Podcasts about literary life

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Best podcasts about literary life

Latest podcast episodes about literary life

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 156: The “Best of” Series – Why Read Fairy Tales, Ep. 70

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 91:01


Welcome to another episode in our “Best of The Literary Life Podcast” series. Today on The Literary Life Podcast, Angelina Stanford and Cindy Rollins tackle the topic of fairy stories, discussing the what, why and how of reading them. Angelina shares the distinctive characteristics of fairy stories in contrast to other types of stories, such as myths. They deal with the question of whether fairy tales are “escapist”, the influence of the Grimm brothers scholarly work on interpreting fairy stories, and allowing the story to unveil its deeper truths without forcing meaning onto it. Angelina gives an illustration of how to see the gospel messages in fairy tales by talking us through the story of Sleeping Beauty. She refutes the ideas that fairy tales are about human romance or are misogynistic. She also highlights some of the Enlightenment and Puritan responses to fairy tales that still linger with us today. Cindy and Angelina also discuss some common concerns such as the magical, weird, or scary aspects of fairy tales. Angelina also makes a distinction between folk tales, literary fairy tales, and cautionary tales. Other Literary Life series openers referenced in this episode: Episode 20: An Experiment in Criticism by C. S. Lewis Episode 71: Phantastes by George MacDonald Episode 30: The Literary Life of Caitlin Beauchamp Commonplace Quotes: After a certain kind of sherry party, where there have been cataracts of culture but never on word or one glance that suggested a real enjoyment of any art, any person, or any natural object, my heart warms to the schoolboy on the bus who is reading Fantasy and Science Fiction rapt and oblivious of all the world beside.  C. S. Lewis Children are not deceived by fairy tales. They are often and gravely deceived by school stories. Adults are not deceived by science fiction. They can be deceived by stories in women's magazines. C. S. Lewis Both fairy stories and realistic stories engage in wish fulfillment, but it is actually the realistic stories that are more deadly. Fairy stories do awaken desires in children, but most often it is not a desire for the fairy world itself. Most children don't really want there to be dragons in modern England. Instead, the desire is for they know not what. This desire for something beyond does not empty the real world, but actually gives it new depths. He does not despise real woods because he has read of enchanted woods. The reading makes all real woods a little enchanted. C. S. Lewis Ancient History by Siegfried Sassoon Adam, a brown old vulture in the rain,    Shivered below his wind-whipped olive-trees;   Huddling sharp chin on scarred and scraggy knees,   He moaned and mumbled to his darkening brain;   ‘He was the grandest of them all—was Cain!    ‘A lion laired in the hills, that none could tire;   ‘Swift as a stag; a stallion of the plain, ‘Hungry and fierce with deeds of huge desire.' Grimly he thought of Abel, soft and fair— A lover with disaster in his face, And scarlet blossom twisted in bright hair.   ‘Afraid to fight; was murder more disgrace? … ‘God always hated Cain' … He bowed his head— The gaunt wild man whose lovely sons were dead. Book List: Phantastes by George MacDonald The World's Last Night by C. S. Lewis An Experiment in Criticism by C. S. Lewis “On Three Ways of Writing for Children” by C. S. Lewis Surprised by Joy by C. S. Lewis The Princess and The Goblin by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at Angelina Stanford – House of Humane Letters. Find Cindy at MorningTimeforMoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at Cindy Rollins – Writer. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 155: The “Best of” Series – The Literary Life of Wendi Capehart, Ep. 69

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 96:26


Today on The Literary Life Podcast, we have another installment in our “Best of The Literary Life Podcast series. This week's replay is a special chat our hosts Angelina and Cindy had with Wendi Capehart. Wendi passed away in 2022, and this episode is in honor of her memory. Wendi was an adventurous mom of many and lived throughout Asia for many years. She spent the last several years enjoying the life of an at-home librarian, caring for her disabled daughter, and cherishing time with her 15 grandchildren. She also served on the AmblesideOnline Advisory board since its founding. Angelina starts off the conversation asking Wendi about her reading life beginning with her childhood memories of reading. Wendi talks a little about how books helped her survive and heal from the trauma of living in an abusive situation. They also discuss what the difference was for Wendi in leisurely reading and reading for school. Wendi shares some of the reasons she began homeschooling her own children, as well, and how she kept reading voraciously even after she became a mother. Angelina and Wendi talk about the brain and changing your reading habits to digest and enjoy more challenging books. Wendi shares how she built a library while one a military budget and moving frequently. They talked about too many things to cover in this summary, but you can scroll down for the many book titles mentioned in this episode! Commonplace Quotes: “We're all fools,” said Clemens, “all the time. It's just we're a different kind each day. We think, I'm not a fool today. I've learned my lesson. I was a fool yesterday but not this morning. Then tomorrow we find out that, yes, we were a fool today too. I think the only way we can grow and get on in this world is to accept the fact we're not perfect and live accordingly.” Ray Bradbury Where science does not teach a child to wonder and admire it has perhaps no educative value. Charlotte Mason Now the story of Christ is simply a true myth, a myth working on us in the same way as the others, but with tremendous difference–that it really happened–and one must be content to accept it in the same way, remembering that it is God's myth, where the others are men's myths. That is, the pagan stories are God expressing himself through the minds of poets, using such images as he found there, while Christianity is God expressing Himself through real things. C. S. Lewis If Only I Were King by A. A. Milne I often wish I were a King, And then I could do anything. If only I were King of Spain, I'd take my hat off in the rain. If only I were King of France, I wouldn't brush my hair for aunts. I think, if I were King of Greece, I'd push things off the mantelpiece. If I were King of Norroway, I'd ask an elephant to stay. If I were King of Babylon, I'd leave my button gloves undone. If I were King of Timbuctoo, I'd think of lovely things to do. If I were King of anything, I'd tell the soldiers, “I'm the King!” Book List: The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury Towards a Philosophy of Education by Charlotte Mason The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. S. Lewis by Alan Jacobs Honey for a Child's Heart by Gladys Hunt Winnie the Pooh by A. A. Milne The Three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas Gene Stratton Porter The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton Jane Austen The Little Prince by Antione de Saint-Exupéry The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson The Heroes by Charles Kingsley The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Graham Kim by Rudyard Kipling The Chestry Oak by Kate Seredy The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis The Rescuers by Marjorie Sharp The Borrowers by Mary Norton Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome Booth Tarkington Ben Hur by Lew Wallace The Bears of Blue River by Charles Major Thornton W. Burgess Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at MorningTimeforMoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 154: The “Best of” Series – What Is the Literary Life?, Ep. 1

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 42:38 Very Popular


Welcome to this episode in our “Best of The Literary Life Podcast” series, this time replaying our very first episode! In this inaugural episode, Cindy and Angelina introduce the podcast and what they mean when they talk about having a “literary life.” Each of them share how stories have shaped their personal lives, as well as how they believe stories have the power to shape culture. You can find and listen to the other 3 introductory episodes of The Literary Life mentioned in this replay at the links below- Episode 2: The Interview Episode Episode 3: The Importance of Detective Fiction Episode 4: Gaudy Night, Ch. 1-3 Although the online conference mentioned at the end of this episode has long since come and gone, you can still purchase the replay at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Commonplace Quotes: The first reading of some literary work is often, to the literary, an experience so momentous that only experiences of love, religion, or bereavement can furnish a standard of comparison. Their whole consciousness is changed. They have become what they were not before. C. S. Lewis The storyteller is one speaking out of memory, out of more than memory, speaking out of a trust left to the memory of the one speaking. Padraic Colum The Truisms by Louis MacNeice His father gave him a box of truisms Shaped like a coffin, then his father died; The truisms remained on the mantlepiece As wooden as the play box they had been packed in Or that his father skulked inside. Then he left home, left the truisms behind him Still on the mantlepiece, met love, met war, Sordor, disappointment, defeat, betrayal, Till through disbeliefs he arrived at a house He could not remember seeing before. And he walked straight in; it was where he had come from And something told him the way to behave. He raised his hand and blessed his home; The truisms flew and perched on his shoulders And a tall tree sprouted from his father's grave. Book List: An Experiment in Criticism by C.S. Lewis The Stone of Victory and Other Tales by Padriac Colum Stratford Caldecott Essay on Man by Alexander Pope For the Children's Sake by Susan Schaeffer Macaulay Elizabeth Gaskell Leisure: The Basis of Culture by Joseph Pieper Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 153: Our Literary Lives of 2022

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 91:55 Very Popular


On The Literary Life podcast today, our hosts look back on their reading lives over the past year. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas each share a commonplace quote, then they each share a little about how they approach reading in a way that fits with the demands of their busy lives. Each of our hosts talks about their literary surprises, their most outstanding reads of the year, disappointing books they read, and their personal favorite podcast books from 2022. Angelina also reiterates why reading rightly is so important to us all! Don't forget to join us for the 2023 Reading Challenge! Get your books and Bingo cards ready! Commonplace Quotes: A good story isn't told to make a point. A good story reflects the World God created. The point makes itself. Timothy Rollins “Blessed be Pain and Torment and every torture of the Body … Blessed be Plague and Pestilence and the Illness of Nations…. “Blessed be all Loss and the Failure of Friends and the Sacrifice of Love…. “Blessed be the Destruction of all Possessions, the Ruin of all Property, Fine Cities, and Great Palaces…. “Blessed be the Disappointment of all Ambitions…. “Blessed be all Failure and the ruin of every Earthly Hope…. “Blessed be all Sorrows, Torments, Hardships, Endurances that demand Courage…. “Blessed be these things–for of these things cometh the making of a Man….” Hugh Walpole I will not walk with your progressive apes, erect and sapient. Before them gapes the dark abyss to which their progress tends – if by God's mercy progress ever ends, and does not ceaselessly revolve the same unfruitful course with changing of a name. I will not treat your dusty path and flat, denoting this and that by this and chat, your world immutable wherein no part the little maker has with maker's art. I bow not yet before the Iron Crown, nor cast my own small golden sceptre down. J. R. R. Tolkien, from “Mythopoeia” A Selection from “The Secular Masque” by John Dryden All, all of a piece throughout; Thy chase had a beast in view; Thy wars brought nothing about; Thy lovers were all untrue. 'Tis well an old age is out, And time to begin a new. Book and Link List: Episode 60: Why Read Pagan Myths Episode 124: The Abolition of Man (beginning of series) Fortitude by Hugh Walpole The Killer and the Slain by Hugh Walpole The Old Ladies by Hugh Walpole Cherringham Mystery Series by Matthew Costello and Neil Richards The Ink Black Heart by Robert Galbraith The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards Anthony Berkeley Ronald Knox Rex Stout Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey Light Thickens by Ngaio Marsh Henry the Eighth by Beatrice Saunders The Talisman by Sir Walter Scott Hard Times by Charles Dickens Captive Flames by Ronald Knox The Book of the Dun Cow by Walter Wangerin The Most Reluctant Convert by David C. Downing The Truth and Beauty by Andrew Klavan The Man Who Knew Too Much by G. K. Chesterton The Rosettis in Wonderland by Dinah Roe Just Passing Through by Winton Porter The Christmas Card Crime and Other Stories ed. by Martin Edwards The Mistletoe Murder and Other Stories by P. D. James Edmund Crispin Agatha Christie: An Elusive Woman by Lucy Worsley Dorothy L. Sayers by Colin Duriez The Silver Chair by C. S. Lewis The Wood Beyond the World by William Morris The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis by Jason Baxter Rob Roy by Sir Walter Scott Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh I Live Under a Black Sun by Edith Sitwell The Dwarf by Par Lagerkvist You Are Not Your Own by Alan Noble Dune by Frank Herbert The Twist of the Knife by Anthony Horowitz The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley (not recommended) The Witness of the Stars by E. W. Bullinger (not recommended) The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim Dracula by Bram Stoker The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 152: Dracula At the Movies

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 111:25 Very Popular


On The Literary Life podcast this week, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are joined by Atlee Northmore to talk about film adaptations of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Atlee guides us through the timeline of Dracula film adaptations and, together with our hosts, talks about why these have fallen short of the book and how they have distorted people's view of this story. Head over to the HouseofHumaneLetters.com to get in on their sales through the end of 2022. Check out the sales on past online conferences this Christmas over at MorningTimeforMoms.com. Find Atlee's list of Movies and Their Literary Roots in pdf form here. You can also view an infographic of his Dracula film adaptation timeline here. Commonplace Quotes: The best thing you can do for your fellow, next to rousing his conscience, is not to give him things to think about, but to wake things up that are in him; or say, to make him think things for himself. George MacDonald, as quoted in A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War With all his passion for art he was not inclined to glorify the artist or to conceive of him as a superman producing masterpieces in his lonely pride. He thought of him rather as a workman who gave more than was asked from him from love of his work. Arthur Clotton-Brock Descartes did not begin with memory, with ‘Grammar': he went straight to Thinking before going through Remembering. Stratford Caldecott The cinematic Dracula, however, is generally bereft of metaphysical gravity. It is his seductive humanity that fascinates. Close examination of the cinematic Dracula reveals a gradual stripping away of his metaphysical attributes and a progressive tendency to humanize him, until, at the end of this evolution, he is transformed into a postmodern tragic antihero in revolt against the injustice of the Christian God. Jack Trotter, “The Cinematic Dracula: From Nosferatu to Bram Stoker's Dracula Hamlet's Advice to the Players by William Shakespeare Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently; for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumbshows and noise: I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it. Book List: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J. K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling Beauty in the Word by Stratford Caldecott A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War by Joseph Loconte William Morris: His Work and Influence by Arthur Clutton-Brock Dracula (Ignatius Critical Edition) by Bram Stoker Hamlet by William Shakespeare Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 151: The Literary Life Podcast Reading Challenge 2023

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 102:06 Very Popular


This week on The Literary Life podcast our hosts introduce the 2023 Reading Challenge! Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are excited to share with you about all the categories on this year's Literary Life Bingo Reading Challenge! You can download your own copy of the challenge here, as well as check out our past reading challenges. Scroll down in the show notes to see a list of the links and books mentioned in this episode. You can use the hashtag #LitLifeBingo on social media so we can all see what everyone is reading in 2023! Don't forget to shop the House of Humane Letters Christmas Sale now through the end of the year. The Literary Life Back to School online conference recordings are also on sale at Morning Time for Moms right now. Commonplace Quotes: Much that we call Victorian is known to us only because the Victorians laughed at it. George Malcolm Young, from Portrait of an Age I think that beauty and grace are performed whether or not we will or sense them. The least we can do is try to be there. Annie Dillard, from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek Reading is to the mind as exercise is to the body. Joseph Addison Thunderstorms by William H. Davies My mind has thunderstorms, That brood for heavy hours: Until they rain me words, My thoughts are drooping flowers And sulking, silent birds. Yet come, dark thunderstorms, And brood your heavy hours; For when you rain me words, My thoughts are dancing flowers And joyful singing birds. Book and Link List: Hercule Poirot's Christmas by Agatha Christie Episode 14: “The Adventures of a Shilling” by Joseph Addison Episode 3: The Importance of Detective Fiction Episode 16: “Why I Write” by George Orwell Reading Challenge Downloads The Letters of Jane Austen by Jane Austen Abigail Adams: Letters ed. by Edith Gelles The Letters of Dorothy Osborne to William Temple ed. by G. C. Moore Smith Few Eggs and No Oranges by Vere Hodgson Letters to an American Lady by C. S. Lewis Letters of C. S. Lewis by C. S. Lewis Letters from Father Christmas by J.R.R. Tolkien Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O'Connor ed. by Sally Fitzgerald Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman by Lord Chesterfield The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer The Aeneid by Virgil The Saga of the Volsungs by Anonymous The Vision of Sir Launfal by James Russell Lowell Evangeline by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow The Ramayana of Valmiki ed. and trans. by Robert and Sally Goldman The Prelude by William Wordsworth Ballad of the White Horse by G. K. Chesterton P. D. James Edmund Crispin Alan Bradley Patricia Moyes Peter Granger Rex Stout Sir Walter Scott The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stevenson Thinking in Bets by Annie Duke Mythos by Stephen Fry The Silver Chair by C. S. Lewis Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell Coming Up for Air by George Orwell P. G. Wodehouse The Last Days of Socrates by Plato The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis Champagne for the Soul by Mike Mason Edges of His Ways by Amy Carmichael The Footsteps at the Lock by Ronald Knox Queen Victoria by Lytton Strachey Jane Austen Patrick Leigh Fermor Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes by Robert Louis Stevenson Heroes by Stephen Fry Troy by Stephen Fry Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman The Mabinogion trans. by Sioned Davies The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table by Roger Lancelyn Green Idylls of the King by Alfred Tennyson Cindy's List of Literature of Honor for Boys (archived webpage) Bleak House by Charles Dickens David Copperfield by Charles Dickens Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens The Man Who Knew Too Much by G. K. Chesterton The 39 Steps by John Buchan Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith The Well Read Poem An Experiment in Criticism by C. S. Lewis The Truth and the Beauty by Andrew Klavan The Magic Apple Tree by Susan Hill Howards End is on the Landing by Susan Hill Jacob's Room is Full of Books by Susan Hill The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis by Jason Baxter 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff Q's Legacy by Helene Hanff Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 150: “Dracula” by Bram Stoker, Ch. 18-End

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 109:21


On The Literary Life podcast this week, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas are back to wrap up their series on Bram Stoker's Dracula. They open with their commonplace quotes then begin diving into the major plot points and the connections being made. Angelina and Cindy discuss what happens to Mina, especially in relation to the idea of the New Woman versus the Angel in the House. Thomas and Angelina talk about Dracula's background and his connection with Satan seen more clearly here at the end of the book. They all share thoughts on the Christian images that are increasingly brought out as the story line progresses. Head over to the HouseofHumaneLetters.com so you don't miss out on their Christmas sale. Kelly Cumbee will also be teaching a course on The Chronicles of Narnia and medieval cosmology in February, and registration is now open. Now is the time to get your copy of Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah in time for celebrating Advent with your family. You can also get a recording of the Advent to Remember webinar at MorningTimeforMoms.com. Commonplace Quotes: Rumor is a pipe Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures, And of so easy and so plain a stop That the blunt monster with uncounted heads, The still-discordant wav'ring multitude, Can play upon it. William Shakespeare, from Henry IV, Part 2 There is the double tragedy of the prophet–he must speak out so that he makes men dislike him, and he must be content to believe that he is making no impression whatsoever. Ronald Knox Be wary of all earnestness. John D. MacDonald Fairy tales, then, are not responsible for producing in children fear, or any of the shapes of fear; fairy tales do not give the child the idea of the evil or the ugly; that is in the child already, because it is in the world already. Fairy tales do not give the child his first idea of bogey. What fairy tales give the child is his first clear idea of the possible defeat of bogey. The baby has known the dragon intimately ever since he had an imagination. What the fairy tale provides for him is a St. George to kill the dragon. Exactly what the fairy tale does is this: it accustoms him for a series of clear pictures to the idea that these limitless terrors had a limit, that these shapeless enemies have enemies in the knights of God, that there is something in the universe more mystical than darkness, and stronger than strong fear. G. K. Chesterton, from The Red Angel The To-be-forgotten by Thomas Hardy I I heard a small sad sound, And stood awhile among the tombs around: "Wherefore, old friends," said I, "are you distrest, Now, screened from life's unrest?" II —"O not at being here; But that our future second death is near; When, with the living, memory of us numbs, And blank oblivion comes! III "These, our sped ancestry, Lie here embraced by deeper death than we; Nor shape nor thought of theirs can you descry With keenest backward eye. IV "They count as quite forgot; They are as men who have existed not; Theirs is a loss past loss of fitful breath; It is the second death. V "We here, as yet, each day Are blest with dear recall; as yet, can say We hold in some soul loved continuance Of shape and voice and glance. VI "But what has been will be — First memory, then oblivion's swallowing sea; Like men foregone, shall we merge into those Whose story no one knows. VII "For which of us could hope To show in life that world-awakening scope Granted the few whose memory none lets die, But all men magnify? VIII "We were but Fortune's sport; Things true, things lovely, things of good report We neither shunned nor sought ... We see our bourne, And seeing it we mourn." Book List: The Deep Blue Goodbye by John D. MacDonald Tremendous Trifles by G. K. Chesterton The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Silver Chair by C. S. Lewis The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain The Odd Women by George Gissing Beowulf trans. by Burton Raffel Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

