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Country in Southwestern Asia

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  • May 15, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Saudi Arabia

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Latest podcast episodes about Saudi Arabia

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast [May 15, '22 Business Report]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 52:19


On this episode of the Business Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are “Rocket Ron” Epstein, PhD, of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Richard Aboulafia of AeroDynamic Advisory and Sash Tusa of Agency Partners. Topics: — Analysis of the biggest sustained drop on world markets since 2008 and how aerospace and defense equities fared — Disconnect between stately pace of US and European defense spending in wake of Russia's war on Ukraine and investor expectations of rapid budget increases — Defense industrial implications of Finland's decision to join NATO, with Sweden expected to follow soon, and Britain's security agreements with Helsinki and Stockholm — Security agreement between Japan and UK and whether Japan and Saudi Arabia might be the next partners in the British-led Tempest next-generation fighter development program and what expanded membership means for other Italy and Sweden that are already part of the effort — Investors punish Boeing stock over company's debt loading and whether new management needed in wake of program missteps — Speculation that Boeing might end troubled development of 777X, a view the firm has dismissed   — Reuters report that Federal Aviation Administration has concerns with Boeing's proposed fixes to 787 jetliner, production of which has been suspended over manufacturing concerns  — Comac's 919 regional airliners moves toward service — Update on US Army Aviation's approach to modernization that will include Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft program that will be downselected in September as well as sustained role for UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters

The Epstein Chronicles
Iran Is Being Destabilized By Extreme Inflation (5/15/22)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 22:06


The people of Iran are being buried under extreme inflation and can hardly afford basic staples that they rely on for food. Things like Macaroni, oil, chicken and other products have been sent skyward in price due to the supply shortages and war in Ukraine, and there is no relief in sight for the people of Iran. Now, the people are starting to get restless and some of them are even taking to the streets to protest. (commercial at 16:13)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/iran-raises-prices-of-food-staples-stirring-panic-and-anger/ar-AAXczmT?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=2e2767dd04d94300883e50f69e42bbf8

Beyond The Horizon
Iran Is Being Destabilized By Extreme Inflation (5/15/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 22:06


The people of Iran are being buried under extreme inflation and can hardly afford basic staples that they rely on for food. Things like Macaroni, oil, chicken and other products have been sent skyward in price due to the supply shortages and war in Ukraine, and there is no relief in sight for the people of Iran. Now, the people are starting to get restless and some of them are even taking to the streets to protest. (commercial at 16:13)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/iran-raises-prices-of-food-staples-stirring-panic-and-anger/ar-AAXczmT?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=2e2767dd04d94300883e50f69e42bbf8

WEALTHTRACK
Energy Insecurity: Global Impact

WEALTHTRACK

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 25:53


If you were to ask investors to name the biggest headwinds facing the markets, higher inflation and interest rates and their potentially negative impact on corporate earnings would top the list. Just about everyone on Wall Street agrees we are in a new era of higher levels of both. But this week's guest believes there is another area that poses even greater challenges to the global economy and markets: energy. Energy is under enormous pressure on numerous fronts: geopolitical, production, distribution, and financing. It's a combination creating a new era of energy insecurity. Our guest is Tom Petrie, a long-time thought leader in the oil and gas industry. Since 2012 he has been Chairman of Petrie Partners, an influential investment banking and consulting boutique to the industry. What is happening with U.S. energy independence? After decades of decline, U.S. oil production picked up significantly in the last decade and a half, largely thanks to the shale oil revolution, to the point where it surpassed Russia and Saudi Arabia's output to become the world's largest oil producer. Despite that achievement, Petrie says the U.S. and the rest of the world are now approaching a possible energy crisis caused by a number of factors. One of the biggest: some new geopolitical realities, what he calls geopolitical fragility. We will discuss them at length as well as why he believes the current elevated levels of oil prices are unsustainable and why the outperformance of traditional energy stocks is as well! WEALTHTRACK #1846 broadcast on May 13, 2022 More Info: https://wealthtrack.com/rising-global-energy-insecurity-and-its-impact-with-industry-thought-leader-tom-petrie/ Bookshelf: Following Oil: Four Decades of Cycle-Testing Experiences and What They Foretell about U.S. Energy Independence https://amzn.to/3FM4ymZ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wealthtrack/support

The Fire These Times
109/ Pro-Palestine Activism, Anti-Authoritarianism and Democracy in the Arab World w/ Dana El-Kurd

The Fire These Times

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 101:32


This is a conversation with Dana El-Kurd, her second time on the podcast. We spoke about a paper that she wrote entitled "Gateway to dissent: the role of pro-Palestine activism in opposition to authoritarianism." We primarily spoke about the role of pro-Palestine activism in pro-democracy movements in the Arab world (with examples from Qatar, Lebanon, Egypt, Syria, Bahrain, the UAE and Saudi Arabia) and also about how pro-Palestine discourse is used to whitewash authoritarianism, especially in the West. Support: Patreon.com/firethesetimes Website: http://TheFireThisTi.Me Substack: https://thefirethesetimes.substack.com Twitter + Instagram @ firethesetimes Recommended Books: عزمي بشارة - المجتمع المدني Joyful Militancy: Building Thriving Resistance in Toxic Times (Anarchist Interventions) by Carla Bergman and Nick Montgomery Queer Palestine and the Empire of Critique by Sa'ed Atshan Contested Modernity: Sectarianism, Nationalism, and Colonialism in Bahrain by Omar Al-Shehabi

The 966
Saudi Arabia's tourism sector, carbon capture investments, and a conversation on Saudi-Iraqi history with Joshua Yaphe

The 966

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 117:37


2:20 - Richard's one big thing is a discussion on carbon capture including a recent huge investment by Aramco into the space. 12:35 - There's a lot going on in Saudi Arabia's tourism sector...This week, there were two events in the region: A major aviation summit in Riyadh, called the Future Aviation Forum, and a tourism and travel event in Dubai, the Arabian Travel Market. Both created significant news in the sector...27:38 - The U.S. State Department's Joshua Yaphe joins The 966 to discuss his book, "Saudi Arabia and Iraq as Friends and Enemies: Borders, Tribes and a Shared History." Yaphe is a foreign affairs officer with the U.S. Department of State; responsible for research and analysis of political, economic, security and social affairs related to the countries of the Arabian Peninsula.1:29:00 - Yallah! Six top storylines on Saudi Arabia to get you up to speed heading into the weekend.•Saudi Arabia's non-oil private sector continued to see “robust growth” in April, Reuters reports, citing the headline seasonally adjusted S&P Global Saudi Arabia Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) which stood at 55.7 for the month. A PMI reading over 50 indicates growth or expansion.The growth fell slightly from 56.8 in March “as fears over inflation began to weigh on demand,” the report added, bringing the PMI to a three month low “as companies sharply raised selling charges to pass on higher input costs,” Bloomberg reports.•Oil prices are surging, will that derail reforms in oil-exporting Middle East?A recent piece in hellenicshippingnews.com wonders, “In March, Iraq's oil exports were worth just over $11 billion (€10.5 billion), the most the country has earned for oil in a month since 1972. Obviously, Iraq can afford to pay all of its bills this month, and the next. But what does this mean for reforms planned before these price rises? Is there even any point to them anymore?Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia's energy minister blames lack of investment for the recent surge in fuel prices…The prince, speaking at an aviation summit in Riyadh, said the world needed to look at energy security, sustainability and affordability as a whole.•Lionel Messi arrives in Jeddah after being unveiled as Saudi Arabia's new tourism ambassadorGlobal soccer story Lionel Messi is Saudi Arabia's newest tourism ambassador, according to a report in Arab News. In a message posted on Twitter, Saudi Tourism Minister Ahmed Al-Khateeb wrote: “I am pleased to welcome Lionel Messi to Saudi Arabia. We are excited for you to explore the treasure of the Red Sea, the Jeddah Season and our ancient history. This is not his first visit to the Kingdom and it will not be the last.”Messi arrived at King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah, accompanied by a group of friends.•Saudi Arabia plans $32bn investment in mining and minerals sectorSaudi Arabia is looking to invest up to 32 billion in the mining and minerals sector, according to reports. Some of the projects considered for investment include a $4bn steel plate factory and a $2bn EV battery metals plant. As part of the plan, the country intends to support the development of nine mining projects for midstream minerals and metals that aim to support the exportation of mineral products.•Saudi Space Commission, NASA Explore Space CooperationThe Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Saudi Space Commission Eng. Abdullah Amer Al-Sawaha held a meeting with Pamela Melroy, the Deputy Administrator to discuss opportunities for strategic cooperation in the development of the space sector, as well as investment in future joint projects to achieve mutual economic and strategic goals. This meeting was a part of a tour which included visits to American institutions and companies working in the space sector, with the goal of enhancing the Commission's efforts in developing the sector and cooperating with various international space and technology organizations.•PGA Tour won't allow players to compete in Saudi-backed Super League next month: ReportsAccording to The Athletic, the PGA Tour has denied its players the ability to play in the first event of the Saudi-backed golf Super League next month in London, according to multiple reports. Members who requested permission to compete were denied on Tuesday, per Golfweek, who was first to break the news. The event, taking place from June 9 to 11 at the Centurion Club, is the opening tournament of the LIV Golf Invitational Series.

Taqat Hob | طاقة حب
ما هي تقنية العلاج بالثيتا وكيف يعمل العقل الباطني؟

Taqat Hob | طاقة حب

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


في هذه الحلقة نستضيف رودريغ حمّال - مخرج سينمائي ومعالج بتقنية الثيتا - للحديث عن العلاج بالثيتا. ما هي هذه التقنية؟ كيف تتم جلسات العلاج من خلالها؟ ما هو العقل الباطني وكيف يعمل؟ كيف تُبنى المعتقدات المحدودة داخل اللاوعي وكيف يمكن أن نختار بكامل إرادتنا الحرّة أن نبدأ بالتنقيب عنها، بفهمها، وبالتحرر منها على مراحل بمساعدة اختصاصي محترف؟

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Sports commentator Sam Ackerman

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:43


Sam examines what Brendon McCullum's appointment as England test cricket coach means, the rugby World Cup is heading to America and can Saudi Arabia rehab its reputation though sportswashing?

Ben Fordham: Highlights
Ben Fordham blasts Greg Norman's 'disgraceful' Saudi Arabia defence

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 3:15


Ben Fordham has slammed Australian golfing great Greg Norman after he tried to dismiss the the murder of a Saudi Arabian journalist by saying "we've all made mistakes". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ELON
Noches de Arabia

ELON

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:28


Si a Arabia tu vaaaas, no debes olvidar, que allí hay una ley que debes cumplir... si quieres vivir... Repasamos la renovada amistad de Elon Musk con Kingdom Holding de Arabia Saudi, el juicio de Amber Heard donde ha quedado nuestro pobre amigo retratado como un pagafantas ghosteado, y el sorprendente juicio de Solar City, y el futuro de Boring Company. Why Saudi Prince Alwaleed Reverse Course on Elon Musk's Twitter Bid - Bloomberg Elon Musk invited to discuss $44 billion Twitter deal in UK Parliament Twitter podría pasar a ser de pago para empresas Musk's $44 billion Twitter buyout challenged in shareholder lawsuit | Reuters Elon Musk wins shareholder lawsuit over Tesla-SolarCity deal Elon Musk Texts With Saudi's PIF Shed Light Around Taking Tesla Private Tweets - Bloomberg Where Are Elon Musk's Pedestrian Tunnels in Texas? Series C Round — The Boring Company https://twitter.com/boringcompany/status/1518615207035039745 Elon Musk Not Testifying in Amber Heard Case - E! Online Amber Heard and new man Elon Musk are Instagram-official - Grazia The ACLU Says It Wrote Amber Heard's Domestic Violence Op-Ed and Timed It to Her Film Release Lucid to deliver up to 100,000 EVs to Saudi Arabia's government ELON está presentado por Matías S. Zavia (@matiass) y Álex Barredo (@somospostpc). Su tema original está compuesto por Nahúm García (@nahum). — Alojado en Cuonda (@cuonda)

PM full episode
Appeal for mental health campaign focus

PM full episode

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 30:00


A marginal seat wins new mental health funding, but mental health leaders give neither major party a tick for their policies. Why some political journalists enjoy 'the drop', the ABC's Hidden Campaign project looks at a key tactic of spin doctors that's skewing reports and leaving you in the dark. A hail of criticism of Australian golfer Greg Norman - after he dismissed Saudi Arabia's killing of a dissident journalist - saying 'everyone makes mistakes'.

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
422: Verge HealthTech Fund with Joseph Mocanu

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:52


Joseph Mocanu is Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Chad talks with Joseph about the healthcare landscape in different places of the world, funding criteria for companies, and how the pandemic has changed prospects for the fund and the market in general. Verge HealthTech Fund (https://www.vergehc.com/) Follow Verge HealthTech Fund on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/verge-healthtech-fund-i/). Follow Joseph on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jmocanu) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jmocanu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me today is Joseph Mocanu, Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Joseph, thank you for joining me. JOSEPH: Thanks so much, Chad, for having me. CHAD: So you have been focused on emerging Asia healthtech for a little while both at Verge HealthTech Fund, and prior to that, how did you get involved in this space? JOSEPH: I wish I had a really cool, deliberate story that made it sound like it was a smooth transition from point A to point B. But I simply have to owe it to an opportunity to transfer to the region through my old employer which is Oliver Wyman, a global management consultancy. So I joined this consultancy in 2011 after doing my Ph.D. and MBA really to understand how to be a better investor, which, again, sounds a little bit backwards. But I had worked at a hedge fund in China just after my MBA, and I learned that they use management consulting techniques to add value to their portfolio companies. And I thought that's a great skill to learn. And it'd be great to even learn it in English and doing it in healthcare 100% of the time. So I had joined Oliver Wyman in 2011 in Toronto office back home, where I spent a lot of my life. And they asked me one day if I wanted to transfer to the Singapore office to help start healthcare over there. And when I went to Singapore, of course, it's this futuristic city, really well planned. It's got a lot of fine names and a reputation globally of being a modern cosmopolitan place to do business. Some people refer to it as Asia-lite. But the surrounding areas have a lot of issues when it comes to their health systems. I knew this from an academic perspective, having studied about the region before moving to Singapore but seeing it firsthand was a completely different experience. At the time, I was working for primarily pharmaceutical clients, helping them with market access and other commercially relevant activities. And they were faced with a fundamental challenge of trying to sell their product, which was usually placed in the premium category to markets that had difficulty affording this. And not only did it have difficulty affording this, it had difficulty in delivering it as well as in using the product appropriately, making sure it gets to the patients when it's needed at the right time, at the right dose. And so they were looking for partners. They were looking for partners on the ground that could assist with this delivery education, the technology, and the financing around it as well. Now, there was a real shortage of said partners on the ground. At the same time, there were also insurance companies that wanted to expand their business. They also realized that the policies tended to be a bit simple, and they tended to resemble one another across competitors. And also, to manage increasing claims, they had a tendency to increase the premium that they charged. This was not possible to do indefinitely. And at some point, they needed to actually manage the medical conditions, which you're probably seeing more and more of in the U.S. and in Western markets, less so of in this part of the world. And then lastly, you had conglomerates and investors who said, "Hey, we hear healthcare is going to be a pretty hot field. How do we get started? How do we invest?" And all of this basically set me on a mission of target hunting. And during the course of this, well, I met a lot of interesting companies, a lot of them really, really early in their journey and really too small for any of my clients to find a meaningful way to engage with them. And unfortunately, they couldn't get to the point where they are relevant and large enough to engage with without a lot of capital. This is where, you know, you'd have a nice investment ecosystem coming in to fill in the gaps. This, unfortunately, did not really exist at the time. And I had the hubris of thinking that I could do something about it by being an angel investor and starting to support these founders directly, which, thankfully, seemed to work to a certain degree. It worked to the point where one day, I woke up, and I realized I had 13 angel investments, 9 of which were in healthcare technology, and not a lot of money left in my bank account to do other things with. CHAD: Uh-oh. [laughs] JOSEPH: Yeah. And at the same time, I also realized that the work that those founders are doing is a whole lot more impactful than me sitting up until 3:00 o'clock in the morning every night writing PowerPoint slides or begging analysts to write the PowerPoint slides that would more or less sit and collect dust on my clients' shelves for various reasons. So I came to the realization that I need to do this full time. I didn't have, you know, $10 million in my pocket as reference to spending all my money on angel investments. So I realized that I have to use other people's money, and the way to do that is to join a fund. Now, the problem with that idea is that there weren't any funds that were doing this, like really, really early investing in healthtech companies in the region that was really geared to helping solve some of these really big access challenges. So then I realized I had to start a VC fund that did this and only this. So that's really kind of a long-winded introduction as to how I got started with this. CHAD: Yeah, I want to come back to the process of actually starting a VC fund in a bit. But I'm curious, were the companies that you were doing angel investment in and now doing seed-stage investment in do they tend to be local companies, or do they tend to be international companies that are planning to solve a problem locally? JOSEPH: It's funny you ask that. At the beginning, they were local. Well, actually, if I really were to take a step back, the very first angel investment I made was for a mentee, and she was based in Toronto. But I'd say that the first true angel investment I made, you know, it was in Singapore, first and foremost, because I was there. And then I started branching out. I started making investments in the Philippines. I started looking at companies in Taiwan and other parts. And actually, that opened my eyes to the fact that there may be other companies around the world that are trying to solve a problem that may not necessarily be in my own backyard. So I started to, you know, cheekily, I sent my wife to tech conferences around the world. And she herself is an entrepreneur from the tech industry; hardware was her specialty. And we started identifying companies from all over the world. And the second angel investment where I was the very first investor was actually from a company in South Africa with similar challenges. So the things that we saw as major health system deficiencies or maybe shortages in infrastructure and human capital were very much true not just in Southeast Asia but in a lot of parts of the world. And we noticed that while there were different reasons for why they ended up in that position, the outcome was similar. CHAD: I'm not sure that everyone listening has a good sense of what the healthcare landscape actually looks like in these different places of the world. So let's take insurance, for example; what is the insurance landscape, generally speaking, in Southeast Asian countries? JOSEPH: So, in Southeast Asia, we do have insurers. I mean, private insurance is certainly there. But it's just not -- CHAD: Do most companies have public insurance, too, like universal healthcare? JOSEPH: That depends on which country you're in. Now, the one interesting thing about our entire region is that they've all committed to universal healthcare coverage. I would say that the implementation thereof has been heterogeneous; let's put it that way. Out of Southeast Asian countries that are not Singapore, I'd say that Thailand probably has the strongest public healthcare system. And in fact, they even do health technology assessments, which is really looking at the true cost-effectiveness of a new intervention versus what's currently done in practice to make decisions as to whether they're going to pay for it. And they cover a pretty high percentage of their population with this. And then there are other places where the financing mechanisms are in place, but you don't necessarily have the doctors or the hospitals where they need to be to address the needs of the population. Still, we are dealing with places that are not fully urbanized. And in fact, a good deal of the population is still working on the pharm, basically. One of the other complexities of our region is that just between the Philippines and Indonesia, which together has a combined population of 380 million at least, maybe it's 390 now, you've got 25,000 islands, and not all of those islands tend to hold major tier-one cities, even though they can hold a lot of people. And if there is one thing about healthcare that seems to be a universal truth is that highly skilled workers like to live in the rich cities. CHAD: And so what I'm hearing is that on an individual island, if there's not a major city there, the access to the actual healthcare might be really limited. JOSEPH: That is exactly it. CHAD: In these economies in these countries, it's typical to have private insurance layered on top. But the pharmas probably aren't doing that, right? JOSEPH: Oh, no, no, unfortunately not. There are some pilots of trying to do co-ops or collective insurance or micro-insurance policies. But again, when you look at the amount of premium that they could pay in, the kind of coverage they get is pretty basic. CHAD: So, how does that landscape influence the solutions that startups are creating? JOSEPH: Well, first and foremost, you've got to try to get some sort of mechanism by which you can seek care without having to travel too much. And I think that concept is extremely familiar to all of us thanks to the global pandemic that I hope we're coming out of right now, although there's always a new strain surprising us. The idea of basic telemedicine is one that can have a great deal of impact in these populations. But even before that, just understanding the importance of healthcare, like, what the concept of healthcare is, what the concept of the modern medical system is, is something that a fair number of people never really had awareness of. And I'll call out an example country, and I try not to call out too many examples. But Indonesia did a really good job of educating people about the concept of healthcare when they promoted their universal healthcare coverage. Even if they didn't have the ability to deliver it as well as they wanted to or as widespread as they wanted to, at least they got people paying attention to this concept called health. So awareness is really the first step. The second challenge is all right, so you know health exists. When do you know when you need it? Where are you going to find a doctor? How do you know if a doctor is even good? And how do you know that the products that you're going to get are appropriate? So there are so many challenges that you have to face when you are in a lack of access situation. CHAD: I assume you're getting pitched on a lot of ideas coming to your fund, a lot of startups. Correct me if that's wrong. [laughs] JOSEPH: No, no, that's absolutely true. So one of the blessings and curses of being one of the very few super early-stage healthtech venture funds out there is that there aren't many of us out there. And when we started...let's just put it this way, if I could find a fund that was doing what I wanted to do, I would have sent my CV in, and I couldn't. And starting a fund was basically the last thing I wanted to do, having never worked at a VC before or ever raised money in my life before. So I still think that we are the only truly global impact-oriented seed - I hate the term pre-seed, but I'll use it because of the audience's familiarity with it- investment fund out there right now for healthtech. So by virtue of that, we do see a lot of companies. CHAD: So what are some of the criteria? JOSEPH: So I'd say some of the criteria that we look for is number one, are you solving a real problem? And we define a real problem by the breadth of the problem, like, how many people are suffering from it or how systemic is this problem if it's an infrastructural one? And depth being how severe is this problem: is it life or death, or is it a minor inconvenience? So first and foremost, it's got to be solving a real problem. Second, it's really around the team. You need a lot of clinical, technical, and commercial experience in order to pull off a healthtech startup successfully. And even before that, we want to understand why are you doing this? Because this is not easy. I'd say on a scale of 1 to 10, doing a startup is like an eight, and then doing a healthtech startup is like an 11. It's slow; it's technical, it's regulated, it's super risky. And health systems are very pathway-dependent in the intent to not have many things in common with one another. So it is really, really hard. So we want to know the motivation. Are you going to stick through the thick and thin, or are you doing this healthtech startup because you think healthtech is cool or hot this particular period in the market cycle? So that's another criterion. Another criterion is, well, what's your edge? I mean, okay, you can have a great team, and I think that is definitely a prerequisite. You can solve a problem. But do you have something that could make sure that you are going to be competitive and remain competitive? CHAD: Given the barriers to market entry that you just outlined, do most of the companies that you're investing in have any sort of traction already in the market, or where are they in the product development or business development cycle? JOSEPH: I'm going to give the ultimate cop-out answer of it depends. CHAD: [laughs] Yeah. JOSEPH: But I will qualify that by saying it depends on whether it's hardware or software, and it depends whether it's regulated or non-regulated. So if you are a software company that's unregulated so, what does this mean? It could be like a marketplace. It could be health education. It could be some telemedicine in a loosely regulated market. We'd really like to see user traction. We'd really like to see revenue even. However, if you're a device company and you need to get FDA before you can earn a single dollar, we're okay with it being a science experiment or a prototype on the table as long as the science part of it has been de-risked. So if we know that the fundamental scientific principles are sound, then we're willing to take the productization and regulatory risk because we've been through this journey ourselves. CHAD: And also, you said a team is really important, so if it's a team that has never gone through that before, that's less attractive than a team that has done it before, I assume. JOSEPH: Yeah, absolutely. However, one of the challenges is that outside of the U.S., certain European markets in Israel, it's really difficult to find a team that's gone through the entire medical device development process before. So you are going to rely heavily on your professional service providers, consultants, advisors, other investors who've done this before. And as long as you have at least a path to getting to a point where you can unlock and utilize that expertise, that's okay. But if you don't, then that's a really, really big risk. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: Earlier, you said FDA. FDA is a United States thing. Do most countries in Southeast Asia have a local regulatory agency like the FDA that things need to be approved through? JOSEPH: Yep, every single one. The question is, what's the process to go through that? Generally speaking, the FDA, as well as the European equivalent, which is the CE Mark, are used as predicates in order to kind of shortcut the process, make it go a little bit faster. Because then you don't have to create a bunch of new work or get the local regulator to really try to do things that they're unfamiliar with. CHAD: You said it's fairly rare for teams to have concrete experience doing that in the local market. Does that mean that most of these markets have been served by, I don't know, large companies previously? JOSEPH: Yeah, and still are. A fair number of emerging markets don't even have the manufacturing capability to even do local production, so they require a lot of importation. I'd say that this is a different case when it comes to generic pharmaceuticals and maybe vaccines and some consumables. But complex devices and biologics are generally manufactured in more developed markets or larger economies. CHAD: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the pandemic, and I'm curious how the pandemic has changed either your prospects for the fund but also the market in general. JOSEPH: I would say, again, it's both a blessing and a curse. So during the start of the pandemic, there was a great deal of societal and economic uncertainty around where are we going to be as a species in six months? And I remember early 2020; it was kind of these Hollywood movies that would paint this kind of semi-apocalyptic picture of where we're going to end up. And as a consequence, people really puckered up and stopped investing in things. I would say that the other side of it is now much of the world understands what it's like to not have access to quality healthcare or even access to healthcare. You see people not going to the hospital for things that they ought to and then suffering the consequences at home, like, let's say, not going for that heart checkup, and then you having a heart attack at home and passing when you otherwise wouldn't have. Or even cancer patients having to delay their therapy because the hospital is just too full. So this concept of telemedicine which has always been resisted by both the payers and providers for being infeasible, or inaccurate, or impossible to fund properly, suddenly had to be done. And the concept of telemedicine is fairly old. I mean, how else would you treat your astronauts in space in the '60s if they got sick? So this is something that NASA thought of and invented and implemented, you know, decades and decades ago. And finally, this came forward. And I was pleasantly surprised to see...and again, I'll quote the U.S. here where The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services or CMS actually reimbursed a bunch of remote procedure codes, which is pretty amazing. And I think that was opening Pandora's Box. There's no going back from that. So I think telemedicine is absolutely here to stay. And the real challenge now is really how to make it more user-friendly, how to improve it, how to improve the decisions that come from it. I really don't think it's going back. And as a consequence of this, it's really benefited a lot of our startups that were trying to build this remote-connected future anyway. CHAD: Has there also been an influx of those kinds of startups? JOSEPH: Absolutely. I would say that there has been a veritable Cambrian explosion of startups where everyone and their uncle is starting a healthtech startup as well as a healthtech fund. I see a lot of new funds coming up promising to invest in this space. So I think it's good in that there's going to be a lot of really new ideas, and hopefully, it's going to improve the standard of care for everyone around the world. But at the same time, it is creating a lot of noise, and it's becoming increasingly difficult to filter through that. CHAD: Do the solutions tend to be local? I guess the nature of my question was, you know, like messaging apps. [laughs] Different countries have different popular messaging apps. What do you see as the penetration of different telemedicine solutions in the different countries? Do you think it's going to be, oh, you know, this is popular in this country? Or do you think it's possible for one company to come in and really have a significant impact in the market across multiple markets? JOSEPH: Yeah, I think it's eventually going to be the latter. So at the start, you do see that you have your national champions. And like instant messaging apps, it's kind of like a 90-10 rule where the number 1 player takes 90% of the market, number 2 takes most of what's left, and then number 3 player caters to some niche or another. And I see two competing forces here; one is, yes, there may be a big player like Babylon or Crew who comes in and rolls up everything backed by heaps of capital. But the other thing could also be that all the health systems start saying, "You know what? Why are we working with an external company? Why don't we just develop all these capabilities ourselves and then keep the patient captive?" And you are starting to see middleware providers who are basically providing that telemedicine layer, white-labeling it, or giving API access to the providers themselves, the legacy providers themselves, and then allowing them to do that. And I actually saw this statistic...I don't know how accurate it was, but I saw a chart in the U.S. that white-labeled or internal telemedicine consults exceeded the number of Teladoc consultations, which is the largest platform in the U.S., at some point last year. CHAD: I'm wondering, do you know if Teladoc uses Twilio? JOSEPH: I really should know the answer to that question, but unfortunately, I do not. CHAD: Because my sense is the real winner in this game might be companies like Twilio because I think everyone is using them. [laughs] JOSEPH: That makes a ton of sense. So when we do look at some investments, we actually want to invest in middleware because why duke it out to be the platform when you're the utility provider? CHAD: So let's turn our attention to the actual creation of the fund. And I know you just opened your second fund last month, right? JOSEPH: Actually, this month. I mean, last month was the paperwork, but it takes time for stuff to get approved. CHAD: Yeah, fair enough. So you already said actually starting a fund was, I think you said, the last thing on earth that you wanted to do. Why was that the last thing you wanted to do? JOSEPH: Frankly, it was a whole lot more uncertainty than I was prepared to handle at the time. And I was either blessed or cursed with this momentary clarity of purpose where I knew with all my being that this is what I wanted to do with myself for, if not the rest of my life, a very long time. And the only alternative, or rather the only choice to pursue this at the time, was really starting a fund. So that's what I had to do, right? CHAD: And how large was the first fund? JOSEPH: It was pretty small; it was $7.6 million, which in local currency equates to a nice number of just above 10 million sings. CHAD: And where did you...I'm going to ask where that ended up coming from. But in terms of the mechanics of actually starting a fund, what did that look like? JOSEPH: Well, it depends on each market. But typically, what happens is you need to first have permission from the regulator in order to actually start and run a fund. So in Singapore, you need to apply for a venture capital fund management license from the Monetary Authority of Singapore. That's what had to be done first, and we got that approved in a pretty good time, actually. I think we might have captured a lull period because now, with all the funds coming out, I've heard the queue is months long in some cases. And then came the business of incorporating the fund itself and then starting to draft all the legal paperwork, the conditions, the private memorandum or prospectus, depending on which geography and how regulated you are, that you show around to investors once they've expressed interest in learning substantially more details about your fund beyond what a simple PowerPoint deck or a casual coffee conversation can yield. And then you start collecting commitments, and then you start collecting the money. And at some point, you have enough money to say, all right, we'll do a close or first close, and that then gives you permission to start deploying that money into investments. And some funds they'll only do one close, some funds will do a first close, and then a final close when they get the rest of the money in or some money committed and then calling the rest of it to come in. Or some will do multiple closes just so that they have the ability to keep deploying continuously while they're doing this fundraising process. And in our case, we were doing rolling closes. So we would close every few months, and we'd continue to deploy. And by the time we finished fundraising, we actually already had nine companies out of the 15 that we have in our portfolio done. So it really depends on all sorts of different factors, which we probably don't have that much time to get into. And I risk perhaps putting my foot in my mouth and misspeaking if I give too many examples. CHAD: [laughs] When it comes to starting a fund, how cookie-cutter is it? Or do you find yourself having to create everything from scratch, all the legal documents, whatever platform you might be...or access you might be giving to the people who are contributing to the fund? JOSEPH: I'd say, again, it depends where you are. I think in the U.S. and especially with the advent of great service providers platforms like AngelList and Assure, it is super cookie-cutter. In our part of the world, I still think it's somewhat cookie-cutter, but we got a little too cute. CHAD: [chuckles] JOSEPH: We thought, okay, it's our first time doing a fund. I've been an LP in other funds. What did I wish I had as an LP? And as a consequence, we introduced some hurdle rates of tiered carry, and even zero carry if we don't hit a certain return. And all that really did was just create more questions from the investors. So we should have probably done it as cookie-cutter as possible in hindsight. CHAD: So I often hear from founders who talk about how it's important to have a VC fund behind you that you agree with, and want to work with, and are excited about, and that can be value additive. Do you need, as someone raising a fund, do you need to consider things like that or other things when it comes to the people you're taking money from the fund? JOSEPH: Absolutely. Maybe knock on wood here, but our relative inexperience when starting a fund probably selected out all the folks who might not have gotten along with us anyway. And the fact that we're pretty straightforward and direct with what we want to do in our objectives probably helped with that selection process as well on the positive side. But I absolutely, absolutely can recommend having that alignment of values and mission with those who are on the journey with you for a good decade. It's like getting married, right? CHAD: Yeah. Well, so when you're planning a fund and thinking about time horizons, is a decade what you're thinking about? JOSEPH: Yeah, all things considered. So our fund lifetime was eight years from final close. But still, it takes time to raise the fund and plan the fund, and you have people that are on board even before the fund begins. So it is a decade-long relationship, at least. And then some of the larger funds because they want to have a longer investment period, will push that out even further where they're going to be a 10-year fund from final close. And if you have enough of your portfolio that hasn't exited yet but still has some value to be uncovered, you may ask your investors to extend the fund life even further. So this is a supremely long relationship that you have. And aside from evergreen funds that don't have a fund lifetime, I think this is about as long as it gets, although I have seen some people float the idea of a 20-year fund or a 50-year fund, but that's really not widely practiced. I think five years is the fastest I've seen, and ten seems to be the average. CHAD: Where did that first fund come from? How did you drum up the interest and decide who would be a part of it? JOSEPH: It's really the folks who have known me the longest or worked with me. So you know how they say when you're raising money for a startup, you get it from the three F's, Friends, Family, and Fools? For funds and for first-time fund managers, I think it's a pretty analogous group of people, although I don't think we have any fools. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And, unfortunately, don't have family either. So it's really all friends, old co-workers, old clients, and then the people that they introduced us to. There were some serendipitous moments where people liked what I said at a conference, or we asked a tough question. And people asked, "Well, how can you ask such a tough question?" Then they got to know us and then decide to invest from there. But majority of it was just introductions, warm introductions. We never did any cold emails. CHAD: Have there been any exits in the first fund? JOSEPH: Not just yet. We do come in as either the first or second investor in these companies. So there is quite a long journey that we expect before we, you know, see some exits. There may be some this year. But if I look back at my angel investments, there was only real serious talk of an exit at the six-year mark for one of the companies that's doing really well. And even that exit turned out to be just another, you know, the investor changed their mind, and instead of buying the company, they decided to just invest more money into it. So this is a long journey. CHAD: Yeah, definitely. Did that make putting together the second fund any harder, or is that what everyone expects? JOSEPH: I am cautiously optimistic because we're still so early in our journey that the only folks we've really spoken with are the ones who invested in our first fund or passed on our first fund because they don't back first-time fund managers. They come to expect that your second fund is built on the momentum of the first fund. And it's really your third fund that's built on the exit and actual realized track record of your first fund. CHAD: That makes sense. What do you think is next for Verge HealthTech? JOSEPH: Well, first things first, we got to get started with the second fund and see if we can build something to scale. I mean, the first fund was an experiment. It was a small fund, you know. Could we build the world's seed-stage global impact healthtech fund on basically a shoestring? And the second fund is now let's take everything that we wish we had for the first fund and scale it up so bigger initial ticket sizes because we want to own more, the ability to follow on properly, the ability to do more deals, which requires a much bigger team which we now have. As well as to go back and support the winners of our first fund as well as some of the companies that maybe we made a mistake on and passed but still have a strong enough relationship to revisit and get them on the next round or the round after that, or just new companies that the market has moved. You know, the area that we might have been really interested in at the seed stage is now a pre-A stage or an A stage. So that's really what we want to do with the second one. And it would be amazing to see where this goes. I'm thrilled that we actually have, well, I think, one of the best healthtech investment teams in the world; maybe I'm slightly biased with this. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And I'm excited to see what we can do together. CHAD: That's great. Well, I wish you the best. And I really appreciate you for stopping by and sharing with us. If folks want to follow along with you or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? JOSEPH: Probably LinkedIn is the best way to do it. Also, I have a blog on Medium, which I'm sure can be linked in the show notes. I've been really bad...I've been traveling intensely in the past half-year. But I promise my next blog post will be interesting. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: Because I just got back from Rwanda and Saudi Arabia, which are two very, very different countries, however, with a great emphasis on improving healthcare, especially on the digital side. CHAD: Well, that's exciting. So folks definitely can find the links for that in the notes, which you can find the notes; you can subscribe to the show and a full transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Joseph Mocanu.

Hot Takes With Matt Gaetz
Episode 42 LIVE: Ultra MAGA – Firebrand with Matt Gaetz

Hot Takes With Matt Gaetz

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 37:00


Today on FIREBRAND: Congressman Matt Gaetz responds to Joe Biden's comments about Republicans' "Ultra MAGA" agenda, dives into a trove of newly declassified information about Saudi Arabia's involvement in the 9/11 terror attacks, admonishes the uni-party in Congress for spending our nation's money on another forever undeclared war in Ukraine, and more! Watch on Rumble: https://rumble.com/v14cpp0-episode-42-live-ultra-maga-firebrand-with-matt-gaetz.html

Off The Road Again
Desk to Glory, Dakar Rally, Saudi Arabia - Episode 121

Off The Road Again

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 71:10


Ross and Chris welcome Ashley and Richard of Desk to Glory back to the show. These world travelers are back from a recent trip to follow the Dakar Rally and then spent some time exploring Saudi Arabia. Also discussed are their upcoming plans to travel through Africa and Asia and a potential trip to just travel in Saudi Arabia until more of the world opens back up. They are planning to use their 2008 Toyota Tundra and have recently started its modification process for this world trip.

Middle East Analysis
Only justice can open the door to peace

Middle East Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 42:13


Middle East Analysis takes a sombre tone this month as, just before recording, we learned of the killing of long-term Al Jazeera Arabic journalist Shireen Abu Akleh in Jenin in the West Bank. We're left asking, as often we do, where is the justice that will open the door to peace in the Israel-Palestine conflict? Dr Harry Hagopian looks at the disturbing upturn in violence as the world, seemingly, looks the other way. Our next stop is Lebanon and a look at the forthcoming Parliamentary Elections slated for Sunday, 15 May. Will the process be 'fair' and democratic? Will it lead to change? Harry then picks up on a rare visit to Tehran by Syrian president Bashar al-Assad and looks at Syria's rehabilitation and potential readmission into the wider Arab fold. He then answers an interesting question: Was Russia's intervention in Syria a dress rehearsal for its conflict with Ukraine? Our final topic looks at frosty relations between the US and some of the Gulf Cooperation Council countries - specifically Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. We conclude with four cap-doffing after thoughts.

The Hot Zone with Chuck Holton
Episode 598 - Adventures in the Saudi Desert

The Hot Zone with Chuck Holton

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:42


On the trail of the Israelite exodus and Mount Sinai - some never-before seen footage of my recent trip to Saudi Arabia.

OTB Football
Are City unstoppable with Haaland? | What is Messi's motivations with Saudi Arabia? | Marcela Mora y Araujo & Dan McDonnell

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:57


Joe Molloy is joined in-studio by The Irish Independent's Dan McDonnell, before South American football expert Marcela Mora y Araujo joins to chat about Lionel Messi becoming an ambassador to Saudi Arabia. Football with @SkyIreland

Jerusalem Studio
Lebanon Pre-Election analysis – Jerusalem Studio 687

Jerusalem Studio

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 27:27


On the 15th of this month Lebanese voters will elect a new parliament. The 128 seats are allocated along “confessional” and geographical lines. As no party can garner a majority, the government is thus always based on complex coalitions. Lebanon is in permanent crisis, economically and socially. Its ruling elite is corrupt. As there is no independent security agenda or foreign policy due to Hezbollah's influence, the government is therefore subject the competing interests of Iran, Israel and Saudi Arabia. Panel: - Amir Oren, Editor at Large, Host of Watchmen Talk and Powers in Play. - Brig. Gen. (Res) Jacques Neriah, former IDF Intelligence Directorate senior official, & military advisor to late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. - Dr. Nir Boms, Research Fellow, Moshe Dayan Center at Tel Aviv University. - Col. (Res.) Reuven Ben-Shalom, TV7 Powers-in-Play Panelist, Cross-Cultural Strategist and Associate at ICT, Reichman University. Articles on the topic: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/gantz-warns-against-further-attacks-from-lebanon/ https://www.tv7israelnews.com/palestinian-rocket-from-lebanon-draws-idf-response/ https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vatican-lebanons-leaders-profiting-from-crisis/ You are welcome to join our audience and watch all of our programs - free of charge! TV7 Israel News: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/563/ Jerusalem Studio: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/18738/ TV7 Israel News Editor's Note: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76269/ TV7 Israel: Watchmen Talk: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76256/ Jerusalem Prays: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/135790/ TV7's Times Observer: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/97531/ TV7's Middle East Review: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/997755/ My Brother's Keeper: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/53719/ This week in 60 seconds: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/123456/ Those who wish can send prayer requests to TV7 Israel News in the following ways: Facebook Messenger: https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Email: israelnews@tv7.fi Please be sure to mention your first name and country of residence. Any attached videos should not exceed 20 seconds in duration. #IsraelNews #tv7israelnews #newsupdates Rally behind our vision - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/donate/ To purchase TV7 Israel News merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/tv7-israel-news-store Live view of Jerusalem - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/jerusalem-live-feed/ Visit our website - http://www.tv7israelnews.com/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/tv7israelnews Like TV7 Israel News on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Follow TV7 Israel News on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tv7israelnews/ Follow TV7 Israel News on Twitter - https://twitter.com/tv7israelnews

Today's Focus of Attention
Not all the world has condemned Russia for the invasion

Today's Focus of Attention

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 7:30


Even though an attack against the sovereignty of a state should be censured by all the nations worldwide, several major countries chose not to criticise Russia. Amongst them are China, India, Pakistan, and South Africa. India and Pakistan receive a good number of their weapons from Moscow. Other countries, for instance, in the Middle East, have accused NATO of hypocrisy. As it happened in 2003 when the United States invaded Iraq. The US and the UK bypassed the United Nations, attacked and occupied Iraq, leading to years of violence and instability in the region. Syria, for obvious reasons, supports Vladimir Putin. Russia helped President Bashar al-Assad stop the advance of ISIS combatants back in 2015. United Arab Emirates's ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, enjoys an excellent relationship with Putin. Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has a good rapport with the Kremlin as well, which as opposed to NATO and the United States, did not accuse the Saudi crown of ordering the gruesome murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. 

5 Second Rule
#32 Setting the Record Straight: A Conversation on Hospital Accreditation

5 Second Rule

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:08


This episode highlights how accrediting bodies fit in to the overall patient safety landscape and their role. We are joined by Sylvia Garcia-Houchins. MBA, RN, CIC, who sets the record straight on the role of healthcare accreditors and some of the myths that are circulating about what surveyors do. This episode is a must listen for all healthcare personnel! Hosted by: Silvia Quevedo, CAE About our Guest: Sylvia Garcia-Houchins, MBA, RN, CIC, Director, Infection Prevention and Control, Division of Healthcare Improvement Sylvia Garcia-Houchins is the Director, Infection Prevention and Control in the Division of Healthcare Improvement. In this role, she is responsible for the oversight of infection prevention and control for The Joint Commission. Ms. Garcia-Houchins has over 30 years of experience in infection control in both hospital and long term care settings, as well as eight years of clinical microbiology experience. Most recently, she served as the Director, Infection Control at University of Chicago Medicine and was also an intermittent consultant for Joint Commission Resources for 10 years. Ms. Garcia-Houchins has provided infection prevention and control consultation, assessment and education in a variety of health care settings including hospitals, health clinics, ambulatory surgery, and dialysis centers both domestically and internationally. Her specialty areas of interest include disinfection and sterilization, dialysis, infection prevention during renovation and construction, and control of Legionella. One of the highlights of her career has been training health care professionals in Saudi Arabia as Infection Preventionists. She served as a test writer and reviewer for the Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology, and has also authored numerous articles and book chapters related to infection control including a chapter in the APIC Text and the Cleaning, Disinfection and Sterilization Chapter in The APIC/JCR Infection Prevention and Control Workbook, Third Edition. Ms. Garcia-Houchins earned a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, a master's of business administration from the Keller Graduate School of Management, and her nursing degree from Truman College.

Sex Talk | حكي سكس
١٢ وضعية لتأخير القذف

Sex Talk | حكي سكس

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022


يعاني واحد من بين ٣ رجال التي تتراوح اعمارهم بين ١٨ و٥٩ من القذف المبكر. لذلك سنستعرض ١٢ وضعية قد تساعد على تحسين الأداء وتأخير القذف. هذا المحتوى قد لا يكون ملائمًا للمستمعين الذين لم يبلغوا 18 عامًا.

Eat The Rich
Patreon Ep 110 - Scum Shit Teaser

Eat The Rich

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 7:33


On this week's Patreon episode, we discuss the emergence of long COVID and the White House Correspondents Dinner, the reactionary response to Dave Chappelle getting tackled, the leaked SCOTUS opinion overturning Roe v. Wade and the spineless Democratic response, and some new evidence linking Saudi Arabia to 9/11. Haven Coalition: http://www.havencoalition.org/ Patreon: patreon.com/eattherich

Bright Side
30 Unique Things That Only Happen in Saudi Arabia

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 10:11


Did you ever think you could serve jail time for a selfie? Well, there's no country quite like Saudi Arabia, and while it definitely has a colorful culture, some of its traditions and rules are fascinating…. And some are just plain weird! For example, birth control is often accessible only for married women. Some pharmacies can ask for a marriage certificate before selling contraceptives! If you're a Saudi man, giving flowers to your sweetheart is also not a good idea. Here, women can only receive flowers from other women. And there are no cinemas in Saudi Arabia. The government believes that movies may give men and women inappropriate ideas. Can you imagine that? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Break It Down Show
Ripley Rawlings – The Kill Box

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 60:51


Ripley Rawlings – The Kill Box - Lt Col Hunter "Rip" Rawlings, IV (Ret.) is the New York Times bestselling author of the Tyce Asher series and co-author of RED METAL with Mark Greaney. With over twenty-three years of active duty service as a Marine Corps infantry and Reconnaissance Officer, he completed ten combat and peacekeeping deployments to Afghanistan (OEF), Iraq (OIF), Saudi Arabia, and Northern Africa (OEF), among others. Get all of Rip's work on his website at: Pete and Ripley talk about…Duh! His combat experience, but besides that, his writing experiences, future plans or books that lurk on his computer, so stay tuned. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Combat writer's on Has the years to back it up Books from own knowledge   ​Similar episodes: Adrian Goldsworthy  DW Wilber  Anna Simons Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

'The Mo Show' Podcast
Abdulrahman Jiffry | The Mo Show 56 | Accelerator Manager, Fintech, The business landscape in Saudi Arabia

'The Mo Show' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 70:39


Abdulrahman Jiffry is the Accelerator Manager at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology's TAQADAM startup program that invests in promising startups from around the world.With funding, tools, mentorship, and hands-on resources, the accelerator program aims to help startups advance rapidly over the course of six months. Mo and Abdulrahman talk about what it takes to be a successful founder, what fintech is, the Saudi business landscape, and much more in this episode.--

The Epstein Chronicles
The Gulf States and Ukraine (5/8/22)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 19:04


The current situation in Ukraine has sent shockwaves all around the world and has begun the process of old alliances fracturing and new ones being formed. One of the main places we see this occurring is in the middle east. The Gulf states continue to vie for power and battle behind the scenes for hegemony of the region, the only question is, who will end up supplying the weapons for them to do so? (commercial at 11:12)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2022/05/05/ukraine-joins-afghanistan-and-yemen-in-shaping-gulf-rivalries/

Beyond The Horizon
The Gulf States and Ukraine (5/8/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 19:04


The current situation in Ukraine has sent shockwaves all around the world and has begun the process of old alliances fracturing and new ones being formed. One of the main places we see this occurring is in the middle east. The Gulf states continue to vie for power and battle behind the scenes for hegemony of the region, the only question is, who will end up supplying the weapons for them to do so? (commercial at 11:12)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://responsiblestatecraft.org/2022/05/05/ukraine-joins-afghanistan-and-yemen-in-shaping-gulf-rivalries/

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
The Supreme Court, Abortion, & ”Deeply-Rooted Tradition” w/ William Hogeland/Yemen & the Ceasefire w/ Nasser Arrabyee/Israel, Palestine, & the Question of Apartheid w/ Yumna Patel

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 103:26


On this edition of Parallax Views, William Hogeland of Hogeland's Bad History on Substack (and author of such rip-snorting histories as The Autumn of the Black Snake and The Whiskey Rebellion) joins me to discuss the Supreme Court draft opinion that seeks to overturn the Roe Vs. Wade decision on abortion. Hogeland wrote about this matter in a Substack entry entitled "'Deeply rooted in this Nation's history and tradition' The Bad History in Alito's Draft Overturning Roe v. Wade". What does the leaked draft say about the trends we're headed towards and what to make of the argument made in the draft and what is driving it? Hogeland argues that the draft has national-mythopoetic language in it that animates nationalist sentiments seeking to overturn progressive gains in the past half century. In the second segment of the show, Sanna'a, Yemen-based journalist Nasser Arraybyee joins us to discuss the ceasefire between Houthi forces and Saudi Arabia in the 7-year long Yemen war that's turned into one of the world's worst humanitarian crises. The ceasefire has been in effect since Ramadan and is, according to Nasser, optimistically looking like it will hold. Nasser explains why this ceasefire is different; Saudi Arabia's changing relationships with Iran, Turkey, and Qatar; the United Arab Emirates; the role of al Qaeda and ISIS in Yemen; the effect of Saudi-led blockades on the Yemeni population; and much more. In the third and final segment of today's program, Yumna Patel, Palestine New Director for Mondoweiss, joins me to discuss her new documentary Inside Israeli Apartheid. Yumna discusses the unequal treatment of Palestinians in both the Occupied Territories AND within Israel proper as well as some of the specific issues covered in her hard-hitting documentary that follows on the heels of human rights organizations like B'Tselem, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International discussing the question of apartheid in relation to Israel. Please be sure to watch the documentary at Mondoweiss!

Slo Mo: A Podcast with Mo Gawdat
Jonathan Garner - How to Turn Your Phone Addiction into an Opportunity for Personal Growth

Slo Mo: A Podcast with Mo Gawdat

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 65:49


I met Jonathan Garner at an event in Saudi Arabia on a panel discussing digital wellbeing. It became clear to me that Jonathan has dedicated a massive amount of time to figuring out how we can not only combat our often unhealthy reliance on technology but actually turn it into an opportunity for serious self-development. We discuss exactly that in this week's episode.In 2016, Jonathan was working as a digital educator and noticing that while tech is really powerful, bad digital habits often end up blocking our human potential by reducing our happiness, productivity, effectiveness and diversity. In response, he founded Mind over Tech in 2018, a company that helps develop habits and mindsets to unlock the human potential of hybrid teams. They recently published the  Digital Habit Lab—a physical toolkit of 50 experiments to help anyone take back control of their tech.Listen as we discuss:Does technology control us or do we control it?The technologies that changed history and what was gained and lost from them.Why I'm proud to have worked at early Google.How Jonathan's company Mind Over Tech was born.Why reliance on technology is actually a starting place for self-development.Swiping and liking - the dangerous habits.A few powerful experiments from Jonathan's Digital Habit Lab.Embrace boredom!Instagram: @mo_gawdatFacebook: @mo.gawdat.officialTwitter: @mgawdatLinkedIn: /in/mogawdatYouTube: @mogawdatofficialWebsite: mogawdat.comConnect with Jonathan Garner on Twitter @mindovertech and get the deck over at  mindovertech.comDon't forget to subscribe to Slo Mo for new episodes every Sunday. Only with your help can we reach One Billion Happy #onebillionhappy.

The 966
Jon Alterman from Center for Strategic and International Studies joins to talk about the Middle East in an evolving global order

The 966

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 105:24


1:00 - Building a Hydrogen Sector: Can the US help Saudi Arabia?Saudi Arabia seeks to become a global supplier of hydrogen and create a home-grown industry. The U.S. and Saudi Arabia should (and already are) working together to help Saudi Arabia realize this goal and to help power the energy transition. 9:50 - Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah Scholarship Program has a new name and a new, refreshed mandate.The refreshed scholarship program will send 70,000 Saudi students abroad to top-ranked universities and training institutes by 2030.They'll go to not just any schools but to 200 approved foreign institutions….Eligible students will be streamed into one of four paths under the new strategy – the Pioneers Path, the Research & Development Path, the Providers Path, and the Promising Path.The hosts discuss these changes within the context of the decades-long history of the program, King Abdullah's legacy, and why the new program makes sense for a changing Saudi Arabia. 20:36 - The venerable Dr. Jon Alterman from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) thinktank in Washington joins The 966 to talk about a changing global order and the Middle East's role in it. The hosts ask Jon about his work to-date, including building the fascinating and informative podcast series for CSIS, Babel: Translating the Middle East, which is available anywhere you get your podcasts. They also discuss Yemen, U.S.-Saudi diplomacy and the relationship, China's role in the region, and so much more.Jon is an expert in the region. He holds the Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and is Director, Middle East Program at CSIS; received his PhD from Harvard University, and worked for the State Department. His very latest among many accomplishments is the recent Podcast mini-series, Babel: Translating the Middle East, which The 966 hosts enthusiastically recommend. For the concluding episode in that series, Jon interviews U.S. Envoy to Yemen, Tim Lenderking, about the status of the fragile peace in the country and whats at stake there. 1:23:24 - Yallah! Six top storylines in Saudi Arabia to get you up to date heading into the weekend. •Saudi Arabia launches the Tawakkalna Services app in a tech-forward leap for Saudi Arabia and its e-government focus...The Saudi Data and Artificial Intelligence Authority has launched a new app, Tawakkalna Services, to help improve the quality of life in the Kingdom, according to a report in Arab News. It provides 140 services that cover health, education, transport, Islamic and public services, and entertainment through 40 strategic partnerships. These include rendering a driving license, insurance documentation, passport inquiries and requests, a digital wallet approved by government agencies, charitable donations, data correction, and information verification.•US removes Saudi Arabia from intellectual property protection concern list, a big win for the Kingdom...According to a report in Arab News, The Office of the United States Trade Representative has taken the Kingdom off its Priority Watch List in its annual Special 301 Report, after Saudi Arabia tightened up its IP enforcement procedures.•Video asking Saudis not to offer census takers coffee sparks pride in hospitalityA public service advert from Saudi Arabian authorities asking residents not to invite census takers into their homes for coffee is proving a hit with the public, according to a report in The National. The video, released by the Saudi General Authority for Statistics, has been viewed almost 800,000 times since its release earlier this week. The Saudi census starts on May 10, the first since 2010. Before that, the official census took place in 2004, 1992 and 1974. Authorities are expecting to record a big increase in the population. The 2010 census recorded a population of 27,136,977, while a preliminary estimate in mid-2020 was just over 35,000,000.•Number of Saudi universities rises to 22 in UK Times Higher Education's Impact RankingsThe number of the Saudi universities jumped to 22 universities in the UK Times Higher Education (THE)'s Impact Rankings in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals for the year 2022, Zawya reports. Three Saudi universities were included in 2019; increasing to 5 universities in 2020. In 2021, the number was increased to 12 universities, and it reached 22 universities this year.•Cash-strapped Pakistan gets $8 billion in financial support from Saudi Arabia, a significant lifeline...According to the Economic Times, during the recent visit of Prime Minister, Shehbaz Sharif, Saudi Arabia has agreed to provide Pakistan with a "sizeable package" of around USD 8 billion to help the cash-starved country bolster dwindling forex reserves and revive its ailing economy. It was also agreed that the existing deposits of USD 3 billion would be rolled over for an extended period of up to June 2023, according to an official.•Diriyah in Saudi Arabia will be home to Armani Hotels & Resorts' first Saudi Arabian outpost Giorgio Armani has decided to open a new hotel—the company's third in the world in the city of Diriyah, home to a UNESCO World Heritage Site and located near the Saudi capital of Riyadh. According to Architectural Digest, overlooking Diriyah's luxury shopping and hospitality district, the hotel will include approximately 70 luxuriously appointed suites plus two restaurants and a spa with a swimming pool, which offers a variety of wellness and relaxation experiences.

American Prestige
E43 - En Marche? w/ Silyane Larcher

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 86:53


Danny and Derek give updates on Ukraine (0:56), Finland and Sweden's attempts to join NATO (17:40), Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's visit to Saudi Arabia (22:06), North Korea's recent weapons test (28:05), and the potential return of the British Virgin Islands to direct UK rule (29:49). They then speak with Silyane Larcher (33:20), tenured research fellow at the French National Center for Scientific Research, about the results of the French election. They discuss the results, five years of Macron’s policies, Le Pen’s surprising gains, Mélenchon’s bold next steps, and more. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.americanprestigepod.com/subscribe

The Breitbart News Daily Podcast
BND Podcast Special: Long-Form With Peter Schweizer on "Red-Handed"

The Breitbart News Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 98:02


On today's special Breitbart News Daily podcast - at long last, we are releasing Alex's  sit-down with Breitbart News Senior Contributor, President of the Government Accountability Institute, and multiple #1 New York Times bestselling author Peter Schweizer on his book, "Red Handed." It is both the book of the year, so far, and the most comprehensive and important documentation of the American elite's deep ties to Communist China to date. In this long-form interview, Alex and Peter touch on a lot of the details about the American establishment's relationships with the Communist Chinese Party that you didn't necessarily see on the front pages of Breitbart.com or hear about on your favorite talk show. We do a deep dive!

Taqat Hob | طاقة حب
كيف نفهم تكرار الأرقام، الأحلام، الحدس والتخاطر في حياتنا؟

Taqat Hob | طاقة حب

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


في هذه الحلقة نتحدث عن: - كيف نفهم تكرار أرقام معيّنة في مراحل مختلفة من حياتنا؟ - كيف نفهم أحلامنا بشكل يساعدنا في حياتنا اليومية؟ - ما هي الحاسة السادسة وكيف نميّز إحساس نابع من الخوف، القلق أو الحدس؟ - ما هو التخاطر وكيف يمكن أن نفعّل هذه القدرة بشكل إيجابي؟ - كيف نفهم ال dejà vu أو ما يُعرَف بالأحداث أو اللحظات التي نشعر أننا رأيناها من قبل بكافة تفاصيلها. كيف يمكن لفهم هذه الأمور ولتعميق معرفتنا فيها أن يساعدنا في رفع الوعي في حياتنا، في رحلة التشافي التي نختار أن نبدأها، وفي فهم الهدف الأسمى لروحنا ولخيارنا بأن نكون بهذا العالم.

Black Op Radio
#1092 – Col. Fletcher Prouty

Black Op Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 235:35


  UNDERSTANDING SPECIAL OPERATIONS (Ratcliffe 1999), CHAPTER 1 I came on duty before the beginning of WWII, an ROTC cavalry unit Active duty with the 4th Armored Division July 10th 1941 I reported to Creighton W. Abrams from my own home town I began flight training in Maxwell Field in Alabama about May of 1942 In February of 1943 I was in Africa with the Air Transport Command We flew General Smith into Saudi Arabia to meet representatives of Standard Oil That's the first clandestine exercise I was ever involved in We established an operating base during the Cairo Conference In Teheran, Churchill had no ID, the Russians weren't going to let him through Success at Teheran enabled Chiang Kai-shek to put more pressure on the Japanese American generals supported Ho Chi Minh against the Japanese A few miles below the Turkish Syrian border, 750 American former prisoners of war I realized that some of my passengers were Nazi intelligence officers This group did contain men who had been selected by Frank Wisner of the OSS I never saw devastation equal to what I saw in the Soviet Union January of '45 I began flying the Pacific, four-engine transport work The atom bomb had been used, this was mid-August, the Japanese had quit We flew up to Tokyo on September 1st, 1945 At Atsugi air base, here were our enemies, they came over and helped us Equipment for 500,000 men going to Hanoi in Indochina Hiroshima, I flew very low over the area and had a good look at it The decision had been made to establish an Air Force ROTC I taught a very interesting course called "The Evolution of Warfare" I visited Werner Von Braun to write about rockets and missiles The Korean War broke out in June of 1950 I was one of five officers selected to initiate a new Air Defense Command A difficult period, because of the enormous devastation power of the atom bomb Spring of '52, I was the Military Manager of Tokyo International Airport Out of Tokyo we ran a regularly scheduled Embassy Run Civil Air Transport, were delivering supplies to the French, fighting Ho Chi Minh I met Colonel Lansdale and his organization in Vietnam I was selected to attend the Armed Forces Staff College, in Norfolk, Virginia One of the courses was a hypothetical NATO confrontation through Europe It just shocked the whole group, the impact of what nuclear weapons could do The hydrogen bomb would wipe out any city, you cannot fight war with that I went to the Pentagon from that schoo, to the Air Force Plans Office, in July of 1955 General Thomas White told me NSC had published Directive Directive 5412, in 1954 The Department of Defense would provide support for clandestine operations "Military Support of the Clandestine Operations of the United States Government" I was the "Chief of Team B," in charge of clandestine operations, for the Air Force The Economy Act of 1932 became the heart of the covert program We created literally hundreds of false military organizations The 1234 Logistics Squadron really belongs to CIA This clandestine system we established, we called "Tab-6" Mr. Dulles sent me around the world to many of his stations In Athens there was a camp for people we call, "mechanics" (hit men, gunmen) Thousands of ex-Nazis were being brought to the US for their various skills We could paratroop people in following a massive nuclear attack "Special Forces" were created for that post-strike purpose Hitler's chief of intelligence, Reinhardt Gehlen, became a U.S. Army general European command began looking on CIA as a "Fourth Force" in nuclear warfare From 1945 until 1965, CIA was the operating command for military forces in Vietnam CIA had quite an air force, operated and maintained under "Air America" New Year's Eve of 1958-59, I waited for CIA orders to go into Cuba Senator Kennedy understood events going on in Vietnam ...

Off the Chain
#948 Ross Gerber On The Bull Thesis for Bitcoin and Tesla

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 39:11


Ross Gerber is Co-Founder & CEO at Gerber Kawasaki. In this conversation we discuss Twitter, Elon Musk, Tesla and Bitcoin. Ross gives us some brand new insights as to how Saudi Arabia owns Twitter and where Tesla will begin building 2 new Gigafactories very soon. ======================= Since 2018 Copper has been at the forefront of institutional digital asset development.   From award winning custody solutions, to creating the first truly off-exchange settlement function, Copper pioneers technology, products, and services, in lock-step with a rapidly changing world.    No other infrastructure provider covers as many assets, across as many exchanges, with the speed and security that Copper can offer. To learn how Copper helps the world's largest institutional investors secure their digital assets, head over to copper.co   Copper - the unfair advantage. ======================= Compass Mining is the world's first online marketplace for bitcoin mining hardware and hosting. Compass was founded with the goal of making it easy for everyone to mine bitcoin.  Visit http://compassmining.io to start mining bitcoin today!  ======================= Bullish is a powerful new digital asset exchange built for institutions that delivers the innovations of DeFi in a regulated environment. The Bullish Hybrid Order Book pairs the high-performance of a traditional Central Limit Order Book with automated market making. Powered by deep Bullish Liquidity Pools, backed by the multi-billion dollar Bullish Treasury. So, you can trade with certainty and at scale across variable market conditions.   Learn more at Bullish.com or follow @Bullish on Twitter. Because the future belongs to the bullish.   *Not investment advice. Digital assets and cryptocurrencies are high risk products. Consult your professional advisor before dealing in them. Bullish's services are available in select locations only and not to U.S persons.    Visit https://bullish.com/legal for important information and risk warnings =======================

Off The Road Again
Lyn Woodward, Rally Jameel - Episode 120

Off The Road Again

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 88:08


Ross and Chris welcome Lyn Woodward back to the show. Lyn makes automotive videos for Kelley Blue Book. She also has competed multiple times in the Rebelle Rally and in the first Rally Jameel in Saudi Arabia. Lyn has also seen and touched the Toyota GR Corolla and the Hummer EV.

Own The Future
Has science become disinformation? [E281]

Own The Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 44:03


95% of biologist agree--life begins at conception . . . but apparently the party the "follows the science" is no longer following the science. Leftism has become the anti science party and is spreading dangerous and deadly disinformation. Time StampsLeftism is Anti-Science 00:00Roe V Wade Leak 00:05:15What does the Supreme Court potential ruling actually means?  00:09:21Arguements for Abortion: rape? 00:10:51When does life begin? 00:13:36POTUS Agreeing Humans have rights to life from God not Gov 00:14:17Ensoulment? 00:16:09Justice Jackson using biology as scapegoat -- let the science define when life begins. 00:20:37Abortion is Baal worship of sacrificing babies for prosperity 00:22:03Euthaniasing the poor in Canada 00:24:04Yeah That Makes Sense 00:30:06Ministry of Truth 00:30:39What does Nina think Disinformation really is? 00:33:22Pro choice arguments is disinformation that is causing death. Needs to be flagged. 00:38:10Weaver and Loom - How to defend against inflation 00:39:54Closing 00:42:53For more detailed show notes visit: https://281.lucasskrobot.comVALUE FOR VALUE- If you get value out of this show— support the show in the value that you've received.You can do that by visiting the website and giving Fiat currency thereORYou can stream bitcoin by listening Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx – PodstationTo find one visit http://newpodcastapps.com and find a player with the “VALUE” tag. I personally listen on Breez.If you want to get MORE value out of the show, talk about it with a colleague or co worker, or friend. You will begin to build (hopefully) stronger relationship and culture through texting this to a friend and then talking about the concepts discussed here. Remember, as leaders our first job is to define reality and define culture and that is done brick by brick.Until next time… uncover your purpose, discern the Truth, and own the future.To take more steps to live a focus life to achieve your dreams and fulfill your destiny–get my book Anchored the Discipline to Stop Drifting.  https://amzn.to/2Vwb22nThank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220http://www.LucasSkrobot.comTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lucasskrobotLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucasskrobotInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lucasskrobot★ Support this podcast ★

Awwal Shi Bonsoir | أول شي بونسوار
صارو مية، ومكملين!

Awwal Shi Bonsoir | أول شي بونسوار

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022


بعد مرور ١٠٠ حلقة من البودكاست، حلقة احتفالية نسترجع فيها أجمل الحلقات، أبرز الضيوف، وأهم المواقف… نهاية مسلسلات رمضان، تحليل نهاية للموت، ومعركة طاحنة بين هيثم وغنوة قد تصل للطلاق المهني بينهما!

BIBLE IN TEN
Acts 7:29

BIBLE IN TEN

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 7:11


Thursday, 5 May 2022   Then, at this saying, Moses fled and became a dweller in the land of Midian, where he had two sons. Acts 7:29   Moses, being challenged by one of the Israelites he encountered, was asked, “Do you want to kill me as you did the Egyptian yesterday?” With that, Stephen continues the narrative with, “Then, at this saying, Moses fled.” The reason for this, which is left out by Stephen now, is found in Exodus 2 –   “So Moses feared and said, ‘Surely this thing is known!' 15 When Pharaoh heard of this matter, he sought to kill Moses. But Moses fled from the face of Pharaoh and dwelt in the land of Midian; and he sat down by a well.” Exodus 2:14, 15   Moses thought that his killing of the Egyptian was done in secret. That was seen earlier in Exodus 2 where it said, “So he looked this way and that way, and when he saw no one, he killed the Egyptian and hid him in the sand” (Exodus 1:12). He thought his act had gone unnoticed, but it had not. Soon, it became known even to Pharaoh who then sought Moses for punishment. That is when Moses fled. With this context more fully understood, Stephen's words continue with, “and became a dweller in the land of Midian.”   The location of Midian has never been exactly determined. Those who believe Mt. Sinai is on the Sinai Peninsula (once known as Arabia Petraea) would place it in the body of land going from the land of Moab and extending south along the eastern shore of the peninsula. Others believe Mt. Sinai is where Saudi Arabia is today. If so, Midian would have to be somewhere further east in that area.   Its location is less important than the fact that the Lord was always aware of where Moses was, and He interacted with him there. The Lord is not simply a local god that dwells in the land of Canaan, but He is the one true God who is not bound by physical limitations. He can and does deal with people in any location in order to meet His set purposes.    As for Moses dwelling in Midian, Stephen notes that is “where he had two sons.” While in Midian he married Zipporah. She was the daughter of Reuel, the priest of Midian. Their first son was named Gershom. This is recorded in Exodus 2 –   “Now the priest of Midian had seven daughters. And they came and drew water, and they filled the troughs to water their father's flock. 17 Then the shepherds came and drove them away; but Moses stood up and helped them, and watered their flock. 18 When they came to Reuel their father, he said, ‘How is it that you have come so soon today?' 19 And they said, ‘An Egyptian delivered us from the hand of the shepherds, and he also drew enough water for us and watered the flock.' 20 So he said to his daughters, ‘And where is he? Why is it that you have left the man? Call him, that he may eat bread.' 21 Then Moses was content to live with the man, and he gave Zipporah his daughter to Moses. 22 And she bore him a son. He called his name Gershom, for he said, ‘I have been a stranger in a foreign land.'” Exodus 2:16-22   The second son's name is Eliezer. He is first recorded in Exodus 18:4.   Life application: Moses was forty (Acts 7:23) at the time he killed the Egyptian and fled to Midian. He was then in Midian for forty years. After all that time, the Lord visited him on Mount Sinai in the burning bush (Acts. 7:30). The Lord determined when He would appear to Moses, and it was at an age when most people were on their way out (see Psalm 90:10). And yet, he was just starting the most productive third of his life.   We may not see the big changes coming that the Lord plans for our lives, but when they come, we should be willing to recognize His hand in what has occurred and use the events to bring Him glory in whatever capacity He has chosen for us.   Moses shepherded flocks for forty years, as can be deduced from Exodus 3:1. Some might see this as a dull existence, but it was a part of the Lord's plan for him. Today, he is one of the most well-known names in all of human history. Those forty years did nothing to detract from what we think of him. They were simply a part of what the Lord had determined.   No matter what our job is, where we live, or how simple we find our surroundings, let us consider that it is no different than what occurred with Moses. If the Lord keeps us there forever, or if He determines something great and exciting for the future, it really doesn't matter if we are living for Him. For those in Christ, the days of the life we now live will end, and there will be eternal days of wonder when we are in our true, heavenly home.   Lord God, help us to be encouraged in the lives we live. Whatever our station is, You have allowed it to be so. May we consider this and be willing to live for You no matter where we are or whatever our vocation may be. As long as we are honoring You with this life, we are doing what is good and proper. Help us in this, O God. Amen.