follow home robberies.  We then touch on should the NFL do away with ties and close discussing the purpose of the show and you do not have to like everything we say let alone agree with it--not there should be no crying over it. Nov. 14: Antioch Police Say Three Wounded in Shooting at Hillcrest Park During Vigil Nov. 13: Antioch Police Report 1 Dead in Shooting on Travesio Way Nov. 10: Two Wounded in Gunfight at Gas Station in Antioch California's average gas price hits new record high Warning from Bay Area parent after 3 recent car break-ins with children inside vehicles Bail set at $100K for alleged Pittsburg kidnapper Woman, 22, dies days after shooting at Lake Merritt Woman and child shot in Oakland Sheriff: Cache of weapons, some stolen, found during domestic violence call Stockton police: Officers sent to hospital following possible fentanyl exposure LAPD investigating more than 100 cases of 'follow-home' robberies UCSF doctors say focus should be on COVID hospitalizations and deaths, not case count Fremont pumping millions into affordable housing projects Citrus Heights vice mayor shares goals of $1B Sunrise Mall revitalization project Detroit Lions-Pittsburgh Steelers ending comes as surprise to some players: 'Didn't even know you could tie

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 14, 2021 - Alan Knitowski, Crypto and Government

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 72:07


Alan Knitowski is the President, Co-Founder, and CEO of Phunware, a local mobile software and blockchain company. We discuss how cryptocurrencies can free people economically, how governments can use them to balance their budget and perhaps lower taxes, and the greater economy as a whole. @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Suspect in amusement park shooting now in custody

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 6:54


In other news: The man accused of shooting and killing a University of Chicago graduate during a robbery last week was denied bond during a court appearance yesterday; The final Sears store in Illinois closes its doors today; Demonstrators gathered in Chicago's Chinatown yesterday, making demands for the City Council to approve what would be the first majority Asian American ward in the city; and much more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hacks & Wonks
Post Election Break Down Part 2

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 47:03


This week we have the second part of the Hacks & Wonks post-election breakdown, featuring Executive Director of America Walks and former mayor of Seattle Mike McGinn, Managing Partner of Upper Left Strategies Michael Charles, and Co-Founder of the Mercury Group and former Colleen Echohawk campaign consultant, Bill Broadhead! They get into election results from outside of Seattle, the continual incorrect characterization of the most progressive elected officials as the "most divisive", the need to hold elected officials accountable to their campaign promises, how strange the office of City Attorney actually is, and much more. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii, Bill Broadhead at @billbroadhead, Michael Charles at @mikeychuck, and Mike McGinn at @mayormcginn. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources "Seattle Progressives Gain 13 Points from Election Night, but Come Up Short" by Doug Trumm from The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2021/11/12/seattle-progressives-gain-13-points-from-election-night-but-come-up-short/  "Where Urbanists and Progressives Go from Poor 2021 Showing" by Doug Trumm from The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2021/11/05/where-urbanists-and-progressives-go-from-poor-2021-showing/ "Election results for Seattle and King County 2021 races" by Crosscut Staff from Crosscut: https://crosscut.com/politics/2021/11/election-results-seattle-and-king-county-2021-races  "Hamdi Mohamed and Toshiko Grace Hasegawa, both challenges in Port of Seattle Commission races, take lead" by Akash Pasricha from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/mohamed-and-hasegawa-both-challengers-in-port-of-seattle-commission-races-take-lead/  "What the Seattle election results mean for progressives" by Katie Wilson from Crosscut: https://crosscut.com/opinion/2021/11/what-seattle-election-results-mean-progressives  "Bruce Harrell and other winners of Seattle elections made big promises. Next they'll try to deliver" by Daniel Beekman and Jim Brunner from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/bruce-harrell-and-other-winners-of-seattle-elections-made-big-promises-next-theyll-try-to-deliver/  "Republican Ann Davison, talking law and order, wins Seattle City Attorney race" by Mike Carter from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/republican-ann-davison-defeats-nicole-thomas-kennedy-to-become-seattles-first-woman-city-attorney/  "Election Analysis: Garcia surpasses Barrett as Mora unseats Marx in Burien City Council races" by Nicholas Johnson from The B-Town Blog: https://b-townblog.com/2021/11/06/election-analysis-garcia-surpasses-barrett-as-mora-unseats-marx-in-burien-city-council-races/  "Six takeaways from the 2021 Spokane City Council election results" by Daniel Walters from the Inlander: https://www.inlander.com/spokane/six-takeaways-from-the-2021-spokane-city-council-election-results/Content?oid=22652130 "Election Results 4: Challengers continue to hold leads in SeaTac City Council races" from The SeaTac Blog: https://seatacblog.com/2021/11/07/election-results-4-challengers-continue-to-hold-leads-in-seatac-city-council-races/    Transcript The transcript will be uploaded as soon as possible.

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 11, 2021 - Mask Bandate Shot Down

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 30:45


Federal Judge slaps down Abbott's ban on school masking requirements McCaunaughey says no mandating vaxx for kids New candidate (activist) for D9 - Zo! Project8p.org and more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

The LA Report
Garcetti set to return after COVID isolation; Millions in overtime for LAFD during pandemic; LAPD loses bid to block vax mandate – The A.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 4:38


Here's your morning news: Mayor Garcetti prepared to return from Glasgow after COVID isolation; LAFD racks up millions in overtime during pandemic; LAPD union loses bid to block vaccine mandate; L.A. City Council aims to stop real estate companies from buying homes. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people. Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

Houston Matters
The Ion development agreement, and a veteran helps resettle Afghan refugees (Nov. 11, 2021)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:45


On Thursday's show: City council members have overwhelmingly approved an agreement with the developers of the Ion innovation district despite two years of pushback from community organizers and neighbors who are concerned about the massive development's potential gentrification impact on the historically Black Third Ward area. News 88.7's Jen Rice explains what the vote means. Also this hour: Plans for the East River development in the East End. Plus, on this Veterans Day, Houston Army veteran Tam Pham, who served in Iraq and Afghanistan and is now a student at South Texas College of Law Houston, shares how working to resettle refugees from Afghanistan helped him process his experiences from the war. And we revisit a 2019 conversation about how Houston influenced the late columnist and humorist Molly Ivins.

The Austin City Councilman
Nov. 10, 2021 - Veterans Day Parade Canceled (Add It To The List)

The Austin City Councilman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 27:48


Austin will not allow the Veteran's Day parade to occur Austin has hit 82 homicides, with three added Monday Pfizer CEO says misinformation is criminal Eddie Rodriguez is officially in (Trey Martinez Fischer is out) And more! @bradswail austincitycouncilman.com Support the show on Patreon!

The Brian Lehrer Show
Who Will Be NYC's Next City Council Speaker?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 14:20


Brigid Bergin, WNYC's senior political correspondent, rounds up the latest in local news including why ballot measures related to expanding voting access failed to pass in last week's election, and who's leading in the race to be New York City's next City Council Speaker.

VPM Daily Newscast
11/10/21 - Mayor Levar Stoney and Richmond School Board continue fight over rebuilding George Wythe

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 4:11


Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney is asking City Council to use funds from the Capital Improvement Plan to get designs for George Wythe High School nailed down; A new job training program for veterans and their spouses is coming to Hampton Roads; The former Charlottesville Police Chief says her termination was unjust and is demanding $3 million dollars from the city; and other local news stories.