What It Takes
Best of - John Irving: A Literary Life

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 30:00


2022 was a big year for John Irving, the author of "The World According to Garp," "A Prayer for Owen Meany," and "The Cider House Rules." He turned 80, and just recently published The Last Chairlift, his first novel in seven years.  It is 913 pages long and is, he says, the last long book he will ever write. Seemed like a great time to bring back our 2016 episode on John Irving. In it, he talks about why he approaches every book by writing the last sentence first.  And he might just convince you that his uncommon approach is the only one that makes any sense. In this episode, he also opens up about his early life, and reveals how his mysteriously absent father, his learning disability, and his passion for wrestling, all contributed to his success as a writer. Whether you've read every John Irving novel or none, this is a fascinating story about the writing process, and about an author some critics have called the Charles Dickens of our time.

Homeschool Conversations with Humility and Doxology
The Risk of Birth by Madeleine L'Engle (with Missy Andrews)

Homeschool Conversations with Humility and Doxology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 6:13


This week's special Advent audioblog episode includes "The Risk of Birth" by Madeleine L'Engle alongside reflections from Missy Andrews. Get your own copy of Wild Bells: A Literary Advent: https://www.centerforlit.com/catalogue/2019/2/4/wild-bells-a-literary-advent Missy Andrews is co-director of the Center for Literary Education and a retired homeschooling mother of six. Her books include Teaching the Classics: A Socratic Method for Literary Education, Wild Bells: A Literary Advent, and My Divine Comedy: A Mother's Homeschooling Journey. Missy earned her BA in English from Hillsdale College and her MA in imaginative literature from Harrison Middleton University. She and her husband Adam live on a mountaintop in Northeast Washington, where she collects children's books and reads and reads and reads. The Center for Lit membership site, The Pelican Society, offers live events, teacher guides for literary classics, audio books, product discounts and other benefits at www.pelicansociety.com Don't miss my previous Homeschool Conversations interview with Missy, "Identity, Grace, and a Literary Life": https://www.humilityanddoxology.com/missy-andrews-center-for-lit-interview/ Find more homeschool family Advent and Christmas resources here: https://www.humilityanddoxology.com/advent/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/humilityanddoxology/message

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 149: “Dracula” by Bram Stoker, Ch. 12-17

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 75:16


Our hosts are back on The Literary Life podcast today to continue our series on Bram Stoker's Dracula. This week we are covering chapters 12-17, and in the introduction to this episode, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas discuss the purpose of the Gothic novel in reorienting us to realize there is more to the world than the physical and empirical. As they cover the plot in these chapters, other ideas shared are the effective blending of modern technology with ancient wisdom in fighting evil, the many mythological and fairy tale elements in this story, the contrast between the true woman and the false woman, the parallels to Paradise Lost, and so much more. Sign up for the mailing list at HouseofHumaneLetters.com so you don't miss out on the upcoming Christmas sale. Kelly Cumbee will also be teaching a course on The Chronicles of Narnia and medieval cosmology in February, and registration is now open. Now is the time to get your copy of Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah in time for celebrating Advent with your family. You can also get a recording of the Advent to Remember webinar at MorningTimeforMoms.com. Commonplace Quotes: He was one of that not uncommon sort of men who, when they want something, must believe that they are right in wanting it. Milton Waldman Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night     Sailed off in a wooden shoe– Sailed on a river of crystal light,     Into a sea of dew. “Where are you going, and what do you wish?”     The old moon asked of the three. “We have come to fish for the herring fish That live in this beautiful sea; Nets of silver and gold have we!”                   Said Wynken,                   Blynken,                   And Nod. Eugene Field, from “Wynkin, Blynken, and Nod” During the period when the forces of Christianity were nearly spent and materialism had dislodged spiritual values, the Gothic novelists planned their novels with an awareness of the Deity and the consciousness of a just fate. The villains learn in due course that the wages of sin is death. Devendra Varma Sonnet 71 by William Shakespeare No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell. Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it, for I love you so That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe. O, if, I say, you look upon this verse When I, perhaps, compounded am with clay, Do not so much as my poor name rehearse, But let your love even with my life decay, Lest the wise world should look into your moan And mock you with me after I am gone. Book List: Rod of Iron by Milton Waldman The Gothic Flame by Devendra Varma   Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Movement As Medicine Podcast
Special Guest Marco Sanchez

The Movement As Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 53:22


Show Notes: IntroductionClubhouse FitnessInstagram @theclubhouse and @notmarksanchezThe benefits of being a generalist Working in professional sportsWorking as a manager at EquinoxSelf care and burnout - Schedule yourself like a client and change your environment!Setting boundaries Book of the Week: Kevin: Making a Literary Life by Carolyn SeeMarco: Anatomy of Breathing by Aandine Calais-Germain

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 148: “Dracula” by Bram Stoker, Ch. 8-11

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 63:00


Welcome back to The Literary Life podcast today and our series on Bram Stoker's Dracula. This week Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins, and Thomas Banks cover chapters 8-11 of the book. Angelina explains both the “New Woman” and “Angel in the House” ideas of the Victorian era and makes some observations about Dr. Seward's interactions with Renfield in contrast to the nuns ministrations to Jonathan Harker. We are also introduced to Dr. Van Helsing in this section of the book as the foil for Dracula, and we quickly learn that he is more than just a medical man. Our hosts discuss Stoker's own medical knowledge and both the historical and metaphorical context of the blood transfusion procedures in these chapters. Thomas will be offering a webinar on Henry VIII and his times, which you can register for at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Kelly Cumbee will also be teaching a course on The Chronicles of Narnia and medieval cosmology in February, and registration is now open. Now is the time to get your copy of Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah in time for celebrating Advent with your family. You can also get a recording of the Advent to Remember webinar at MorningTimeforMoms.com. Commonplace Quotes: Once the imagination has been awakened, it is procreative. Through it we can give more than we were given, say more than we had to say. This is a beautiful double proposition, that art enlarges our repertoire for being, and that it further enables a giving onwards of that enriched utterance, that broadened perception. Lewis Hyde The passions are more powerful than the gods. If the gods speak, which they seldom do, the passions drown their voices. Walter Savage Lander The gods love blood. Leconte de Lisle What can the world be to him who lives for thought, if there be no supreme and perfect Thought? None but such poor struggles after thought as he finds in himself? Take the eternal Thought from the heart of things, no longer can any beauty be real, no more can shape, motion, aspect of nature, have significance in itself or sympathy with human soul. George MacDonald A Dream Within a Dream by Edgar Allan Poe Take this kiss upon the brow! And, in parting from you now, Thus much let me avow — You are not wrong, who deem That my days have been a dream; Yet if hope has flown away In a night, or in a day, In a vision, or in none, Is it therefore the less gone?  All that we see or seem Is but a dream within a dream. I stand amid the roar Of a surf-tormented shore, And I hold within my hand Grains of the golden sand — How few! yet how they creep Through my fingers to the deep, While I weep — while I weep! O God! Can I not grasp Them with a tighter clasp? O God! can I not save One from the pitiless wave? Is all that we see or seem But a dream within a dream? Book List: Beauty in the Word by Stratford Caldecott The Gifts of Reading by Robert Macfarlane The Gift by Lewis Hyde Imaginary Conversations by Walter Savage Landor A Dish of Orts by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Muse and Hearth
Episode 18: How to be a reader (when life is “too full” for reading)

Muse and Hearth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 45:12


In episode 18 I'm joined by Courtney Handermann and Anna van den Broek as we discuss strategies for making reading a priority when life is busy. Our discussion includes tips for starting a book group as a way to help us keep up reading momentum. Podcasts like The Literary Life, Close Reads Podcast, and Stories are Soul Food provide inspiration for new titles and encouragement to continue with old favorites. We name drop some favorite book titles, and if you want inspiration for others you can check out Muse and Hearth episode 6 “Reading Lists”.

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 147: “Dracula” by Bram Stoker, Ch. 3-7

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 81:21


On The Literary Life Podcast this week, our hosts continue with part 2 of their series on Bram Stoker's Dracula. After sharing their commonplace quotes, Angelina, Cindy and Thomas begin discussing how to properly read Dracula and other books written in this tradition. (Hint: It's not the Freudian or psychoanalytical approach!) Angelina argues that Bram Stoker was trying, among other things, to reintroduce the traditional forms and metaphors into the modern era. Thomas shares the dark etymology of the name Dracula and how that relates to the image of Satan in this character. Cindy brings up Jonathan's memory of Mina when he is in his darkest moments and the power of love against evil. Now is the time to get your copy of Hallelujah: Cultivating Advent Traditions with Handel's Messiah in time for celebrating Advent with your family. You can also get a recording of the Advent to Remember webinar at MorningTimeforMoms.com. Thomas will be offering a webinar on Henry VIII and his times, which you can register for at HouseofHumaneLetters.com. Kelly Cumbee will also be teaching a course on The Chronicles of Narnia and medieval cosmology in February, and registration is now open. Commonplace Quotes: I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read. Samuel Johnson For, indeed, a change was coming upon the world, the meaning and direction of which even still is hidden from us, a change from era to era. The paths trodden by the footsteps of ages were broken up; old things were passing away, and the faith and the life of ten centuries were dissolving like a dream. Chivalry was dying; the abbey and the castle were soon together to crumble into ruins; and all the forms desires, beliefs, convictions of the old world were passing away, never to return. A new continent had risen up beyond the western sea. The floor of heaven, inlaid with stars, had sunk back into an infinite abyss of immeasurable space; and the firm earth itself, unfixed from its foundations, was seen to be but a small atom in the awful vastness the universe. In the fabric of habit in which they had so laboriously built for themselves, mankind were to remain no longer. And now it is all gone–like an unsubstantial pageant faded; and between us and the old English there lies a gulf of mystery which the prose of the historian will never adequately bridge. They cannot come to us, and our imagination can but feebly penetrate to them. Only among the aisles of the cathedral, only as we gaze upon their silent figures sleeping on their tombs, some faint conceptions float before us of what these men were when they were alive; and perhaps in the sound of church bells, that peculiar creation of mediæval age, which falls upon the ear like the echo of a vanished world. James Anthony Froude A man no more creates the forms of which he would reveal his thoughts, than he creates thoughts themselves. For what are the forms by means of which a man may reveal his thoughts? Are they not those of nature?…What springs there is the perception that this or that form is already an expression of this or that phase of thought or of feeling. For the world around him is an outward figuration of the condition of his mind; an inexhaustible storehouse of forms whence he may choose exponents…The meanings are in those forms already, else they could be no garment of unveiling. George MacDonald A Selection from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Alone, alone, all, all alone,  Alone on a wide wide sea!  And never a saint took pity on  My soul in agony.  The many men, so beautiful!  And they all dead did lie:  And a thousand thousand slimy things  Lived on; and so did I.  I looked upon the rotting sea,  And drew my eyes away;  I looked upon the rotting deck,  And there the dead men lay.  I looked to heaven, and tried to pray;  But or ever a prayer had gusht,  A wicked whisper came, and made  My heart as dry as dust.  Book List: A Dish of Orts by George MacDonald The History of England, from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth by James Anthony Froude The Weight of Glory by C. S. Lewis Studies in Words by C. S. Lewis Wilkie Collins Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Dani Shapiro on the Fifteen Year Journey of Signal Fires

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 41:21


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan is joined by Dani Shaprio to discuss her latest novel, Signal Fires, out now from Knopf. ________________________________ Subscribe now to The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you find your podcasts! Dani Shapiro s a best-selling novelist and memoirist and host of the podcast Family Secrets (now in its seventh season). Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Vogue, and Time. She has taught at Columbia and New York University and is the co-founder of the Sirenland Writers Conference. She lives in Litchfield County, Connecticut. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 146: Introduction to “Dracula” by Bram Stoker, Ch. 1 & 2

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 88:04 Very Popular


On this week's episode of The Literary Life Podcast, Angelina Stanford is joined as always by Thomas Banks and Cindy Rollins for the opening of their series on Bram Stoker's Dracula. Today our hosts focus on the background and historical context for this piece of literature, as well as going over the highlights of the first two chapters. They talk about the question of the role of the monster in literature in modernity versus its historical interpretation. Understanding the form of the Gothic novel and the time period in which this book was written are important aspects of approaching Dracula. Keep listening next week for more about how to read this book. We will be covering chapters 3-7. Get the latest news from House of Humane Letters by signing up for their e-newsletter today! Commonplace Quotes: And yet, unless my senses deceive me, the old centuries had, and have, powers of their own which mere modernity cannot kill. Bram Stoker That children should have the peace of God as a necessary condition of growth is a practical question. If we believe it is their right, not to be acquired by merit nor lost by demerit, we shall take less upon ourselves and understand that it is not we who pasture the young souls. The managing mother who interferes with every hour and every occupation of her child's life, all because it is her duty, would tend to disappear. She would see with some amusement why it is that the rather lazy, self-indulgent mother, is often blessed with very good children. She, too, will let her children be, not because she is lazy, but being dutiful, she sees that, give children opportunity and elbow room, and they are likely to become natural persons, neither cranks nor prigs. And here is the hope for society–children so brought up are hardly likely to become managing persons in their turn, inclined to intrude upon the lives of others and be rather intolerable in whatever relation. Charlotte Mason Men of science spend much time and effort in the attempt to disentangle words from their metaphorical and traditional associations. The attempt is bound to prove vain, since it runs counter to the law of humanity. Dorothy Sayers Ghosts by Elizabeth Jennings Those houses haunt in which we leave Something undone. It is not those Great words or silence of love That spread their echoes through a place And fill the locked-up, unbreathed gloom. Ghosts do not haunt with any face That we have known; they only come With arrogance to thrust at us Our own omissions in a room. The words we would not speak they use, The deeds we dared not act they flaunt, Our nervous silences they bruise; It is our helplessness they choose And our refusals that they haunt. Book List: The Mind of the Maker by Dorothy Sayers The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole A Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Wake Not the Dead by Johann Ludwig Tieck Frankenstein by Mary Shelley The Vampyre by John Polidori Varney the Vampire by James Malcolm Rymer Carmilla by Sheridan Lefanu Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
David Maraniss on the Afterlife of Jim Thorpe

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 39:16


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan is joined by David Maraniss to discuss his latest book, Path Lit by Lightning: The Life of Jim Thorpe, out now from Simon & Schuster. David Maraniss is an associate editor at The Washington Post and a distinguished visiting professor at Vanderbilt University. He has won two Pulitzer Prizes for journalism and was a finalist three other times. Among his bestselling books are biographies of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Roberto Clemente, and Vince Lombardi, and a trilogy about the 1960s—Rome 1960; Once in a Great City (winner of the RFK Book Prize); and They Marched into Sunlight (winner of the J. Anthony Lukas Prize and Pulitzer Finalist in History). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 145: The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: A Conversation with Jason M. Baxter

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 76:19 Very Popular


On The Literary Life Podcast this week, our hosts Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins, and Thomas Banks sit down for a special conversation with Jason Baxter, author of The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis. Jason is a speaker, writer, and college professor who writes primarily on medieval thought and is especially interested in Lewis' ideas. You can find out more about him and his books at JasonMBaxter.com. Our hosts and Jason discuss a wide range of ideas, including the values of literature, the sacramental view of reality, why it is important to understand medieval thought, the “problem” of paganism in Lewis' writings, and how to approach reading ancient and medieval literature. Be back next week when we will begin digging into Bram Stoker's Dracula together and learning more about this late Victorian Gothic novel. It's not what you might think! Get the latest news from House of Humane Letters by signing up for their e-newsletter today! Commonplace Quotes: My part has been merely that of Walter Scott's Old Mortality, who busied himself in clearing the moss, and bringing back to light the words, on the gravestones of the dead who seemed to him to have served humanity. This needs to be done and redone, generation after generation, in a world where there persists always a strong tendency to read newer writers, not because they are better, but because they are newer. The moss grows fast, and ceaselessly. F. L. Lucas It is the memory of time that makes us old; remembering eternity makes us young again. Statford Caldecott It is my settled conviction that in order to read old Western literature aright, you must suspend most of the responses and unlearn most of the habits you have acquired in reading modern literature. C. S. Lewis, from “De Descriptione Temporum” What then is the good of–what is even the defense for–occupying our hearts with stories of what never happened and entering vicariously into feeling which we should try to avoid in our own person?…The nearest I have yet got to an answer is that we seek an enlargement of our being. We want to be more than ourselves…[In] reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself. Like the night sky in the Greek poem, I see with myriad eyes, but it is still I who see. Here as in worship, in love, in moral action, and in knowing, I transcend myself; and am never more myself than when I do. C. S. Lewis Victory by C. S. Lewis Roland is dead, Cuchulain's crest is low, The battered war-rear wastes and turns to rust, And Helen's eyes and Iseult's lips are dust And dust the shoulders and the breasts of snow. The faerie people from our woods are gone, No Dryads have I found in all our trees, No Triton blows his horn about our seas And Arthur sleeps far hence in Avalon. The ancient songs they wither as the grass And waste as doth a garment waxen old, All poets have been fools who thought to mould A monument more durable than brass. For these decay: but not for that decays The yearning, high, rebellious spirit of man That never rested yet since life began From striving with red Nature and her ways. Now in the filth of war, the baresark shout Of battle, it is vexed. And yet so oft Out of the deeps, of old, it rose aloft That they who watch the ages may not doubt. Though often bruised, oft broken by the rod, Yet, like the phoenix, from each fiery bed Higher the stricken spirit lifts its head And higher-till the beast become a god. Book List: Beauty in the Word by Stratford Caldecott An Experiment in Criticism by C. S. Lewis The Discarded Image by C. S. Lewis The Art of Living: Four Eighteenth Century Minds by F. L. Lucas Transposition by C. S. Lewis The Weight of Glory by C. S. Lewis Til We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis The Divine Comedy by Dante Nicholas of Cusa The Life of St. Francis of Assisi by St. Bonaventure The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius Confessions by St. Augustine Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 144: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Bk. 3, Ch. 4-End

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 96:29 Very Popular


On this week's episode of The Literary Life Podcast, our hosts wrap up their series on Hard Times by Charles Dickens. Angelina opens the conversation about the book by highlighting Dickens' masterful ability to tie up all the loose ends in his stories. They cover not only the major plot points here at the end of the book, but talk about the craft of Dickens and continue to teach us how to read this type of story. We see each character's full arc and the positive changes that come when people choose repentance versus the fate of those who remain stubbornly on the road to destruction. Join us next time for a special conversation with Jason Baxter, author of The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis. After that, we will be digging into Bram Stoker's Dracula together and learning more about this late Victorian Gothic novel. It's not what you might think! Head over to MorningTimeforMoms.com to get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism,” taking place later this week! Get the latest news from House of Humane Letters by signing up for their e-newsletter today! Commonplace Quotes: It is not the business of poetry to go about distributing tracts. Andrew Lang The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing people of very ordinary literary ability that they could write excellent continuations of The Screwtape Letters. Fred Sanders In the Bible, the opposite of Sin, with a capital ‘S,' is not virtue – it's faith: faith in a God who draws all to himself in his resurrection. Robert Farrar Capon Reviewers who have not had time to reread Milton have failed for the most part to digest your criticism of him, but it is a reasonable hope that of those who heard you in Oxford, many will understand henceforward that when the old poets made some virtue their theme they were not teaching but adoring, and that what we take for the didactic is often the enchanted. C. S. Lewis Say not the Struggle nought Availeth by Arthur Hugh Clough Say not the struggle nought availeth,       The labour and the wounds are vain,  The enemy faints not, nor faileth,       And as things have been they remain.  If hopes were dupes, fears may be liars;       It may be, in yon smoke concealed,  Your comrades chase e'en now the fliers,      And, but for you, possess the field.  For while the tired waves, vainly breaking       Seem here no painful inch to gain,  Far back through creeks and inlets making,       Comes silent, flooding in, the main.  And not by eastern windows only,       When daylight comes, comes in the light,  In front the sun climbs slow, how slowly,       But westward, look, the land is bright.     Book List: The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis Between Noon and Three by Robert Farrar Capon A Preface to Paradise Lost by C. S. Lewis The Gifts of Reading by Robert MacFarlane North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 143: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Bk. 3, Ch. 1-3

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 95:15 Very Popular


On The Literary Life this week our hosts cover the next section of Hard Times by Charles Dickens. Angelina opens the conversation highlighting the structure of the book and the storytelling devices Dickens uses in this book. Cindy talks about the failure of educational systems in general, and the confrontation between Louisa and her father. Thomas shares a little about Jeremy Bentham and his utilitarian economic theory in relation to Hard Times. One of the main points they discuss in today's episode is the importance of motherhood and the quiet work that goes on in the family unit. Head over to MorningTimeforMoms.com to get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” Commonplace Quotes: Persuasion enters like a sunbeam, quietly and without violence. Jeremy Taylor To me the greatness of the story, the horror of the story, and the threat to humanity the story portrays lie in the fact that Frankenstein has usurped the power, not of God, but of women. He has made a man without a mother. His science has eliminated the principle of femininity from the creation of human life. Through the miracle of science a woman can now medicate her body so that men may use it for pleasure without consequence or attachment. Andrew Klavan In the first place, we naturally wish to help the students in studying those parts of the subject where we have most help to give and they need help most. On recent and contemporary literature their need is least and out help least. They ought to understand it better than we, and if they do not then there is something radically wrong either with them or with the literature. But I need not labour the point. There is an intrinsic absurdity in making current literature a subject of academic study, and the student who wants a tutor's assistance in reading the works of his own contemporaries might as well ask for a nurse's assistance in blowing his own nose. C. S. Lewis, from “Our English Syllabus” Death and the Lady by Mary Elizabeth Coleridge TURN in, my lord, she said ;      As it were the Father of Sin    I have hated the Father of the Dead,      The slayer of my kin ;    By the Father of the Living led,      Turn in, my lord, turn in.    We were foes of old ; thy touch was cold,      But mine is warm as life ;    I have struggled and made thee loose thy hold,     I have turned aside the knife.   Despair itself in me was bold,     I have striven, and won the strife.   But that which conquered thee and rose     Again to earth descends ;   For the last time we have come to blows.     And the long combat ends.   The worst and secretest of foes,     Be now my friend of friends. Book List: Holy Living and Dying by Jeremy Taylor The Truth and the Beauty by Andrew Klavan Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 142: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Book 2, Ch. 6-9

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 99:09 Very Popular


Welcome back to The Literary Life this week and the continuation of our series on Hard Times by Charles Dickens. After some autumnal chit-chat, our hosts Angelina, Cindy, and Thomas dive into the plot of the end of Book 2. They open discussing Stephen's fate and Tom Gradgrind's destructive, devouring nature. They highlight Mrs. Sparsit and her similarities to a harpy and other imagery surrounding her denoting evil. Some other ideas discussed are good intentions with bad results, the concept of the fallen woman in Victorian times, Louisa's homecoming and confession, and the failure of a formula in imparting virtue. Head over to MorningTimeforMoms.com to get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” Commonplace Quotes: Beware of the superficial knowledge of cold facts. Beware of sinful ratiocination, for it kills the heart, and when heart and mind have died in a man, there art cannot dwell. Caspar David Friedrich I don't think they are noticeably worse at reading or writing than they were all those decades ago, though they're less likely to have a lot of experience with the standard academic essay (introduction, three major points, conclusion) — which I do not see as a major deficiency. That kind of essay was never more than a highly imperfect tool for teaching students how to read carefully and write about what they have read, and, frankly, I believe that over the years I have come up with some better ones. Alan Jacobs, from Snakes and Ladders The hours of unsponsored, uninspected, perhaps even forbidden, reading, the ramblings, and the “long, long thoughts” in which those of luckier generations first discovered literature and nature and themselves are a thing of the past. C. S. Lewis, from “Lilies that Fester” A Daughter of Eve by Christina Rossetti A fool I was to sleep at noon,  And wake when night is chilly  Beneath the comfortless cold moon;  A fool to pluck my rose too soon,  A fool to snap my lily.  My garden-plot I have not kept;  Faded and all-forsaken,  I weep as I have never wept:  Oh it was summer when I slept,  It's winter now I waken.  Talk what you please of future spring  And sun-warm'd sweet to-morrow:—  Stripp'd bare of hope and everything,  No more to laugh, no more to sing,  I sit alone with sorrow.  Book List: The World's Last Night: and Other Essays by C. S. Lewis Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy Esther Waters by George Moore Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell Pictures from Italy by Charles Dickens Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 141: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Book 2, Ch. 1-5

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 71:50 Very Popular


The Literary Life Podcast's new episode this week continues our series on Hard Times by Charles Dickens. After Angelina ties up a few loose ends from Book 1, Thomas leads us into Book 2 and introduces us to Mr. Harthouse. Cindy highlights the dangers of not allowing children learn self-government as illustrated in the character of Tom Gradgrind. They then look again at Stephen Blackpool and his position as the martyr in the story. Our hosts also discuss Dickens' focus on demonstrating the problems facing people in his day, not moralizing or trying to present solutions. Head over to MorningTimeforMoms.com to get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: It is ill for a country, Gentlemen – I fear we must acknowledge it – when her destiny passes into the guidance of professors. Arthur Quiller-Couch, from “Studies in Literature” It is the old story. Utilitarian education is profoundly immoral in that it defrauds a child of the associations which should give him intellectual atmosphere. Charlotte Mason That evil may spring from the imagination, as from everything except the perfect love of God cannot be denied. But infinitely worse evils would be the result of its absence. Selfishness, avarice, sensuality, cruelty, would flourish tenfold; and the power of Satan would be well established ere some children had begun to choose. Those who would quell the apparently lawless tossing of the spirit, called the youthful imagination, would suppress all that is to grow out of it. They fear the enthusiasm they never felt; and instead of cherishing this divine thing, instead of giving it room and air for healthful growth, they would crush and confine it–with but one result of their victorious endeavors–imposthume, fever, and corruption. And the disastrous consequences would soon appear in the intellect likewise which they worship. Kill that whence spring the crude fancies and wild day-dreams of the young, and you will never lead them beyond dull facts–dull because their relations to each other, and the one life that works in them all, must remain undiscovered. Whoever would have his children avoid this arid region will do well to allow no teacher to approach them–not even of mathematics–who has no imagination. George MacDonald The Golf Links by Sarah Norcliffe Cleghorn The golf links lie so near the mill That almost every day  The laboring children can look out And see the men at play. Book List: Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason A Dish of Orts by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Christopher M. Finan: How to Battle Book Banning in Your Own Community

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 38:31


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan is joined by Christopher M. Finan to discuss his new book, How Free Speech Saved Democracy: The Untold History of How the First Amendment Became an Essential Tool for Securing Liberty and Social Justice, out now from Steerforth Press. ________________________________ Subscribe now to The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you find your podcasts! Christopher M. Finan has been involved in the fight against censorship for 35 years. He is executive director of the National Coalition Against Censorship and the former president of the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression. After working as a newspaper reporter, he studied American history at Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1992. He is the author of Alfred E. Smith: The Happy Warrior, Drunks: An American History, and From the Palmer Raids to the Patriot Act: A History of the Fight for Free Speech in America, winner of the American Library Association's Eli M. Oboler Award. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 140: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Book 1, Ch. 11-16

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 81:45 Very Popular


Today on The Literary Life Podcast, our hosts continue their series on Charles Dickens' Hard Times. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas open the conversation with their commonplace quotes, which all lead into the discussion of Hard Times. They start out highlighting once again the fairytale and allegory aspects of this story, including the setting of Coketown. Together they talk about the two sides of Sissy Jupe's education, along with the situations and portrayals of the other key characters in this section. A large part of the discussions centers around the ideas of input and output versus sowing and reaping. Purchase the recordings of our 2022 Back to School Conference at MorningTimeforMoms.com. That is also where you can get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: The ways of authorship are dusty and stony, and the stones are only too handy for throwing at the few that, deservedly or undeservedly, have made a name. Andrew Lang, from “How to Fail in Literature” To taboo knowledge is not to secure innocence. We must remember that ignorance is not innocence, and also that ignorance is the parent of insatiable curiosity. Charlotte Mason Early in 1851, Dickens suggested in Household Words that a second exhibition be held of “England's sins and negligences.” When he finally went to the Crystal Palace, he described it as “terrible duffery.” He wrote in July 1851, “I find I am used up by the exhibition. I don't say there is nothing in it. There is too much. I have only been twice. So many things bewildered me. I have a natural horror of sights, and the fusion of so many sights in one has not decreased it. I'm not sure that I have seen anything but the fountain and perhaps the Amazon. It is a dreadful thing to be obliged to be false, but when anyone says, ‘Have you seen…?' I say, ‘Yes', because if I don't he'll explain it, and I can't bear that. Julia Baird, quoting Charles Dickens from “Ode On a Distant Prospect of Clapham Academy” by Thomas Hood Ah me! those old familiar bounds!  That classic house, those classic grounds  My pensive thought recalls!  What tender urchins now confine,  What little captives now repine,  Within yon irksome walls?  Ay, that's the very house! I know  Its ugly windows, ten a-row!  Its chimneys in the rear!  And there's the iron rod so high,  That drew the thunder from the sky  And turn'd our table-beer! There I was birch'd! there I was bred!  There like a little Adam fed  From Learning's woeful tree!  The weary tasks I used to con!—  The hopeless leaves I wept upon!—  Most fruitless leaves to me!— The summon'd class!—the awful bow!—  I wonder who is master now  And wholesome anguish sheds!  How many ushers now employs,  How many maids to see the boys  Have nothing in their heads! Book List: Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason The Ink Black Heart (Cormoran Strike Book 6) by Robert Galbraith Victoria: The Queen by Julia Baird Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Javier Zamora: You Can't Simply Make Art From Your Trauma to Heal Yourself

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 44:59


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan is joined by Javier Zamora to discuss his memoir, Solito, out now from Hogarth Press. Javier Zamora was born in El Salvador in 1990. His father fled the country when he was one, and his mother when he was about to turn five. Both parents' migrations were caused by the U.S.-funded Salvadoran Civil War. When he was nine Javier migrated through Guatemala, Mexico, and the Sonoran Desert. His debut poetry collection, Unaccompanied, explores the impact of the war and immigration on his family. Zamora has been a Stegner Fellow at Stanford and a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard and holds fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 139: “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens, Bk. 1, Ch. 1-10

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 108:17 Very Popular


On this week's episode of The Literary Life, we begin our fall series on Charles Dickens' Hard Times. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas start out the book chat by covering some of the differences between this book and other novels of his, as well as how to approach Dickens in general. They also discuss misrepresentations of Dickens as a social reformer, the allegorical and fairy tale elements of his works, and what keys to look for as you read through Hard Times. Thomas talks about Utilitarianism in educational reform, and Cindy highlights the ideas of Charlotte Mason in connection with Victorian times. Angelina brings out the references to imagination in these first chapters and the danger of distorting the child's imagination. Purchase the recordings of our 2022 Back to School Conference at MorningTimeforMoms.com. That is also where you can get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Thomas' webinar on Evelyn Waugh or register for Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: But already the Utilitarian citadel had been more heavily bombarded on the other side by and lonely and unlettered man of genius. The rise of Dickens is like the rising of a vast mob. This is not only because his tales are indeed as crowded and populous as towns: for truly it was not so much that Dickens appeared as that as hundred Dickens characters appeared. G. K. Chesterton, from The Victorian Age in Literature The first qualification for judging any piece of workmanship from a corkscrew to a cathedral is to know what it is–what it was intended to do and how it is meant to be used. C. S. Lewis, from A Preface to Paradise Lost Never be without a really good book on hand. If you find yourself sinking to a dull, commonplace level, with nothing particular to say, the reason is probably that you are not reading, and therefore, not thinking. Charlotte Mason, as quoted by Essex Cholmondeley in The Story of Charlotte Mason from “Among School Children” by William Butler Yeats Labour is blossoming or dancing where The body is not bruised to pleasure soul, Nor beauty born out of its own despair, Nor blear-eyed wisdom out of midnight oil. O chestnut tree, great rooted blossomer, Are you the leaf, the blossom or the bole? O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, How can we know the dancer from the dance? Book List: Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell The Life of Our Lord by Charles Dickens A Child's History of England by Charles Dickens “Why Should Businessmen Read Great Literature?” by Vigen Guroian “The Fantastic Imagination” by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 139: "Hard Times" by Charles Dickens, Bk. 1, Ch. 1-10

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 108:17 Very Popular


On this week's episode of The Literary Life, we begin our fall series on Charles Dickens' Hard Times. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas start out the book chat by covering some of the differences between this book and other novels of his, as well as how to approach Dickens in general. They also discuss misrepresentations of Dickens as a social reformer, the allegorical and fairy tale elements of his works, and what keys to look for as you read through Hard Times. Thomas talks about Utilitarianism in educational reform, and Cindy highlights the ideas of Charlotte Mason in connection with Victorian times. Angelina brings out the references to imagination in these first chapters and the danger of distorting the child's imagination. Purchase the recordings of our 2022 Back to School Conference at MorningTimeforMoms.com. That is also where you can get signed up for Dawn Duran's webinar on “A Reasoned Patriotism.” You can also get the replay of Thomas' webinar on Evelyn Waugh or register for Angelina's mini-class on The Taming of the Shrew at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: But already the Utilitarian citadel had been more heavily bombarded on the other side by and lonely and unlettered man of genius. The rise of Dickens is like the rising of a vast mob. This is not only because his tales are indeed as crowded and populous as towns: for truly it was not so much that Dickens appeared as that as hundred Dickens characters appeared. G. K. Chesterton, from The Victorian Age in Literature The first qualification for judging any piece of workmanship from a corkscrew to a cathedral is to know what it is–what it was intended to do and how it is meant to be used. C. S. Lewis, from A Preface to Paradise Lost Never be without a really good book on hand. If you find yourself sinking to a dull, commonplace level, with nothing particular to say, the reason is probably that you are not reading, and therefore, not thinking. Charlotte Mason, as quoted by Essex Cholmondeley in The Story of Charlotte Mason from “Among School Children” by William Butler Yeats Labour is blossoming or dancing where The body is not bruised to pleasure soul, Nor beauty born out of its own despair, Nor blear-eyed wisdom out of midnight oil. O chestnut tree, great rooted blossomer, Are you the leaf, the blossom or the bole? O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, How can we know the dancer from the dance? Book List: Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell The Life of Our Lord by Charles Dickens A Child's History of England by Charles Dickens “Why Should Businessmen Read Great Literature?” by Vigen Guroian “The Fantastic Imagination” by George MacDonald Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Remarkable Receptions
The Mixed Results of Sutton Grigg's debut -- episode by John Gruesser

Remarkable Receptions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:59 Transcription Available


Despite revieing positive reviews, why  did Sutton Griggs have some unfavorable feelings about the circumstances surrounding his first book?Episode by John Gruesser.Read by GiGi Monroe. ------------Senior Research Scholar at Sam Houston State University, John Gruesser is the author of A Literary Life of Sutton E. Griggs: The Man on the Firing Line (Oxford University Press 2022), the editor of Animals in the American Classics: How Natural History Inspired Great Fiction (Texas A&M University Press 2022), and the co-editor of a scholarly edition of Griggs's 1905-06 novel The Hindered Hand (West Virginia University Press 2017), a Broadview Edition of Pauline E. Hopkins's 1901-02 serial novel Hagar's Daughter (2021), and African American Writers Respond to Poe, a special issue of the journal Poe Studies: History, Theory, Interpretation (2023).

Ancestral Kitchen
#38 - Fat Rendering, Traditional Food Gems & Eggs, Eggs, Eggs!

Ancestral Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 68:58


As well as recording two podcasts a month, Alison & Andrea also sit down together once a month to catch up on what's been happening in their own food worlds. These chats are recorded these chats especially for the patrons of the Ancestral Kitchen Podcast. As the podcasts this month are all about bringing you closer, what better than to share one of these intimate chats with you?! So coming up you've got them both at the kitchen table, tea in hand, sharing, laughing and learning together. In this episode you'll hear: Alison's process for wet-rendering fat including the pros and cons of this method. Andrea's take on the the diaries of Nella Last and the food gems she found in her WW1&2 writings. A hilarious discussion on the many ways to cook eggs, including Alison's UK-based expertise on soft boiled eggs and soldiers. About the book Alison considers the best read on traditional English food. Andrea quiz Alison on the technicalities of the English cup of tea! Want more? Come be part of our community and help support the continued work of the podcast! Our podcast is sponsored by our patrons and listeners who are also supported by the extra content that we share (think exclusive podcasts, live chats, cook ups and recipes) over at our http://patreon.com/ancestralkitchenpodcast (Patreon community!) From $5 a month (or equivalent in your currency) you'll be helping us with the costs of recording, editing and putting this work out into the world. And you'll get to be part of our community on a deeper level. The Run Down: 0:00 Last foods and new patrons! 11.45 Rendering fat using the wet method. "If you want a very clear, very pure, very odour-free fat, try it this way" 21:18 Fat storage - room temperature or fridge? 25:00 Nella Last's WW1&2 diaries "I want to shout loudly to all the mothers and tell them how important they are!" 31:30 Restriction enhancing creativity "I wish we could bring back the offal recipes" 40:20 Andrea quizzes Alison on the word 'tea' as used in England 48:45 Food in England by Dorothy Hartley 49:30 Cooking eggs - boiling, 'coddling', poaching, scrambling/rumbling, omlettes "She uses 'rumbled' instead of scrambled. I think I might start using that word!" If you like us and use Apple Podcasts, we'd love it if you left a review! Here's how: Open the Apple Podcast app Find Ancestral Kitchen Podcast in your library (you can search for it) Scroll down to 'ratings and reviews' Click on 'write a review', choose how many wonderful stars you would like to give us (!), title your review and then, in the lower box type a review of up to 300 words. Thank you. We really appreciate you taking the time to support us! Resources: https://instagram.com/honeyandchamomeleon?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (Dyana @honeyandchameleon) https://instagram.com/thefunctionalforce?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (Ximena @thefunctionalforce) https://instagram.com/tiffany.bye?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (Tiffany is here) https://www.theliterary.life (The Literary Life) https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/863963.Nella_Last_s_War (Nella Last's diaries) https://www.instagram.com/p/CRoStnvBs7c/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= ("Sparks of light" quote) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p028z2z0 (BBC Food Chain podcast) https://anthrochef.com/category/podcast-the-history-of-food/ (History of Food podcast) https://ancestralkitchen.com/2022/05/24/cooking-ancestrally-in-a-van/ (Podcast episode with Charlie in the van) https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_in_England (Food in England) https://instagram.com/lexysauve?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (Lexy is here) https://instagram.com/_crunchybitch_?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (Hannah is here) Thank you for listening - we'd love to continue the conversation. Come find us on Instagram: Andrea is at http://instagram.com/farmandhearth (Farm and Hearth) Alison is at http://instagram.com/ancestral_kitchen (Ancestral Kitchen) The podcast is at http://www.instagram.com/ancestralkitchenpodcast/...

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Dwyer Murphy on the Romantic Optimism in L.A. and South Florida Crime Novels

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 41:53


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan is joined by Dwyer Murphy to discuss his debut novel, An Honest Living, out now from Viking. Dwyer Murphy is a New York-based writer and editor. He is the editor-in-chief of CrimeReads, Literary Hub's crime fiction vertical and the world's most popular destination for thriller readers. He practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton in New York City, where he was a litigator, and served as editor of the Columbia Law Review. He was previously an Emerging Writer Fellow at the Center for Fiction. His writing has appeared in The Common, Rolling Stone, Guernica, The Paris Review Daily, Electric Literature, and other publications. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 138: In Search of the Austen Adaptation: Sense and Sensibility

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 109:10 Very Popular


Today on The Literary Life Podcast we bring you another fun episode in our “In Search of the Austen Adaptation” series. Hosts Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks are joined by resident film aficionado, Atlee Northmore to discuss film adaptations on Sense and Sensibility. The conversation opens by revisiting the question of what makes a good adaptation of a book when translating it for the screen. They talk about the challenges of showing modern audiences the characters and situations as Jane Austen meant them to be understood. Atlee gives a brief overview of the lesser known film adaptations, as well as a more in depth discussion of the 1995 and 2008 versions. You can access the PDF he created with links to watch here. You are not too late to join in this year's Back to School Online Conference! Go to MorningTimeforMoms.com to register and get in on the great talks, always live or later! Commonplace Quotes: Sound principles that are old may easily be laid on the shelf and forgotten, unless in each successive generation a few industrious people can be found who will take the trouble to draw them forth from the storehouse. Thomas Ruper, as quoted by Karen Glass His senile fury was not exhausted by endless repetition. Eric Linklater ‘Remember, no one is made up of one fault, everyone is much greater than all his faults,' and then she would add with a smile: ‘I find it much easier to put up with people's faults than with their virtues!' Charlotte Mason, as quoted by Essex Cholmondeley The great abstract nouns of the classical English moralists are unblushingly and uncompromisingly used: good sense, courage, contentment, fortitude, some duty neglected, some failing indulged, impropriety, indelicacy, generous candor, blameable distrust, just humiliation, vanity, folly, ignorance, reason. These are the concepts by which Jane Austen grasps the world. In her we still breathe the air of the Rambler and Idler. All is hard, clear, definable; by some modern standards, even naïvely so. The hardness is, of course, for oneself, not for one's neighbours. It reveals to Marianne her want ‘of kindness' and shows Emma that her behaviour has been ‘unfeeling'. Contrasted with the world of modern fiction, Jane Austen's is at once less soft and less cruel. C. S. Lewis Selection from With a Guitar, To Jane by Percy Shelley Ariel to Miranda:-- Take This slave of music, for the sake Of him who is the slave of thee; And teach it all the harmony In which thou canst, and only thou, Make the delighted spirit glow, Till joy denies itself again And, too intense, is turned to pain. For by permission and command Of thine own Prince Ferdinand, Poor Ariel sends this silent token Of more than ever can be spoken; Your guardian spirit, Ariel, who From life to life must still pursue Your happiness,-- for thus alone Can Ariel ever find his own. From Prospero's enchanted cell, As the mighty verses tell, To the throne of Naples he Lit you o'er the trackless sea, Flitting on, your prow before, Like a living meteor. When you die, the silent Moon In her interlunar swoon Is not sadder in her cell Than deserted Ariel. Book List: In Vital Harmony by Karen Glass The Story of Charlotte Mason by Essex Cholmondeley Robert the Bruce by Eric Linklater C. S. Lewis' Selected Literary Essays edited by Walter Hooper Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 137: Why Pastors Should Read Fiction

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 116:04 Very Popular


This week on The Literary Life podcast with Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks, we have a very special episode for you. Our hosts are joined by guests Dan Bunting and Anthony Dodgers, both of whom are pastors, for a discussion on why pastors should read fiction books. Dan is also host of the the Reading the Psalms podcast. Angelina starts off the conversation by asking why these men would prioritize taking literature classes. Anthony shares about his own literary life journey and how rediscovering literature has helped him personally. Dan talks about the book club that he and a couple of his pastor friends have and what kinds of books they read together. They discuss many other deep topics and crucial questions that we hope will be encouraging and thought-provoking to everyone who listens to and shares this episode. Join us for the 2022 Back to School Conference, “Education: Myths and Legends” happening live online this August 1st-6th. Our special guest speakers will be Lynn Bruce and Caitlin Beauchamp, along with our hosts Cindy Rollins, Angelina Stanford and Thomas Banks. Learn more and register today at Morning Time for Moms. Commonplace Quotes: If education is beaten by training, civilization dies. C. S. Lewis, from “Our English Syllabus” How am I a hog and me both? Flannery O'Connor He who has done his best for his own time has lived for all times. Freidrich Schiller Whoever wants to become a Christian, must first become a poet. St. Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia It is hard to have patience with those Jeremiahs, in press or pulpit, who warn us that we are “relapsing into paganism”. It might be rather fun if we were. It would be pleasant to see some future Prime Minister trying to kill a large and lively milk-white bull in Westminster Hall. But we shan't. What lurks behind such idle prophecies, if they are anything but careless language, is the false idea that the historical process allows mere reversal; that Europe can come out of Christianity “by the same door as in she went”, and find herself back where she was. It is not what happens. A post-Christian man is not a Pagan; you might as well think that a married woman recovers her virginity by divorce. The post-Christian is cut off from the Christian past, and therefore doubly from the Pagan past. C. S. Lewis, from “De Descriptione Temporum” A Boy in Church by Robert Graves ‘Gabble-gabble, . . . brethren, . . . gabble-gabble!'     My window frames forest and heather. I hardly hear the tuneful babble,     Not knowing nor much caring whether The text is praise or exhortation, Prayer or thanksgiving, or damnation.   Outside it blows wetter and wetter,     The tossing trees never stay still. I shift my elbows to catch better     The full round sweep of heathered hill. The tortured copse bends to and fro In silence like a shadow-show.   The parson's voice runs like a river     Over smooth rocks, I like this church: The pews are staid, they never shiver,     They never bend or sway or lurch. ‘Prayer,' says the kind voice, ‘is a chain That draws down Grace from Heaven again.'   I add the hymns up, over and over,     Until there's not the least mistake. Seven-seventy-one. (Look! there's a plover!     It's gone!) Who's that Saint by the lake? The red light from his mantle passes Across the broad memorial brasses.   It's pleasant here for dreams and thinking,     Lolling and letting reason nod, With ugly serious people linking     Sad prayers to a forgiving God . . . . But a dumb blast sets the trees swaying With furious zeal like madmen praying. Put Out More Flags by Evelyn Waugh Asterix Comics by René Goscinny Tin Tin by Herge Sigrid Undset Giants in the Earth by Ole Rolvaag Roald Dahl A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle John Donne George Herbert The Complete Stories by Flannery O'Connor The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John le Carré Graham Greene Alfred Lord Tennyson The New Oxford Book of Christian Verse edited by Donald Davie Waiting on the Word by Malcolm Guite Word in the Wilderness by Malcolm Guite Neil Gaiman Bill Bryson Ursula Le Guin Terry Pratchett Reflections on the Psalms by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Blitz Bazawule on Why Crop Rotation Is The Perfect Metaphor For the Creative Mind

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 51:44


This week, The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan revisits a Books & Books virtual event with multidisciplinary artist Blitz Bazawule in conversation with Beasts of Prey author Ayana Gray. Bazawule's debut novel, The Scent of Burnt Flowers, set in the mid-1960s, tells the story of a Black couple, Melvin and Bernadette, who have fled the United States for Ghana after Melvin kills a racist assailant in self-defense. “The literary world has given me so much in terms of freedom and the ability to zig-zag though the world of time and space, in a way I probably could never do in another medium,” said Bazawule. The filmmaker, musician and now author is currently directing the musical adaptation of The Color Purple movie.  The Scent of Burnt Flowers is available at Books & Books.  BLITZ BAZAWULE is a multidisciplinary artist born in Ghana. His feature directorial debut, The Burial of Kojo, premiered on Netflix via ARRAY Releasing. He co-directed Beyoncé's Black Is King, which earned him a Grammy nomination. Bazawule is set to direct the musical version of The Color Purple for Warner Bros. His artwork has been featured at the Whitney Biennial. He is also a TED senior fellow and a Guggenheim fellow. The Scent of Burnt Flower is his debut novel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 136: Two for '22 Reading Challenge Check-In

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 101:15 Very Popular


This week on The Literary Life podcast our hosts give an update on their progress with the “Two for '22” Literary Life Reading Challenge. Angelina, Cindy and Thomas share their commonplace quotes, then begin going over each category and talking about their progress and the various books they have chosen so far. Scroll down in the show notes for all the book titles mentioned and affiliate links to them on Amazon. Download the adult reading challenge PDF here, and the kids' reading challenge PDF here. The Literary Life Commonplace Books published by Blue Sky Daisies are always available for purchase, as well! Join us for the 2022 Back to School Conference, “Education: Myths and Legends” happening live online this August 1st-6th. Our special guest speakers will be Lynn Bruce and Caitlin Beauchamp, along with our hosts Cindy Rollins, Angelina Stanford and Thomas Banks. Learn more and register today at Morning Time for Moms. Check out Episode 3: The Importance of the Detective Novel. Commonplace Quotes: Nobody seems great to his dwarf. Par Lagerkvist What is true of nature is also true of freedom. The half-baked Rousseau-ism in which most of us have been brought up has given us a subconscious notion that the free act is the untrained act. But of course, freedom has nothing to do with the lack of training. We are not free to move until we have learned ot walk. We are not free to express ourselves musically until we have learned music. We are not capable of free thought unless we can think. Similarly, free speech cannot have anything to do with the mumbling and grousing of the ego. Free speech is cultivated and precise speech, which means that there are far too many people who are neither capable of it nor would know if they had lost it. A group of individuals who retain the power and desire of genuine communication is a society. An aggregate of egos is a mob. Northrop Frye He had had a choice, after all. The army had been keen to keep him, even with half his leg missing. Friends of friends had offered everything from management roles in the close protection industry to business partnerships, but the itch to detect, solve, and reimpose order on the moral universe could not be extinguished in him. He doubted it ever would be. Robert Galbraith The Composer by W. H. Auden All the others translate: the painter sketches A visible world to love or reject; Rummaging into his living, the poet fetches The images out that hurt and connect. From Life to Art by painstaking adaption Relying on us to cover the rift; Only your notes are pure contraption, Only your song is an absolute gift. Pour out your presence, O delight, cascading The falls of the knee and the weirs of the spine, Our climate of silence and doubt invading; You, alone, alone, O imaginary song, Are unable to say an existence is wrong, And pour out your forgiveness like a wine. Book List: The Dwarf by Par Lagerkvist The Well-Tempered Critic by Northrop Frye Formation of Character by Charlotte Mason Anatomy of Criticism by Northrop Frye Lethal White by Robert Galbraith Poet's Corner by John Lithgow Rob Roy by Sir Walter Scott The Wise Woman by George MacDonald The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald Paradise Lost by John Milton The Wood Beyond the World by William Morris Phantastes by George MacDonald Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott The Bride of Lammermoor by Sir Walter Scott Evelina by Fanny Burney The Boys by Ron and Clint Howard The Most Reluctant Convert by David C. Downing Dorothy L. Sayers by Colin Duriez Dracula by Bram Stoker Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell Silas Marner by George Eliot Hard Times by Charles Dickens David Copperfield by Charles Dickens Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë An Old Man's Love by Anthony Trollope She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare Timon of Athens by Williams Shakespeare The Trojan Women by Euripedes Antigone by Sophocles The Rehearsal by George Villiers The Great Divorce by C. S. Lewis Til We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis by Jason M. Baxter The Oxford Inklings by Colin Duriez Anxious People by Fredrik Backman Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim The Shepherd's Life by James Rebanks Wintering by Katherine May The Eternal Husband by Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Aeneid by Virgil A Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey The Vision of the Anointed by Thomas Sowell The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards DC Smith Investigation Series by Peter Grainger Nero Wolfe Series by Rex Stout Anthony Horowitz Simon Serrailler Series by Susan Hill P. D. James The Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley The Leavenworth Case by Anna Catherine Green Trent's Last Case by E. C. Bentley David Bentley Hart Joseph Epstein Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 135: The Literary Life of Jone Rose

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 89:00 Very Popular


Welcome back to this long awaited return of The Literary Life podcast and a new “Literary Life of…” interview episode with Angelina, Cindy and their guest Jone Rose. Jone is a “super-fan” of the podcast and is a homeschool mom living in North Carolina. Today Angelina starts off the interview asking about Jone's childhood reading life and school experience. Jone shares how her own adult literary education didn't start until after she had been homeschooling her own children for several years. In addition to discussing the redemption of Jone's own education, they talk about what her reading life looks like now, how narration helps make connections and increase understanding, asking better questions, and so much more! Join us for the 2022 Back to School Conference, “Education: Myths and Legends” happening live online this August 1st-6th. Our special guest speakers will be Lynn Bruce and Caitlin Beauchamp, along with our hosts Cindy Rollins, Angelina Stanford and Thomas Banks. Learn more and register today at Morning Time for Moms. Commonplace Quotes: Surely this great writer would provide me with a definitive definition which showed me all the answers. He didn't, and I was naive to expect him to. Generally, what is more important than getting watertight answers is learning to ask the right questions. Madeleine L'Engle Stories are able to help us to become more whole, to become named; and naming is one of the impulses behind all art, to give a name to the cosmos we see, despite all the chaos. Madeleine L'Engle I am inclined to think that her work is in danger of being overlaid by too many interpreters and the simplicity of her message needs preserving. Essex Cholmondeley from Ode: Intimations of Immortality by William Wordsworth Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower; We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind; In the primal sympathy Which having been must ever be; In the soothing thoughts that spring Out of human suffering; In the faith that looks through death, In years that bring the philosophic mind. Book List: Walking on Water by Madeleine L'Engle What Is Art? by Leo Tolstoy The Story of Charlotte Mason by Essex Cholmondeley Brother Cadfael Series by Ellis Peters The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C. S. Lewis The Magician's Nephew by C. S. Lewis Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Ottessa Moshfegh: Why Do I Write About Such Darkness?

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 56:24


On today's episode of The Literary Life, at a live event at Books & Books, special guest Amanda Keeley is joined by Ottessa Moshfegh to discuss her latest novel, Lapvona, out now from Penguin Press. Ottessa Moshfegh is a fiction writer from New England. Eileen, her first novel, was shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. My Year of Rest and Relaxation and Death in Her Hands, her second and third novels, were New York Times bestsellers. She is also the author of the short story collection Homesick for Another World and a novella, McGlue. She lives in Southern California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Homeschool Conversations with Humility and Doxology
Adding Enchantment to Your Homeschool Through Literature (with Dachelle McVey)

Homeschool Conversations with Humility and Doxology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 14:22


Learn how to bring a little sparkle to your homeschool! Today's audioblog guest is Dachelle McVey from Hide the Chocolate. Would you like a copy of my FREE Homeschool Planning Guide? Grab your copy at HumilityandDoxology.com/Homeschool-Planning-Guide Exploring Shakespeare with Children: https://humilityanddoxology.com/exploring-shakespeare-children/ Dachelle is a homeschooling mom of 3 who knows the struggle of getting kids excited to read a book, especially the classics. This is why she created Literary Adventures for Kids, a full language arts curriculum for preschool to high school that inspires kids to read through rabbit trails and a little bit of magic dust. She uses her experiences as an educator in the traditional system to create courses that encourage critical thinking and are catalysts for big conversations. Dachelle is also the owner of Hide The Chocolate, a blog about her adventures in homeschooling and parenting using a relaxed Charlotte Mason philosophy. You can often find her reading a good book (or even sometimes just an okay book) and enjoying a jar of Nutella — don't judge. ;) Find more from Dachelle: Free Courses: https://www.literaryadventuresforkids.com/p/free-courses/?affcode=168584_eobiapnt Free Enchantment Planner: https://www.literaryadventuresforkids.com/p/enchantment-homeschool-planner/?affcode=168584_eobiapnt Book Clubs: https://www.hidethechocolate.com/book-clubs/?affcode=168584_eobiapnt Poetry Teatimes: https://www.hidethechocolate.com/poetry-teatime/?affcode=168584_eobiapnt My past interview with Dachelle: https://humilityanddoxology.com/dachelle-mcvey This week's podcast replay suggestion is: Identity, Grace, and a Literary Life (with Missy Andrews from Center for Lit) These show notes contain affiliate links. Disclaimer. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/humilityanddoxology/message

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 134: “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame, Part 4

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 74:31 Very Popular


In this week's episode of The Literary Life, our hosts wrap up their series on The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Angelina, Thomas and Cindy talk about these final chapters of the book, covering some key ideas such as the siren song of the Sea Rat, Toad's inability to see himself rightly, the echoes of Homer's Odyssey, examples of bad discussion questions, and what makes this such a lasting book. It's not too late to join Cindy's Summer Discipleship group! Head over the MorningTimeforMoms.com to register. Thomas will be teaching an introductory course on Russian Literature in July 2022. Learn more and register at houseofhumaneletters.com. Commonplace Quotes: Secrets had an immense attraction for him, because he never could keep one. Kenneth Grahame It is a reasonable hope that those who heard you in Oxford, many will understand henceforth that when the old poets made some virtue their theme, they were not teaching, but adoring, and that which we take for the didactic is often the enchanted. C. S. Lewis A childhood without books–that would be no childhood. That would be like being shut out from the enchanted place where you can go and find the rarest kind of joy. Astrid Lindgren Mr. Toad's Song by Kenneth Grahame The world has held great Heroes, As history-books have showed; But never a name to go down to fame Compared with that of Toad! The clever men at Oxford Know all that there is to be knowed. But they none of them knew one half as much As intelligent Mr. Toad! The animals sat in the Ark and cried, Their tears in torrents flowed. Who was it said, ” There's land ahead ” ? Encouraging Mr. Toad! The Army all saluted As they marched along the road. Was it the King? Or Kitchener? No. It was Mr. Toad! The Queen and her Ladies-in-waiting Sat at the window and sewed. She cried, ” Look! who's that handsome man? “ They answered, ” Mr. Toad. “ Book List: Preface to Paradise Lost by C. S. Lewis Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren Seacrow Island by Astrid Lindgren Wild Wood by Jan Needle (not a recommendation) The Golden Age by Kenneth Grahame Pagan Papers by Kenneth Grahame Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB