The Literary Life Podcast

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A podcast exploring all aspects of a life cultivated by books and stories.

Angelina Stanford and Cindy Rollins


    • Sep 27, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • every other week NEW EPISODES
    • 1h 26m AVG DURATION
    • 143 EPISODES

    4.8 from 582 ratings Listeners of The Literary Life Podcast that love the show mention: angelina, cindy rollins, education i never, thomas banks, charlotte mason, literary life podcast, start listening today, per usual, cyndi, stanford, literature, want to read, homeschooling, pt, beware, book club, gracious, studied, joining, classics.



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    Latest episodes from The Literary Life Podcast

    Episode 142: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Book 2, Ch. 6-9

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 99:09


    Welcome back to The Literary Life this week and the continuation of our series on Hard Times by Charles Dickens. After some autumnal chit-chat, our hosts Angelina, Cindy, and Thomas dive into the plot of the end of Book 2. They open discussing Stephen's fate and Tom Gradgrind's destructive, devouring nature. They highlight Mrs. Sparsit and her similarities to a harpy and other imagery surrounding her denoting evil. Some other ideas discussed are good intentions with bad results, the concept of the fallen woman in Victorian times, Louisa's homecoming and confession, and the failure of a formula in imparting virtue. Head over to MorningTimeforMoms.com to get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” Commonplace Quotes: Beware of the superficial knowledge of cold facts. Beware of sinful ratiocination, for it kills the heart, and when heart and mind have died in a man, there art cannot dwell. Caspar David Friedrich I don't think they are noticeably worse at reading or writing than they were all those decades ago, though they're less likely to have a lot of experience with the standard academic essay (introduction, three major points, conclusion) — which I do not see as a major deficiency. That kind of essay was never more than a highly imperfect tool for teaching students how to read carefully and write about what they have read, and, frankly, I believe that over the years I have come up with some better ones. Alan Jacobs, from Snakes and Ladders The hours of unsponsored, uninspected, perhaps even forbidden, reading, the ramblings, and the “long, long thoughts” in which those of luckier generations first discovered literature and nature and themselves are a thing of the past. C. S. Lewis, from “Lilies that Fester” A Daughter of Eve by Christina Rossetti A fool I was to sleep at noon,  And wake when night is chilly  Beneath the comfortless cold moon;  A fool to pluck my rose too soon,  A fool to snap my lily.  My garden-plot I have not kept;  Faded and all-forsaken,  I weep as I have never wept:  Oh it was summer when I slept,  It's winter now I waken.  Talk what you please of future spring  And sun-warm'd sweet to-morrow:—  Stripp'd bare of hope and everything,  No more to laugh, no more to sing,  I sit alone with sorrow.  Book List: The World's Last Night: and Other Essays by C. S. Lewis Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy Esther Waters by George Moore Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell Pictures from Italy by Charles Dickens Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 141: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Book 2, Ch. 1-5

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 71:50


    The Literary Life Podcast's new episode this week continues our series on Hard Times by Charles Dickens. After Angelina ties up a few loose ends from Book 1, Thomas leads us into Book 2 and introduces us to Mr. Harthouse. Cindy highlights the dangers of not allowing children learn self-government as illustrated in the character of Tom Gradgrind. They then look again at Stephen Blackpool and his position as the martyr in the story. Our hosts also discuss Dickens' focus on demonstrating the problems facing people in his day, not moralizing or trying to present solutions. Head over to MorningTimeforMoms.com to get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: It is ill for a country, Gentlemen – I fear we must acknowledge it – when her destiny passes into the guidance of professors. Arthur Quiller-Couch, from “Studies in Literature” It is the old story. Utilitarian education is profoundly immoral in that it defrauds a child of the associations which should give him intellectual atmosphere. Charlotte Mason That evil may spring from the imagination, as from everything except the perfect love of God cannot be denied. But infinitely worse evils would be the result of its absence. Selfishness, avarice, sensuality, cruelty, would flourish tenfold; and the power of Satan would be well established ere some children had begun to choose. Those who would quell the apparently lawless tossing of the spirit, called the youthful imagination, would suppress all that is to grow out of it. They fear the enthusiasm they never felt; and instead of cherishing this divine thing, instead of giving it room and air for healthful growth, they would crush and confine it–with but one result of their victorious endeavors–imposthume, fever, and corruption. And the disastrous consequences would soon appear in the intellect likewise which they worship. Kill that whence spring the crude fancies and wild day-dreams of the young, and you will never lead them beyond dull facts–dull because their relations to each other, and the one life that works in them all, must remain undiscovered. Whoever would have his children avoid this arid region will do well to allow no teacher to approach them–not even of mathematics–who has no imagination. George MacDonald The Golf Links by Sarah Norcliffe Cleghorn The golf links lie so near the mill That almost every day  The laboring children can look out And see the men at play. Book List: Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason A Dish of Orts by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 140: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Book 1, Ch. 11-16

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 81:45


    Today on The Literary Life Podcast, our hosts continue their series on Charles Dickens' Hard Times. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas open the conversation with their commonplace quotes, which all lead into the discussion of Hard Times. They start out highlighting once again the fairytale and allegory aspects of this story, including the setting of Coketown. Together they talk about the two sides of Sissy Jupe's education, along with the situations and portrayals of the other key characters in this section. A large part of the discussions centers around the ideas of input and output versus sowing and reaping. Purchase the recordings of our 2022 Back to School Conference at MorningTimeforMoms.com. That is also where you can get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: The ways of authorship are dusty and stony, and the stones are only too handy for throwing at the few that, deservedly or undeservedly, have made a name. Andrew Lang, from “How to Fail in Literature” To taboo knowledge is not to secure innocence. We must remember that ignorance is not innocence, and also that ignorance is the parent of insatiable curiosity. Charlotte Mason Early in 1851, Dickens suggested in Household Words that a second exhibition be held of “England's sins and negligences.” When he finally went to the Crystal Palace, he described it as “terrible duffery.” He wrote in July 1851, “I find I am used up by the exhibition. I don't say there is nothing in it. There is too much. I have only been twice. So many things bewildered me. I have a natural horror of sights, and the fusion of so many sights in one has not decreased it. I'm not sure that I have seen anything but the fountain and perhaps the Amazon. It is a dreadful thing to be obliged to be false, but when anyone says, ‘Have you seen…?' I say, ‘Yes', because if I don't he'll explain it, and I can't bear that. Julia Baird, quoting Charles Dickens from “Ode On a Distant Prospect of Clapham Academy” by Thomas Hood Ah me! those old familiar bounds!  That classic house, those classic grounds  My pensive thought recalls!  What tender urchins now confine,  What little captives now repine,  Within yon irksome walls?  Ay, that's the very house! I know  Its ugly windows, ten a-row!  Its chimneys in the rear!  And there's the iron rod so high,  That drew the thunder from the sky  And turn'd our table-beer! There I was birch'd! there I was bred!  There like a little Adam fed  From Learning's woeful tree!  The weary tasks I used to con!—  The hopeless leaves I wept upon!—  Most fruitless leaves to me!— The summon'd class!—the awful bow!—  I wonder who is master now  And wholesome anguish sheds!  How many ushers now employs,  How many maids to see the boys  Have nothing in their heads! Book List: Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason The Ink Black Heart (Cormoran Strike Book 6) by Robert Galbraith Victoria: The Queen by Julia Baird Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 139: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Bk. 1, Ch. 1-10

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 108:17


    On this week's episode of The Literary Life, we begin our fall series on Charles Dickens' Hard Times. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas start out the book chat by covering some of the differences between this book and other novels of his, as well as how to approach Dickens in general. They also discuss misrepresentations of Dickens as a social reformer, the allegorical and fairy tale elements of his works, and what keys to look for as you read through Hard Times. Thomas talks about Utilitarianism in educational reform, and Cindy highlights the ideas of Charlotte Mason in connection with Victorian times. Angelina brings out the references to imagination in these first chapters and the danger of distorting the child's imagination. Purchase the recordings of our 2022 Back to School Conference at MorningTimeforMoms.com. That is also where you can get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Thomas' webinar on Evelyn Waugh or register for Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: But already the Utilitarian citadel had been more heavily bombarded on the other side by and lonely and unlettered man of genius. The rise of Dickens is like the rising of a vast mob. This is not only because his tales are indeed as crowded and populous as towns: for truly it was not so much that Dickens appeared as that as hundred Dickens characters appeared. G. K. Chesterton, from The Victorian Age in Literature The first qualification for judging any piece of workmanship from a corkscrew to a cathedral is to know what it is–what it was intended to do and how it is meant to be used. C. S. Lewis, from A Preface to Paradise Lost Never be without a really good book on hand. If you find yourself sinking to a dull, commonplace level, with nothing particular to say, the reason is probably that you are not reading, and therefore, not thinking. Charlotte Mason, as quoted by Essex Cholmondeley in The Story of Charlotte Mason from “Among School Children” by William Butler Yeats Labour is blossoming or dancing where The body is not bruised to pleasure soul, Nor beauty born out of its own despair, Nor blear-eyed wisdom out of midnight oil. O chestnut tree, great rooted blossomer, Are you the leaf, the blossom or the bole? O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, How can we know the dancer from the dance? Book List: Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell The Life of Our Lord by Charles Dickens A Child's History of England by Charles Dickens “Why Should Businessmen Read Great Literature?” by Vigen Guroian “The Fantastic Imagination” by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 139: "Hard Times" by Charles Dickens, Bk. 1, Ch. 1-10

