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Academic disciplines that study human culture

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Best podcasts about Humanities

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Latest podcast episodes about Humanities

The VoxPopcast
e198. STEM vs Humanities: the Clatter in the Classroom

The VoxPopcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022


If you've been or known any kid who has gone to an American school in the last 50 years or so you've probably heard the advice to “get into STEM”… The post e198. STEM vs Humanities: the Clatter in the Classroom appeared first on The VoxPopcast.

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Roosevelt Montás On Saving The Humanities

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022


Roosevelt, who led the humanities-rich Core Curriculum at Columbia for a decade and still teaches there, has a new book out, Rescuing Socrates. We talk of Augustine and Socrates and Freud and Gandhi and the timelessness of the great texts. His book is a kind of response to the notion that these ideas and texts are somehow blighted by “whiteness” — a topic the Dish tackled last year. I loved this conversation — and the relief it gave from contemporary political and cultural obsessions. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

New Books in African American Studies
72 Caryl Phillips Speaks with Corina Stan

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 49:59


Our second January Novel Dialogue conversation is with Caryl Phillips, professor of English at Yale and world-renowned for novels ranging from The Final Passage to 2018's A View of the Empire at Sunset. He shares his thoughts on transplantation, on performance, on race, even on sports. Joining him here are John and the wonderful comparatist Corina Stan, author of The Art of Distances: Ethical Thinking in 20th century Literature. If you enjoy this conversation, range backwards through the RtB archives for comparable talks with Jennifer Egan, Helen Garner, Orhan Pamuk, Zadie Smith, Samuel Delany and many more. It's a rangy conversation. John begins by raving about Caryl's italics–he in turn praises Faulkner's. Corina and Caryl explore his debt (cf. his The European Tribe) to American writers like Richard Wright and James Baldwin. Meeting Baldwin was scary–back in those days before there were “writers besporting themselves on every university campus.” Caryl praises the joy of being a football fan (Leeds United), reflects on his abiding loyalty to his class and geographic origins and his fondness for the moments of Sunday joy that allow people to endure. John raises Orhan Pamuk's claim (In Novel Dialogue last season) that the novel is innately middle-class; Caryl says that it's true that as a form it has always taken time and money to make–and to read. But “vicars and middle class people fall in love, too; they get betrayed and let down…a gamut of emotion that's as wide as anybody else.” He remains drawn to writers haunted by the past: Eliot, W.G. Sebald, the huge influence of Faulkner trying to stitch the past to the present. Mentioned in the Episode James Baldwin, Blues for Mister Charley, The Fire Next Time Richard Wright, Native Son Johnny Pitts, Afropean Caryl Phillips, Dancing in the Dark J. M. Coetzee, “What We like to Forget” (On Caryl Phillips) Graham Greene (e.g Brighton Rock and The Quiet American) wrote in “The Lost Childhood” (1951) that at age 14 ” I took Miss Marjorie Bowen's The Viper of Milan from the library shelf…From that moment I began to write.” Maya Angelou, Letter to My Daughter William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom Read a transcript here Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Logos Institute Podcast
C. Stephen Evans on Moral Obligations and Divine Command Theory - Part 1

Logos Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 41:03


In this episode of the Logos Institute Podcast, we (Dani Ross & Jason Stigall) interview Professor C. Stephen Evans (University Professor of Philosophy and Humanities at Baylor; Professorial Fellow at the Logos Institute) about his extensive work on divine command theory and moral obligations. This is only part 1 of the interview, so we have much more to come. If you're interested in looking ahead, here are a few time stamps to help: 0:45 - How did you become interested in moral obligations and divine command theory (DCT)? 3:19 - How is your account of divine command theory different from theological volunteerism and other traditional renderings of DCT? 5:55 - What is the divine discretion thesis? 10:10 - Why is it misleading to describe all DCT's as a type of theological voluntarism? 15:43 - What are moral obligations and where do they fit in your account of DCT? 23:42 - How moral obligations are grounded on your account? 26:15 - What it means for Gods commands to be directed at the good 31:42 - Do moral obligations come in varying degrees? 34:41 - `how much do humans have to be aware of these obligations/standing to God in order to be subject to them? 36:20 - What are the different types of obligations? Are all obligations moral obligations? To learn more about the Logos Institute, visit our webpage at logos.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk. And don't forget to follow us on our blog where we post content from friends of the Institute at blogos.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk. You can also find us on Twitter (@TheologyStAs) and Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheologyStAs/?fb…Oc4Pz4P0qkCrfO_w Music: “10 Days (Instrumental)" by Forget the Whale
 From Free Music Archive 
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FMC Fast Chat

Biden's First Year & The State of America with Presidential Historian Douglas Brinkley

FMC Fast Chat


Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:14


In this episode of FMC Fast Chat, America's foremost presidential historian Douglas Brinkley grades Biden's first year, offers up some advice for the Cabinet, and tells us how he really feels about The 1619 Project from The New York Times. FMC Fast Chat is the podcast of the Fair Media Council and is hosted by Fair Media Council CEO & Executive Director Jaci Clement. Douglas Brinkley is the Katherine Tsanoff Brown Chair in Humanities and Professor of History at Rice University, a CNN Presidential Historian, and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. More: douglasbrinkley.com The Fair Media Council is a 501c3 nonprofit organization advocating for quality news and working to create a media-savvy society. This podcast is made possible by Northwell Health, Henry Schein, Protiviti, St Joseph's College, The Bartol Law Firm, and Hofstra University. More: fairmediacouncil.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
573: Dr. Sheree Bekker: A Contemporary Vision for Sports Injury Prevention

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:43


In this episode, Social Justice and Sports Medicine Research Specialist, Sheree Bekker, talks about social justice in sports, medicine, and research. Today, Sheree talks about the conversations around physiology and injuries, and the different environments that affect the ACL injury cycle. How do clinicians implement the findings in the research? Hear about Sheree's qualitative research methods, the importance of recognising the social determinants of injuries, tackling systemic experiences, and get Sheree's advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “We have to recognise the human at the centre of those experiences.” “Gendered language that seems like everyday language in sport can be really harmful to both men and women.” “[Be] cognisant of, and [be] able to have those conversations with athletes, patients, people that you work with all the time about their social conditions of their lives.” “The social conditions of our lives play into our injuries and our rehabilitation.” “It is about not simply seeing rehab as a biomedical issue alone to solve, but thinking about it as socially, politically, and materially oriented is a practice that you might incorporate in your way of thinking.” “Injury prevention, and a contemporary vision for injury prevention, needs to be athlete-centred and human-focused.” “We need to have those uncomfortable conversations about our complex, messy realities.” “Context is everything.” “Sport isn't neutral. It isn't apolitical.” “We can start to ask these questions, start to have these conversations. The answers aren't going to come tomorrow.” “These ripples will take some time.” “Connection is greater than competition.” “Hold on to the power of connecting with people who are at the same career stage and doing work with people who are at the same career stage as you.”   More about Sheree Bekker Dr Sheree Bekker (she/her) was born in South Africa, grew up in Botswana, completed her PhD in Australia, and now calls Bath (UK) home. She is an expert in ‘complexity' and research that links social justice and (sports) injury prevention. She has a special interest in sex/gender and uses qualitative methods. This underpins her work as an Assistant Professor in Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion in the Department for Health at the University of Bath. At Bath, she is Co-Director of the Centre for Qualitative Research, and a member of the Centre for Health and Injury and Illness Prevention in Sport (CHI2PS), and the Gender and Sexuality Research Group. Internationally, Sheree is an Early Career Representative for the International Society for Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise, and a founding member of the Qualitative Research in Sports Medicine (QRSMed) special interest group. In 2020 she was appointed as an Associate Editor of the British Journal of Sports Medicine, and in 2021 she was appointed Qualitative Research Editor of BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine. She completed a Prize Research Fellowship in Injury Prevention at the University of Bath from 2018-2020, and received the 2019 British Journal of Sports Medicine Editor's Choice Academy Award for her PhD research.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Physiotherapy, Social Justice, Injury, Prevention, Gender, Sexuality, Physiology, Sociology, Environment, Research, Change,   Resources: Anterior cruciate ligament injury: towards a gendered environmental approach   To learn more, follow Sheree at: Website:          https://sites.google.com/view/shereebekker/home Twitter:            @shereebekker Instagram:       @sheree_bekker   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hi, Sheree, welcome to the podcast. I'm so excited to have you on. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you so much for joining.   00:12 Thank you for having me. Karen. I am delighted to be talking to you today.   00:16 And today we're going to talk about some of now you had a couple of different presentations at the International Olympic Committee meeting in Monaco a few weeks ago, and we're going to talk about a couple of them. But first, I would love for you to tell the audience a little bit more about you, and about the direction of your research and kind of the why behind it. Because I think that's important.   00:43 Mm hmm. Yeah, I've actually I have been thinking about this a lot recently, over the course of the pandemic, and thinking about where my research and my work is going and why I'm so interested in in kind of social justice issues in sports injury research in Sport and Exercise medicine. And I guess for me, there are two reasons for that both of them related to my background. First of all, I was born in South Africa. And I grew up in Botswana. And I think, you know, growing up into countries that have interesting pasts, you know, South Africa having post of apartheid and Botswana having been a colonized country, I think I grew up in places where we were used to having difficult conversations about social justice issues on a national level. And I think, you know, that is something that has influenced me definitely in the way that I see the world. The second part for me is I studied human movement science at university. And my program was in a Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. And I didn't realize at the time that most people get their sport and exercise medicine, sports science, human movement, science training, in medical faculties, or in health faculties, whereas mine was very much social sciences and humanities. And I only realized this later that my training in this regard was quite different in terms of the way that I see the work that we do. And so now, I've landed here at the University of Bath, and I'm in a department for health. But once again, I'm back in a Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. So it's been a really, really nice connection for me to come back to these bigger social justice questions, I guess, that I'm interested, you know, in our field. So for me, that's really the why I think of why I do this work.   02:42 And, and kind of carrying along those themes of social justice and really taking a quat. Know, a quantitative, qualitative, sorry, qualitative eye, on athletes and on injury, let's talk about your first talk that you gave it at IOC, which is about the athletes voice. So take us through it. And then we'll ask some questions. So I'll, I'll shoot it over to you.   03:17 Yeah, so um, my first talk, the first symposium that I was involved in at IOC this year, we had titled The athlete's voice, and those of us who were involved with it, we're really proud to be able to get this topic, this kind of conversation onto the agenda in Monaco. I had so many people comment to me afterwards, that this was the first time that we've been able to have this kind of discussion at this specific conference. And, you know, previous editions, I think, have been very much focused on that biomedical that I was just talking about, given that it's Sport and Exercise medicine. And it was the first time that we've been able to bring athlete voice into this space. And so this symposium in my talk in particular, was really focused on qualitative research. Even though when we pitched the symposium, we kind of decided that we couldn't call it qualitative research, because it wouldn't have been accepted at the time. And, and now, it's amazing to me how far we've come that we can actually talk about qualitative research in these spaces. So what I spoke about, and what I was interested in is, you know, what are the kinds of different knowledges and who are the people that we might listen to in Sport and Exercise medicine and sports injury more broadly, that traditionally we maybe haven't scented and haven't listened to? And I was interested in those kinds of social meanings of injury and of injury prevention and how we might do things differently. So you know, for me, it was that Recognizing the value of alternative perspectives, and working across disciplines and advancing our research and practice in this way. And so that's really what I spoke about was, you know how we might do these things differently by actually listening to the people at the center of our work and listening to athletes themselves. And that was really the focus of that symposium.   05:26 And in looking through some of the slides from the symposium, some of the quotes that I'm assuming we're taking from the qualitative work are, gosh, they're kind of heartbreaking. So what do you do with that information once you have it, right? So you're conditioned not to quit, you turn off your emotions, you become a robot as soon as you step onto the field or the pitch or the court. So how do you take that qualitative research? And what do you do with that once you have it?   06:01 Yeah, so you know, my talk, the way I kind of structured my talk was to talk about how we generally do injury prevention. And what we generally do is we, you know, figure out what the issue is what the injury problem is, we develop an intervention, and then we implement that in intervention and hope that it works. And, and some, you know, that's the kind of general cycle that we use. And what I decided to do in my talk, which was only a 10 minute talk was to dedicate two of those minutes to a video that I showed, that was just set to music that flashed up all of these quotes from athletes. And there were quotes that I'd collected from a number of different sports, a number of different athletes and spaces over the years, that really speak about their experience in sports and these toxic environments, which is something that I think we tend to kind of put to the side, maybe sometimes and ignore, sometimes in sport, when we put sport up on a pedestal and only think about the good things that happen in sports. And those quotes are also, I guess, a throwback or connection to one of the other talks that I had at IOC, which is not something that I think we'll speak about today, but about safeguarding and recognizing safeguarding as an injury prevention issue. And so we had these, like two minutes of these quotes from athletes. And I think that video really signaled a palpable shift in the room in recognizing what athletes are actually saying, and what their experiences are in sport about needing to, I guess, you know, put their their kind of robot hat on and be this strong person within sport where they can't break down where they can't have injuries or anything like that. Otherwise, they're going to be the team. And just for us to come back and to recognize that humanity in that experience, within sport, I think is really, really important, especially when we're at a conference where we're talking about injury prevention and interventions, we have to recognize the human at the center of those experiences. And so for me, coming back to your question about what do we do with that information? I think that's really powerful information, in terms of how we think about what injury prevention is, and does. And I guess we always focus on bodies, and you know, body parts, the ankle, the knee, the hip, the growing. You know, that's, that's kind of been a big focus of injury prevention. And I think we often forget that injury prevention is and can be so much more than that. And that there are these social factors, or social determinants, that to play into injury and its prevention. So the social aspects of our lives in terms of, you know, abuse that might happen in these spaces, or just being exposed to toxic spaces, you know, how that does actually render us more susceptible to injury, and how that can thwart our injury prevention efforts in these spaces. So for me, it's about integrating both of those two things I think together, and that's what I'm kind of getting at with qualitative research.   09:19 And, and that leads me into something else I wanted to talk about, and that is a review from the British Journal of Sports Medicine that you co authored with Joanne Parsons and Stephanie Cohen, anterior cruciate ligament injury towards a gendered environmental approach. And what you just said, triggered in me something in in reading through that article was that there's intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors that can lead to injury and injury prevention programs, if done well, should incorporate both of those. Right but they often concentrate on the biomedical part of the The, whether it be strength training, or landing, or, you know, whatever it may be when we look at a lot of these injury prevention programs, but there are so many contextual issues and extrinsic issues that can impact any of those programs. So I'll kind of let you sort of talk through that a little bit and talk through some of the main points that you found in that paper. But gosh, it really gets you thinking like, Well, wait a second, it could be, like you said, if you are, depending on the environment in which you live, can have a huge impact. And it's, it's more than just, especially when it comes to girls and women, it's more than just oh, it's because you have your period. And that's why this happened. Or if your hips are wider, that's why you got injured, right? So go ahead, I'll throw it over to you. And you can kind of talk through that paper a little bit, and then we'll see what comes up.   11:04 Mm hmm. You know, I'm so happy to hear you say that, because I'm so I'm not a clinician, but it has been amazing to me to hear how this paper has resonated with clinicians and people working in this space in terms of your own experiences and what you see and what you hear from the people that you're working with. So yeah, you're absolutely right. I mean, this paper was born out of conversations that Steph and Joanne and I had in terms of how we were frustrated by I guess, the discourse around sports injury, particularly for girls and women, often being blamed on our physiology on our bodies, right. And to us, that seems like a bit of a cop out. And just to say, oh, you know, girls are more susceptible to ACL injury, because they have wider hips, so there's nothing that we can do about it, you know, so that's really pitched us that intrinsic risk factor that girls and women are just inherently weaker, or supposedly more fragile than boys and men, and there's nothing that we can do about it. So we're just going to have to kind of live with those injury breeds. Right. And, and we found that this kind of thinking had really underpins so much of the injury prevention work that we'd seen over the last 10 or 20 years. And we wanted to problematize this a little bit and to think through what those kind of other social and I would say structural determinants of sports injuries are. So I'm starting to talk about this idea of the social determinants of injury. So not just what are those intrinsic things, but actually, what are the what are the other other social modes, I guess, that we might carry that might lead to injury. So in this paper, we speak about how we, as human beings, literally incorporate I think, biologically, the world in which we live. So our societal or ecological circumstances, we incorporate that into our bodies. And so we can start to see how injury might be a biological manifestation of exposure to that kind of social load. So for girls and women, how our gendered experience of the world might render us more susceptible to injury, rather than just positioning ourselves as being more weak, or more fragile. So we were interested in how society makes us and skills in women more weaker, and more fragile. And so in this way, we speak about how you know, from the time that we're babies, girls are not expected to do as much physically we are brought up differently to young boy babies might be when we go through school and play sport in school, we play different kinds of sports, and again, you know, on average, or in general, and girls, goes out, you know, not encouraged to be as active and to do as much with our bodies as boys. And we then go in right to have this kind of that cumulative effect of less exposure to activities and doing things with our bodies. Actually, that is what leads to us being more susceptible to things like ACL injury over time. And this is carried on in the kind of elite sports space as well. So we see how girls and women's sports are devalued in so many ways and how we're not expected to do as much or to perform as well. Or to train as hard I guess, as boys and men So an example of this that actually happened a couple of weeks after we published the paper was the NCAA March Madness. I don't know if you remember, there were those pictures that were tweeted all over social media, about the women's division, only being supplied with one set of teeny, tiny Dunda. Whereas the men's division was given, you know, massive weight room with everything that they needed to be able to train to be able to warm up and do everything that they needed to do in that state. And the first that was just an excellent example of what we're talking about in terms of girls and women being expected to and actually being made, I guess, weaker than boys and men are in exactly the same sports spaces. And so that's kind of a rundown, I guess, of what we wrote about in the paper.   15:53 Yeah, and I look back on my career as I was a high school athlete, college athlete, and not once was it, hey, we should go into the gym and train with specific training programs, because it will help to make you stronger, maybe faster, better, less prone to injury, but the boys were always had a training program. You know, they always had a workout program. So I can concur. That is like a lived experience for me as to what training was like, comparing the boys versus girls college straight through or high school straight through to college. And yes, that March Madness thing was maddening. Pun intended. I couldn't you could not believe couldn't believe what we were seeing there. That was that was completely out of bounds. But what I'd like to dive in a little bit deeper to the article, not not having you go through everything line by line. But let's talk about the different environments that you bring up within the article, because I think they're important. And a little more explanation would be great. So throughout this kind of ACL injury paradigm, you come up with four different environments, the pre sport environment, the training environment, the competition environment, and the treatment environment. So would you like to touch on each of those a little bit? Just to explain to the listeners, how that fits into your, into this paper and into the structure of injury prevention?   17:31 Yeah, sure. So um, yeah, what we did with this paper was we take we take the the traditional ACL injury cycle, and that a lot of us working in sports injury prevention are aware of, and we overlay what we called gendered environmental factors on top of that, so we wanted to take this this site, call and think through how our gendered experiences and girls and women, again render us more susceptible, and over the course of a lifetime, or a Korean. And so starting with the pre sport environment, you know, that goes back to what I was just saying about girls and boys being girls being socialized differently to boys, when we're growing up. So that kind of life course effect, gender affects over the life course, in terms of what we're expected to do with our bodies. That really starts in that pre sport environment when we're babies and young boys and young girls. And then we track how that works throughout the ACL injury cycle. So moving into the next step, coming back to this NCAA example, you know, what the training environment looks like, and how it might be gendered in ways that we might not even pick up on. So another example here, and this is a practical example that we've given to some sports organizations, since then, is, you know, the kind of gendered language that seems like everyday language and sport that can actually be really harmful to both men and women. So for example, you know, talking about girl push ups, you know, that really does set a precedent for what we think about girls and women in sports spaces. When you say, Oh, you go over there and do some girl push ups, it really does render girls and women as being more weak, you know, weaker and more fragile than boys and men. So those kinds of gendered experience in sports spaces, and you're an example there is really key. But then we also talk about kind of during injury and post injury as well. And this comes more into the kind of rehabilitation space and so on how, again, expectations of girls and women's bodies might play into what we expect when we go through rehabilitation as well and, and how that plays into that ACL injury cycle of recovery, as well. So that's really for So it was overlaying gender, across all of those spaces. And I think that gives us a really powerful way of looking at ACL injury differently and to, to conceptualize what we might do both in injury prevention, but also once injury has happened to help girls and women differently.   20:20 And in reading through this paper, and and also going through the slides that you graciously provided on Twitter, of of all of your talks at IOC, as a clinician, it for me, gives me so much more to think about, and really sparked some thoughts in my head as to conversations to have with the patient. So what advice would you give to clinicians, when it comes to synthesizing a lot of this work? And taking it into the clinic, talking with their patient in front of them and then implementing it? Because some people may say, oh, my gosh, I have so much to do. Now, I have to read all of this. Now I have to incorporate this, do you know what I mean? So it can some be somewhat overwhelming. So what advice do you have for clinicians? Yes,   21:13 so I really do think and as I said earlier, I think a lot of what we're seeing here is what clinicians are doing all the time anyway, I think, especially people who are already connected to this kind of idea of this social determinants of health. And so I guess, for me, it is really just being cognizant of, and being able to have those conversations with athletes, with patients with people that you work with all the time, about their social conditions of their lives. So not again, not just reducing people down to bodies, but recognizing that people have you know, that the social conditions of our lives play into our injuries and our rehabilitation, and holding space for that, you know, when I'm teaching, that's what I say to my students all the time, but I know that that you know, this, and clinicians know this better than I do. You, you know, it's not just about saying to someone, go away and do these exercises, and come back to me when you know, that person might have a full time job with three kids to look after. And, you know, a lot of other things on their plate as well that that one exercise or exercise program isn't necessarily going to be the silver bullet or the answer to, you know, the way that they need to be dealing with that injury. So I think for me, it's again, that re humanizing and being able to have those those conversations and recognizing those social determinants of injury or recovery, and so on. And so I think for clinicians, it is about not simply seeing rehab as a biomedical issue alone to solve, but thinking about it as socially and politically and materially oriented as a practice that you might incorporate in your way of thinking. That's really it. It doesn't need to be any more than that. We don't need to complicate it. Any more than that.   23:10 Yeah. Perfect. Thank you for that. And as we start to wrap things up, is there a, are there any kind of key points that you want to leave the listeners with? Or is there anything that we didn't touch on that you were like, oh, I need I need people to know this. This is really important. Hmm.   23:36 Yeah, I think, you know, if we kind of connect the conversations that we've kind of had today with the different points that we've connected to, I think, you know, what I saw in IRC at the IOC conference in Monaco is I really felt especially on day one at that athlete centered symposium that we had, I really felt like a palpable shift in that room. And in the conversations that I've had afterwards, with people I've had so many people come up to me to say that, you know, that it was really inspiring, and it's helped them to be able to go away and have different kinds of conversations, incredibly have different kinds of conversations about the work that we're doing in injury prevention and in Sport and Exercise medicine more broadly. And so I really think that we need to focus on that idea that injury prevention and a contemporary vision for injury prevention needs to be athlete centered and human focused. And I think if we truly committed to this, I think the ways in which we develop our interventions, and the ways in which we might go about our work, more generally in Sport and Exercise medicine, in physiotherapy and so on, it needs to reflect the socio cultural, so meaning those social determinants of injury in cluding the ways in which things like sexism, and misogyny, and racism, and classism, and ableism, and homophobia and transphobia, how that all can and does actually lead to injury. I think those are larger conversations that we need to be having enough field that we've started to have very slowly, but they are difficult conversations to have. And we often cut them out when we only think about injury as a biomedical thing, again, only thinking about bodies. And so for me, I think those are the those are the thing that we now need to get uncomfortable, you know, about, we need to have those uncomfortable conversations about our complex, messy realities, and that we're dealing with that athletes are human beings, that these are our experiences of the world, that sport and exercise medicine needs to reflect that as well. In terms of our composition, we need to reflect the communities that we serve as well. And Tracy Blake talks about that often. And you know, those are the conversations that I'd like to see our field having going forward. And I do think there was a shift in being able to say those things at Monaco this year.   26:16 Yeah. And so what I'm hearing is, was the big takeaway for me from Monaco is context is everything. And we can't, we can no longer take that out. And focus, like you said, just on the biomedical aspect of this person in front of us as if they don't have past experiences and emotions and thoughts and fears and concerns. And context is everything. And for clinicians, it sounds like a challenge to start having these conversations at more conferences. I know it's this little kind of bubble of clinicians, but if it can start there, perhaps it can make a ripple out into the wider public and into having these conversations with your athletes and patients and not be afraid to have these difficult conversations, or to ask the probing questions to the person in front of you. Because they're more than just their ACL injury, they're more than just their back pain. So I think challenging clinicians to have these conversations, whether it be one on one like this, or within large groups at conferences, and then take that back to your, to your practice and really start living it and understanding that this can is as important, maybe, in some cases more important than the biomedical injury in front of you.   27:41 Oh, I could not agree more with that statement. I mean, something that I've spoken about a lot before is that, you know, sport isn't neutral. It's not a political. And it's the same for the work that we do. It's, you know, for far too long, it's been positioned as a neutral science thing that we do. And I think we're now starting to recognize the context around that, that our values and our principles and people's lives and experiences, you know, as you say, play as much as if not more of a role in their experience of sport, and injury, and rehab, and all of that. So I would agree with you completely, we need to be having more of these conversations, we need to recognize this within our research, we need to recognize this within our practice. And we can't keep going on as if you know, none of so if we can remove all of that from the practice of working with human beings and being human beings as well. You know, all of this is connected for me. And as you know, as we're seeing now, it's for all of us who work in this space, once we start to have these conversations, we can start to ask different questions, we can start to think about things differently. And I think that that's really powerful for the future of our work in this space.   28:55 Yeah. And I think it's also important to remember that we can start to ask these questions start to have these conversations that the answers aren't going to come tomorrow. So that instant gratification that has become the world that we are now living in that if it doesn't happen within the next couple of days, that means it's not going to happen, but that these ripples will take some time. Yeah, absolutely.   29:19 And, you know, so a lot of my work is in complexity theory. And what I say about that is, you know, there probably are not going to be hard and fast answers here. But it will bring up new considerations and it will bring up I think, I'd like us to move away from this idea that we can solve things, but actually move closer towards the idea that this is an ongoing practice. And that that's always going to be I think, more powerful for me when we see things like injury prevention as a process or a practice. That's not necessarily going to solve things. But that is you know, really To the context in which we live in our lives is an ongoing thing. And I think that's what we brought into the ACL injury cycle. Papers. Well,   30:09 yeah, I think it takes away from the clinician as being the MS or Mr. Fix it to, okay, we are layering ourselves into people's lives. And we need to be able to do that in a way that fits the person in front of us as best we can.   30:26 Yeah, exactly. Beautifully said exactly. We can't necessarily solve those things for them. But these provide considerations, things that we can do. And yeah, we can move with that.   30:39 Yeah, absolutely. Well, Cherie, thank you so much. I mean, we can go on and talk for days on end about this stuff. And perhaps when one of these days we will we'll have a bigger, wider, broader conversation and and make it go on for a couple of hours, because I'm sure it will bring up a lot of questions, maybe some answers, and perhaps some changing of minds when it comes to injury prevention and what our role is as clinicians. So thank you so much, where can people find you?   31:13 Thank you, Karen. And I love that I think broader conversations are so helpful in this space. So people can find me on Twitter at Shree Becker, that's probably the best place to find me. I'm always over there and happy to have broader conversations with everybody. So please come and find me on Twitter.   31:32 Perfect. And we'll have links to everything, including the paper that we're talking about. From BDSM. We'll have links to everything at the show notes at podcast dot healthy, wealthy, smart, calm. So one question left that I asked everyone and that is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career? What advice would you give to your younger self?   31:51 Oh, so that's a really good question. And it's I think it's my Elan series, again, connected to what we saw in Monaco. And something that I've said for many years now is connection is greater than competition. And something that I live in that I feel like I wish I had done earlier is to hold on to the power of connecting with people who are at the same career stage and doing work with people who are at the same career stages as you especially someone who has and is an emerging researcher, or researcher clinician in this space, because I think the exciting new conversations that we're seeing in this space are coming from people who are you know, recently merging, I guess, in these researchers faces and so it's okay to collaborate rather than being in competition with people who are doing great work in your area. So that would be my advice.   32:54 I love it. I love it and couldn't agree more. So Sheree, thank you so much for coming on. Thank you again. I appreciate it.   33:02 Thank you so much, Karen. And everyone. Thanks   33:04 so much for tuning in and listening and have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

[Abridged] Presidential Histories
25.A.) How William McKinley revolutionized politics, an interview with Christopher McKnight Nichols

[Abridged] Presidential Histories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 56:09


When William McKinley ran for president in 1896, he out-raised his opponent 7-to-1, printed more campaign literature than all previous GOP presidential candidates combined, and organized what is often called the first modern presidential campaign. How'd he do it?Join me as I talk with professor Christopher McKnight Nichols, director of the Oregon State University Center for the Humanities; an expert on the Gilded Age, Progressive Era, World War I, and the 1918 flu pandemic; and author of Promise and Peril, America at the Dawn of the global age, to discuss what made McKinley's 1896 campaign such a game changer and how he pulled it off.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/AbridgedPresidentialHistories)

Sacred and Profane Love
Episode 45: Roosevelt Montas on Great Books and Intellectual Transformation

Sacred and Profane Love

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 75:08


In this episode, I am joined by Professor Roosevelt Montas to discuss his new book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation. Montas, a Dominican born American academic, makes the compelling case that study of the Great Books is potentially transformative, especially for students from working class communities or who are members of historically marginalized communities. Montas further argues that the future of the Humanities in this country does not lay primarily in specialized research but in undergraduate education--particularly in general undergrad education. We talk about arguments that Great Books courses are racist, sexist, or otherwise somehow oppressive, and why we think they are dead wrong. This episode is especially close to my heart and I hope you enjoy our conversation. Buy Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation here: https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691200392/rescuing-socrates Audio Edited & Music Produced by Anthony Monson

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 207: Humanities majors drop 8 years in a row

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 106:40


In this episode you will hear:   (16:05) In this week's “In the news” segment, a November 22nd, 2021 article in the Hechinger Report, by jill Barshay “The number of college graduates in the humanities drops for the eighth consecutive year”  Mark and Dave discuss why this is happening and what are the implications of this.   https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-the-number-of-college-graduates-in-the-humanities-drops-for-the-eighth-consecutive-year/   (38:56) Mark and Lisa discuss a question that three listeners sent in to us: Why would Connecticut College tell a student with a 1320 on the SAT, that they will admit the student if they withdraw their test score. Mark and Lisa debate whether Conn College crossed an inappropriate line by doing this. Mark and Lisa got really immersed in this debate, with each side having points they wanted to make, so they turned this into a multiple part answer. This is part 1.    (01:00:26) Mark interviews Lynda Doepker, a parent and podcast listener about how she strategically used parent college Facebook groups to learn more about the colleges her daughter is applying to. (Part 1 of 2)     (01:11:26) Our recommended resource for episode 207 is the book: “The Debt Trap: How Student Loans Became a National Catastrophe” by Josh Mitchell. The book traces the 70 year history of how student debt is now at 1.6 trillion dollars.   (01:21:54) The college Spotlight is:  Sewanee: The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee (https://new.sewanee.edu/)   To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live:     To access our transcripts, click: Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans is used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   Feel free to pass this podcast on to others who you feel will benefit, even if they are not a YCBK listener.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: . If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you subscribe to our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340. All they ask is that you review the services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Jouissance Vampires
Psychiatry and Trauma with Vincenzo Di Nicola

Jouissance Vampires

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 90:17


We are joined by Dr. Vincenzo Di Nicola to discuss modern psychiatry and his work on trauma, family therapy and the philosophical underpinnings of psychiatry. We discuss the prevalence of trauma discourse, the philosophy of Alain Badiou, why social dynamics are often ignored by modern psychiatry and psychology, and we examine the history of the "anti-psychiatry movement" with special focus on R.D. Laing, Jacques Lacan and Frantz Fanon. Vincenzo Di Nicola is an Italian-Canadian psychologist, psychiatrist and family therapist, and philosopher of mind. Di Nicola is a tenured Full Professor in the Dept. of Psychiatry & Addiction Medicine at the University of Montreal, where he founded and directs the postgraduate course on Psychiatry and the Humanities, and Clinical Professor in the Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at The George Washington University, where he gave The 4th Annual Stokes Endowment Lecture in 2013.

New Left Radio
What Is To Be Done - Interview w/ Slavoj Žižek

New Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 54:45


Fan of the show? https://www.patreon.com/newleftradio (Support us on Patreon)! World renowned leftist philosopher Slavoj Žižek joins for a sweeping and wide ranging conversation on the urgency of this moment as we struggle through COVID-19 while trying to cling to failed paradigms. In a world where the status quo realizes that the old way must give way to the new, there is little action being taken to transition to what Žižek calls the “communism of necessity”. How can the left win in the face of a century of losses? How do we battle against the losses of the working class to the politics of the right? What is to be done? About his new book Heaven In Disorder As we emerge (though perhaps only temporarily) from the pandemic, other crises move center stage: outrageous inequality, climate disaster, desperate refugees, mounting tensions of a new cold war. The abiding motif of our time is relentless chaos. Acknowledging the possibilities for new beginnings at such moments, Mao Zedong famously proclaimed “There is great disorder under heaven; the situation is excellent.” The contemporary relevance of Mao's observation depends on whether today's catastrophes can be a catalyst for progress or have passed over into something terrible and irretrievable. Perhaps the disorder is no longer under, but in heaven itself. Characteristically rich in paradoxes and reversals that entertain as well as illuminate, Slavoj Žižek's new book treats with equal analytical depth the lessons of Rammstein and Corbyn, Morales and Orwell, Lenin and Christ. It excavates universal truths from local political sites across Palestine and Chile, France and Kurdistan, and beyond. Heaven In Disorder looks with fervid dispassion at the fracturing of the Left, the empty promises of liberal democracy, and the tepid compromises offered by the powerful. From the ashes of these failures, Žižek asserts the need for international solidarity, economic transformation, and—above all—an urgent, “wartime” communism. https://www.orbooks.com/catalog/heaven-in-disorder/ (Buy the book here) About Slavoj Žižek Slavoj Žižek (b. 1949) is a Slovenian-born philosopher and psychoanalyst. He is a professor of philosophy at The European Graduate School / EGS, a senior researcher at the Institute for Sociology and Philosophy at the University of Ljubljana, Global Distinguished Professor of German at New York University, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, and founder and president of the Society for Theoretical Psychoanalysis, Ljubljana. Aside from these appointments, Žižek tirelessly gives lectures around the globe and is often described as “the Elvis of cultural theory”. Although, more seriously, as British critical theorist Terry Eagleton confers, Žižek is the “most formidably brilliant” theorist to have emerged from Europe in decades. Many, in fact, now consider Žižek to be “the most dangerous philosopher in the West.” He grew up in in Ljubljana, Slovenia, which at the time was part of the former Yugoslavia. The regime's more permissive, albeit “pernicious,” policies allowed for Žižek's exposure to Western theory and culture, in particular film, English detective novels, German Idealism, French structuralism, and Jacques Lacan. Studying at the University of Ljubljana, he completed his master's degree in philosophy in 1975 with a thesis on French structuralism and his Doctoral degree in philosophy in 1981 with a dissertation on German Idealism. He then went to Paris, along with Mladen Dolar, to study Lacan under Jacques Alain-Miller (Lacan's son-in-law and disciple). During this time in Paris, from 1981–85, Žižek completed another dissertation on the work of Hegel, Marx, and Kripke through a Lacanian lens. After his return to Slovenia, he became more politically active writing for , a weekly newspaper, co-founding the Slovenian Liberal Demorcratic Party, and running for one of four seats that comprised the collective Slovenian presidency... Support this podcast

Filter: Biblical Clarity in a Confusing World
Mark Talbot on Suffering, Lament, and Hope in the Christian Life

Filter: Biblical Clarity in a Confusing World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 49:43


All of human life is accompanied by pain and difficulty. Christians are frequently caught off guard by the suffering they experience. They are unprepared either due to bad assumptions about the gospel's promises or by poor discipleship. Since everyone will face hardship in some form, it's important that believers understand what the Bible has to say about suffering in the Christian life. My guest on today's show is Dr. Mark Talbot and he has written an excellent book called When the Stars Disappear to help with this task. Mark Talbot grew up in the Seattle area. When he was seventeen, he fell off a Tarzan-like rope swing and suffered a paralyzing accident that left him partially paraplegic. After graduating from Seattle Pacific College with a B. A. in English Literature, he completed his Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. He began his teaching career as an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Calvin College in 1987 and then moved to Wheaton College in 1992, where he teaches courses on suffering, philosophical theology, philosophical psychology, David Hume, and Jonathan Edwards. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he served as the Vice-Chair of the Council for the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals as well as the Executive Editor of Modern Reformation magazine. More recently, he has published When the Stars Disappear: Help and Hope from Stories of Suffering in Scripture, which is the first of four volumes on Suffering and the Christian Life. The second volume, Give Me Understanding that I May Live: Situating Our Suffering within God's Redemptive Plan will be available in July of 2022. He has received the Leland Ryken Award for Teaching Excellence in the Humanities and is currently a Scholar for the Christian Scholars' Fund. He and his wife, Cindy, have one grown daughter. They reside in Wheaton. Check out the full show notes for highlights and resources from this episode: https://tinyurl.com/2p8fhy8s SUPPORT THIS PODCAST: PayPal: https://paypal.me/AaronShamp?locale.x=en_US Venmo: @AaronShamp Cash App: $AaronShamp –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Track: Perseverance — Land of Fire [Audio Library Release] Music provided by Audio Library Plus Watch: https://youtu.be/Ue48lJLVA30​Free Download / Stream: https://alplus.io/perseverance​–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

EthicalStL.org
Feelings of Awe and Wonder – Helen De Cruz, PhD, 9-Jan-2022

EthicalStL.org

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 22:25


Dr Helen De Cruz, the Danforth Chair in the Humanities in the Philosophy department of Saint Louis University, discusses the feelings of awe and wonder.

Faith Matters
Can Creation Heal Us? — Terryl Givens with George Handley

Faith Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 52:28


For this week's episode, we're releasing a classic conversation between George Handley and Terryl Givens — one that was released very early in the life of this podcast, and that many of you may not have yet heard.The first chapter of Genesis says: “In the beginning, God said let there be light, and there was light.” God created this extraordinary world, the scriptures tell us, through the power of his Word.It makes all the more sense, then, that a Professor of comparative arts and letters, like George Handley, would spend so much time thinking about, and enjoying creation. After serving as Associate Dean of the College of Humanities from 2015 - 2018, George was appointed Associate Director of the Faculty Center at BYU.He's also the author of several books, including Home Waters, the novel American Fork, and two Maxwell Institute “Living Faith” books: If Truth were a Child, and, most recently, The Hope of Nature. In this conversation, George speaks with Terryl about connecting with the divine through nature, about being a good steward of the earth; about the tragic death of his brother; and the history of a river. He's consecrated his life and talents to discovering and sharing what is good and beautiful.We're so happy to be able to share this classic episode of the podcast with all of you, and we hope you enjoy Terryl's conversation with George Handley.

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew
Meghan Sullivan and Paul Blaschko | The Good Life Method

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 69:21


About our guests: Meghan Sullivan is the Wilsey Family College Chair in Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, director of the God and the Good Life Program, and director of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study. She has published works in many leading philosophy journals. Her first book, Time Biases, was published by Oxford University Press. Her work has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the John Templeton Foundation. Sullivan has degrees from the University of Virginia, Oxford University, and Rutgers University, where she earned a PhD in philosophy. She studied at Balliol College, Oxford University, as a Rhodes Scholar. Paul Blaschko is an assistant teaching professor in philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. He heads up curriculum design and digital pedagogy for the God and the Good Life Program, and has recently been working to develop similar curricula at universities across the nation as part of an initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Blaschko completed an MA in philosophy at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, a PhD at the University of Notre Dame in 2018, and held the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship prior to being appointed to his current position. About The Good Life Method: For seekers of all stripes, philosophy is timeless self-care. Notre Dame philosophy professors Meghan Sullivan and Paul Blaschko have reinvigorated this tradition in their wildly popular and influential undergraduate course “God and the Good Life,” in which they wrestle with the big questions about how to live and what makes life meaningful. Now they invite us into the classroom to work through issues like what justifies our beliefs, whether we should practice a religion and what sacrifices we should make for others—as well as to investigate what figures such as Aristotle, Plato, Marcus Aurelius, Iris Murdoch, and W. E. B. Du Bois have to say about how to live well. Sullivan and Blaschko do the timeless work of philosophy using real-world case studies that explore love, finance, truth, and more. In so doing, they push us to escape our own caves, ask stronger questions, explain our deepest goals, and wrestle with suffering, the nature of death, and the existence of God. Philosophers know that our “good life plan” is one that we as individuals need to be constantly and actively writing to achieve some meaningful control and sense of purpose even if the world keeps throwing surprises our way. For at least the past 2,500 years, philosophers have taught that goal-seeking is an essential part of what it is to be human—and crucially that we could find our own good life by asking better questions of ourselves and of one another. This virtue ethics approach resonates profoundly in our own moment. The Good Life Method is a winning guide to tackling the big questions of being human with the wisdom of the ages. You can purchase The Good Life Method anywhere where great books are sold.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 We Love Music...the Podcast By Lia Bremer

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 23:54


“We Love Music...the podcast” focuses on the benefits of music. During this episode, Lia Bremer speaks with two experts about music education. They examine how it has changed over time with the advancement of technology. They also highlight the importance of music therapy.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Voice Of Good By Cate Baker

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 11:25


“Voice of Good” is a podcast that gives a voice to smaller, lesser-known nonprofits to share their mission and their passion for change. In this episode, Cate Baker focuses on Circles Salt Lake. Circles Salt Lake is a 5-year-old non-profit that works with families to help them get out and stay out of poverty.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Utah Rewind Western Special By Tyler Jackson

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 68:19


In this episode of “Utah Rewind,” Tyler Jackson explores the different genres of Western Movies. As he explores each era of Westerns, he highlights movies filmed in Utah and talks about the state's contribution to the film industry.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Social Effect- Steyee Podcast

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 32:49


The “Social Effect” is about all things “social”. This episode focuses on the effects of social media specifically surrounding young kids around the ages of 8-18. In this episode Rylee Steyee interviews mother/daughter duo Emma and Stacee Worthen and how social media has affected both their high school experience and job working with kids both in middle and high schools in the Utah area.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Mental Aspect By Jaylene Gilstrap

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:55


Welcome to the “Mental Aspect,” in which we discuss the importance of mental health and the role it plays in sports. In this episode, Jaylene Gilstrap talks about gymnastics and the well-known case of the twisties. She speaks with Olympic medalists and a certified psychologist and athletic trainer here at the U.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Studying Abroad By Eunice Jung

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:10


“Studying Abroad” shares the stories of students who have left their homes in pursuit of a broader education. Eunice Jung examines the advantages and disadvantages of learning abroad. She also examines the difficulties students face due to cultural and language differences.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Someone Else's Shoes By Jena James Personal

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 25:35


When listening to “Someone Else's Shoes,” you get to dive into the life of someone else, and really understand what it's like to be them. For this episode, trade in your dress shoes for a pair of jellies because we're throwing it back to our childhood days. Host Jena James shares conversations with four different children and gets the inside scoop on what it's like to be a kid, because– let's face it– after so many years, we seem to have forgotten what that is like.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Pop Up The Volume A Pop - Culture Podcast By Justin Galletly

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:20


In the episode of “Pop Up the Volume,” Justin Galletly speaks with voice actress Dorothy Elias-Fahn who has been doing voice over for almost three decades. It's an insightful conversation about her career and how she broke into the profession.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Normal Brain By Kenzie Wilkinson

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 48:33


Welcome to “Normal Brain.” A safe place where you can hear other people's stories and experiences with mental health. Listen to therapists, parents, teens, and people just like you, as we spread awareness to end the stigma surrounding mental health. This episode features the host Kenzie Wilkinson, her mother Heidi Wilkinson, mental health advocate Saige Glazier, and therapist Richard Sullivan. Trigger Warning: Note that sensitive topics are talked about that
could trigger certain individuals. Make sure you are in a safe place physically and mentally before continuing.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Here's To Our Twenties By Camille Baron

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 35:36


“Here's to Our Twenties” focuses on 20-year-olds who are learning from their mistakes as they begin to navigate adulthood. Camille Baron shares “life tips." Whether it's paying bills or having a work-life balance, it all takes some getting used to. This podcast ensures twenty-somethings don't feel like they're alone.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 GenZ Utah Jazz By Brian Preece

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 17:11


The Utah Jazz headed into the 2021-22 NBA season with a bad taste in their mouths 
following last year's unceremonious playoff exit. In this episode of “GenZ Utah Jazz,” Brian Preece talks with Quin Snyder, Jordan Clarkson, Donovan Mitchell, Mike Conley and several Jazz newcomers to get their feelings on the upcoming season and how they can put last year behind them.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Better Than Coffee By Maxwell Cotton

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 15:37


Motivation, it's what gets us moving every morning of every day. In this episode of
“Better than Coffee,” Maxwell Cotton learns what motivates a couple of University of Utah football players.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Aria Talks Sports By Aria Fatahian

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 23:26


In this episode of “Aria Talks Sports,” Aria Fatahian breaks down the GOAT debate between Michael Jordan and LeBron James. It's a deep dive into the facts regarding the debate. The episode is purposefully set at 23 minutes to honor both men's number in basketball.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 All Things Sports by Micah Bernard

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 22:31


In this episode of “All Things Sports,” Micah Bernard examines why athletes decide to become coaches. He interviews three members of the University of Utah Football Program to learn about their career journeys.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Aliens By Gaetano Chiarenza

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:34


Do Aliens Exist? In this episode of “Aliens,” Gaetano Chiarenza takes a look at aliens in pop culture, in scientific fact and in conspiracy theories to determine if they do exist. Do you believe? Don't make a decision before listening to this thrilling episode.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Adventuring 801 By Brooke Christensen

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 23:42


In this episode of “Adventuring 801,” Brooke Christenson is talking about things to do in Salt Lake City. She focuses on things unique to our hometown and experiences you won't find anywhere else. Won't you adventure with us?

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 University Of Dating Episode 3

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:15


Hosted by: Micah Bernard, Jenalee James, Eunice Jung, Rylee Steyee University of Dating focuses on the culture and taboos surrounding campus dating life in Utah. University of Dating relays awkward dating stories and interviews of specific topics each week to relate to everyone's interests. Episode 3 focuses on what it's like for international students to be dating at Utah's universities.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 University Of Dating Episode 2

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 51:42


Hosted by: Micah Bernard, Jenalee James, Eunice Jung, Rylee Steyee University of Dating focuses on the culture and taboos surrounding campus dating life in Utah. University of Dating relays awkward dating stories and interviews of specific topics each week to relate to everyone's interests. Episode 2 focuses on BYU Students, and how they navigate dating on a campus that has a strong religious presence and many dating myths.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: CPMM 4670 University of Dating Episode 1

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 50:11


Hosted by: Micah Bernard, Jenalee James, Eunice Jung, Rylee Steyee University of Dating focuses on the culture and taboos surrounding campus dating life in Utah. University of Dating relays awkward dating stories and interviews of specific topics each week to relate to everyone's interests. Episode 1 focuses on student athletes, and how they navigate dating with a busy schedule and a small circle of individuals always knowing their personal business.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: Comm 4670 Pop Quarantine Episode 3

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 24:27


Hosted by: Cate Baker, Lia Bremer, Justin Galletly, and Ethan Pearce The “Pop Quarantine” podcast talks about how Pop Culture has been impacted by the Covid-19 Pandemic. Episode 3 of “Pop Quarantine examines the film industry and how it's been impacted by the COVID-19 Pandemic. We'll talk about everything from the movie theater experience to a film insider's take on the effects of the pandemic.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Pop Quarantine Episode 2

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 12:51


Hosted by: Cate Baker, Lia Bremer, Justin Galletly, and Ethan Pearce The “Pop Quarantine” podcast talks about how Pop Culture has been impacted by the Covid-19 Pandemic. In episode 2 of “Pop Quarantine,” Ethan, Lia, Justin, and Cate go over the effect of COVID-19 on public libraries. We spoke to Brooke Young, who works with the Salt Lake City public library, to get her perspective on the changes libraries have seen over the past two years.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Pop Quarantine Episode 1

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:08


Hosted by: Cate Baker, Lia Bremer, Justin Galletly, and Ethan Pearce The “Pop Quarantine” podcast talks about how Pop Culture has been impacted by the Covid-19 Pandemic. Episode 1 focuses on the music industry and the impact on local music festivals.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Aftermath Episode 4

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 21:02


Hosted by: Brooke Christenson, Jaylene Gilstrap, Brian Preece, and Kenzie Wilkinson The Aftermath discusses changes that have occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It's a safe place where you can relate, learn, and prepare yourself for whatever comes next. Episode 4 of “The Aftermath” highlights the more uplifting and positive aspects of the pandemic. Hear messages of hope and learn to be grateful for every day.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Aftermath Episode 3

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:16


Hosted by: Brooke Christenson, Jaylene Gilstrap, Brian Preece, and Kenzie Wilkinson The Aftermath discusses changes that have occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It's a safe place where you can relate, learn, and prepare yourself for whatever comes next. Episode 3 of “The Aftermath” focuses on loss. Loss of lives, loss of opportunities and loss of our sense of normal. A University of Utah marching band member talks about the opportunities she lost, while another woman talks about the loss of a loved one with an unflinching positivity.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Aftermath Episode 2

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 21:10


Hosted by: Brooke Christenson, Jaylene Gilstrap, Brian Preece, and Kenzie Wilkinson The Aftermath discusses changes that have occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It's a safe place where you can relate, learn, and prepare yourself for whatever comes next. Episode 2 of “The Aftermath” focuses on the many changes brought about by Covid. Societal norms have transformed the way we eat, learn, work, vacation, and keep ourselves healthy.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 The Aftermath Episode 1

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 39:05


Hosted by: Brooke Christenson, Jaylene Gilstrap, Brian Preece, and Kenzie Wilkinson The Aftermath discusses changes that have occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It's a safe place where you can relate, learn, and prepare yourself for whatever comes next. Episode 1 of “The Aftermath” features the personal stories of each host and how their lives were impacted by Covid-19. Hear how the virus impacted Jaylene and the U's gymnastics program. Brooke outlines the effects of Covid on her Drum Corp career. Kenzie describes the stark differences in health precautions in her dorm compared to those taken in her hometown of Salem. And Brian talks about how Covid turned his wedding plans upside down.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Utah Rewind Episode 3 - Hereditary

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 61:18


Hosted by: Camille Baron, Gaetano Chiarenza, Aria Fatahian, Tyler Jackson In the third thrilling episode of “Utah Rewind,” Aria, Camille, Tyler, and Guy discuss the movie “Hereditary” and their own paranormal experiences! “Hereditary” was directed by Ari Aster and has been critically acclaimed as a masterpiece.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Utah Rewind Episode 2 - The Sandlot

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:30


Hosted By: Camille Baron, Gaetano Chiarenza, Aria Fatahian, Tyler Jackson In Episode 2 of “Utah Rewind,” we discuss “The Sandlot.” We will tell you some cool stories and facts behind the movie.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Utah Rewind Episode 1- High School Musical

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:30


Hosted by: Camille Baron, Gaetano Chiarenza, Aria Fatahian, Tyler Jackson Welcome to the “Utah Rewind!” Every week we dive into the stories behind some of our favorite movies filmed here in the beautiful state of Utah. In our first episode, we cover a childhood favorite – “High School Musical.” Tune in to meet our team, learn about the production of the film, and get our take on how we feel about the film now that we are adults.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Wine-ing About Life Episode 3 - Afterlife

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:37


Hosted by: Averiel Bailey, Maxwell Cotton, and Darienne Debrule Episode 3 of “Wine-ing About LIfe” examines how the afterlife may drive us to find our purpose in life. Hear a religious perspective from the son of a Christian pastor, an atheist, and a woman who shares her afterlife experience.

Humanities Radio
Humanities Radio Presents: COMM 4670 Wine-ing About Life Episode 1 - Purpose

Humanities Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 30:43


Hosted by Averiel Bailey, Maxwell Cotton, and Darienne Debrule Episode 1 of “Wine-ing About Life” examines the purpose of life. What is the purpose of life? Hear a scientific perspective from a medical doctor and get a philosophical perspective from a life coach to gain insight on how to find purpose in your life.

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: Humans have free will

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 49:06


Life is full of decisions, big and small.  What to eat for breakfast, what to wear to work, who to ask for advice, where to send your kids to school.  But are any of these decisions truly our own? A growing movement of psychologists, philosophers, and neuroscientists believe that these decisions may feel like a tossup, but in reality are predetermined, merely the firing of neural pathways forged over time that lead to predictable conclusions. Despite how we feel, free will is an illusion. Supporters of this deterministic worldview argue that our choices are no more under our own control than our own biology. The myriad decisions we make over the course of our lives emerge from background causes of which we are unaware and over which we exert no conscious control. But detractors of this worldview argue that free will and the modern understanding of our brains is not mutually exclusive.  They argue that free will exists on a higher order beyond our physical selves, and cannot be reduced to our mere biology. Much of human thought and action cannot be explained at the physical level, but that renders it no less real. Today we ask the question, do we make our choices, or do our choices make us? Arguing for the motion is Christian List, Professor of philosophy and decision theory at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, co-director of the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy, and author of Why Free Will Exists. Arguing against the motion is Gregg Caruso, Professor of philosophy at SUNY Corning, Visiting Fellow at the New College of the Humanities, and author of Just Deserts: Debating Free Will. Christian List: “Free will is the capacity to choose and control our own actions, and common sense suggests that we humans have this capacity”. Gregg Caruso: “Who we are, and what we do is ultimately the result of factors beyond our control”. Sources: Big Think, Closer to Truth The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/ Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Jacob Lewis Editor: Kieran Lynch Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney
#279 Meghan Sullivan - Creating a Good Life with Philosophy

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 73:26


Meghan Sullivan is the Wilsey Family College Chair in Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, director of the God and the Good Life Program, and director of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study. She has published works in many leading philosophy journals. Her first book, Time Biases, was published by Oxford University Press. Her most recent book -- The Good Life Method (with Paul Blaschko) -- is out with Penguin on January 4, 2021. Her work has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the John Templeton Foundation. Sullivan has degrees from the University of Virginia, Oxford University, and Rutgers University, where she earned a PhD in philosophy. She studied at Balliol College, Oxford University, as a Rhodes Scholar. The Good Life Method is a winning guide to tackling the big questions of being human with the wisdom of the ages. Episode Transcript  Watch on YouTube Get exclusive access to Masterworks by clicking HERE Subscribe to my Momentum Monday Newsletter Connect with us! Whatgotyouthere Sponsors Masterworks NuSkool Snacks Collagen Protein Bars https://nuskoolsnacks.com/

The Story Collider
A Magical Night: Stories about moments when science was magic

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 33:37


In this week's episode, both of our storytellers experience a magical night that changes everything. Here's hoping that we all have a similarly magical night tonight, on New Year's Eve! Part 1: Growing up in Pakistan, Salman Hameed falls in love with the mysteries of the universe when he stumbles upon Carl Sagan's Cosmos. Part 2: As Zuri Sullivan pursues her dream of becoming an immunologist at Harvard, she begins to worry that she's being “weeded out.” Salman Hameed is Charles Taylor Chair and Associate Professor of Integrated Science and Humanities at Hampshire College, Amherst, MA. He holds a Ph.D. in astronomy from New Mexico State University at Las Cruces and a B.S. in physics and astronomy from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research interests have now moved in a sociological direction, and today his primary research focuses on understanding the reception of science in Muslim societies and how Muslims view the relationship between science & religion. He is also actively engaged in science communication and is the founder and CEO of Kainaat Studios that produces astronomy content in Urdu for audience in Pakistan. He has a YouTube channel for Urdu videos and a weekly astronomy segment in English for a radio station in Western Massachusetts. His classes focus on issues related to science, religion & society, and his favorite class is titled, “Aliens: Close Encounters of a Multidisciplinary Kind”. Zuri Sullivan is an immunologist and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University, where she studies how the immune system influences animal behavior. She hails from the DMV (DC, Maryland, and Virginia) and is fascinated by how the immune system helps animals adapt to different environments. Outside the lab, Zuri is passionate about increasing access to STEM careers for folks of all genders and ethnic backgrounds and sharing her science with the public. She loves spin class, sparkling rosé, and bragging about the fact that she shares a birthday with Beyoncé. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In Our Time
Fritz Lang

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 55:00


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Austrian-born film director Fritz Lang (1890-1976), who was one of the most celebrated film-makers of the 20th century. He worked first in Weimar Germany, creating a range of films including the startling and subversive Mabuse the Gambler and the iconic but ruinously expensive Metropolis before arguably his masterpiece, M, with both the police and the underworld hunting for a child killer in Berlin, his first film with sound. The rise of the Nazis prompted Lang's move to Hollywood where he developed some of his Weimar themes in memorable and disturbing films such as Fury and The Big Heat. With Stella Bruzzi Professor of Film and Dean of Arts and Humanities at University College London Joe McElhaney Professor of Film Studies at Hunter College, City University of New York And Iris Luppa Senior Lecturer in Film Studies in the Division of Film and Media at London South Bank University Producer: Simon Tillotson