Podcasts about Humanities

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Academic disciplines that study human culture

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    Latest podcast episodes about Humanities

    10% Happier with Dan Harris
    487: How (And Why) To Lose Yourself | Jay Garfield

    10% Happier with Dan Harris

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 59:57


    Today's episode looks at one of the hardest Buddhist principles to grasp— the notion that the self is an illusion. Many people get stuck on the misunderstanding that they don't exist. They look in the mirror and say, “Of course I exist. I'm right there.” And that's true, you do exist, but just not in the way you think you do. Today's guest, Jay Garfield explores this notion by arguing that you are indeed a person just not a self— a principle that can simultaneously feel both imponderable and liberating. Jay Garfield is the Doris Silbert Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy, Logic, and Buddhist Studies at Smith College and a visiting professor of Buddhist philosophy at Harvard Divinity School. He is the Author of multiple books, including his latest, which is called, Losing Ourselves: Learning to Live without a Self.In this episode we talk about: The difference between a person and a selfThe problems with being taken by the illusion of selfhoodWhy he believes the illusion of self is not an evolutionary design flawThe many benefits of “losing ourselves”How to actually lose ourselvesThe concept of InterconnectionHis definition of real happinessThe difference between pain and suffering and how to have the former without the latterFull Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/jay-garfield-487See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The Thomistic Institute
    Reforming the Bride of Christ: The New, Improved Tridentine Church | Prof. Carlos Eire

    The Thomistic Institute

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 71:57


    Prof. Eire's slides can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/yw558acx https://tinyurl.com/ydam72nn This lecture was given on June 13, 2022 at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C. as part of The Civitas Dei Summer Fellowship: "The City of God in Modernity: Culture and Ecclesiology." For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Carlos Eire, who received his PhD from Yale in 1979, specializes in the social, intellectual, religious, and cultural history of late medieval and early modern Europe, with a focus on both the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the history of popular piety; and the history of the supernatural, and the history of death. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, he taught at St. John's University in Minnesota and the University of Virginia, and was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton for two years. He is the author of War Against the Idols: The Reformation of Worship From Erasmus to Calvin (1986); From Madrid to Purgatory: The Art and Craft of Dying in Sixteenth Century Spain (1995); A Very Brief History of Eternity (2010); Reformations: The Early Modern World (2016); and The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila: A Biography (2019). And he is co-author of Jews, Christians, Muslims: An Introduction to Monotheistic Religions (1997). He has also ventured into the twentieth century and the Cuban Revolution in the memoir Waiting for Snow in Havana (2003), which won the National Book Award in Nonfiction in the United States and has been translated into more than a dozen languages. His second memoir, Learning to Die in Miami (2010), explores the exile experience. A past president of the Society for Reformation Research, he is currently researching attitudes toward miracles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. His recent book Reformations won the R.R.Hawkins Prize for Best Book of the Year from the American Publishers Association, as well as the award for Best Book in the Humanities. It was also awarded the Jaroslav Pelikan Prize by Yale University Press. All of his books are banned in Cuba, where he has been proclaimed an enemy of the state – a distinction he regards as the highest of all honors.

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
    YCBK 248: Marichal Gentry: How to excel while in college-Part 2

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 48:44 Very Popular


    In this episode you will hear:   Announcements about the various college applications with a special focus on the Coalition. More information about YCBK PLUS  Interview: Marichal Gentry Part 2 Marichal discusses Cannibas and drugs, including prescription drugs Marichal discusses the importance for consent for physical contact, sexual advances, what does this mean? How VAWA-Violence Against Women's Act impacts school's policies What students should do if they experience sexual inappropriate behavior Unhealthy Eating habits and Sleeping habits The importance of Staying active Take advantage of the workshops at the counseling center, including peer health workshops How to handle unexpected changes in appearances, such as scraggy beards, tattooes, tongue piercings How to handle unexpected student proclamations: i.e. your student says they are gay; they don't want to use that pronoun anymore; they say, I'm an athiest,  or I'm a born again Christian; they say, I don't want to do biology and chemistry and I don't want to be a doctor anymore; I want to be an art historian     Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 25 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews not yet completed Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Reed-Milyon Truelove- Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) University of Connecticut-Vern Granger* Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner Arlene Cash   To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

    The Idea Store
    Humanities Seminar: The History of The World

    The Idea Store

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 83:28


    Here's everything as we know it. What now? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genevieve-sugrue/support

    Things Fall Apart
    117: Unflattening & Thinking With Comics w/ Nick Sousanis

    Things Fall Apart

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 59:08


    I was introduced to Nick Sousanis' work through a Twitter connection, shout out to @AndrewJ, as I wanted to spend more time over the summer with what are broadly called graphic novels. Probably like many listeners, I had read comic books as they appeared in pop culture over the years, The Dark Tower adaptation, the Walking Dead, even “classic” graphic novels, I suppose, like Alan Moore's Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell. As a history major, I read the first book of Maus in college. but other than that I never really knew where to go from there. Now, just last month, I had a friend recommend Marjan Sahtrapi's Persepolis, a graphic memoir of her childhood before, during, and after the Iranian Revolution. I borrowed it from the library, read it in a single sitting, and was hooked. So I immediately put a call out on Twitter on where to go from there and got dozens of suggestions. I've spent the rest of the summer catching up on a number of graphic memoirs including the March Trilogy, The Best We Could Do, and Fun Home. Then came Nick Sousanis' Unflattening. Nick Sousanis is an Eisner-winning comics author and an associate professor of Humanities & Liberal Studies at San Francisco State University, where he runs a Comics Studies program. He received his doctorate in education at Teachers College, Columbia University in 2014, where he wrote and drew his dissertation entirely in comic book form. Titled Unflattening, it argues for the importance of visual thinking in teaching and learning, and was published by Harvard University Press in 2015. Unflattening received the 2016 American Publishers Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE Award) in Humanities, the Lynd-Ward Prize for best Graphic Novel of 2015, and was nominated for an Eisner Award for Best Scholarly/Academic work. To date, Unflattening has been translated into French, Korean, Portuguese, Serbian, Polish, Italian, and Chinese.There is an irony here that we are going to attempt to discuss these very visually linked ideas in an audio podcast, but I will also provide links to the excerpts of Unflattening that are available on Nick's website.GUESTSDr. Nick Sousanis, Eisner-winning comics author and an associate professor of Humanities & Liberal Studies at San Francisco State UniversityRESOURCESNick Sousanis' WebsiteNick Sousanis' TwitterUnflatteningOn Graphic Scholarship: A Conversation with Nick Sousanis (The Comics Grid) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
    YCBK 247: College enrollment is dropping even though the pandemic is waning

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 94:34 Very Popular


    In this episode you will hear:   (11:30) Mark and Vince discuss a May 26th article by Stephanie Saul that appeared in the New York Times entitled, “College Enrollment Drops, Even as the Pandemic's Effects Ebb”. Vince and Mark discuss why enrollment is dropping even though the pandemic is no longer at its zenith.   Mark and Vince also go off topic and talk about a range of college admissions topics       (39:34) For our question from a listener, a mom from Illinois wants to know if four schools is too few for her son to apply to   (56:24) Our interview is with John Ambrose, the Director of Undergraduatate Admissions at Michigan State University. Our topic is, Understanding Michigan State University.  3 of 3 This interview will also serve as our college spotlight.  Preview of Part 3 John continues to discuss MSU's strongest programs John goes on the hot seat in our lightning round   The recommended resource is the book, Fiske Countdown to College: 41 To-Do Lists and a Plan for Every Year of High School by Ed Fiske and Bruce Hammond     Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 27 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews you can still send in questions for our guests: Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Reed College-Milyon Truelove- Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

    Sound & Vision
    Andrew Ross

    Sound & Vision

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 70:42


    Andrew Ross received his BFA from The Cooper Union in 2011, where he was awarded the Gelman Trust Award for Excellence in Sculpture. He attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2011. He's been a resident and/or fellow of programs including The Triangle Arts Association, The Drawing Center's Open Sessions, LMCC's Swing Space, The Macedonia Institute, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, and he is a current awardee of Two Trees' Cultural Space Subsidy Program. Ross has exhibited in group exhibitions at The Hessel Museum, The Drawing Center, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Artists Space, Center for the Humanities at CUNY, White Columns, and Greene Naftali. He has staged solo exhibitions at Signal (Brooklyn, NY), American Medium (NY, NY), Clima Gallery (Milan, Italy), and False Flag (Long Island City, NY). Ross' work has been reviewed in Artforum, Art in America, Cultured, Flash Art, Mousse, and the Brooklyn Rail. Ross is a sculptor and new media artist who creates fragmentary constructions with figurative elements and everyday objects. With attention to metaphoric associations that his imagery elicits Ross' tableau scenes oscillate between speculative fiction and cartoonish satire. His figures are chimeric and mythical in appearance yet typically occupied with some form of work and juxtaposed with commonplace detritus. Joining traditional sculpture, assemblage and digital imaging, Ross's works capture existential issues regarding the conundrum of representation in our age of many avatars.

    Design Lab with Bon Ku
    EP 84: Designing Healthcare through Stories | Jay Baruch

    Design Lab with Bon Ku

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 39:43


    Does creativity help physicians care for their patients? Can making space for stories improve healthcare? How does imagination come into play in the practice of Medicine? Jay Baruch is a Professor of Emergency Medicine at Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where he directs the Medical Humanities and Bioethics Scholarly Concentration. He's a practicing ER doc, writer and educator. His upcoming book of non-fiction, narrative essays is: Tornado of Life: A Doctor's Journey through Constraints and Creativity in the ER (MIT Press, fall 2022) He is also the author of two award-winning short fiction collections, "What's Left Out" and and "Fourteen Stories: Doctors, Patients, and Other Strangers" (Kent State University Press, 2007). His academic work emerged as a response to the realization that medical training didn't prepare him for the complexity, uncertainty, and ambiguity that pervades patient care. His teaching involves interdisciplinary collaborations and pushing boundaries with people who hold different expertise and ways of looking at the world. His innovative collaborators have included brilliant museum educators, designers, and artists. Past honors include Director-at-Large, American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, the medical humanities section chair for the American College of Emergency Physicians, and faculty fellow at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities at Brown University. He received the inaugural Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Gold Humanism Award and the Brown Emergency Medicine, Innovations in Education Award. His current work focuses on arts and health and designing authentic spaces for fostering difficult conversations. Episode Mentions: Jay Baruch, MD. Doctoring and writing, creatively Book: Tornado of Life. A Doctor's Journey through Constraints and Creativity in the ER Follow Jay: Twitter | LinkedIn Episode Website: https://mailchi.mp/designlabpod/jaybaruch More episode sources & links Sign-up for Design Lab Podcast's Newsletter Newsletter Archive Follow @DesignLabPod on Twitter Instagram and LinkedIn Follow @BonKu on Twitter & Instagram Check out the Health Design Lab Production by Robert Pugliese Cover Design by Eden Lew Theme song by Emmanuel Houston

    Asia Rising
    Webinar: China's Ambitions in Antarctica and Their Implications for Australia

    Asia Rising

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 63:14


    In recent years, as the People's Republic of China (PRC) has grown in economic size, military strength and international influence, it has become more active in Antarctica. This has led to worries that Beijing's ambitions extend further than just scientific research and fishing. Concerns have been raised about the PRC wanting to exploit Antarctica's mineral and fossil energy resources and militarise the continent. There has been speculation that the PRC is even planning to make its own territorial claims. A La Trobe Asia event in collaboration with Australian Institute of International Affairs (AIIA) and China Matters to launch a new policy research report "China's Antarctic ambitions - and their implications for Australia" by Yun Jiang. Panel: - Yun Jiang (AIIA China Matters Fellow) - Assoc. Professor Nengye Liu (School of Law, Singapore Management University) - Richard Maude (Senior Fellow, Asia Society Australia) - Professor Nick Bisley (Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University)(Chair) Recorded on 3 August, 2022.

    With Good Reason
    HBCU Renaissance

    With Good Reason

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 52:00


    HBCUs rose from the ashes of slavery and have been educating Black students for generations. Cheryl Mango says HBCUs are currently experiencing a renaissance, sparked from Black Lives Matter movement and the fight for racial justice. Plus: HBCU bands like the Trojan Explosion at Virginia State University play with power and energy. It's an audio and visual display, with high-step marching and decked-out drum majors at the center of the performance. Taylor Whitehead says that HBCU sound and style is the pinnacle of Black musical excellence. Later in the Show: What does William Faulkner and a cool pair of sneakers have in common? More than you might think. Jemayne King is a sneakerhead and English professor at Virginia State University. He's combined his two passions into the first ever college English course on sneaker culture.

    Extreme Health Radio
    Dr. Betty Martini – Aspartame Is In Over 6,000 Food Products & Could Be Killing You, Are You Eating Any Of Them?

    Extreme Health Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 67:56


    [include file=get-in-itunes.html]Today was a great show about the dangers of aspartame. Dr. Betty Martini talked about how aspartame turns into a formaldahyde and actually damages the mitochondria in your cells. This is nasty stuff that you don't want to be eating. The trouble is that it's in over 6000 different food products and even more ingredients. We also discussed how MSG and natural flavors are almost as toxic and damaging to the human body. Please pass this show on to you friends and family. Aspartame is the sweet kiss of death. It's in over 6,000 food products. Listen to Dr. Betty Martini talk about it here. - Click to tweet this! - Get Notified:[ois skin="Show Page2"] - Commercials: - Please Subscribe: Subscribe To Our Radio Show For Updates! - Other Shows:[include file=show-links.html] | All Shows With This Guest - Show Date:Monday 8/19/2013 - Show Guest:Dr. Betty Martini - Guest Info:Dr. Betty Martini is the founder of the worldwide volunteer force, Mission Possible World Health International, which is committed to removing the deadly chemical aspartame from our food. This poison has brought more complaints to the American Food and Drug Administration than any other additive and is responsible for 75% of such complaints to that agency. From 10,000 consumer complaints FDA compiled a list of 92 symptoms, including death. They used to mail this list out, but now you can't get the list without a congressman or Freedom of Information Act request.Read More... Dr. Martini has been awarded an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree for the work she has done and continues to do in alerting the world to the dangers of aspartame and other unhealthy chemicals and additives. Dr. Martini has spent 22 years in the medical field. While working with a hematologist she supplied the CDC with reports on leukemia, which CDC said, were more than all the case histories submitted by the entire Emory University Hospital system combined, an indication of the low level of physician generated reports to the CDC. This reveals that only a small percentage of serious health threats are collected and statistically tabulated. - Topic:Aspartame, MSG, natural flavors, food dyes, artificial sweeteners - Guest Website(s): http://www.mpwhi.com (Guest Social Links Below. Please Follow Them!) Facebook N/A Twitter N/A Youtube N/A - Guest Product(s):Click Below To Checkout The Products While Listening! :) N/A - Items Mentioned: Dr. Russell Blaylock The Blaylock Wellness Report Sweet Misery - documentary A taste the kills documentary Diane Fleming – Husband Died From Aspartame Eating May Be Hazardous To Your Health - The Case Against Food Additives. While Science Sleeps http://www.doorway.com Aspartame detox resource guide Email: Ralph Walton aspartame birth defects rwalton193@aol.com - Connect:Discuss This Episode With Others - Donate: (Opens in a new window - Every bit helps us to keep delivering even better shows that help you heal & thrive!) - Support & Share :) Copy and paste the following HTML code into any web page. Or you can grab a badge! Interview with Dr. Betty Martini - Video Version:Full Youtube Interview (Opens in a new window) Youtube Time - Follow Us!:Please consider ReTweeting the following update to share this episode...#Aspartame is the sweet kiss of death. It's in over 6,000 products. Listen to Dr. #BettyMartini talk about it... http://t.co/gwXNhEFSOl— Extreme Health Radio (@ehrshow) August 27, 2013 - Watch a very helpful video [video_lightbox_youtube video_id=kNTs_YgKivw width=640 height=480 anchor=tutorial] for this page. - Subscribe to iTunes or Leave a Review Subscribe to iTunes podcast

    ASLE EcoCast Podcast
    Empires in Ruin: A Conversation with Rina Garcia Chua and Jeffrey Santa Ana

    ASLE EcoCast Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 63:22


    This month Lindsay and Brandon are joined by Rina Garcia Chua and Jeffrey Santa Ana to discuss their recent edited collection Empire and Environment: Ecological Ruin in the Transpacific. Rina is an incoming Jack and Doris Shadbolt Fellow in the Humanities at Simon Fraser University and she completed her PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of British Columbia Okanagan. Jeffrey is an associate professor of English and affiliated faculty in Asian and Asian American Studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University. Among other things, the group discusses cigar-smoking monsters, the recent edited collection, and problems with the word “anthropocene.” Co-editors of the collection, Heidi Amin-Hong and Zhou Xiaojing, were unable to join the episode due to scheduling conflicts. For more on Rina and Jeff:  Twitter: @RinaGarciaChua  Website: https://www.rinagarciachua.com/ Empire and Environment: https://www.press.umich.edu//11580516  ASLE EcoCast: If you have an idea for an episode, please submit your proposal here: https://forms.gle/Y1S1eP9yXxcNkgWHA   Twitter: @ASLE_EcoCast Lindsay Jolivette: @lin_jolivette Brandon Galm: @BeGalm If you're enjoying the show, please consider subscribing, sharing, and writing reviews on your favorite podcast platform(s)! Episode recorded July 19, 2022. CC BY-NC-ND 4.0  

    The Idea Store
    Humanities Seminar: Don Quixote

    The Idea Store

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 66:13


    You can find "Don Quixote" here A not-so-gallant knight's adventures --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genevieve-sugrue/support

    Reading McCarthy
    Episode 29: BLOOD MERIDIAN panel, Part I

    Reading McCarthy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 54:56


    Three returning guests join us for this first part of our interesting and engaging discussion of Cormac McCarthy's magnum opus Blood Meridian.  Steve Frye is professor and chair of English at California State University, Bakersfield and President of the Cormac McCarthy Society. He is the author of Understanding Cormac McCarthy (Univ. of South Carolina Press) and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Cormac McCarthy, and Cambridge UP's Cormac McCarthy in Context. He has written numerous journal articles on Cormac McCarthy and other authors of the American Romanticist Tradition.  Additionally, he is the author of the recently published novel Dogwood Crossing. Stacey Peebles is Chair of the English program, Director of Film Studies, and the Marlene and David Grissom Professor of Humanities at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky.  She is the author of Welcome to the Suck: Narrating the American Soldier's Experience in Iraq (2011) and Cormac McCarthy and Performance: Page, Stage, Screen (2017).  She is co-editor of Approaches to Teaching the Works of Cormac McCarthy.  She has been editor of the Cormac McCarthy Journal since 2010.   Rick Wallach is one of the founders of the Cormac McCarthy society, and recently retired after some few years teaching English at the University of Miami, He is senior editor of the Cormac McCarthy Society casebook series, and editor of the two-volume collection of essays Sacred Violence as well as Myth, Legend Dust: Critical Responses to Cormac McCarthy, and co-editor with Lynnea Chapman King and the late James Welsh of From Novel to Film: No Country for Old Men. He has written widely and extensively on numerous topics in literature, film, media and contemporary music.  Thanks to Thomas Frye, who composed, performed, and produced the theme music and interludes for READING MCCARTHY.   The views of the host and his guests do not necessarily reflect the views of their home institutions or the Cormac McCarthy Society. To contact me, please reach out to readingmccarthy(@)gmail.com. Find us on Twitter and Facebook; the website is at readingmccarthy.buzzsprout.com, and if you'd like to support the show you can click on the little heart symbol at the top of the page to buy the show a cappuccino, or you can support us at www.patreon.com/readingmccarthy.Support the show

    MelissaBPhD's podcast
    EP112: Six Things To Do After an Alzheimer's Diagnosis

    MelissaBPhD's podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 7:42


    In 2022, it is estimated that 6.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease.   The number of people per 100,000 newly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease per year (incident rate) appears to be declining, the number of people with Alzheimer's disease (prevalence) is expected to continue to grow (2022 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Report, p. 19).     If you are or someone you love have been newly  diagnosed with Alzheimer's, this episode will give you 6 things to do because many people do not know where to start.  Many people feel that everything has changed after learning that a loved one has Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. There are many myths and misperceptions about Alzheimer's disease (stigma) – this episode will give you resources to learn more about the reality of disease progression and steps to take.  First of all, remember that you're not alone. There is help available, and there are resources to connect you to people who understand what you've been through and what you're going to go through.  These six things presented in this podcast will help you after getting a diagnosis like Alzheimer's disease; tips on what to get organized, permission to make healthy living a priority, and ensuring important things are taken care of.  Key points covered in this episode:   ✔️ #1. Educate Yourself (And Others) About The Disease.  Being stigmatized by others is often a primary concern of people living with Alzheimer's and their care partners. Stigma is a negative label identifying a person with an illness or disability. Stigma around Alzheimer's disease typically happens because people don't understand it or know what to expect.   Learn as much as possible about this disease and encourage care partners to do the same. You can learn about the condition from the Alzheimer's Association website.  ✔️ #2. Coming To Terms With Your Diagnosis And Sharing The Diagnosis     With Others  You may or may not be able to come to terms with your diagnosis before you tell others. You may not want to wait until you've had time to come to terms with it, or you may want to wait; but either way,  as the disease progresses, you will need help and support from others who know and understand you. You can decide who to tell and when to tell and when you do, this is an excellent time to educate them, too.   ✔️ #3. Be An Active Participant In Your Financial, Legal, And Long-Term Care Planning.  This will likely be the best gift you can give your loved ones. If you don't provide information about your wishes and your legal documents accessible, the burden of making these decisions will fall on your loved ones. I recommend getting a copy of Cameron Huddleston's book “Mom & Dad, We Need to Talk” and filling out the “In Case of Emergency Organizer” available on her website for free.   ✔️ #4. Reevaluate Your Priorities.  Set goals for the things you still want to accomplish. Life is not over yet – so dust off that bucket list and start planning to do as much of it as possible while you're still able. This is the same thing that many people do after receiving a terminal diagnosis.   You know yourself best and what's most important to you in the time you have left – which by the way, could be 20 more years. While you are able, make decisions about how you want the rest of your life to look and share that vision with those who love you.  ✔️ #5. Take An Active Role In Managing Your Disease And Build Your Care Team.  Start now and begin to build your care team. This includes you, your family and friends, neighbors, and healthcare professionals with expertise in Alzheimer's care.   Learn more about Dementia Friendly Communities. These are communities that provide supportive options that foster quality of life. If you don't have one yet, you may want to look into starting one.   Additionally, find out if there is a Village in your area, join it and start volunteering. The Village Model is “neighbors caring for neighbors” – a nonprofit, grassroots, community-based organization of volunteers that reflects the needs of its members and communities.   ✔️ #6. Discuss Alternative Treatments, Supplements, And Medications With Your Healthcare Team.  Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's, some drugs may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Other medicines change disease progression, with benefits to cognition and function.  Look into FDA-approved drugs, alternative treatments and supplements, and consider participating in clinical trials.   If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.   About Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FGSA, FAAN:   I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my PhD in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 which led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/. 

    Developing Classical Thinkers
    Tree by its Fruits: A Summary of 2021-2022

    Developing Classical Thinkers

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 7:50


    Do classical schools deliver on their promises? Thales Academy can answer the question by simply pointing to the remarkable academic achievements of last school year, which are similar at both high school campuses and consistent with every graduating class since its inception. Check out the episode to hear the benefits of classical education and how Thales Academy is helping preparing its graduates to not just survive but thrive in the colleges and careers of their choice.

    Story in the Public Square
    STPSQ1205H_ELENA_CONIS_SXM

    Story in the Public Square

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 28:35


    We grow up being educated on the power of science to explain the physical world.  But Dr. Elena Conis offers a more complex view of the role of science in public life—and the stories and understanding it offers all of us as we grapple with everything from pesticides, to vaccines, and climate change. Conis is a writer and historian of medicine, public health and the environment and an affiliate of Berkeley's Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.  Prior to joining the Graduate School of Journalism, she was a professor of history and the Mellon Fellow in Health and Humanities at Emory University.  She was also award-winning health columnist for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote the “Esoterica Medica,” “Nutrition Lab,” and “Supplements” columns.  Conis' current research focuses on scientific controversies, science denial, and the public understanding of science, and has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, and the Science History Institute.  Her first book, “Vaccine Nation: America's Changing Relationship with Immunization,” received the Arthur J. Viseltear Award from the American Public Health Association and was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title and a Science Pick of the Week by the journal Nature.  Her latest book is “How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall and Toxic Return of DDT.”  She holds a Ph.D. in the history of health sciences from UCSF, master's degrees in journalism and public health from Berkeley and a bachelor's degree in biology from Columbia University.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
    YCBK 246: Marichal Gentry: How to excel while in college-Part 1

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 50:21 Very Popular


    In this episode you will hear:   Announcements and introduction of our newest team member, Lynda Doepker. Lynda and Mark will discuss her new role on the podcast  Interview: Marichal Gentry Marichal shares his distinguished background from banking to social work to working at Duke and on to various roles he played at Sewanee, Middlebury and Yale. Marichal talks about how important it is for students to learn how to handle freedom in a responsible way; he talks about teaching adulting, now, before they leave for college. Marichal explains what FERPA is, and he talks about the importance of FERPA Marichal talks about the importance of the Career Center Next Marichal discusses safety at college Finally, Marichal talks about alcohol and drinking at college     Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 25 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews not yet completed Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Reed-Milyon Truelove- Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) University of Connecticut-Vern Granger* Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner Arlene Cash   To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

    Arab Digest podcasts
    The Arab Digest Podcast Top Ten Countdown number 7: Cairo and Ankara: a new axis?

    Arab Digest podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 33:07


    Our podcast Cairo and Ankara: a new axis? ranks number 7 in the Arab Digest top ten podcast list. It was released 18 June 2021 and features Ali Bakir, a research assistant professor at Ibn Khaldoon center for Humanities and Social Sciences in Doha. Ali is an analyst following geopolitical and security trends in the Middle East, and especially those between Turkey and the Arab world. His conversation with Digest editor William Law focussed on the thaw in relations between Cairo and Ankara. Sign up NOW at ArabDigest.org for free to join the club and start receiving our daily newsletter & podcasts.

    Asia Rising
    #189: Pelosi's Visit to Taiwan Escalates Tension with China

    Asia Rising

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 27:47


    There has been an escalation of tension between China, Taiwan and the United States in the wake of a visit to Taiwan by United States house speaker Nancy Pelosi, the first visit of such a rank in close to 30 years. While the visit validates Taiwan's democratic claims, it gives China an incentive to increase hostilities and increase tension in the region. Guest: Professor Nick Bisley (Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at La Trobe University). Recorded on 8 August, 2022.

    Bob Dylan: About Man and God and Law
    26: Bob Dylan Goes Electric with Kathryn Lofton

    Bob Dylan: About Man and God and Law

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 73:25 Very Popular


    We are going electric with Bob Dylan and  Professor Kathryn Lofton. Few pop culture moments have been analyzed more closely than Bob Dylan "going electric" at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. We ask what is all means for American religion, race, and music with our special guest, Kathryn Lofton.Kathryn is the Lex Hixon Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies, Professor of History and Divinity, and FAS Dean of Humanities at Yale University. She has written extensively about capitalism, popular culture, and the secular, from her first book, Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon (2011) to the book Consuming Religion (2017), parsing the  relationship between religion and consumer capitalism from the Kardashian family to  Goldman Sachs. Her article on Dylan going electric in the Journal of Popular Music Studies knocked us off our feet. Enjoy this wide-ranging conversation about some of our most favorite topics in rock music, the life of the spirit, and more. Check out the book About Man and God and Law: The Spiritual Wisdom of Bob Dylan wherever fine books are sold, and learn about related projects at mangodlaw.com.We are proud to be part of the Pantheon Podcasts Network.  

    The Idea Store
    Humanities Seminar: Measure For Measure

    The Idea Store

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 79:45


    You can find "Measure For Measure" here Shakespeare's most misunderstood (and in our opinion, most underrated) play --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genevieve-sugrue/support

    With Good Reason
    Set The Stage

    With Good Reason

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 52:00


    It's difficult to be a veteran re-entering civilian life. One day your major decisions are being made for you. The next? It's up to you. What do you do? Every Tuesday in one small town, veterans gather with Elizabeth Byland for life-affirming improv. Plus: How Brad Stoller worked with incarcerated women to create a performance about, in part, one of the world's most unsuspecting hot commodities... toilet paper. Later in the show: How David Riley turned a museum auditorium into a public programming TV set. And: Some industries came to a slow crawl at the dawning of the pandemic. Gregg Stull says that the curtains closed immediately for theaters across the country.

    The Idea Store
    Humanities Seminar: Montagine

    The Idea Store

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 81:12


    The essays of Michel de Montagine --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genevieve-sugrue/support

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
    YCBK 245: The testing predators have beat the ACT & the College Board

    Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 126:26 Very Popular


    In this episode you will hear:   (23:02) Mark and Susan discuss an article by Akil Bello, written on June 27th, 2022 that appeared in Forbes entitled, “The testing predators have beaten the ACT and the College Board” They article looks at how the test providers of the ACT and the College Board once skewered the test prep companies but now they are in bed with them. How and why did this happen? Susan draws off her decades of experience to shed invaluable of insights on this topic.   https://www.forbes.com/sites/akilbello/2022/06/27/the-testing-predators-have-beat-act-and-the-college-board/?sh=706e6651cf7f   (01:01:17) For our question from a listener, Jessica, a student in Connecticut wants to know, How do I pick the school I am going to apply Early Decision to? Mark explains why this is a flawed question.   (01:28:00) Our interview is with John Ambrose, the Director of Undergraduatate Admissions at Michigan State University. Our topic is, Understanding Michigan State University.  2 of 3 This interview will also serve as our college spotlight.  Preview of Part 2 John talks about an admission model they have built that really helps them to factor different high schools into their file reading. John explains why test scores are not necessary for MSU to read a file well. John talks about whether the college a student applies to impacts admissions decisions. John shares what colleges are the toughest to get in John discusses merit scholarships John shares all of the new developments on campus John shares some of the initiatives that are being worked on John shares how MSU can provide support for incoming freshman John talks about whether MSU is looking at making their classes smaller John is asked if MSU is working on improving communication with parent and students about “to do” items regarding transitioning to MSU John goes more in depth about MSU's strongest programs   (01:42:48) The recommended resource is Common App's updated application guide for First-Year students to completing the Common App. Here is the link: https://www.commonapp.org/apply/first-year-students   .   Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 27 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews you can still send in questions for our guests: Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Reed College-Milyon Truelove- Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

    New Books in Dance
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books in Dance

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

    New Books Network
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in History
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    New Books in Biography
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books in Biography

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

    Recall This Book
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    Recall This Book

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    New Books in American Studies
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books in American Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

    New Books in Communications
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books in Communications

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

    New Books in Film
    86 Dana Stevens on Buster Keaton (JP EF)

    New Books in Film

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:46


    Dana Stevens joins Elizabeth and John to discuss Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema and the Invention of the Twentieth Century. Her fantastic new book serves as occasion to revel in the work and working world of Buster Keaton, that "solemn, beautiful, perpetually airborne man." Although packed with fascinating tidbits from Keaton's life, Camera Man is much more than just a biography. It performs its own airborne magic, lightly traversing topics like the crackdown on the use of children in vaudeville, the fluidity of roles before and behind the camera in early Hollywood and the doors that were briefly (ever so briefly) opened for female directors. Among other treats, Dana unpacks one of Keaton's early great "two-reelers" One Week ( a spoof of brisk upbeat industrial films) and his parodic "burlesques" e.g. of Lillian Gish. People, Films, Books and Ideas in the conversation include: Roscoe ("Fatty") Arbuckle: got Keaton his start in early films like Butcher Boy, reportedly filmed the day Keaton first stepped onto a set. He said "Buster lived inside the camera." "Cinema of Attractions." a phrase coined by film historian Tom Gunning to describe the way the early years of cinema (1895 to 1913, more or less) achieved success by way of gags, stunts, special effects and other dazzling technological innovations--rather than plot or character development,. John and Dana rave about Keaton's last great film (age 33!), The Cameraman (1928) and deprecate the later silents (with a silent caveat for the pancake scene Grand Slam Opera). Mabel Normand: Arbuckle's longtime collaborator and briefly a rising director--Charlie Chaplin kneecapped her at a crucial moment in her career. Dana singles out for special praise Fatty and Mabel Adrift (1916) starring Luke, the first canine movie star. Singing in the Rain as a MGM-friendly myth-making explanation for Clara Bow's eclipse (and the famous vocal failure moment: "I can't stand 'im") Steamboat Bill Jr. ( 1928, Buster Keaton feature) "Keaton's most mature movie" says Dana. Read the transcript here. Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

    Behind Greatness by Inspire North
    118. Dr. Jeffrey Kripal – Chair in Philosophy & Religious Thought, Rice University / Author / Philosopher – Believing in Belief, not in Beliefs

    Behind Greatness by Inspire North

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 62:24


    Jeff joins us from Houston. He is the current Associate Dean of the Faculty and Graduate Programs in the School of the Humanities and the J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought at Rice University. He is also the Associate Director of the Center for Theory and Research at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California. In this conversation we explore the “3rd space” that Jeff occupies and a wide array of topics therein and all connected to the esoteric: a term that is important to Jeff. We discuss Jeff's position on the physical world vs the immaterial world, Belief vs Beliefs, the importance of the Humanities and the porosity of the human being. We delve immediately into the Paranormal and learn how old religious heterodoxy allowed what we could accept and what we should ignore and linked to how many scientists (social and otherwise) are “in the closet” about these experiences. We discuss how our culture is trying to change itself today as we share our experiences without the societal / cultural shackles of our recent ancestors. We learn more about his thoughts on religion as a mechanism to tap into paranormal forces and then attribute to an external deity. We discuss being in your own story, creating your own story versus believe that you are your own story. We talk about religion as an art, the self, reincarnation, the importance of acting, the persona – and the Friendly Neighbourhood Spiderman.   Soo much to talk about and too little time!   To DONATE to the Behind Greatness podcast, please visit here: https://behindgreatness.org. As a charity, tax receipts are issued to donors. Behind Greatness IG: @behindgreatnesspodcast & @inspire_north   Jeff, Website: http://jeffreyjkripal.com Books: https://www.amazon.com/Jeffrey-John-Kripal/e/B001IODIT2%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share    

    Academic Dean
    Dr. Jeffrey Cass, Arkansas Tech University

    Academic Dean

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 38:01


    Jeffrey Cass is the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at Arkansas Tech University in Russellville, AR. Prior to this appointment he was Provost at the University of Houston-Victoria and Professor of English. He also been a faculty member and administrator at the University of Louisiana at Monroe and Texas A&M International University. Jeffrey is a native of Valley Center, CA and received is Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego. His professional field is British Romanticism and has published in the area of women and Orientalism. More recently, he has published research on the work of John Galt and William Godwin.

    Rattlecast
    ep. 153 - Heather Altfeld

    Rattlecast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 122:20


    Heather Altfeld has an undergraduate degree from Columbia University with majors in both Anthropology and Creative Writing, and an MFA in Poetry from the California State MFA consortium. She teaches in the Honors Program and for the Department of Comparative Religion and Humanities at California State University, Chico. Heather's second book of poems, Post-Mortem was selected by Eric Pankey for the 2019 Orison Prize, and is now available for order through Orison Books. Find more at: https://www.heatheraltfeld.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Choose a local news article. Follow Anna M. Evan's process from The Quarantina Chronicles: Make a word cloud from the text. Write a tritina using the three most common words as its line endings. Next Week's Prompt: Write an obituary for an inanimate object or idea. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.