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 108:17


    On this week's episode of The Literary Life, we begin our fall series on Charles Dickens' Hard Times. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas start out the book chat by covering some of the differences between this book and other novels of his, as well as how to approach Dickens in general. They also discuss misrepresentations of Dickens as a social reformer, the allegorical and fairy tale elements of his works, and what keys to look for as you read through Hard Times. Thomas talks about Utilitarianism in educational reform, and Cindy highlights the ideas of Charlotte Mason in connection with Victorian times. Angelina brings out the references to imagination in these first chapters and the danger of distorting the child's imagination. Purchase the recordings of our 2022 Back to School Conference at MorningTimeforMoms.com. That is also where you can get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Thomas' webinar on Evelyn Waugh or register for Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: But already the Utilitarian citadel had been more heavily bombarded on the other side by and lonely and unlettered man of genius. The rise of Dickens is like the rising of a vast mob. This is not only because his tales are indeed as crowded and populous as towns: for truly it was not so much that Dickens appeared as that as hundred Dickens characters appeared. G. K. Chesterton, from The Victorian Age in Literature The first qualification for judging any piece of workmanship from a corkscrew to a cathedral is to know what it is–what it was intended to do and how it is meant to be used. C. S. Lewis, from A Preface to Paradise Lost Never be without a really good book on hand. If you find yourself sinking to a dull, commonplace level, with nothing particular to say, the reason is probably that you are not reading, and therefore, not thinking. Charlotte Mason, as quoted by Essex Cholmondeley in The Story of Charlotte Mason from “Among School Children” by William Butler Yeats Labour is blossoming or dancing where The body is not bruised to pleasure soul, Nor beauty born out of its own despair, Nor blear-eyed wisdom out of midnight oil. O chestnut tree, great rooted blossomer, Are you the leaf, the blossom or the bole? O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, How can we know the dancer from the dance? Book List: Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell The Life of Our Lord by Charles Dickens A Child's History of England by Charles Dickens “Why Should Businessmen Read Great Literature?” by Vigen Guroian “The Fantastic Imagination” by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 138: In Search of the Austen Adaptation: Sense and Sensibility

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 109:10


    Today on The Literary Life Podcast we bring you another fun episode in our “In Search of the Austen Adaptation” series. Hosts Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks are joined by resident film aficionado, Atlee Northmore to discuss film adaptations on Sense and Sensibility. The conversation opens by revisiting the question of what makes a good adaptation of a book when translating it for the screen. They talk about the challenges of showing modern audiences the characters and situations as Jane Austen meant them to be understood. Atlee gives a brief overview of the lesser known film adaptations, as well as a more in depth discussion of the 1995 and 2008 versions. You can access the PDF he created with links to watch here. You are not too late to join in this year's Back to School Online Conference! Go to MorningTimeforMoms.com to register and get in on the great talks, always live or later! Commonplace Quotes: Sound principles that are old may easily be laid on the shelf and forgotten, unless in each successive generation a few industrious people can be found who will take the trouble to draw them forth from the storehouse. Thomas Ruper, as quoted by Karen Glass His senile fury was not exhausted by endless repetition. Eric Linklater ‘Remember, no one is made up of one fault, everyone is much greater than all his faults,' and then she would add with a smile: ‘I find it much easier to put up with people's faults than with their virtues!' Charlotte Mason, as quoted by Essex Cholmondeley The great abstract nouns of the classical English moralists are unblushingly and uncompromisingly used: good sense, courage, contentment, fortitude, some duty neglected, some failing indulged, impropriety, indelicacy, generous candor, blameable distrust, just humiliation, vanity, folly, ignorance, reason. These are the concepts by which Jane Austen grasps the world. In her we still breathe the air of the Rambler and Idler. All is hard, clear, definable; by some modern standards, even naïvely so. The hardness is, of course, for oneself, not for one's neighbours. It reveals to Marianne her want ‘of kindness' and shows Emma that her behaviour has been ‘unfeeling'. Contrasted with the world of modern fiction, Jane Austen's is at once less soft and less cruel. C. S. Lewis Selection from With a Guitar, To Jane by Percy Shelley Ariel to Miranda:-- Take This slave of music, for the sake Of him who is the slave of thee; And teach it all the harmony In which thou canst, and only thou, Make the delighted spirit glow, Till joy denies itself again And, too intense, is turned to pain. For by permission and command Of thine own Prince Ferdinand, Poor Ariel sends this silent token Of more than ever can be spoken; Your guardian spirit, Ariel, who From life to life must still pursue Your happiness,-- for thus alone Can Ariel ever find his own. From Prospero's enchanted cell, As the mighty verses tell, To the throne of Naples he Lit you o'er the trackless sea, Flitting on, your prow before, Like a living meteor. When you die, the silent Moon In her interlunar swoon Is not sadder in her cell Than deserted Ariel. Book List: In Vital Harmony by Karen Glass The Story of Charlotte Mason by Essex Cholmondeley Robert the Bruce by Eric Linklater C. S. Lewis' Selected Literary Essays edited by Walter Hooper Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 137: Why Pastors Should Read Fiction

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 116:04


    This week on The Literary Life podcast with Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks, we have a very special episode for you. Our hosts are joined by guests Dan Bunting and Anthony Dodgers, both of whom are pastors, for a discussion on why pastors should read fiction books. Dan is also host of the the Reading the Psalms podcast. Angelina starts off the conversation by asking why these men would prioritize taking literature classes. Anthony shares about his own literary life journey and how rediscovering literature has helped him personally. Dan talks about the book club that he and a couple of his pastor friends have and what kinds of books they read together. They discuss many other deep topics and crucial questions that we hope will be encouraging and thought-provoking to everyone who listens to and shares this episode. Join us for the 2022 Back to School Conference, “Education: Myths and Legends” happening live online this August 1st-6th. Our special guest speakers will be Lynn Bruce and Caitlin Beauchamp, along with our hosts Cindy Rollins, Angelina Stanford and Thomas Banks. Learn more and register today at Morning Time for Moms. Commonplace Quotes: If education is beaten by training, civilization dies. C. S. Lewis, from “Our English Syllabus” How am I a hog and me both? Flannery O'Connor He who has done his best for his own time has lived for all times. Freidrich Schiller Whoever wants to become a Christian, must first become a poet. St. Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia It is hard to have patience with those Jeremiahs, in press or pulpit, who warn us that we are “relapsing into paganism”. It might be rather fun if we were. It would be pleasant to see some future Prime Minister trying to kill a large and lively milk-white bull in Westminster Hall. But we shan't. What lurks behind such idle prophecies, if they are anything but careless language, is the false idea that the historical process allows mere reversal; that Europe can come out of Christianity “by the same door as in she went”, and find herself back where she was. It is not what happens. A post-Christian man is not a Pagan; you might as well think that a married woman recovers her virginity by divorce. The post-Christian is cut off from the Christian past, and therefore doubly from the Pagan past. C. S. Lewis, from “De Descriptione Temporum” A Boy in Church by Robert Graves ‘Gabble-gabble, . . . brethren, . . . gabble-gabble!'     My window frames forest and heather. I hardly hear the tuneful babble,     Not knowing nor much caring whether The text is praise or exhortation, Prayer or thanksgiving, or damnation.   Outside it blows wetter and wetter,     The tossing trees never stay still. I shift my elbows to catch better     The full round sweep of heathered hill. The tortured copse bends to and fro In silence like a shadow-show.   The parson's voice runs like a river     Over smooth rocks, I like this church: The pews are staid, they never shiver,     They never bend or sway or lurch. ‘Prayer,' says the kind voice, ‘is a chain That draws down Grace from Heaven again.'   I add the hymns up, over and over,     Until there's not the least mistake. Seven-seventy-one. (Look! there's a plover!     It's gone!) Who's that Saint by the lake? The red light from his mantle passes Across the broad memorial brasses.   It's pleasant here for dreams and thinking,     Lolling and letting reason nod, With ugly serious people linking     Sad prayers to a forgiving God . . . . But a dumb blast sets the trees swaying With furious zeal like madmen praying. Put Out More Flags by Evelyn Waugh Asterix Comics by René Goscinny Tin Tin by Herge Sigrid Undset Giants in the Earth by Ole Rolvaag Roald Dahl A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle John Donne George Herbert The Complete Stories by Flannery O'Connor The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John le Carré Graham Greene Alfred Lord Tennyson The New Oxford Book of Christian Verse edited by Donald Davie Waiting on the Word by Malcolm Guite Word in the Wilderness by Malcolm Guite Neil Gaiman Bill Bryson Ursula Le Guin Terry Pratchett Reflections on the Psalms by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 136: Two for '22 Reading Challenge Check-In

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 101:15


    This week on The Literary Life podcast our hosts give an update on their progress with the “Two for '22” Literary Life Reading Challenge. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share their commonplace quotes, then begin going over each category and talking about their progress and the various books they have chosen so far. Scroll down in the show notes for all the book titles mentioned and affiliate links to them on Amazon. Download the adult reading challenge PDF here, and the kids' reading challenge PDF here. The Literary Life Commonplace Books published by Blue Sky Daisies are always available for purchase, as well! Join us for the 2022 Back to School Conference, “Education: Myths and Legends” happening live online this August 1st-6th. Our special guest speakers will be Lynn Bruce and Caitlin Beauchamp, along with our hosts Cindy Rollins, Angelina Stanford and Thomas Banks. Learn more and register today at Morning Time for Moms. Check out Episode 3: The Importance of the Detective Novel. Commonplace Quotes: Nobody seems great to his dwarf. Par Lagerkvist What is true of nature is also true of freedom. The half-baked Rousseau-ism in which most of us have been brought up has given us a subconscious notion that the free act is the untrained act. But of course, freedom has nothing to do with the lack of training. We are not free to move until we have learned ot walk. We are not free to express ourselves musically until we have learned music. We are not capable of free thought unless we can think. Similarly, free speech cannot have anything to do with the mumbling and grousing of the ego. Free speech is cultivated and precise speech, which means that there are far too many people who are neither capable of it nor would know if they had lost it. A group of individuals who retain the power and desire of genuine communication is a society. An aggregate of egos is a mob. Northrop Frye He had had a choice, after all. The army had been keen to keep him, even with half his leg missing. Friends of friends had offered everything from management roles in the close protection industry to business partnerships, but the itch to detect, solve, and reimpose order on the moral universe could not be extinguished in him. He doubted it ever would be. Robert Galbraith The Composer by W. H. Auden All the others translate: the painter sketches A visible world to love or reject; Rummaging into his living, the poet fetches The images out that hurt and connect. From Life to Art by painstaking adaption Relying on us to cover the rift; Only your notes are pure contraption, Only your song is an absolute gift. Pour out your presence, O delight, cascading The falls of the knee and the weirs of the spine, Our climate of silence and doubt invading; You, alone, alone, O imaginary song, Are unable to say an existence is wrong, And pour out your forgiveness like a wine. Book List: The Dwarf by Par Lagerkvist The Well-Tempered Critic by Northrop Frye Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason Anatomy of Criticism by Northrop Frye Lethal White by Robert Galbraith Poet's Corner by John Lithgow Rob Roy by Sir Walter Scott The Wise Woman by George MacDonald The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald Paradise Lost by John Milton The Wood Beyond the World by William Morris Phantastes by George MacDonald Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott The Bride of Lammermoor by Sir Walter Scott Evelina by Fanny Burney The Boys by Ron and Clint Howard The Most Reluctant Convert by David C. Downing Dorothy L. Sayers by Colin Duriez Dracula by Bram Stoker Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell Silas Marner by George Eliot Hard Times by Charles Dickens David Copperfield by Charles Dickens Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë An Old Man's Love by Anthony Trollope She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare Timon of Athens by Williams Shakespeare The Trojan Women by Euripedes Antigone by Sophocles The Rehearsal by George Villiers The Great Divorce by C. S. Lewis Til We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis by Jason M. Baxter The Oxford Inklings by Colin Duriez Anxious People by Fredrik Backman Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim The Shepherd's Life by James Rebanks Wintering by Katherine May The Eternal Husband by Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Aeneid by Virgil A Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey The Vision of the Anointed by Thomas Sowell The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards DC Smith Investigation Series by Peter Grainger Nero Wolfe Series by Rex Stout Anthony Horowitz Simon Serrailler Series by Susan Hill P. D. James The Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley The Leavenworth Case by Anna Catherine Green Trent's Last Case by E. C. Bentley David Bentley Hart Joseph Epstein Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 135: The Literary Life of Jone Rose

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 89:00


    Welcome back to this long awaited return of The Literary Life podcast and a new “Literary Life of…” interview episode with Angelina, Cindy and their guest Jone Rose. Jone is a “super-fan” of the podcast and is a homeschool mom living in North Carolina. Today Angelina starts off the interview asking about Jone's childhood reading life and school experience. Jone shares how her own adult literary education didn't start until after she had been homeschooling her own children for several years. In addition to discussing the redemption of Jone's own education, they talk about what her reading life looks like now, how narration helps make connections and increase understanding, asking better questions, and so much more! Join us for the 2022 Back to School Conference, “Education: Myths and Legends” happening live online this August 1st-6th. Our special guest speakers will be Lynn Bruce and Caitlin Beauchamp, along with our hosts Cindy Rollins, Angelina Stanford and Thomas Banks. Learn more and register today at Morning Time for Moms. Commonplace Quotes: Surely this great writer would provide me with a definitive definition which showed me all the answers. He didn't, and I was naive to expect him to. Generally, what is more important than getting watertight answers is learning to ask the right questions. Madeleine L'Engle Stories are able to help us to become more whole, to become named; and naming is one of the impulses behind all art, to give a name to the cosmos we see, despite all the chaos. Madeleine L'Engle I am inclined to think that her work is in danger of being overlaid by too many interpreters and the simplicity of her message needs preserving. Essex Cholmondeley from Ode: Intimations of Immortality by William Wordsworth Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower; We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind; In the primal sympathy Which having been must ever be; In the soothing thoughts that spring Out of human suffering; In the faith that looks through death, In years that bring the philosophic mind. Book List: Walking on Water by Madeleine L'Engle What Is Art? by Leo Tolstoy The Story of Charlotte Mason by Essex Cholmondeley Brother Cadfael Series by Ellis Peters The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C. S. Lewis The Magician's Nephew by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 134: “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, Part 4

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 74:31


    In this week's episode of The Literary Life, our hosts wrap up their series on The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Angelina, Thomas and Cindy talk about these final chapters of the book, covering some key ideas such as the siren song of the Sea Rat, Toad's inability to see himself rightly, the echoes of Homer's Odyssey, examples of bad discussion questions, and what makes this such a lasting book. It's not too late to join Cindy's Summer Discipleship group! Head over the MorningTimeforMoms.com to register. Thomas will be teaching an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: Secrets had an immense attraction for him, because he never could keep one. Kenneth Grahame It is a reasonable hope that those who heard you in Oxford, many will understand henceforth that when the old poets made some virtue their theme, they were not teaching, but adoring, and that which we take for the didactic is often the enchanted. C. S. Lewis A childhood without books–that would be no childhood. That would be like being shut out from the enchanted place where you can go and find the rarest kind of joy. Astrid Lindgren Mr. Toad's Song by Kenneth Grahame The world has held great Heroes, As history-books have showed; But never a name to go down to fame Compared with that of Toad! The clever men at Oxford Know all that there is to be knowed. But they none of them knew one half as much As intelligent Mr. Toad! The animals sat in the Ark and cried, Their tears in torrents flowed. Who was it said, ” There's land ahead ” ? Encouraging Mr. Toad! The Army all saluted As they marched along the road. Was it the King? Or Kitchener? No. It was Mr. Toad! The Queen and her Ladies-in-waiting Sat at the window and sewed. She cried, ” Look! who's that handsome man? “ They answered, ” Mr. Toad. “ Book List: Preface to Paradise Lost by C. S. Lewis Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren Seacrow Island by Astrid Lindgren Wild Wood by Jan Needle (not a recommendation) The Golden Age by Kenneth Grahame Pagan Papers by Kenneth Grahame Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 133: “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, Part 3

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 80:39


    On The Literary Life podcast this week, our hosts are joined in their discussion of The Wind in the Willows by Kelly Cumbee. Angelina, Cindy, Thomas and Kelly talk about chapters 7-8, focusing special attention on a section of this book that presents a potential problem for some readers. Angelina opens with background on the Enlightenment and Romanticism, the concept of “the Numinous,” and the popularity of the Pan character in Edwardian times. Thomas gives us a classical picture of who Pan was in mythology. Kelly then speaks to the Medieval understanding of the figure of Pan and the pastoral tradition along with their connections with Christ. They also address concerns over neo-paganism in relation to this book. If you want more discussion on mythology in literature, tune in to Episode 60: Why Read Pagan Myths. Cindy's 2022 Morning Time for Moms Summer Discipleship group is now open for registration. The theme this year is “Laughter and Lament.” Head over to morningtimeformoms.com to find out more and sign up! Thomas will be teaching an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more about his classes, as well as Kelly Cumbee's classes, and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: Dictionaries are like watches. The worst is better than none, and the best cannot be expected to go quite true. Samuel Johnson “Here I am, sitting at a little oak table where in old times possibly some fair lady sat to pen, with much thought and many blushes, her ill-spelt love letter, and writing in my diary in shorthand all that has happened since I closed it last. It is the nineteenth century up-to-date with a vengeance. And yet, unless my senses deceive me, the old centuries had, and have, powers of their own which mere ‘modernity' cannot kill.” Bram Stoker This malady of unbelief, again, is common to serious minds, educated to examine all things before they know the things they criticise by the slow, sure process of assimilating ideas. If we would but receive it, we are not capable of examining that which we do not know; and knowledge is the result of a slow, involuntary process, impossible to a mind in the critical attitude. Let us who teach spend time in the endeavour to lay proper and abundant nutriment before the young, rather than in leading them to criticise and examine every morsel of knowledge that comes their way. Who could live if every mouthful of bodily food were held up on a fork for critical examination before it be eaten? Charlotte Mason Suppose you were told that there was a tiger in the next room: you would know that you were in danger and would probably feel fear. But if you were told “There is a ghost in the next room,” and believed it, you would feel, indeed, what is often called fear, but of a different kind. It would not be based on the knowledge of danger, for no one is primarily afraid of what a ghost may do to him, but of the mere fact that it is a ghost. It is “uncanny” rather than dangerous, and the special kind of fear it excites may be called Dread. With the Uncanny one has reached the fringes of the Numinous. Now suppose that you were told simply “There is a might spirit in the room” and believed it. Your feelings would then be even less like the mere fear of danger: but the disturbance would be profound. You would feel wonder and a certain shrinking–described as awe, and the object which excites it is the Numinous. C. S. Lewis To Find God by Robert Herrick Weigh me the fire; or canst thou find A way to measure out the wind? Distinguish all those floods that are Mixed in that wat'ry theater, And taste thou them as saltless there, As in their channel first they were.    Tell me the people that do keep Within the kingdoms of the deep; Or fetch me back that cloud again, Beshivered into seeds of rain. Tell me the motes, dust, sands, and spears Of corn, when summer shakes his ears; Show me that world of stars, and whence They noiseless spill their influence. This if thou canst; then show me Him That rides the glorious cherubim. Book List: Dracula by Bram Stoker Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason The Problem of Pain by C. S. Lewis Letters to Children by C. S. Lewis The Great God Pan by Arthur Machen Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 132: “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, Part 2

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 98:24


    Today on The Literary Life podcast, our hosts continue their discussion of The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas kick off the book discussion by clarifying some confusion over the definition of a picaresque novel. They share some thoughts on the how stories communicate to us in a unique way that cannot easily be expressed in any other way. Other ideas brought up in this episode are the following: the home as a refuge from the world, the centrality of food and drink, friendship with an addict, the problem of trying to use books to teach virtue, and more! Cindy's 2022 Morning Time for Moms Summer Discipleship group is now open for registration. The theme this year is “Laughter and Lament.” Head over to morningtimeformoms.com to find out more and sign up! Thomas will be teaching a webinar on Napoleon Bonaparte later this month, as well as an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: A work of art speaks a truth we can't speak outright: the truth of the human experience. Love, joy, grief, guilt, beauty–no words can communicate these. We can only represent them in stories and pictures and songs. Art is the way we speak the meaning of our lives. Andrew Klavan He is led more by his ears than his understanding, taking the sound of words for their true sense…His ill-luck is not so much in being a fool, as in being put to such pains to express it to the world, for what in others is natural, in him (with much ado) is artificial. Thomas Overbury, in “A Mere Scholar” Granted that the average man may live for seventy years, it is a fallacy to assume that his life from sixty to seventy is more important than his life from five to fifteen. Children are not merely people: they are the only really living people that have been left to us in an over-weary world. Any normal child will instinctively to agree with your own American poet, Walt Whitman, when he said: “To me every house of the day and night is an unspeakably perfect miracle.” In my tales about children, I have tried to show that their simple acceptance of the mood of wonderment, their readiness to welcome a perfect miracle at any hour of the day or night, is a think more precious than any of the laboured acquisition of adult mankind… Kenneth Grahame To Althea, from Prison by Richard Lovelace When Love with unconfinèd wings  Hovers within my Gates,  And my divine Althea brings  To whisper at the Grates;  When I lie tangled in her hair,  And fettered to her eye,  The Gods that wanton in the Air,  Know no such Liberty.  When flowing Cups run swiftly round  With no allaying Thames,  Our careless heads with Roses bound,  Our hearts with Loyal Flames;  When thirsty grief in Wine we steep,  When Healths and draughts go free,  Fishes that tipple in the Deep  Know no such Liberty.  When (like committed linnets) I  With shriller throat shall sing  The sweetness, Mercy, Majesty,  And glories of my King;  When I shall voice aloud how good  He is, how Great should be,  Enlargèd Winds, that curl the Flood,  Know no such Liberty.  Stone Walls do not a Prison make,  Nor Iron bars a Cage;  Minds innocent and quiet take  That for an Hermitage.  If I have freedom in my Love,  And in my soul am free,  Angels alone that soar above,  Enjoy such Liberty. Book List: The Truth and Beauty by Andrew Klavan First Whisper of “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry “On Three Ways of Writing for Children” by C. S. Lewis Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh Children and Books by Mayhill Arbuthnot and Zena Sutherland The Adventure of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens History of Tom Jones by Henry Fielding Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 131: “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, Part 1

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 99:44


    Grahame. Angelina, Thomas and Cindy set out to introduce this book in its historical and literary context, as well as address a few of the challenges people may have on their first reading of The Wind in the Willows. They also discuss some other pertinent topics such as Edwardian cultural concerns, the form of this novel, the rebirth images in the opening chapters, and the echoes of this book in other literature. Cindy's 2022 Morning Time for Moms Summer Discipleship group is now open for registration. The theme this year is “Laughter and Lament.” Head over to morningtimeformoms.com to find out more and sign up! Thomas will be teaching a webinar on Napoleon Bonaparte later this month, as well as an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: There is no vice so simple but assumes/ Some mark of virtue on his outward parts. William Shakespeare, from The Merchant of Venice A boat will not answer to the rudder unless it is in motion. The poet can work upon us only as long as we are kept on the move. C. S. Lewis, from his Preface to Paradise Lost One does not argue about The Wind in the Willows. The young man gives it to the girl with whom he is in love, and, if she does not like it, asks her to return his letters. The older man tries it on his nephew, and alters his will accordingly. The book is a test of character. We can't criticize it, because it is criticizing us. But I must give you one word of warning. When you sit down to it, don't be so ridiculous as to suppose that you are sitting in judgement on my taste, or on the art of Kenneth Grahame. You are merely sitting in judgment on yourself. You may be worth: I don't know, but it is you who are on trial. A. A. Milne Sonnet to the River Otter by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Dear native brook! wild streamlet of the West! How many various-fated years have passed, What happy and what mournful hours, since last I skimmed the smooth thin stone along thy breast, Numbering its light leaps! Yet so deep impressed Sink the sweet scenes of childhood, that mine eyes I never shut amid the sunny ray, But straight with all their tints thy waters rise, Thy crossing plank, thy marge with willows grey, And bedded sand that, veined with various dyes, Gleamed through thy bright transparence! On my way, Visions of childhood! oft have ye beguiled Lone manhood's cares, yet waking fondest sighs: Ah! that once more I were a careless child! Book List: The Golden Age by Kenneth Grahame Dream Days by Kenneth Grahame The Five Children and It by Edith Nesbit Kim by Rudyard Kipling Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens by J. M. Barrie Cautionary Tales for Children by Hilaire Belloc A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy Mary Poppins by P. L. Travers P. G. Wodehouse Leisure the Basis of Culture by Josef Pieper Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry Kenneth Grahame: A Biography by Peter Green   Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 130: "The Enchanted April" Film Adaptations

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 97:23


    Our Literary Life podcast hosts are back this week, along with Atlee Northmore, to wrap up their discussion of The Enchanted April with some thoughts on the various film adaptations of this enchanting book. After expanding on their commonplace quotes, Angelina, Cindy, Thomas and Atlee start the film talk with the “dreadful” 1935 RKO version. Then they move on to dig in to how Enchanted April was and brought to the big screen in 1991 and why it worked so well as an adaptation of the novel. Our next book will be The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Graham, starting May 17th, so be sure to join us for that as well! Cindy's 2022 Morning Time for Moms Summer Discipleship group is now open for registration. The theme this year is “Laughter and Lament.” Head over to morningtimeformoms.com to find out more and sign up! Thomas will be teaching an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: No matter how much experience we may gather in life, we can never in life get the dimension of experience that the imagination gives us. Only the arts and sciences can do that; and of these, only literature gives us the whole sweep and range of human imagination as it sees itself. It seems to be very difficult for many people to understand the reality and intensity of literary experience. Northrop Frye Education is always an individual endeavor. In terms of a future renewal, much of it will depend on a commitment to individualism, something that has been much maligned in recent years. We hear so much trendy, tedious talk about how bad individualism is and how we need to think in terms of “the group.” The problem is that the group usually offers conformity, not genuine community. Morris Berman And yet, we are still being taught that fairy tales and myths are to be discarded as soon as we are old enough to understand “reality.” I received a disturbed and angry letter from a young mother who told me that a friend of hers with young children gave them only instructive books. She wasn't going to allow their minds to be polluted with fairy tales. They were going to be taught the “real world.” This attitude is a victory for the powers of this world. A friend of mine, a fine storyteller, remarked to me, “Jesus was not a theologian. He was a God Who told stories.” Yes, God Who told stories. Madeleine L'Engle The general fate of sects is to obtain a high reputation for sanctity while they are oppressed, and to lose it as soon as they become powerful. Thomas Macaulay To Italy by Percy Shelley As the sunrise to the night, As the north wind to the clouds, As the earthquake's fiery flight, Ruining mountain solitudes, Everlasting Italy, Be those hopes and fears on thee. Book List: The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim The Educated Imagination by Northrop Frye The Twilight of American Culture by Morris Berman Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry Walking on Water by Madeleine L'Engle A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle The History of England by Thomas Macaulay Tea with the Dames documentary Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 129: “The Enchanted April” by Elizabeth von Arnim, Ch. 12-22

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 91:35


    This week on The Literary Life podcatst, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas continue their discussion of The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim, on chapters 12-22. Angelina and Thomas begin the conversation sharing some thoughts on modern literature and why we don't hear of modern authors like Elizabeth von Arnim among “the academy.” Cindy tells us what stood out to her most in the second half of the book and the surprising turns von Arnim takes in the storyline. Angelina and Thomas also talk about the types of books they enjoy, and Cindy brings up the longings and fears of the various characters. The metaphors and fairy tale concepts found in this book are, of course, major topics of the conversation. Return next week when we will discuss the film versions of The Enchanted April. Our next book will be The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Graham, starting in May, so be sure to join us for that as well! Cindy's 2022 Morning Time for Moms Summer Discipleship group is now open for registration. The theme this year is “Laughter and Lament.” Head over to morningtimeformoms.com to find out more and sign up! Thomas will be teaching an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: Keeping up with the Joneses was a full time job with my mother and father. It was not until many years later when I lived alone that I realized how much cheaper it was to drag the Joneses down to my level. Quentin Crisp Here is a matter which sometimes causes uneasiness to parents: they are appalled when they think of the casual circumstances and chance people that may have a lasting effect upon their children's characters. But their part is, perhaps, to exercise ordinary prudence and not over-much direction. They have no means of knowing what will reach a child; whether the evil which blows his way may not incline him to good, or whether the too-insistent good may not predispose him to evil. Perhaps the forces of life as they come should be allowed to play upon the child, who is not, be it remembered, a product of educational care, but a person whose spiritual nurture is accomplished by that wind which bloweth whither it listeth. Charlotte Mason, Formation of Character Chaste and ardent eros for the Beautiful is the first task of human life, and falling in love with Beauty is the beginning of every adventure that matters. Timothy Patitsas To be sure, there are limits and patterns governing the transposition of beauty into truth, such that it can never be mapped fully in the reductive way some would insist. It was never my desire to write a truth-first book about the beauty-first approach to ethics. Beauty creates its own structure, a form that may not be perfectly linear and symmetrical, but which is still harmonious and beneficial, and in its odd way, perfectly accurate. Through the surprising order of the beautiful, reason participates in and discloses living mystery as mystery. That is, when it starts with an eros for the beautiful, reason is able to announce to the world what mystery is, that which interprets and changes us, just when we manage to engage with it and interpret it. Timothy Patitsas Summer Dawn by William Morris Pray but one prayer for me 'twixt thy closed lips, Think but one thought of me up in the stars. The summer night waneth, the morning light slips, Faint and grey 'twixt the leaves of the aspen, betwixt the cloud-bars That are patiently waiting there for the dawn: Patient and colourless, though Heaven's gold Waits to float through them along with the sun. Far out in the meadows, above the young corn, The heavy elms wait, and restless and cold The uneasy wind rises; the roses are dun; Through the long twilight they pray for the dawn, Round the lone house in the midst of the corn, Speak but one word to me over the corn, Over the tender, bow'd locks of the corn. Book List: The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim The Ethics of Beauty by Timothy Patitsas Katherine Mansfield Barbara Pym The Narnian by Alan Jacobs Vera by Elizabeth von Arnim Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 128: “The Enchanted April” by Elizabeth von Arnim, Ch. 1-11

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 99:28


    Welcome back to The Literary Life podcast with Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks. This week our hosts begin their discussion of The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim, covering chapters 1-11. Thomas gives some interesting biographical information about von Arnim, and Angelina shares some perspective on appreciating the art and the life of artist. Cindy highlights the fact that we see only caricatures of the women in England, and it isn't until they get to Italy that we begin to see their real selves. Angelina also points out that all the women are on identity quests in this story. Angelina unpacks some of the metaphors in this book and the Dante-esque images, in addition to the key place beauty has in the story. Commonplace Quotes: Whoso maintains that I am humbled now (Who await the Awful Day) is still a liar; I hope to meet my Maker brow to brow And find my own is higher. Frances Cornford, “Epitaph for a Book Reviewer” “(The) sufferer is by definition a customer.” Wendell Berry, from The Art of the Commonplace Beauty will save the world. Fyodor Dostoyevsky Sonnet 98 by William Shakespeare From you have I been absent in the spring, When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim, Hath put a spirit of youth in everything, That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him. Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue, Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew: Nor did I wonder at the lily's white, Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose; They were but sweet, but figures of delight Drawn after you, – you pattern of all those. Yet seem'd it winter still, and, you away, As with your shadow I with these did play. Book List: The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 127: The Literary Life of Kay Pelham

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 105:31


    On The Literary Life podcast today, our hosts are bringing you another “Literary Life Of” interview episode. This week's guest is Kay Pelham, a lifelong reader, veteran homeschooling mother, and accomplished pianist. After sharing their commonplace quotes, Angelina, Cindy and Kay dig into their conversation about the journey of Kay's reading life. She shares a little about her family of story-tellers and readers, her personal reading versus school studies, and how her reading life changed as a young adult. Kay also talks about how she came to homeschool using Charlotte Mason's philosophy. The discussion turns to Kay's self-education journey as an older adult and she gives encouragement for anyone coming to this later in life. You can read Kay's own thoughts on books and more at KayPelham.com. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: When children come to school, they can read and speak. When they leave school they can do neither the one nor the other. Arthur Burrell, from “Recitation, the Children's Art” in The Parent's Review It is my settled conviction that in order to read Old Western Literature aright, you must suspend most of the responses and unlearn most of the habits you have acquired in reading modern literature. C. S. Lewis Mythology is the embryo of literature and the arts, not of science, and no form of art has anything to do with making direct statements about nature, mistaken or correct. Similarly, as science does not grow out of mythology, so it can never replace mythology. Mythology is recreated by the poets in each generation, while science goes its own way. Northrup Frye Mozart by Maurice Baring The sunshine, and the grace of falling rain, The fluttering daffodil, the lilt of bees, The blossom on the boughs of almond trees, The waving of the wheat upon the plain— And all that knows not effort, strife or strain, And all that bears the signature of ease, The plunge of ships that dance before the breeze The flight across the twilight of the crane: And all that joyous is, and young, and free, That tastes of morning and the laughing surf; The dawn, the dew, the newly turned-up turf, The sudden smile, the unexpressive prayer, The artless art, the untaught dignity,— You speak them in the passage of an air. Books Mentioned: Creation and Recreation by Northrup Frye If I Were Going: The Alice and Jerry Basic Reader by Mabel O'Donnell My Bookhouse edited by Olive B. Miller Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian The Mind of the Maker by Dorothy L. Sayers The Boys by Ron and Clint Howard Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 126: "The Abolition of Man" by C. S. Lewis, Ch. 3

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 101:31


    On today's episode of The Literary Life, our hosts wrap up their series on The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis. Angelina kicks off today's conversation about chapter 3 with more exploration and clarification of the concept of “the Tao.” Cindy talks about the importance of respect for the past and how much we have lost by letting go of that. Thomas highlights the fact that so many education theorists were men who never had reared children and the difference that a mother's experience makes. One of the main themes of this discussion is the state of education and Lewis' prescient insight into our current cultural climate. Lewis also goes beyond criticizing scientism by laying out his vision for good science. We will be back next week with a “Literary Life of…” interview with a surprise guest. After that we will take a short break for the conference, and return in April with a read along of The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: Only in destroying I find ease for my relentless thoughts. Satan in Paradise Lost, by John Milton …the fact that the story does not turn on children, and does not foster that self-consciousness, the dawn of which in the child is, perhaps, the individual “Fall of Man.” Charlotte Mason The physical sciences, good and innocent in themselves, had already begun to be warped, had been subtly maneuvered in a certain direction. Despair of objective truth had been increasingly insinuated into the scientists; indifference to it, and a concentration upon mere power, had been the result. C. S. Lewis, in That Hideous Strength Who Has Seen the Wind? by Christina Rossetti Who has seen the wind? Neither I nor you: But when the leaves hang trembling, The wind is passing through. Who has seen the wind? Neither you nor I: But when the trees bow down their heads, The wind is passing by. Book List: Paradise Lost by John Milton The Last Battle by C. S. Lewis That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 125: “The Abolition of Man” by C. S. Lewis, Ch. 2

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 87:12


    On The Literary Life podcast this week, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas continue their series of discussions on The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis. They open the conversation with their commonplace quotes and give us a working definition of debunking. You can also read a fantastic post on debunking from Kelly Cumbee's blog here. Other topics of this conversation include “the tao,” objective reality, utilitarianism, finding wisdom, and how this book speaks to our current culture. Kelly Cumbee will be teaching a webinar on The Tempest by William Shakespeare this Thursday, March 17, 2022 at 5pm Eastern, so head over to HouseofHumaneLetters.com to register today. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: An ounce of mother is worth a pound of clergy. A Scottish proverb, as quoted by Joseph Addison “Well, at any rate there's no Humbug here. We haven't let anyone take us in. The Dwarfs are for the Dwarfs.” “You see,” said Aslan. “They will not let us help them. They have chosen cunning instead of belief. Their prison is only in their own minds yet they are in that prison; and so afraid of being taken in that they cannot be taken out.” C. S. Lewis Do not remove the ancient landmark which your fathers have set. Proverbs 22:28 (NKJV) Inexpensive Progress by John Betjeman Encase your legs in nylons, Bestride your hills with pylons O age without a soul; Away with gentle willows And all the elmy billows That through your valleys roll. Let's say goodbye to hedges And roads with grassy edges And winding country lanes; Let all things travel faster Where motor car is master Till only Speed remains. Destroy the ancient inn-signs But strew the roads with tin signs 'Keep Left,' 'M4,' 'Keep Out!' Command, instruction, warning, Repetitive adorning The rockeried roundabout; For every raw obscenity Must have its small 'amenity,' Its patch of shaven green, And hoardings look a wonder In banks of floribunda With floodlights in between. Leave no old village standing Which could provide a landing For aeroplanes to roar, But spare such cheap defacements As huts with shattered casements Unlived-in since the war. Let no provincial High Street Which might be your or my street Look as it used to do, But let the chain stores place here Their miles of black glass facia And traffic thunder through. And if there is some scenery, Some unpretentious greenery, Surviving anywhere, It does not need protecting For soon we'll be erecting A Power Station there. When all our roads are lighted By concrete monsters sited Like gallows overhead, Bathed in the yellow vomit Each monster belches from it, We'll know that we are dead. Book List: The Last Battle by C. S. Lewis That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 124: “The Abolition of Man” by C. S. Lewis, Ch. 1

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 106:09


    On The Literary Life podcast this week, our hosts begin a much-anticipated series on The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis. Angelina, Thomas, and Cindy share their commonplace quotes to open the discussion, then they give some background on this particular work. They talk about the ideas behind the “new criticism” approach to literature and why it is so problematic. Angelina and Thomas expand on the significance of the concept of the sublime. Cindy shares some thoughts on learning to identify and to produce good writing. Angelina helps us connect Lewis' points about ordo amoris with our current day dilemmas. Other topics touched on in their conversation are the nature of objective reality, the tripartite soul, the medieval view of Reason, debunking the ideal of honor, and so much more. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: The modern state exists not to protect our rights but to do us good or make us good–anyway, to do something to us or make us something. Hence the new name “leaders” for those who were once “rulers.” We are less their subjects than their wards, pupils, or domestic animals. There is nothing left of which we can say to them, “Mind your own business.” Our whole lives are their business. C. S. Lewis, from “Is Progress Possible?” It is good for a professional to be reminded that his professionalism is only a husk, that the real person must remain an amateur, a lover of the work. May Sarton In truth, he wished to command the respect at once of courtiers and of philosophers, to be admired for attaining high dignities, and to be at the same time respected for despising them. Thomas Macaualy Duty Surviving Self-Love, The Only Sure Friend Of Declining Life. A Soliloquy by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Unchanged within, to see all changed without, Is a blank lot and hard to bear, no doubt. Yet why at others' Wanings should'st thou fret? Then only might'st thou feel a just regret, Hadst thou withheld thy love or hid thy light In selfish forethought of neglect and slight. O wiselier then, from feeble yearnings freed, While, and on whom, thou may'st--shine on! nor heed Whether the object by reflected light Return thy radiance or absorb it quite: And tho' thou notest from thy safe recess Old Friends burn dim, like lamps in noisome air, Love them for what they are; nor love them less, Because to thee they are not what they were. Book List: The History of England from the Accession of James II by Thomas Macaulay The Last Battle by C. S. Lewis God in the Dock by C. S. Lewis That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 123: In Search of the Austen Adaptation – Emma

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 113:39


    Our hosts are back on The Literary Life podcast this week with another fun episode in our series “In Search of the Austen Adaptation.” In this episode, Angelina, Cindy, and Thomas are joined again by Atlee Northmore to discuss the several film versions of Jane Austen's Emma. To start the conversation, Angelina highlights the challenges of adapting Emma to film. Atlee outlines the major film adaptations of Emma. Then they discuss the ups and downs of the various adaptations, as well as casting, personal favorites and production choices. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: In all our literary experience there are two kinds of response. There is the direct experience of the world itself, while we're reading a book or seeing a play, especially for the first time. This experience is uncritical, or rather pre-critical, so it's not infallible. If our experience is limited, we can be roused to enthusiasm or carried away by something that we can later see to have been second-rate or even phony. Then there is the conscious, critical response we make after we've finished reading or left the theatre, where we compare what we've experienced with other things of the same kind, and form a judgment of value and proportion on it. This critical response, with practice, gradually makes our pre-critical responses more sensitive and accurate, or improves our taste, as we say. But behind our responses to our literary experience as a whole, as a total possession. Northrup Frye Reason thus with life: If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing That none but fools would keep. William Shakespeare A boat will not answer to the rudder unless it is in motion; the poet can work upon us only as long as we are kept on the move. C. S. Lewis The wit of Jane Austen has for partner the perfection of her taste. Her fool is a fool, her snob is a snob, because he departs from the model of sanity and sense which she had in mind, and conveys to us unmistakably even while she makes us laugh. Never did any novelist make more use of an impeccable sense of human values. It is against the disc of an unerring heart, an unfailing good taste, an almost stern morality, that she shows up those deviations from kindness, truth, sincerity which are among the most delightful things on English literature. Virginia Woolf Selection from “Epistle to a Lady, Of the Characters of Women” by Alexander Pope Say, what can cause such impotence of mind? A Spark too fickle, or a Spouse too kind. Wise wretch! with pleasures too refin'd to please; With too much spirit to be e'er at ease; With too much quickness ever to be taught; With too much thinking to have common thought: You purchase Pain with all that Joy can give, And die of nothing but a rage to live. Book List: Emma by Jane Austen Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian The Educated Imagination by Northrup Frye Measure for Measure by William Shakespeare Preface to Paradise Lost by C. S. Lewis The Common Reader by Virginia Woolf Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 122: The Literary Life of Timilyn Downey

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 92:16


    This week on The Literary Life podcast, we are bringing you another Literary Life of interview episode. This week's guest is Timilyn Downey, and together with hosts Angelina Stanford and Cindy Rollins dig into how Timilyn became a lifelong reader. Timilyn shares about the incredibly literary childhood education that she had without even realizing it at the time. She also tells the story of her trip to London during college, then goes into how she used a literary approach in her teaching career. Timilyn also describes her journey to homeschooling and the role that God's grace clearly played in where she is now. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: The founding of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was not as programmatic or formal as its name suggests, but rather evolved out of a series of pub discussions and informal get-togethers. Carolyn Weber Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one. Charles MacKay On a Saturday afternoon in winter, when nose and fingers might be pinched enough to give an added relish to the anticipation of tea and fireside, and the whole week-end's reading lay ahead, I suppose I reached as much happiness as is ever to be reached on earth. C. S. Lewis from “Among School Children” by William Butler Yeats VII Both nuns and mothers worship images, But those the candles light are not as those That animate a mother's reveries, But keep a marble or a bronze repose. And yet they too break hearts—O Presences That passion, piety or affection knows, And that all heavenly glory symbolise— O self-born mockers of man's enterprise; VIII Labour is blossoming or dancing where The body is not bruised to pleasure soul, Nor beauty born out of its own despair, Nor blear-eyed wisdom out of midnight oil. O chestnut tree, great rooted blossomer, Are you the leaf, the blossom or the bole? O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, How can we know the dancer from the dance? Book List: The Rossetti's in Wonderland by Dinah Roe Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles MacKay Surprised by Joy by C. S. Lewis Little Britches by Ralph Moody Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery The Arabian Nights by Muhsin Mahdi The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan Mere Motherhood by Cindy Rollins Morning Time by Cindy Rollins Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian D'Aulaire's Book of Norse Myths by Ingri and Edgar D'Aulaire Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 121: “A Midsummer Night's Dream”, Acts 4 and 5

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 80:55


    On The Literary Life podcast this week, we will wrap up our series on Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Our hosts, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas walk through the last two acts of the play, sharing their thoughts on the structure and ideas presented here. Angelina talks about why she thinks Shakespeare resolves the different conflicts the way he does. They discuss the importance of the play within the play, the fairy tale atmosphere, and the unreality of time and space. Cindy and Angelina both bring up plot points that feel slightly problematic to them. Angelina highlights the theme of harmonizing discord and bringing order from disorder. On February 8th, Angelina will be offering a webinar on Jonathan Swift: Enemy of the Enlightenment. Check it out at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: Revolutionaries always hang their best friends. Christopher Hollis It is easy to forget that the man who writes a good love sonnet needs not only be enamored of a woman, but also to be enamored of the sonnet. C. S. Lewis For the end of imagination is harmony. A right imagination, being the reflex of the creation, will fall in with the divine order of things as the highest form of its own operation; “will tune its instrument here at the door” to the divine harmonies within; will be content alone with growth towards the divine idea, which includes all that is beautiful in the imperfect imagination of men; will know that every deviation from that growth is downward; and will therefore send the man forth from its loftiest representations to do the commonest duty of the most wearisome calling in a hearty and hopeful spirit. This is the work of the right imagination; and towards this work every imagination, in proportion to the rightness that is in it, will tend. The reveries even of the wise man will make him stronger for his work; his dreaming as well as his thinking will render him sorry for past failure, and hopeful of future success. George MacDonald Earth's Secret by George Meredith Not solitarily in fields we find Earth's secret open, though one page is there; Her plainest, such as children spell, and share With bird and beast; raised letters for the blind. Not where the troubled passions toss the mind, In turbid cities, can the key be bare. It hangs for those who hither thither fare, Close interthreading nature with our kind. They, hearing History speak, of what men were, And have become, are wise. The gain is great In vision and solidity; it lives. Yet at a thought of life apart from her, Solidity and vision lose their state, For Earth, that gives the milk, the spirit gives. Book List: Fossett's Memory by Christopher Hollis A Dish of Orts by George MacDonald A Preface to Paradise Lost by C. S. Lewis The Meaning of Shakespeare by Harold Goddard Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 120: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act III

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 72:43


    Today on The Literary Life podcast, we continue our series on Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream with coverage of Act 3. Angelina talks about the pacing of this act and the importance of the characters' madcap, lunatic behavior. She also highlight's Shakespeare's wrestling with the relationship between the imagination and art and reality. Thomas highlights the structure of the play as reflecting a dreamlike state. Cindy shares some of her thoughts on being concerned about making sure our children know what is real and pretend. On February 8th, Angelina will be offering a webinar on Jonathan Swift: Enemy of the Enlightenment. Check it out at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: The most insipid, ridiculous play that I ever saw in my life. Samuel Pepys, describing “A Midsummer Night's Dream” in his diary Or the lovely one about the Bishop of Exeter, who was giving the prizes at a girls' school. They did a performance of A Midsummer Night's Dream, and the poor man stood up afterwards and made a speech and said [piping voice]: ‘I was very interested in your delightful performance, and among other things I was very interested in seeing for the first time in my life a female Bottom.' C. S. Lewis in a conversation with Kingsley Amis and Brian Aldiss Still, if Homer's Achilles isn't the real Achilles, he isn't unreal either. Unrealities don't seem so full of life after three thousand years as Homer's Achilles does. This is the kind of problem we have to tackle next–the fact that what we meet in literature is neither real nor unreal. We have two words, imaginary, meaning unreal, and imaginative, meaning what the writer produces, and they mean entirely different things. Northrop Frye A Dream by William Blake Once a dream did weave a shade O'er my angel-guarded bed, That an emmet lost its way Where on grass methought I lay. Troubled, wildered, and forlorn, Dark, benighted, travel-worn, Over many a tangle spray, All heart-broke, I heard her say: "Oh my children! do they cry, Do they hear their father sigh? Now they look abroad to see, Now return and weep for me." Pitying, I dropped a tear: But I saw a glow-worm near, Who replied, "What wailing wight Calls the watchman of the night? "I am set to light the ground, While the beetle goes his round: Follow now the beetle's hum; Little wanderer, hie thee home!" Book List: Of Other Worlds by C. S. Lewis The Educated Imagination by Northrop Frye The Elizabethan World Picture by E. M. Tillyard The Meaning of Shakespeare by Harold Goddard The Golden Ass by Apuleius Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 119: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Acts I and II

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 91:38


    Welcome back to The Literary Life podcast and our series on Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. After kicking off the episode with their commonplace quotes, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas start digging into the play itself. Thomas brings up the importance of the timing of this story being midsummer. Angelina gives a little background into the names and characters in this play as well as some of the major ideas we can be looking for in the story. In February Angelina will be offering a webinar on Jonathan Swift: Enemy of the Enlightenment. Check it out at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: Cousin Swift, you will never be a poet. John Dryden, in a letter to Jonathan Swift It would be difficult indeed to define wherein lay the peculiar truth of the phrase “merrie England”, though some conception of it is quite necessary to the comprehension of A Midsummer Night's Dream. In some cases at least, it may be said to lie in this, that the English of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, unlike the England of today, could conceive of the idea of a merry supernaturalism. G. K. Chesterton And yet, there are people who say that Shakespeare always means, “just what he says.” He thinks that to find over and under meanings in Shakespeare's plays is to take unwarranted liberties with them, is like a man who holds the word “spring” must refer only to a particular period of the year, and could not possibly mean birth, or youth or hope. He is a man who has never associated anything with anything else. He is a man without metaphors, and such a man is no man at all, let alone a poet. Harold Goddard Advice to Lovers by Robert Graves I knew an old man at a Fair Who made it his twice-yearly task To clamber on a cider cask And cry to all the yokels there:-- "Lovers to-day and for all time Preserve the meaning of my rhyme: Love is not kindly nor yet grim But does to you as you to him. "Whistle, and Love will come to you, Hiss, and he fades without a word, Do wrong, and he great wrong will do, Speak, he retells what he has heard. "Then all you lovers have good heed Vex not young Love in word or deed: Love never leaves an unpaid debt, He will not pardon nor forget." The old man's voice was sweet yet loud And this shows what a man was he, He'd scatter apples to the crowd And give great draughts of cider, free. Book List: “Battle of the Books” by Jonathan Swift Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift Orthodoxy by G. K. Chesterton The Meaning of Shakespeare by Harold Goddard The Elizabethan World Picture by E. M. Tillyard Mansfield Park by Jane Austen Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 118: An Intro to Shakespeare and “A Midsummer Night's Dream”

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 79:44


    Welcome to this new season of The Literary Life podcast! This week we bring you an introduction both to William Shakespeare and his play A Midsummer Night's Dream. Hosts Angelina, Cindy and Thomas seek to give new Shakespeare readers a place from which to jump into his work and more experienced readers eyes to see more layers in his stories. Cindy begins with some perspective on how to start cultivating a love for Shakespeare. Angelina shares her “hot take” on whether you should read the play or watch the play. They suggest some books for further digging into Shakespeare's works, and Angelina gives an overview of the format of his comedies. Thomas goes into some detail about Roman comedy. Next week we will be back with a discussion of Acts I and II of the play. Also, if you would like to join the free live read-along over at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Join us this spring for our next Literary Life Conference “The Battle Over Children's Literature” featuring special guest speaker Vigen Guroian. The live online conference will take place April 7-9, 2022, and you can go to HouseofHumaneLetters.com for more information. Commonplace Quotes: If certain tendencies within our civilization were to proceed unchecked, they would rapidly take us towards a society which, like that of a prison, would be both completely introverted and completely without privacy. The last stand of privacy has always been, traditionally, the inner mind….It is quite possible, however, for communications media, especially the newer electronic ones, to break down the associative structures of the inner mind and replace them by the prefabricated structures of the media . A society entirely controlled by their slogans and exhortations would be introverted because nobody would be saying anything: there would only be echo, and Echo was the mistress of Narcissus….the triumph of communication is the death of communication: where communication forms a total environment, there is nothing to be communicated. Northrop Frye No writer can persist for five hundred pages in being funny at the expense of someone who is dead. Harold Nicolson Originality was a new and somewhat ugly idol of the nineteenth century. Janet Spens Unwisdom by Siegfried Sassoon To see with different eyes From every day, And find in dream disguise Worlds far away— To walk in childhood's land With trusting looks, And oldly understand Youth's fairy-books— Thus our unwisdom brings Release which hears The bird that sings In groves beyond the years. Book List: “The Practice of Biography” by Harold Nicolson The Modern Century by Northrop Frye An Essay on Shakespeare's Relation to Tradition by Janet Spens Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare by Edith Nesbit Tales from Shakespeare by Charles and Mary Lamb Stage Fright on a Summer Night by Mary Pope Osborne Leon Garfield's Shakespeare Stories by Leon Garfield Stories from Shakespeare by Marchette Chute Asimov's Guide to Shakespeare by Isaac Asimov The Meaning of Shakespeare by Harold Goddard The Elizabethan World Picture by E. M. Tillyard Shakespeare's Problem Plays by E. M. Tillyard Shakespeare's Early Comedies by E. M. Tillyard Shakespeare's History Plays by E. M. Tillyard Great Stage of Fools by Peter Leithardt Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 117: Our 2021 Literary Life Reading Wrap-up

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 84:48


    On this week's episode of The Literary Life podcast, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share a wrap up of their year in reading–their favorite books of the year, their most hated books read in 2021, and how they each did with covering the categories of the #LitLife192021 Reading Challenge. They also talk a little about how they will be approaching their reading for next year. Download the Two for '22 adult reading challenge PDF here, and the kids' reading challenge PDF here. The Literary Life Commonplace Books published by Blue Sky Daisies are back with new covers for 2022! Also, check out the Christmas sale at HouseofHumaneLetters.com! Coming up on The Literary Life podcast in the new year, we have Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream coming up in January and after that, Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis. Then we will be reading The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim and Charles Dickens' Hard Times later in the year. Our children's classic novel this year will be The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Commonplace Quotes: Literature's world is a concrete human world of immediate experience. The poet uses images and objects and sensations much more than he uses abstract ideas. The novelist is concerned with telling stories, not with working out arguments. Northrop Frye The moon is the only one of the heavenly bodies that, whilst rising resplendently like the other luminaries, nevertheless changes and waxes and wanes as we do. Malcolm Guite I almost think that the same skin For one without has two or three within. Lord Byron, from “Don Juan” The Poetry of Shakespeare by George Meredith Picture some Isle smiling green ‘mid the white-foaming ocean; – Full of old woods, leafy wisdoms, and frolicsome fays; Passions and pageants; sweet love singing bird-like above it; Life in all shapes, aims, and fates, is there warm'd by one great human heart. Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins The Educated Imagination by Northrup Frye Faith, Hope, and Poetry by Malcolm Guite David's Crown by Malcolm Guite Savior of the World by Charlotte Mason The Mirror Cracked from Side to Side by Agatha Christie Anthony Horowitz Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy Hiking Through by Paul Stutzman A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson Wintering by Katherine May The Narnian by Alan Jacobs In the Year of Our Lord 1943 by Alan Jacobs Elizabeth Goudge Assignment in Brittany by Helen Macinnes Look Back with Love by Dodie Smith The Go-Between by L. P. Hartley The Atonement by Ian McEwan Desmond MacCarthay David Cecil Letters by a Young Contrarian by Christopher Hitchens Ann Veronica by H. G. Wells The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell The Odd Women by George Gissing Excellent Women by Barbara Pym If Walls Could Talk by Lucy Worsley Corsets and Codpieces by Karen Bowman *The Storytelling Animal by Jonathan Gottschall (not recommended) *Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics by Stephen Greenblatt (not recommended) MacBeth by William Shakespeare As the Indians Left It by Robert Sparks Walker Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset Lady Susan by Jane Austen Tolkien and the Great War by John Garth A Hobbit, A Wardrobe and A World War by Joseph Laconte Piranesi by Susanna Clarke Neil Gaiman The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham Mythos by Stephen Fry Nina Balatka by Anthony Trollope Christmas at Thompson Hall by Anthony Trollope Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 116: The “Two for '22” Literary Life Reading Challenge

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 70:43


    “Two for '22” Literary Life Reading Challenge! This coming year Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are challenging us to read books in 11 categories, but choose 2 books in each category, with a bit of a twist. In today's episode they briefly go over each category and give a few examples of books would fit into those categories. They also take us through the Kids' “Two for '22” Reading Challenge topics. Next time we will be back with a wrap-up episode for our 19 for 2022 Reading Challenge. The Literary Life Commonplace Books published by Blue Sky Daisies are back with new covers for 2022! Coming up on The Literary Life podcast in the new year, we have Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dreamcoming up in January and after that, Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis. Then we will be reading The Enchanted Aprilby Elizabeth von Arnim and Charles Dickens' Hard Times later in the year. Our children's classic novel this year will be The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Commonplace Quotes: The artist must be in his work as God is in creation, invisible and all-powerful. One must sense him everywhere, but not see him. Gustave Flaubert There reigns thro' all the blank verse poems such a perpetual trick of moralizing every thing–which is very well, occasionally–but never to see or describe any interesting appearance in nature, without connecting it by dim analogies with the moral world, proves faintness of Impression. Nature has her proper interest; and he will know what it is, who believes and feels, that everything has a Life of its own, and that we are all one Life.  Malcolm Guite The principle behind modern methods of reading is stated in the form: if there is to be a meaning, it shall be ours. C. S. Lewis There is No Frigate Like a Book by Emily Dickinson There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry – This Traverse may the poorest take Without oppress of Toll – How frugal is the Chariot That bears the Human Soul – Book List: Faith, Hope and Poetry by Malcolm Guite The Allegory of the Faerie Queene by Pauline Parker Hard Times by Charles Dickens Cranford by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell The Splendid Century by W. H. Lewis The Fellowship by Philip and Carol Zaleski Bandersnatch by Diana Pavlac Goyer Tolkein and The Great War by John Garth A Hobbit, a Wardrobe and a Great War by Joseph Loconte The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini Laurus by Eugene Vodolazkin Elizabeth and Essex by Lytton Strachey Elizabeth the Great by Elizabeth Jenkins The Daughter of Time by Josephine They Elizabeth von Arnim Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Anthony Horowitz Margery Allingham E. C. Bentley Nero Wolfe Series Alan Bradley J. K. Rowling/Roberth Galbraith A Collection of Essays by George Orwell Essays of G. K. Chesterton by G. K. Chesterton David Bentley Hart In a Cardboard Belt! by Joseph Epstein Padraic Colum The Wonder Book for Boys and Girls by Nathaniel Hawthorne Bill Peet: An Autobiography by Bill Peet Kingfisher Book of Russian Tales by James Mayhew Paul Galdone The Cooper Kids Adventure Series by Frank Peretti Harriet the Spy Series by Louise Fitzhugh Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 115: In Search of the Austen Adaptation – Pride and Prejudice

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 131:03


    This week on The Literary Life podcast we have a fun episode for you to kick off a fun series of episodes that will come up from time to time, “In Search of the Austen Adaptation.” This week our hosts Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are joined by Atlee Northmore, and together they are debating which film version of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is the best. Atlee shares some of the history of the Pride and Prejudice adaptations that were made for TV and film. Angelina highlights different ideas of what makes a good film adaptation of a book. Cindy brings up the importance of the casting, and Angelina talks about why she still feels like no film has gotten Mr. Darcy right. She also talks about the difficulty of embodying the virtues that Jane Austen gives her characters. Our hosts critique each major movies from over the decades, sharing what they like and dislike about each one. Click here to download the PDF Atlee created for all the Pride and Prejudice film adaptations. Commonplace Quotes: If we cannot get the better of life, at any rate, we can be so free as to laugh at it. Desmond MacCarthy Jane Austen is thus a mistress of much deeper emotion than appears upon the surface. She stimulates us to supply what is not there. What she offers is, apparently a trifle, yet is composed of something that expands in the reader's mind and endows with the most enduring form of life scenes which are outwardly trivial. Virginia Woolf The most extraordinary thing in the world is an ordinary man and an ordinary woman and their ordinary children. G. K. Chesterton Never judge a book by its movie. Anonymous False Though She Be by William Congreve FALSE though she be to me and love, I'll ne'er pursue revenge; For still the charmer I approve, Though I deplore her change. In hours of bliss we oft have met: They could not always last; And though the present I regret, I'm grateful for the past. Book List: The Common Reader by Virginia Woolf Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 114: The Literary Life of Dr. Carolyn Weber

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 86:47


    This week on The Literary Life podcast, we are excited to bring you a much anticipated interview with Dr. Carolyn Weber, author of the popular memoir, Surprised by Oxford. She is also currently a professor at New College Franklin. To keep up with Carolyn, visit carolynweber.com or follow her on Facebook. Angelina and Cindy kick off the conversation by asking Carolyn about her childhood and how she came to love reading. They talk about her experience in school education and whether that differed from her personal reading life. Carolyn talks about her love of teaching and her immersive literary education experience at Oxford. She also expands on the way that reading the Bible for the first time opened her eyes to so many more of the truths in the literature she had read. Commonplace Quotes: Unexpectedly, it was Oxford that taught me it was okay to be both feminine and smart, that intelligence was, as a friend put it, a “woman's best cosmetic.” Carolyn Weber I'm like an addict when it comes to books. Compelled to read, understand, savor, wrangle with, be moved by, learn to live from these silent companions who speak so loudly. Surely some language must have a word for such a “book junkie”? Carolyn Weber We must not, that is, try to behave as though the Fall had never occurred nor yet say that the Fall was a Good Thing in itself. But we may redeem the Fall by a creative act. Dorothy Sayers Batter my heart, three-person'd God by John Donne Batter my heart, three-person'd God, for you As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to mend; That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend Your force to break, blow, burn, and make me new. I, like an usurp'd town to another due, Labor to admit you, but oh, to no end; Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend, But is captiv'd, and proves weak or untrue. Yet dearly I love you, and would be lov'd fain, But am betroth'd unto your enemy; Divorce me, untie or break that knot again, Take me to you, imprison me, for I, Except you enthrall me, never shall be free, Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me. Book List: Surprised by Oxford by Carolyn Weber Holy Is the Day by Carolyn Weber The Mind of the Maker by Dorothy Sayers Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Robertson Davies Margaret Atwood Stephen Leacock Flannery O'Connor Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv Mousekins books by Edna Miller Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis The Life of Samuel Johnson by James Boswell Paradise Lost by John Milton The Crosswicks Journals by Madeleine L'Engle Elizabeth Goudge Frederick Buechner Frankenstein by Mary Shelley The Epic of Gilgamesh Number the Stars by Lois Lowry The Giver by Lois Lowry The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass by Adrian Plass A Small Cup of Light by Ben Palpant Letters from the Mountain by Ben Palpant Lectures to My Students by Charles Spurgeon Come Away, My Beloved by Frances J. Roberts The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 113: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 3, Ch. 9-17

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 95:08


    Welcome to the final episode in our series covering Mansfield Park by Jane Austen here on The Literary Life podcast. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas dive right into the book chat today in order to cover as much as possible as they wrap up Fanny Price's story. Angelina brings out the parallels to Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene. Cindy talks about how Julia and Maria's upbringing is instructive for parents. Another topic is how, in a way, the characters continue their roles from “Lover's Vows” in real life unless they repent. Our hosts also highlight Fanny's journey toward finding a home throughout this story. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Also, check out the House of Humane Letters newsletter to get in on the read-a-long of Shakespeare's The Tempest. To view the schedule for upcoming episodes, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: To educate means to help the human soul enter into the totality of the real. Luigi Giussani, from the forward to Beauty for Truth's Sake The man who is endowed with logical astuteness is very apt to keep himself in practice by taking up indefensible positions for the fun of defending them. G. M. Young Information can thrill, but only once. Wendell Berry Amoretti Sonnet XXII by Edmund Spenser This holy season, fit to fast and pray, Men to devotion ought to be inclin'd: Therefore I likewise on so holy day, For my sweet saint some service fit will find. Her temple fair is built within my mind, In which her glorious image placed is, On which my thoughts do day and night attend, Like sacred priests that never think amiss. There I to her as th' author of my bliss, Will build an altar to appease her ire: And on the same my heart will sacrifice, Burning in flames of pure and chaste desire: The which vouchsafe, O goddess, to accept, Amongst thy dearest relics to be kept. Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins The Risk of Education by Luigi Giussani Beauty for Truth's Sake by Stratford Caldecott Daylight and Champaign by G. M. Young A Preface to the Faerie Queene by Graham Hough Ourselves by Charlotte Mason Surprised by Oxford by Carolyn Weber Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 112: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 3, Ch. 1-8

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 82:45


    Welcome back for another installment in our series covering Mansfield Park by Jane Austen. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share their commonplace quotes which leads them into discussing Fanny's character in contrast to the heroine of a gothic novel. They talk about what makes a good marriage in the Regency period and Jane Austen's own personal life, as well as the contrast between the household of Sir Thomas compared to Fanny's own family home. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Also, check out the House of Humane Letters newsletter to stay in the know about our upcoming read-a-long of Shakespeare's The Tempest. To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: Fear the man who says he knows how things should be. He doesn't Alexander Galich Things were easier for us. We were brought up on stories with happy endings and on the Prayer Book. C. S. Lewis One of the most dangerous of literary ventures is the little, shy, unimportant heroine whom none of the other characters value. The danger is that your readers may agree with the other characters. Something must be put into the heroine to make us feel that the other characters are wrong, that she contains the depths they never dreamed of. That is why Charlotte Brontë would have succeeded better with Fanny Price. To be sure, she would have ruined everything else in the book; Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram and Mrs. Norris would have been distorted from credible types of pompous dullness, lazy vapidity and vulgar egoism into fiends complete with horns, tails and rhetoric. But through Fanny there would have blown a storm of passion which made sure that we at least would never think her insignificant. C. S. Lewis Something Nasty in the Bookshop by Kingsley Amis Between the Gardening and the Cookery Comes the brief Poetry shelf; By the Nonesuch Donne, a thin anthology Offers itself. Critical, and with nothing else to do, I scan the Contents page, Relieved to find the names are mostly new; No one my age. Like all strangers, they divide by sex: Landscape Near Parma Interests a man, so does The Double Vortex, So does Rilke and Buddha. “I travel, you see”, “I think” and “I can read” These titles seem to say; But I Remember You, Love is my Creed, Poem for J., The ladies' choice, discountenance my patter For several seconds; From somewhere in this (as in any) matter A moral beckons. Should poets bicycle-pump the human heart Or squash it flat? Man's love is of man's life a thing apart; Girls aren't like that. We men have got love well weighed up; our stuff Can get by without it. Women don't seem to think that's good enough; They write about it. And the awful way their poems lay them open Just doesn't strike them. Women are really much nicer than men: No wonder we like them. Deciding this, we can forget those times We stayed up half the night Chock-full of love, crammed with bright thoughts, names, rhymes, And couldn't write. Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Pamela by Samuel Richardson David Copperfield by Charles Dickens Jane Austen by Peter Leithart Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 111: “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen, Vol. 2, Ch. 6-13

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 76:07


    On The Literary Life Podcast this week, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are back to discuss the next several chapters of Mansfield Park by Jane Austen. They pick back up with the continuation of the Cinderella theme in these chapters, and much of the conversation centers around the Crawfords and their ambitions and schemes. Once again, Fanny is demonstrated to be the embodiment of temperance. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! To view the schedule for the episodes in this series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: Lewis learnt that focusing on the state of his own mind was precisely the wrong way to obtain the imaginative pleasures that he had been seeking for ten years and more. Michael Ward Through seas of knowledge we our course advance, Discov'ring still new worlds of ignorance; And these discov'ries make us all confess That sublunary science is but guess; Matters of fact to man are only known, And what seems more is mere opinion; The standers-by see clearly this event; All parties say they're sure, yet all dissent; With their new light our bold inspectors press, Like Ham, to show their fathers' nakedness, By who example after ages may Discover we more naked are than they. Sir John Denham, “The Progress of Learning” The Inklings is now really very well provided, with Fox as chaplain, you as army, Barfield as lawyer, Havard as doctor–almost all the estates, except of course, anyone who could actually produce a single necessity of life: a loaf, a boot, or a hut. C. S. Lewis Sly Thoughts by Coventry Patmore “I saw him kiss your cheek!”—“T'is true.” “O Modesty!”—“'T was strictly kept: He thought me asleep; at least, I knew He thought I thought he thought I slept.” Book List: Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah by Cindy Rollins After Humanity: A Guide to C.S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man by Michael Ward That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Experiment in Criticism by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

    Episode 110: “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 97:14


    On this special Halloween episode of The Literary Life, Angelina (Harriet Vane), Cindy (Professor MacGonagall), and Thomas (Lord Peter Wimsey), talk about Edgar Allan Poe's tale, “The Masque of the Red Death.” If you are a Patron, you can watch this episode and see our hosts in their costumes as they discuss the story! Angelina begins the chat with a little background on Edgar Allan Poe and his thoughts on the imagination and why he wrote the way he did, as well as connections with Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Thomas points out the connection between this story and Boccaccio's Decameron. Highlights of the discussion include Poe's use of medieval motifs, the imagery and symbolism in Poe's writing, the modern person's avoidance of considering death, and Poe's idea of life as a play within a play. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Next week we will continue our series on Mansfield Park. To view the schedule for the episodes in the series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: I am more concerned by what “the Bomb” is doing already. One meets young people who make the threat of it a reason for poisoning every pleasure and evading every duty in the present. Didn't they know that, bomb or no bomb, all men die, many in horrible ways? There is no good moping and sulking about it. C. S. Lewis There are certain evil men who would be less dangerous if there were not some scrap of virtue in them. La Rochefoucauld This handmaiden (poesy) is not forbidden to moralize in her own fashion. She is not forbidden to depict but to reason and preach of virtue. Edgar Allan Poe, from his review of Longfellow's Ballads Sonnet – To Science by Edgar Allan Poe Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!    Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes. Why preyest thou thus upon the poet's heart,    Vulture, whose wings are dull realities? How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise,    Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,    Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing? Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car,    And driven the Hamadryad from the wood To seek a shelter in some happier star?    Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood, The Elfin from the green grass, and from me The summer dream beneath the tamarind tree? Source: The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe (1946) Book List: Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe God in the Dock by C. S. Lewis Maxims and Reflections by François de La Rochefoucauld “The Philosophy of Composition” by Edgar Allan Poe The Murders in the Rue Morge by Edgar Allan Poe The Decameron by Giovanni Boccacio Comus by John Milton The Tempest by William Shakespeare The Castle of Utronto by Horace Walpole Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen Oxford Book of English Verse ed. by Arthur Quiller-Couch Hamlet by William Shakespeare Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB