Podcasts about Native Americans

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  • 7,236PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Native Americans

Show all podcasts related to native americans

Latest podcast episodes about Native Americans

Global News Podcast
Dozens missing in Deadly Indian Floods

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 32:43


Severe flooding in the Indian state of Kerala leaves more than twenty six people dead and dozens missing; An American Christian organisation has confirmed that seventeen missionaries and family members have been kidnapped in Haiti and to what extent were modern European ideas of democracy influenced by Native Americans?

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
October 17, 2021 - PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 26:36


On this edition for Sunday, October 17, American missionaries kidnapped in Haiti as the crisis-hit nation sees a rise in gang violence. Also, why Native Americans are paying huge sums to buy back ancestral land, and the many acts of musician-turned-actor-turned-musician Stevie Van Zandt. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Native American tribes land buybacks start a commercial approach to social justice

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 7:22


In part two of a two-part series, Special Correspondent Kira Kay reports on the Nez Perce tribe and its efforts to regain control of part of the 7.5 million acres of land granted to it by the U.S. government in the mid 19th century. Reclaiming that land, which was almost all taken after the tribe was violently driven away, has meant taking a more commercial approach to social justice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
October 16, 2021 - PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 26:36


On this edition for Saturday, October 16th, the murder of a British lawmaker is now being called a terror attack, infrastructure funding is stalled in Congress but a giant project is creeping forward in the northeast transit corridor, and in our signature segment, some Native American tribes are joining in a growing movement to buy back their ancestral lands. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why Native Americans are buying back land that was stolen from them

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 7:57


From 1877 to 1934, under a range of laws and reneged-upon treaties, the U.S. government appropriated tens of millions of acres of Native American land. In recent years there has been a growing movement known as "land back" to reclaim their lands. In some cases that has meant tribes are choosing to buy it back on the open market. In the first of a two-part series, special correspondent Kira Kay reports from Northern California. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Ramble by the River
The 10 year-old Who Runs 10ks and 10x Investments in 10 days!

Ramble by the River

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 98:28


Jeff talks about the Great Columbia Crossing 10k, where last weekend he competed with his young daughter and she did incredibly well. We also get to hear more from local fisherman, property owner, and crypto enthusiast, Ross Kary. In the second half of the interview, the conversation rambled away from crypto and into more varied and topical subjects like bushcraft, solar flares, and the last stand of the Suicide Brothers. Ross explains what it takes to become a Vessel Captain in the eyes of the law, and Jeff finds out that Ross has famous Native American blood in his veins. Ross is a man with a lot of unique knowledge to share and it was great to have him with me on Ramble by the River. I hope you enjoy the show. Topics/Keywords: rypto; NFTs; Finance, Internet Computer Protocol; Ethereum; Cardano; Opensea; Solanart; Cryptopunks; Alaska; fishing; camping; bushcraft; seafood; pregnancy; new parents; immigrants from Finland, 23andMe; genetics; comedy; existential threats; pandemic life; Portland, Oregon; Hood to Coast; running; National debt; Alex Becker; Elon Musk; TV; Christopher Walken; Scarface; Deer Hunter; Al Pacino; race; ethnicity; Cheyenne River Sioux Lakota tribe; cultural appropriation; Native American culture; Swiftcloud; Suicide Brothers; Crazy Horse; climate change; investing; inflation; real estate; mass coronal ejection; solar flares; faraday cage; Tesla coils; Chainlink; time travelers; GPU; crypto mining; Vosk coin; youtube; ASIC miners; video games; Starcraft; Diablo II; gambling; D-race; FUD; Polkadot;  Links: Join the Patreon for exclusive access https://my.captivate.fm/Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver (Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver) Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619 (https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619) Instagram: https://instagram.com/ramblebytheriver?r=nametag (@ramblebytheriver) Twitter: @RambleRiverPod Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg (https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg) Business inquiries/guest booking: Ramblebytheriver@gmail.com Website: (For episode catalogue): https://my.captivate.fm/Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm (Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm) (Podcast main website): https://my.captivate.fm/RamblebytheRiver.com (RamblebytheRiver.com) Music Credit(s): Still Fly, Revel Day. Old Time Circus, Luella Gren. Support this podcast

StudioTulsa
"American Indian Expressions" -- An upcoming Signature Symphony chamber music concert

StudioTulsa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 29:29


Our guest is the acclaimed Chickasaw classical composer, Jerod Impichchaachaaha' Tate. He's known for blending Chickasaw and other Native American elements with European musical instruments to create compositions that've been performed by the likes of the National Symphony Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, and others. Tate will be the focus of the next Signature Symphony chamber music concert, happening in-person on Saturday the 16th at the VanTrease PACE on the TCC Southeast Campus. The concert is titled "American Indian Expressions" and begins at 7:30pm; more info, including how to get tickets, is posted here . Tate will appear onstage at this special concert, speaking about his compositions as well as his training and career in music.

Science Friday
Native Biodata, Indigenous Carbon Resistance, COVID Boosters Next Steps. Oct 15, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:18


More Boosters, For More People This week, an FDA advisory committee met to pore over data and debate the role of COVID vaccine boosters. And on Thursday, they voted to recommend Moderna boosters for older Americans, as well as people in certain at-risk groups. This recommendation came just a few weeks after the FDA authorized a Pfizer booster for similar individuals. The recommendations of the panel regarding boosters for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines, as well as the idea of mixing and matching different vaccine and booster types, will now go to FDA officials. The CDC will also weigh in. Amy Nordrum, commissioning editor at MIT Technology Review, joins Ira to talk about the vaccine meeting and other topics from the week in science—including the FDA authorization of an e-cigarette, efforts to map the brain, mysterious radio signals from space, and a mission to explore asteroids near Jupiter.   Indigenous-Led Biology, Designed For Native Communities Monday was Indigenous Peoples' Day here in the United States: a holiday to honor Native Americans and their resilience over many centuries of colonialism. Due to a long history of discrimination, Native Americans face stark health disparities, compared to other American populations. Illnesses like chronic liver disease, diabetes, and respiratory diseases are much more common in Native communities. This is where the Native BioData Consortium (NBDC) comes in. It's a biobank, a large collection of biological samples for research purposes. What sets this facility apart from others is its purpose—the biological samples are from indigenous people, and the research is led by indigenous scientists. This is important, say the founders, because for too long, biological samples from Native people have been used for purposes that don't benefit them. Joining Ira to talk about the importance of having a biobank run by indigenous scientists are three foundational members of the project: Krystal Tsosie, co-founder and ethics and policy director of the NBDC and PhD candidate in genetics at Vanderbilt University, Joseph Yracheta, executive director and laboratory manager of the NCDC, and Matt Anderson, assistant professor of microbiology at Ohio State University and NCDC board member.   Indigenous Activists Helped Save Almost A Billion Tons Of Carbon Per Year This summer, Science Friday and other media outlets covered the protests against an oil pipeline project in northern Minnesota, where Canadian company Enbridge Energy was replacing and expanding their existing Line 3 infrastructure. Native American tribes in Minnesota—whose lands the pipeline would pass through and alongside—organized protests, direct action, and other resistance against the project. The pipeline was completed, and began moving tar sands oil at the beginning of October. But the protests and their non-Native allies drew arrests, news coverage, and social media attention to the debate over continued drilling of fossil fuels. Before Line 3, there were protests at the Dakota Access Pipeline, which was completed against the wishes of the nearby Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and the Keystone XL pipeline, which President Biden ultimately cancelled after objections and lawsuits from two Native American communities in Montana and South Dakota. So far, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has remained un-drilled, despite multiple attempts, with help from vocal opposition by Alaska's Gwich'in people. A new report from two advocacy groups does the math on how much carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions these cancelled or delayed projects would have emitted in the last 10 years. According to their calculations, Indigenous resistance to pipelines and other fossil fuel projects has saved the U.S. and Canada 12% of their annual emissions, or 0.8 billion tons of CO2 per year. Ira talks to the co-authors, Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network, and Kyle Gracey from Oil Change International, about the value of tallying these emissions in the fight to prevent future oil projects. Plus, why Native American protesters and their allies deserve credit for keeping fossil fuels in the ground—and the bigger environmental justice issue of pipeline projects alongside Native land.

The True Beauty Brooklyn Podcast
Uniting The World Through The Power of Beauty w/ Ahsaki Baa LaFrance-Chachere, founder of Ah-Shi Beauty

The True Beauty Brooklyn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 80:16


Friends!! Today we are releasing an episode that we are very, very proud of. We have been conceptualizing this narrative for months, searching for the perfect person to come and speak with us about indigenous beauty--and boy did we find her! Our guest today, Ahsaki Baa LaFrance-Chachere is a proud tribal member of the Diné (Navajo) Nation, a black woman, and the Founder & CEO of Ah- Shi Beauty, the first Native American-owned and operated luxury skincare and cosmetics brand in the United States. To learn more about Ahsaki, Ah-Shi Beauty, and to support this incredible woman, check out Ahshibeauty.com and follow them on Instagram @ahshibeauty . Don't forget to send us YOUR beauty, skincare, or life, questions, your Milk?! With Your Dinner?! And “I Didn't Know Then, But I'm Older Now” segments to truebeautybrooklynpodcast@gmail.com. DM us on Instagram @truebeautybrooklyn, @truebeautybrooklynpodcast, and check us out Twitter @truebeautyBKpod Don't forget to rate, review, subscribe (ayeee!!) & tell a friend to tell a friend if you like the show! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Brookings Cafeteria
Politics and the pandemic in Latino and Native American communities

The Brookings Cafeteria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:54


This episode features an interview with an expert who calls immigration and the Latino vote a golden opportunity for Democrats in 2022. Gabriel Sanchez is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and a professor of political science at the University of New Mexico. In the interview, he discusses a range of policy issues including why COVID-19 has had such a devastating impact on Latino families, why vaccination rates are so high in Native American communities, and why immigration policy remains so important headed into the midterm elections. Sanchez is also Founding Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Endowed Chair in Health Policy and director of the Center for Social Policy at the University of New Mexico. Also on this episode, Hanna Love, a research associate with the Bass Center for Transformative Placemaking in the Brookings Metropolitan Policy program, discusses three trends shaping the future of rural America that she says the dominant narratives aren't very good at capturing. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Missing in the Carolinas
Ep 30-Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in N.C., Part 2

Missing in the Carolinas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:16


Renee Roberson interviews Crystal Cavalier-Keck, Founder of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in North Carolina. They discuss the mission of the organization, the unsolved murders in Robeson County, recent developments in Faith Hedgepeth's case, and the need for a comprehensive database of missing and murdered people in Native American communities. Show Notes: Visit https:www.mmiwnc.com to learn more. Cover Art by Mackinstosh Multimedia. Sound Editing by Mia Roberson.

The Laura Flanders Show
Uncut Full Conversation: Sunny Red Bear, NDN Collective's Director of Racial Equity

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:27


The following audio exclusive  features the entire uncut interview with NDN Collective's Director of Racial Equity, Sunny Red Bear of the Lakota Nation.  Excerpts of this interview were included in our recent special  “LANDBACK! A Tipi Town Approach to Healing & Homelessness”.   In this special feature, Laura traveled to the sacred Black Hills of South Dakota where NDN Collective is reclaiming ancestral lands to address homelessness, addiction and violence against Native Americans.  Laura reported on  Camp Mniluzahan, a tipi village built on tribal trust land, that welcomed hundreds of unhoused Indigenous people and others in the Rapid City area in the dead of winter last year.   Catalyzed in 2020, by an action in which Land Defenders blocked former President Donald Trump's road to Mount Rushmore, this Landback campaign is about reclaiming, along with stolen land, native ceremonies, spirituality and traditions of community care. If you're a listener or a viewer, you spend time with us. Many of you have for years. So how about taking a few minutes to give us the support we need to keep doing what we do… Only a few minutes from you, pledging $3 or $5 or $12 a month, will keep us going all year. Go to Patreon.com/theLFShow and join our media team and support movement building.  Thanks!

Permission To Enter
Getting Read by Psychic Sophia

Permission To Enter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:00


This week we are giving you all permission to sit in on a live reading done by the incredible Psychic Sophia!! She is clairvoyant, clairaudient, and clairsentient and a third-generation psychic empath. She is a Native American and this is a gift that has been passed down from her grandmother who was born with a skin vail over her face We have discussed our experiences with palm/tarot readings outside of the podcast, but now we are doing one live (no edits) for you to hear for yourself! Ever been curious as to how it works when you go to a psychic? We are letting you in behind the curtain to understand how it all goes down and learn from Sophia about how everything works! Call, Text, or Email for an appointment and you will not be disappointed! Connect with Sophia: Website: https://www.psychicindianhealer.com Phone: 404-472-3744 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/psychicindianhealer7/ Connect with us: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ptepodcast/ Tiffany: https://www.instagram.com/tiffanydaniellexo/ LC: https://www.instagram.com/123laurenc/ Email: permissiontoenter@gmail.com If you liked this episode, let us know in a review! :)

Jews Talk Racial Justice with April and Tracie
Ep 58: We are the Product of Our Ancestor's Choices

Jews Talk Racial Justice with April and Tracie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:33


In this week's episode, April shares more about her ongoing exploration around her Indigenous, Cherokee heritage and the impact a healing workshop had on her desire to live and embody this aspect of her identity. Tracie and April use this exploration to reflect on the ways in which we are the products of our ancestors' choices to survive the oppressions they faced. Check out our discussion/reflection questions for this episode:  https://joyousjustice.com/blog/jews-talk-racial-justice-ep-58Find April and Tracie's full bios and submit topic suggestions for the show at www.JewsTalkRacialJustice.comLearn more about Joyous Justice where April is the founding and fabulous (!) director, and Tracie is a senior partner.: https://joyousjustice.com/Read more of Tracie's thoughts at her blog, bmoreincremental.comListen to our Thanksgiving episode, part 1 here: https://joyousjustice.com/blog/jews-talk-racial-justice-ep-12-jews-talk-thanksgiving-part-1 Listen to our Thanksgiving episode, part 2 here: https://joyousjustice.com/blog/jews-talk-racial-justice-ep-12-jews-talk-thanksgiving-part-2Learn more about the Cherokee Nation here: https://www.cherokee.org/

StateImpact Oklahoma Report
Oklahoma School for the Deaf welcomes new, more inclusive Bison mascot

StateImpact Oklahoma Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:31


Host: Earlier this month Oklahoma School for the Deaf unveiled a fresh logo featuring their new Bison mascot. StateImpact's Robby Korth reports the Bison name flips a new page in the storied history of Oklahoma's school for deaf students. NEWSPAPER CLIPPING PAGE FLIP RK: John Reinenger is thumbing through a book of old newspaper clippings. The pages are from his days as a student at Oklahoma School for the Deaf here in Sulphur, a school that competed under the name Indians in his time. He's speaking here through an interpreter. REINENGER (through interpreter): It brings back a lot of memories. Definitely nostalgic. So yeah. I feel very, very closely connected to OSD. It's like my second home, really. (11) RK: The Midwest City man has a son here. His parents met here. He is a 2000 graduate. But there was one thing his mother Sylvia told him not to do at school. REINENGER: My mother told me never to dress like in costume as an Indian, like any kind of Indian costumes. (06) RK: John and his mother are both citizens of the Muscogee Nation. And people did dress up in costume regularly at football games and pep rallies.  REINENGER: I mean, I didn't honestly really think much about it. And then as life went on and I've gotten older, then I've looked at it and realized, Ooh. [air sucking grimace] Yikes. OK. (08) RK: There's been a community-wide realization here as well. The Indians mascot was officially retired this year and replaced with the Bison. Superintendent Chris Dvorak. DVORAK: It really kind of came to a head where there were some serious conversations within the administration that had links to alumni. And we just got the sense that the time is now, you know, we can we really need to have a serious conversation. The writing is on the wall. (18) RK: So he tasked OSD alum and director of student life Trudy Mitchell with creating a task force and leading the charge toward a new mascot. She spoke to StateImpact through an interpreter. MITCHELL: The change is needed. I'm excited that it's going to be something new, it's going to be a new vision for our school. (08) RK: Mitchell met and spoke with dozens of alumni about the potential for change. It wasn't well received at first, but she says, after several discussions many in the community have come around to the idea.  MITCHELL: Oh we had lots of options. We had painted horse, a T. Rex, a Tasmanian Devil. There was an eagle.  RK: But more than two-thirds ended up voting for Bison. Oklahoma School for the Deaf was hardly alone in its use of an Indigenous-themed mascot in Oklahoma. A StateImpact review of school nicknames found at least 75 public school districts - almost 15 percent - use Indigenous themed mascots. Corey Bunch, Education Services executive director for Cherokee Nation, says that can be hurtful. BUNCH: The chants from opposing teams and the slogans that kind of are associated with the mascots and the imagery they can quickly get carried away. And they just don't represent Native people.  (14) RK: The movement to change offensive names is gaining momentum in western states. Laws in Washington and Colorado passed this year are compelling schools to stop using Indigenous-themed mascots. Such a bill has not even been introduced in Oklahoma - the state with the highest proportion of Native Americans in the lower 48.  BUNCH: Certainly, Cherokee Nation nor other tribal nations are out twisting anybody's arm, telling them that they ought to change their mascots. But when we are asked we are certainly happy to participate. (13) RK: Individual districts are considering changes. Tulsa Union recently announced it would change its nickname. Tulsa Public Schools is looking at changing mascots at some sites as well. Bunch served as an advisory member for the review boards at both districts. And he says he always wants to advocate for Native students. BUNCH: We don't want them to be ashamed for any reason to just be the people that...

Ain't It Scary? with Sean & Carrie
Ep. 56: The Salem Witch Trials, Pt. 1

Ain't It Scary? with Sean & Carrie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 77:32


We've finally come to our long promised two-parter on one of Carrie's pet interests, the Salem Witch Trials! In 1692 Salem, Massachusetts, tensions were already high. The Puritan colonists were struggling through the "Little Ice Age" devastating their crops, paranoid about being attacked by neighboring Native American tribes, and quarreling with their minister and each other about who the most godly of the bunch really was. The atmosphere was rife for backstabbing and tragedy, and that tragedy was about to hit in a horrific way. It began with whispers, and would end with screams. Was the root of the Salem Witch Trials the hysteria of a group of young girls? Was everyone completely zonked out from ergot poisoning? Or had Satan himself really infiltrated this infighting colonial town? Join us, as we explore the whole unbelievable story of the Salem Witch Trials in the next two episodes. Thanks to the spooktacular THINGS TO DO IN SALEM.COM for sponsoring this episode - find them at www.thingstodoinsalem.com! ________________________________________ Connect with us on social media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/aintitscary Twitter: @aintitscary Instagram: @aintitscary Patreon: www.patreon.com/aintitscary ___________________________________________ Thank you to our sponsors: BetterHelp - Special offer for Ain't it Scary? listeners: Get 10% off your first month at www.betterhelp.com/aintitscary Audible - Get a FREE audiobook and 30-Day Free Trial at www.audibletrial.com/aintitscary BarkBox - Enjoy a FREE month of BarkBox on us when you sign up for a 6 or 12-month BarkBox subscription! Visit www.barkbox.com/aintitscary for more details Hunt a Killer - Receive 20% off your first Hunt a Killer subscription box at www.huntakiller.com with the code SCARYSQUAD at checkout! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/aintitscary/support

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 5/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:04


Photo:  View of the Attack on Bunker's Hill with the Burning of Charlestown, by Lodge CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1762: 4/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:25


Photo:  John Glover (November 5, 1732 – January 30, 1797) was an American fisherman, merchant, and military leader from Marblehead, Massachusetts, who served as a brigadier general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 1/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:20


Photo:    A portion of Howes Map (1776) showing "The Heights" [of Guan, which is a variant of Gowanus], north of the village of Flatbush. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 6/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:55


Photo:  First page of Paine's The American Crisis              "The morale of the Patriot forces was boosted on December 19 when a new pamphlet titled The American Crisis written by Thomas Paine, the author of Common Sense, was published. "These are the times that try men's souls; the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph."Within a day of its publication in Philadelphia, General Washington ordered it to be read to all of his troops. It encouraged the soldiers and improved the tolerance of their difficult conditions." CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:00


Photo:  Brooklyn Heights in 1854. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 3/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:35


Photo:  Gen. Sir William Howe CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 7/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:20


Photo:  George Washington praying at Valley Forge Dr Bond inoculated Washington's troops: "Finding the Small pox to be spreading much and fearing that no precaution can prevent it from running through the whole of our Army, I have determined that the troops shall be inoculated. This Expedient may be attended with some inconveniences and some disadvantages, but yet I trust in its consequences will have the most happy effects. Necessity not only authorizes but seems to require the measure, for should the disorder infect the Army in the natural way and rage with its usual virulence we should have more to dread from it than from the Sword of the Enemy. Under these circumstances I have directed Doctr Bond to prepare immediately for inoculating in this Quarter,1 keeping the matter as secret as possible, and request that you will without delay inoculate All the Continental Troops that are in philadelphia and those that shall come in as fast as they arrive."*             CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution. ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  *  The Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond had a problem. During the Battle of Lexington and Concord, in obedience to his Hippocratic Oath, he had treated British soldiers. For performing his duty as a doctor, he was falsely accused of being a Loyalist and had his life threatened by an angry mob.     "Doctor Nathaniel Bond, of Marblehead, having been charged before this Committee with having acted an unfriendly part to this Colony, the said Committee appointed Joseph Warren, Esq., Colonel Thos. Gardner, and Lieut. Colonel Joseph Palmer, as a Court of Inquiry, to examine witnesses in the case, and hear and determine the same; and upon full enquiry into the case, they are clearly of the opinion that said Bond's general behaviour has been friendly to American liberty; and though he may have discovered an imprudent degree of warmth in some instances, yet we do not find any proof of an inimical temper or disposition to this Country, and therefore recommend him to the esteem and friendship of his Country, that (as the errour which occasioned his being brought before this Committee appears to have been altogether involuntary, and was such as several of our most firm friends were led into, by false rumours spread, of the transactions of the nineteenth instant) no impressions to the Doctor's disadvantage may remain on the minds of any person whatsoever.             [signed] Joseph Warren, Chairman.”  April 26, 1775. .

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 8/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:50


Photo:   Colonel John Glover directs the evacuation of the American army from Brooklyn, on the night of August 29-30, 1776. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

Paradelphia
Paradelphia Radio: Ep 305 - Scaredy Pants

Paradelphia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:50


Are they aliens, interdimensional beings, unknown cryptids or pants off doing a dance off? This week we look at one of the more recent new creatures of the night, the Fresno Nightcrawlers. Looking like either a clothespin or disco pants these creatures have appeared on CCTV cameras in California since 2007 and also in ancient Native American lore. What they are is anyone's guess and tonight we made a few guesses.    Fresno Nightcrawler Scary Monsters Magazine (Issue #123) Toxic Radio

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Bruce Hartman: Former Director, Nerman Museum of Art (Part 1): - Epi. 165, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:18


I had Bruce Hartman on today, which was so much fun. He's a natural, gregarious, happy individual, and he's always been that way. I've known him for 20 plus years and any time I've ever seen him at a show (which is usually where I see him)  he's always laughing and giggling and just having a great time. You see, Bruce absolutely loves art and is a very knowledgeable former art professional having just retired after 30 years as Executive Director and Chief Curator at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art.At first glance, you may get the impression that contemporary art was Bruce's main focus at the museum, but don't let that fool you. He knows an incredible amount on the subject of Native American art. His father and mother collected prehistoric and then historic Indian art, which got Bruce's artistic entanglement going very early in life, resulting in him becoming one of the foremost authorities on Native American paintings, from both historic to contemporary - as well as Zuni fetishes.It was a long interview than normal, not because of any particular reason other than Bruce is such an interesting individual. I just couldn't stop listening and, you know, those are the best interviews as far as I'm concerned. As a result, this podcast will be split into two parts. This is part one of the Bruce Hartman podcast.

Better Than Human
Bigfoot: If You're Going to make up a Cryptid, at least make it Believable

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:05


Bigfoot, also commonly referred to as Sasquatch, (another word we've stolen from Native Americans), is a large bipedal ape-like creature, covered in hair. Bigfoot has become an icon of cryptozoology. You know what cryptozoology is? Fake science. There is no evidence that Bigfoot exists. Even animals that have gone extinct millions of years ago leave evidence of their existence.Giants (Larger than human beings) appear in the folklore of cultures worldwide and evoke terror and remind humans of our weakness and mortality. This may be the reason why there are so may 'bigfoot' tales in Native American lore. Thousands of people have claimed to have seen a Bigfoot, but even with all of these claims there is still no concrete evidence of any ape-like creatures living in North America. However, we do have a lot of proof of Bigfoot Hoaxes, like a man saying he had discovered the body of a dead Bigfoot in a forest in northern Georgia, and getting paid 50,000 dollars to produce it…So what are people claiming to have seen Bigfoot actually seeing? There are a lot of possible logical answers that are not mythical.Listen now to learn why Jennifer and Amber do not believe in Bigfoot. Note: when Jennifer says no Native Americans had a writing system, she means Native Americans of North America. The Maya, Aztecs, Mixtecs, and Zapotecs of Mesoamerica had writing systems.For more information on us, visit our website at betterthanhumanpodcast.comFollow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!#betterthanhuman #cultofweirdnes

The African History Network Show
Dr. David Imhotep: Africans In America before Columbus, Native Americans, New Bk

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 97:00


Dr. David Imhotep discusses The Africans In America before Columbus and Native Americans and Why Indigenous Peoples' Day includes African Americans as well.  He will talk about his NEW BOOK, ‘The First Americans Were Africans Expanded & Revised'. – TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 10-12-21 Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow   NEXT Class Starts Sun. 10-17-21, 12:00pm EST (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. ON SALE $80; ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND! REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021

Podcast UFO
476. Dr Robert Gross

Podcast UFO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 113:51


Guest Dr Robert Gross talks about Native American culture and space exploration as well as changes in the last few years on how the world views the topic of UAPs/UFOs and the potential for learning.Show Notes

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
259: (news) Nonprofits Helping Afghan resettlement and Indigenous community Reparations

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 24:22


Nonprofitnewsfeed.com   Nonprofits On Front Lines of Afghan Resettlement Seek More Foundation & Government Support Nonprofits on the front lines of helping the thousands of Afghan refugees settling in the United States say that they need more financial support to continue to provide services for resettlement. Many of these organizations, accustomed to relatively limited numbers of people who need assistance, have gone into overdrive to help refugees who have been coming to the U.S. over the past several months. However, because these refugees are being admitted primarily through a process called “humanitarian parole,” they receive almost no federal assistance beyond a one-time $1,200 stipend. Organizations carrying out the bulwark of the resettlement work say that in order to provide for so many people who arrived with almost no possessions, they will need additional assistance. Read more ➝ The “Land Back” Movement Brings Reparations To Indigenous Communities To The Forefront The “Land Back” movement, akin to Black lives Matter in its relatively decentralized usage, is a call for recognizing that Indigenous land has been stolen through genocide and calls for reparations to Native Americans, largely in the form of the returning of land and disassembly of colonizing structures. In this article for Nonprofit Quarterly, the authors lay out a framework for providing adequate reparations to Indigenous communities who still face the repercussions of colonization. The article also calls for the philanthropic sector to work in partnership with communities to work to repair the damage done throughout history. Curious about the Indigenous land where you live? This interactive map shows you which tribes existed on the land based on your address! Read more ➝   Summary   Crain's 2021 Notable Nonprofit Board Leaders Binance Charity launches NFT tree planting project 'Tree Millions' to plant 10M trees worldwide California Nonprofits: New Changes to the Corporate Laws Greenwich nonprofit holding job fair to fill 70 openings Sandusky donut contest brings in dough for nonprofit      

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
10-12-21 Young people promote healthy living

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:30


Some civic-minded young Native people are devoting their energy to promoting healthy living for themselves and those around them. Several groups are hoping to deploy Native youth to help improve statistics for Native Americans who are disproportionately affected by many adverse health problems, from diabetes to obesity.

All American Savage Pod cast
Native Americans Big Mad About Chris Day-

All American Savage Pod cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:52


Check out our show sponsor at: https://shellshockcbd.com Enter the $2k give away here: https://shellshockcbd.com/the-all-ame... Listen to us on itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... Watch the podcast on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqig...

Believer: A Paranormal Mystery
BONUS: The Historical Natives | Coast Salish | Sasquatch

Believer: A Paranormal Mystery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 25:31


Happy Indigenous People's Day! Enjoy this preview episode from The Historical Natives, a horror-themed podcast about Native American history, culture, and folklore. Follow The Historical Natives and check out their full-length Sasquatch episode on November 30, 2021! BUT FIRST, Julie talks about Indigenous horror writers for like 5 minutes. [0.00 - 5:24] - Julie chat [5:25 - End] - The Historical Natives - Coast Salish - Sasquatch BOOKS RECOMMENDED: The Only Good Indians, by Stephen Graham Jones Into The Forest And All The Way Through, by Cynthia Pelayo Grass Dancer (from Tribal Scream) and Coyote Rage, by Owl Goingback Elatsoe, by Darcie Little Badger The Marrow Thieves, by Cherie Dimaline Taaqtumi: An Anthology of Arctic Horror Stories, by Aviaq Johnston, Richard Van Camp, Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley, Seaan Qitsualik-Tinsley, and Thomas Anguti Johnston MUSIC: Julie's preamble Taking Me High, Taking Me Low (Instrumental Version) - Gold Flow My Brother - Yi Nantiro Intro to Historical Natives Episode: Eerie Music Box 2 - Natalie000 Background: People: Daniel Birch - Indigo Shore DooDoo - Unknown Background: Being: Haunted Woods - Dark Music Radio Silence - Dark Music Background: Call to Action: Creepy Night - Astrofreq Story Intro: Samuel Francis Johnson - Creepy Ambient Outro of Episode: AQUI - Charles Michel

Where We Live
Indigenizing Connecticut curriculum

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:19


Native American studies is a new requirement for Connecticut schools, with resources being prepared in time for the 2023-2024 school year. What kind of guidance will teachers get? Plus, with the launch of Land Grab CT, we look at UConn's status as a land-grant institution and the links to the expropriation of Indigenous lands. Chris Newell - Director of Education, Akomawt Educational Initiative; Citizen of Passamaquoddy Tribe endawnis Spears - Director of Programming and Outreach, Akomawt Educational Initiative; Citizen of Navajo Nation Steve Armstrong - Social Studies Advisor, Connecticut Dept. of Education Sage Phillips - Student Coordinator, UConn Native American Cultural Programs; Member of the Penobscot Nation Luisa Fernanda Arietta - Researcher, Greenhouse Studios at UConn Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 72: Tango Alpha Lima: Mission Roll Call with Patrick Griffith

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:33


Mission Roll Call is a nonpartisan movement to help provide veterans with a powerful, unified voice that is heard by our nation's leaders and communities. On this episode, we're joined by MRC Director Patrick Griffith, who talks about how their team uses digital messaging and polling to collect the views, experiences, and insights of veterans and delivers them directly to national and community leaders in an effort to enact positive change. Patrick discusses how his organization uses storytelling to educate and activate their audience, and how Mission Role Call can work with traditional VSOs like The American Legion. Special Guest: Patrick Griffith .

City Cast Denver
Is Denver Repeating the Past By Sweeping this Indigenous Camp?

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 18:32


Since 2012 when the City of Denver enacted the Urban Camping Ban, the forced removal of people from tents and other temporary shelters — commonly known as “sweeps” — have become the norm. Even as houseless neighbors and advocates protest these displacements, the Hancock administration continues to conduct them. But one recent sweep of an encampment outside the Four Winds American Indian Council in Baker challenged the status quo in a different way. Today on the show, City Cast Denver host Bree Davies talks with Four Winds American Indian Council chair Mateo Parsons about why this sweep is different and where things stand with this part of the indigenous community and the city. To hear from one of the residents of the encampment outside Four Winds, here's a link to a video of a man talking about a confrontation he had with DPD at the camp: https://www.facebook.com/fourwindsamericanindiancouncil/videos/?ref=page_internal Here's the full response we got from the mayor's office: General about the cleanup: We remain focused on connecting those living in any unsanctioned encampment with services, shelter and housing that will help them exit homelessness as quickly as possible. Unsanctioned encampments pose a health and safety risk to those living in them and those living around them. The Mayor has been clear that they cannot persist when better alternatives remain available.   About the meeting with Four Winds folks: Mayor Hancock and city staff meet with representatives from the Four Winds American Indian Council and the encampment that was located outside their building. The meeting was productive and alternative options were discussed for those who were in the encampment, including housing, shelter and access to safe outdoor spaces. As well, several of the individuals in the encampment were connected with housing already through outreach efforts prior to the encampment cleanup.   Additional context: For further context on those who were connected to real solutions as opposed to the accusations of those who want them to stay in these conditions: there were five people from that encampment who were placed in Safe Outdoor Spaces and 10 who were provided two-week motel vouchers to help them connect with longer term services and resources. The week before the actual cleanup, the Homeless Outreach Team contacted a woman living in the encampment outside Four Winds who had three small children (including a toddler) living in the tent with her. Nobody at Four Winds or within the camp had offered her assistance or bothered to provide resources for the children. DPD was able to get her and her children out of the encampment and connected with supportive resources. And here's the full response we got from the Department of Housing Stability (HOST):  Prior to all encampment cleanups, street outreach teams are deployed on multiple dates leading up to the cleanup to connect individuals with resources, services, shelter and housing. Outreach prior to the Four Winds cleanup resulted in the following:   One family (mother plus three children) placed into family shelter and connected with services Five individuals placed into Safe Outdoor Space managed campsites 10 individuals placed, via motel vouchers, into motels for 14 days with follow-up visits provided by street outreach teams One person referred for permanent supportive housing with another successfully rehoused Three individuals completed case management steps necessary in order to be prioritized for future housing referral In addition, individuals were provided with food, vaccinations, and medical/behavioral care   HOST continues to work with individuals who were residing in this encampment.   HOST has partnered with several Native American-led organizations, as well as with the Colorado Village Collaborative, on visioning efforts related to future Safe Outdoor Space sites.

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay
Lynnette Grey Bull on Busting Myths and the Silence Around Missing Natives

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:25


Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay welcome activist and founder of Not Our Native Daughters Lynnette Grey Bull to discuss the lack of attention given to missing Indigenous people, and what she's doing to make a change. Plus, myths get dispelled and she tells us the dopest thing about being a Native American.  Hosts: Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay Guest: Lynnette Grey Bull Producers: Trudy Joseph and Donnie Beacham Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza- THE ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:10


Dinesh D'Souza- THE ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD. Dinesh D'Souza Podcast Watch the entire episode at- https://youtu.be/OZCvDH7O5bg Dinesh D'Souza 625K subscribers In this Columbus Day special episode, Dinesh celebrates Columbus as the architect of the modern world.  Dinesh debunks several leftist myths surrounding Columbus: that he was a racist, that he was the originator of slavery, that he is responsible for wiping out a large segment of the Native American population. Dinesh argues that the Columbus landing inaugurated the transmission of Western concepts of freedom and enlightenment to large parts of the world that would not likely have developed them otherwise. If pre-Columbian America was such a paradise, Dinesh asks, why don't people go back to living that way now? — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Email: http://www.dineshdsouza.com/email/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://balanceofnature.com https://www.moinkbox.com https://www.puretalk.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Books mentioned in podcast: https://www.amazon.com/Great-Explorer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona... Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-...

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza- THE ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:10


Dinesh D'Souza- THE ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD. Dinesh D'Souza Podcast Watch the entire episode at- https://youtu.be/OZCvDH7O5bg Dinesh D'Souza 625K subscribers In this Columbus Day special episode, Dinesh celebrates Columbus as the architect of the modern world.  Dinesh debunks several leftist myths surrounding Columbus: that he was a racist, that he was the originator of slavery, that he is responsible for wiping out a large segment of the Native American population. Dinesh argues that the Columbus landing inaugurated the transmission of Western concepts of freedom and enlightenment to large parts of the world that would not likely have developed them otherwise. If pre-Columbian America was such a paradise, Dinesh asks, why don't people go back to living that way now? — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Email: http://www.dineshdsouza.com/email/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://balanceofnature.com https://www.moinkbox.com https://www.puretalk.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Books mentioned in podcast: https://www.amazon.com/Great-Explorer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona... Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-...

Forgotten America
Ep. 030: Property Rights Can Save the Environment

Forgotten America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 48:57


Peter J. Hill is Professor of Economics Emeritus at Wheaton College and a Senior Fellow at the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, Montana, where he currently resides. He joins Garrett on Forgotten America to discuss free-market environmentalism (FME) and the property rights framework he uses to evaluate conservation issues. P.J. also gives us a look back into the truth about the Wild West and whether or not it was really all that wild.    Follow P.J.'s work and the work of PERC at https://www.perc.org/    Rachel Carson's Silent Spring: http://www.rachelcarson.org/SilentSpring.aspx   Learn more about the economist Ronald Coase: https://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/bios/Coase.html    Read about Terry Anderson at PERC: https://www.perc.org/people/terry-anderson-2/     You can buy the book Free Market Environmentalism for the Next Generation on Amazon.    Edward Abbey was originally discussed in Ep. 021.    The Not So Wild, Wild West by Terry Anderson & P.J. Hill    The Foundation for Economic Education teaches about the Knowledge Problem.  ------------------------------------------------------------------------   You can support the Cardinal Institute by donating or following us on social media:    Donate: www.cardinalinstitute.com/donate Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cardinalinstitute Newsletter: www.cardinalinstitute.com/contact YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCosCMp86mjLbf8ZWfE5yS7Q Twitter: @CardinalWV Facebook: /CardinalInstitute/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cardinal-institute-for-wv-policy/ Instagram: @teamcardinalwv  

Overcome to Become
When a Dream Dies: Learning to Trust God's Process with Rachel Marie Kang

Overcome to Become

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:37


What do you do when your lifelong dream is suddenly snatched away by a health diagnosis?  My guest Rachel Kang joins me today to share her journey of being diagnosed with rheumatic fever and navigating through the lasting impacts on her voice, how she felt that God had taken her dreams away, and how she did the heart work, and changed her perspective. We also chat about the complexities of being a writer who is multiethnic and the heart changing message she has for women who may be experiencing disappointments or delays.About Rachel Kang:Rachel Kang is a mixed woman of African American, Native American, Irish, and Dutch descent. She is a writer of prose, poems, and other pieces, and she is the founder of Indelible Ink Writers. Her first book, on creativity as a calling, is due out in 2022 with Revell Books. Connect with Rachel:Website// Instagram// Twitter// Facebook// Indelible Ink Writers Website// Indelible Ink Writers InstagramConnect with Latasha:Website// Instagram//EmailOTB Email Tribe: Click here for updates and encouragement in your inbox!Mentioned in this episode:Read Rachel's Published Articles: https://www.rachelmariekang.com/piecesTime (from the movie Inception)- https://youtu.be/RxabLA7UQ9k

The African History Network Show
What is Indigenous People's Day? Columbus Day; Africans In Americas

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 97:00


What is Indigenous People's Day? Why do people still Celebrate Columbus Day? What about The Africans that were in the Americas before Columbus and Native Americans?; Dave Chappelle gets major support from Netflix. - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 10-11-21   Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow   NEXT Class Starts Sun. 10-17-21, 12:00pm EST (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. ON SALE $80; ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND! REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021

National Day Calendar
October 12, 2021 – National Gumbo Day | National Farmer’s Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:30


This Stew Makes Us Think Of Southern Cooking But It's Actually Much Older Than That! Welcome to October 12, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a Southern melting pot and those who work the land.  When we think of gumbo, the hearty stew of seasoned vegetables and seafood or meat, we immediately think of Southern cooking.  For this we can thank it's older West African roots that blended with Native American and European traditions to create a culinary classic.  Traditional recipes call for okra, a vegetable that thickens things nicely, but you may have also heard of gumbo filé. This Choctaw spice made from dried sassafras root, also thickens the stew and was most likely used when okra was out of season.  And if all else fails you can tighten things up with a good old fashioned roux.  Or leave the cooking to an expert!  On National Gumbo Day, celebrate this “melting stew” that warms us during chilly seasons.  Farmer's Day has been celebrated since the mid 1800s and it's easy to see why.  These folks contribute to much more than just the food on our table.  From early on, people who worked the land set the bar for hard work and their products have affected many industries from manufacturing to transportation.  For proof, you can look at a whole host of products from leather goods to textiles and even the ethanol in our gas tanks.  These days it's more important than ever to support your local farmers.  Even city slickers can do their part by purchasing from markets and visiting restaurants that take pride in their farm to table menus.  On National Farmer's Day, celebrate the way of life that sustains us all.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Unpleasant Dreams
The Sounds of Death - Unpleasant Dreams 8

Unpleasant Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 14:21


Aural death omens that are believed to be harbingers of doom across cultures around the globe. Tune into some of the sounds of death on this episode of Unpleasant Dreams. That is, if you dare. Cassandra Harold is your host. EM Hilker is our principal writer and researcher with additional writing by Cassandra Harold. Jim Harold is our Executive Producer. Unpleasant Dreams is a production of Jim Harold Media. PODCAST TRANSCRIPT There's something of the foreboding in an unexpected sound piercing an otherwise placid stillness; perhaps it's an eerie hoot borne through the evening hush, or the lull of the afternoon suddenly shaken by a grandfather clock chiming loudly off-time. It might be a mysterious whistling where there ought not be anyone to whistle, or a heavy knocking from an empty doorway. It chills the blood and brings to mind strange, dark suspicions of things to come. Aural death omens. Those sounds that herald the approach of death. Common across cultures all over the world, generations of people have heard them and known, deep down, that they signal an ending. Sometimes it's the cry of an animal; sometimes it's the full brassy ring of a bell or the chime of an old broken clock, or an inexplicable knocking or a strange, ghostly figure. Aural death omens can often take the form of an animal messenger. Perhaps one of the most interesting living aural death omens was made famous in Edgar Allen Poe's short story The Tell-Tale Heart: “He was still sitting up in the bed listening; –just as I have done, night after night, hearkening to the death watches in the wall.” The “death watches” being referred to were, of course, the deathwatch beetle, a woodboring beetle that makes a peculiar tap-tap-tap sound from within the walls of the home or building they've infested. As author Laura Martisiute suggests, the beetles' tap-tap-tapping became associated with the long sleepless vigils held by the bedsides of the dying, during which the sounds of the beetle would persist throughout the otherwise quiet night. Over time, people came to believe that the tap-tap-tap was forecasting death rather than simply accompanying it, and they came to dread it… during the long, silent nights. Birds, the natural predator of beetles, are also a common source of aural death omens. Owls in particular are generally seen as magical birds for both good and ill across many countries and cultures. And as such, they are also commonly considered death-signalling birds across vast geographical expanses. The Hottentot in Southern Africa believe that the hooting of an owl predicts death, as do a number of Native American tribes, and people in Mexico and India. A relative to the owl, the tawny frogmouth, also has a cry that portends death throughout Asia and Australia. FIND THE REST OF THE TRANSCRIPT & SOURCES HERE

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How Native Americans view Biden's restoration of national monuments Trump shrank

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:11


The Biden administration recently restored the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and Bears Ears National Monument just ahead of Indigenous Peoples Day. The White House said the move protects land sacred to Native Americans and preserves cultural and scientific wonders. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Consider This from NPR
Native Americans Take Over The Writers' Room and Tell Their Own Stories

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 11:42


After decades of Indigenous stories told by non-Natives, two shows from this past year signal a change. Reservation Dogs from FX on Hulu was created by and stars Native people. It follows four Indigenous teenagers growing up on a reservation in rural Oklahoma, with dreams of adventuring to California. Vincent Schilling, a Native journalist and critic for Rotten Tomatoes, calls Reservation Dogs 'a show about Native American resilience.' Rutherford Falls is a sitcom on NBC's streaming platform, Peacock, which follows a conflict over a historical statue in a small town. When the show was co-created by Sierra Teller Ornelas, she became the first Native American showrunner of television comedy. Teller Ornelas told Audie Cornish this year: "There are five Native writers on staff. We had a Native director for four of the episodes, and this is really a reflection of our shared experience as Native people from nations all over the country." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
ARCHITECT OF THE MODERN WORLD

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:34


In this Columbus Day special episode, Dinesh celebrates Columbus as the architect of the modern world.  Dinesh debunks several leftist myths surrounding Columbus: that he was a racist, that he was the originator of slavery, that he is responsible for wiping out a large segment of the Native American population. Dinesh argues that the Columbus landing inaugurated the transmission of Western concepts of freedom and enlightenment to large parts of the world that would not likely have developed them otherwise. If pre-Columbian America was such a paradise, Dinesh asks, why don't people go back to living that way now?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fascinating Podcast
Reservation Dogs with Rev Sonya Brown - Fascinating Season 7

The Fascinating Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 82:57


What happens when you make a TV show about Native Americans with a Native show runner and an all-Native writers' room? You get the unparalleled new show Reservation Dogs. Rev. Sonya Brown (Dine/Navajo) joins us to dive into this groundbreaking show.

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs
Episode 333: Charles Robinson + Indigenous Peoples' Day

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:17


My friend Charles Robinson, founder of The Red Road, joins us today to celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day, to teach us about Native American culture, faith, and what we can do to help our neighbors. Do you have questions for Charles and his wife Siouxsan? SUBMIT THEM HERE BEFORE NOVEMBER 1. CLICK HERE to give to The Red Road! . . . . . Pre-order my first kids' book What Sound Fun To You today! https://whatsoundsfuntoyou.com/ . . . . . Sign up to receive the AFD Week In Review email and ask questions to future guests! #thatsoundsfunpodcast . . . . . Thank you to our partners! Stamps: Save time and money with Stamps.com. There's NO risk. And with my promo code, THATSOUNDSFUN, you get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. No long-term commitments or contracts. Third Love: Right now, you can get 20% off your first order at THIRDLOVE.com/SOUNDSFUN. Rothy's: Right now, you can get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/SOUNDSFUN.

Keepin It 100 with Konnan
K100Talks...Dave Chappelle's new Netflix special

Keepin It 100 with Konnan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 22:42


On the sixth episode of K100Talks...the crew discusses Dave Chappelle's new Netflix stand up special, and the backlash from the transgender community, plus GLAAD, the executive producer of "Dear White People," and more. Plus, stand up yesterday vs. today, Tommy Dreamer's situation, an issue on Vince Russo's YouTube, Latino and Latinx, and Native American inspired sports team names!Get Interactive on Twitter @Konnan5150 @TheRealDisco @MaskedRepublic @JFFeeney3rd @TheCCNetwork1 @K100Konnan Check out our Patreon site at Konnan.me and Patreon.com/Konnan for extra audio, FULL AD FREE episodes, exclusive video, listener roundtable discussion shows, weekly watch-a-longs, call in shows with Konnan and DI, plus so much more!