Podcasts about translators

Communication of the meaning of a source language text by means of an equivalent target language text

  • 1,385PODCASTS
  • 2,587EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 24, 2023LATEST
translators

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about translators

Show all podcasts related to translators

Latest podcast episodes about translators

Church News
Church History Department's Matt Heiss on collecting, preserving and sharing records

Church News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 53:37


In Doctrine and Covenants 21:1, the Lord commanded the Prophet Joseph Smith that the Church's records and history should be kept "continually." While the prospect of recording and preserving those records can seem daunting, the Lord has promised that the keeping of records would be "for the good of the Church, and for the rising generations." Matt Heiss is the manager for the Global Support and Training Division of the Church History Library in the Church's seven areas in Europe and Africa. He is the guest on this episode of the Church News podcast. Since 1987, Heiss has worked with the Church History Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to acquire, manage and train others on collecting Church history. He discusses the importance of Church history, the potential of recording-keeping and what he knows now after decades of working for the Church. The Church News Podcast is a weekly podcast that invites listeners to make a journey of connection with members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints across the globe. Host Sarah Jane Weaver, reporter and editor for The Church News for a quarter-century, shares a unique view of the stories, events, and most important people who form this international faith. With each episode, listeners are asked to embark on a journey to learn from one another and ponder, “What do I know now?” because of the experience. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Den of Rich
Andrey Zilber | Андрей Зильбер

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 121:14


Andrey Zilber is a Research Fellow at the Academia Kantiana, Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University. Philosophy teacher for philosophers and non-philosophers. Translator of philosophical treatises and articles from German and English. He studied philosophy in Kaliningrad and in Germany, spent a total of about three years on scientific internships at German universities. Secretary of the editorial board of the international scientific journal "Kantovsky Sbornik" (Kantian Journal). The main field of activity is the philosophy of Kant. The scientific dream is to make science out of parascience. FAIND ANDREY ON SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook | VKontakte ================================ SUPPORT & CONNECT: Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrich Twitter: https://twitter.com/denofrich Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mark.develman/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/denofrich Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/den_of_rich/ Hashtag: #denofrich © Copyright 2023 Den of Rich. All rights reserved.

Matt Christiansen Bible Study
Session 28: January 21, 2023

Matt Christiansen Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023


Scripture Reading: John 19:16b-30 So they took Jesus, 17 and carrying his own cross he went out to the place called “The Place of the Skull” (called in Aramaic Golgotha). 18 There they crucified him along with two others, one on each side, with Jesus in the middle. 19 Pilate also had a notice written and fastened to the cross, which read: “Jesus the Nazarene, the king of the Jews.” 20 Thus many of the Jewish residents of Jerusalem read this notice because the place where Jesus was crucified was near the city, and the notice was written in Aramaic, Latin, and Greek. 21 Then the chief priests of the Jews said to Pilate, “Do not write, ‘The king of the Jews,' but rather, ‘This man said, I am king of the Jews.'” 22 Pilate answered, “What I have written, I have written.”23 Now when the soldiers crucified Jesus, they took his clothes and made four shares, one for each soldier, and the tunic remained. (Now the tunic was seamless, woven from top to bottom as a single piece.) 24 So the soldiers said to one another, “Let's not tear it, but throw dice to see who will get it.” This took place to fulfill the scripture that says, “They divided my garments among them, and for my clothing they threw dice.” So the soldiers did these things.25 Now standing beside Jesus' cross were his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. 26 So when Jesus saw his mother and the disciple whom he loved standing there, he said to his mother, “Woman, look, here is your son!” 27 He then said to his disciple, “Look, here is your mother!” From that very time the disciple took her into his own home.28 After this Jesus, realizing that by this time everything was completed, said (in order to fulfill the scripture), “I am thirsty!” 29 A jar full of sour wine was there, so they put a sponge soaked in sour wine on a branch of hyssop and lifted it to his mouth. 30 When he had received the sour wine, Jesus said, “It is completed!” Then he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.Main Themes[I am still working on the blog post.]Historical Context: Roman CrucifixionThe latter half of chapter 19 describes the crucifixion of Christ, one of the most significant events in human history even without taking into account its religious implications. If its theology is true, then its significance is certainly without rival. Yet, I fear the story—gory and mystical as it is—barely fazes us. It is part of our cultural DNA. It's too familiar, while yet remaining unexamined. In an attempt to bring some “newness” to the story, I will begin this session by reading an extended quotation from Tom Holland's (the historian, not Spider-Man) Dominion. Tom Holland is not a Christian, yet he realized, to quote the books byline, “how the Christian revolution remade the world.” He has the best description of crucifixion and its first century cultural significance I have encountered. Without further ado, here is Tom Holland in the preface to Dominion: No death was more excruciating, more contemptible, than crucifixion. To be hung naked, ‘long in agony, swelling with ugly weals on shoulders and chest', helpless to beat away the clamorous birds: such a fate, Roman intellectuals agreed, was the worst imaginable. This in turn was what rendered it so suitable a punishment for slaves. Lacking such a sanction, the entire order of the city might fall apart. Luxury and splendour such as Rome could boast were dependent, in the final reckoning, on keeping those who sustained it in their place. ‘After all, we have slaves drawn from every corner of the world in our households, practicing strange customs, and foreign cults, or none—and it is only by means of terror that we can hope to coerce such scum.'Nevertheless, while the salutary effect of crucifixion on those who might otherwise threaten the order of the state was taken for granted, Roman attitudes to the punishment were shot through with ambivalence. Naturally, if it were to serve as a deterrent it needed to be public. Nothing spoke more eloquently of a failed revolt than the sight of hundreds upon hundreds of corpse-hung crosses, whether lining a highway or else massed before a rebellious city, the hills all around it stripped bare of their trees. Even in peacetime, executioners would make a spectacle of their victims by suspending them in a variety of inventive ways: ‘one, perhaps, upside down, with his head towards the ground, another with a stake driven through his genitals, another attached by his arms to a yoke'. Yet in the exposure of the crucified to the public gaze there lurked a paradox. So foul was the carrion-reek of their disgrace that many felt tainted even by viewing a crucifixion. The Romans, for all that they had adopted the punishment as the ‘supreme penalty', refused to countenance the possibility that it might have originated with them. Only a people famed for their barbarousness and cruelty could ever have devised such a torture: the Persians, perhaps, or the Assyrians, or the Gauls. Everything about the practice of nailing a man to a cross—a ‘crux'—was repellent. ‘Why, the very word is harsh on our ears.' It was this disgust that crucifixion uniquely inspired which explained why, when slaves were condemned to death, they were executed in the meanest, wretchedest stretch of land beyond the city walls; and why, when Rome burst its ancient limits, only the planting of the world's most exotic and aromatic plants could serve to mask the taint. It was also why, despite the ubiquity of crucifixion across the Roman world, few cared to think much about it. Order, the order loved by the gods and upheld by magistrates vested with the full authority of the greatest power on earth, was what counted—not the elimination of such vermin as presumed to challenge it. Criminals broken on implements of torture: who were such filth to concern men of breeding and civility? Some deaths were so vile, so squalid, that it was best to draw a veil across them entirely.The surprise, then, is less that we should have so few detailed descriptions in ancient literature of what a crucifixion might actually involve, than that we should have any at all. The corpses of the crucified, once they had first provided pickings for hungry birds, tended to be flung into a common grave. In Italy, undertakers dressed in red, ringing bells as they went, would drag them there on hooks. Oblivion, like the loose earth scattered over their tortured bodies, would then entomb them. This was a part of their fate. Nevertheless, amid the general silence, there is one major exception which proves the rule. Four detailed accounts of the process by which a man might be sentenced to the cross, and then suffer his punishment, have survived from antiquity. Remarkably, they all describe the same execution: a crucifixion that took place some sixty or seventy years after the building of the first heated swimming pool in Rome. The location, though, was not the Esquiline, but another hill, outside the walls of Jerusalem: Golgotha, ‘which means the place of a skull'. The victim, a Jew by the name of Jesus, a wandering preacher from an obscure town named Nazareth, in a region north of Jerusalem named Galilee, had been convicted of a capital offence against Roman order. The four earliest accounts of his execution, written some decades after his death, specify what this meant in practice. The condemned man, after his sentencing, was handed over to soldiers to be flogged. Next, because he had claimed to be ‘the king of the Jews', his guards mocked him, and spat on him, and set a crown of thorns on his head. Only then, bruised and bloodied, was he led out on his final journey. Hauling his cross as he went, he stumbled his way through Jerusalem, a spectacle and an admonition to all who saw him, and onwards, along the road to Golgotha. There, nails were driven into his hands and feet, and he was crucified. After his death, a spear was jabbed into his side. There is no reason to doubt the essentials of this narrative. Even the most sceptical historians have tended to accept them. ‘The death of Jesus of Nazareth on the cross is an established fact, arguably the only established fact about him.' Certainly, his sufferings were nothing exceptional. Pain and humiliation, and the protracted horror of ‘the most wretched of deaths': these, over the course of Roman history, were the common lot of multitudes.Decidedly not the common lot of multitudes, however, was the fate of Jesus' corpse. Lowered from the cross, it was spared a common grave. Claimed by a wealthy admirer, it was prepared reverently for burial, laid in a tomb and left behind a heavy boulder. Such, at any rate, is the report of all four of the earliest narratives of Jesus' death—narratives that in Greek were called euangelia, ‘good news', and would come to be known in English as gospels. The accounts are not implausible. Certainly, we know from archaeological evidence that the corpse of a crucified man might indeed, on occasion, be granted dignified burial in the ossuaries beyond the walls of Jerusalem. Altogether more startling, though—not to say unprecedented—were the stories of what happened next. That women, going to the tomb, had found the entrance stone rolled away. That Jesus, over the course of the next forty days, had appeared to his followers, not as a ghost or a reanimated corpse, but resurrected into a new and glorious form. That he had ascended into heaven and was destined to come again. Time would see him hailed, not just as a man, but as a god. By enduring the most agonising fate imaginable, he had conquered death itself. ‘Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth…'The utter strangeness of all this, for the vast majority of people in the Roman world, did not lie in the notion that a mortal might become divine. The border between the heavenly and the earthly was widely held to be permeable. In Egypt, the oldest of monarchies, kings had been objects of worship for unfathomable aeons. In Greece, stories were told of a ‘hero god' by the name of Heracles, a muscle-bound monster-slayer who, after a lifetime of spectacular feats, had been swept up from the flames of his own pyre to join the immortals. Among the Romans, a similar tale was told of Romulus, the founder of their city. In the decades before the crucifixion of Jesus, the pace of such promotions into the ranks of the gods had begun to quicken. So vast had the scope of Roman power become that any man who succeeded in making himself its master was liable to seem less human than divine. The ascent into heaven of one of those, a warlord by the name of Julius Caesar, had been heralded by the blaze across the skies of a fiery-tailed star; that of a second, Caesar's adopted son, who had won for himself the name of Augustus, by a spirit seen rising—just as Heracles had done—from a funeral pyre. Even sceptics who scorned the possibility that a fellow mortal might truly become a god were happy to concede its civic value. ‘For the human spirit that believes itself to be of divine origin will thereby be emboldened in the undertaking of mighty deeds, more energetic in accomplishing them, and by its freedom from care rendered more successful in carrying them out.'Divinity, then, was for the very greatest of the great: for victors, and heroes, and kings. Its measure was the power to torture one's enemies, not to suffer it oneself: to nail them to the rocks of a mountain, or to turn them into spiders, or to blind and crucify them after conquering the world. That a man who had himself been crucified might be hailed as a god could not help but be seen by people everywhere across the Roman world as scandalous, obscene, grotesque. The ultimate offensiveness, though, was to one particular people: Jesus' own. The Jews, unlike their rulers, did not believe that a man might become a god; they believed that there was only the one almighty, eternal deity. Creator of the heavens and the earth, he was worshipped by them as the Most High God, the Lord of Hosts, the Master of all the Earth. Empires were his to order; mountains to melt like wax. That such a god, of all gods, might have had a son, and that this son, suffering the fate of a slave, might have been tortured to death on a cross, were claims as stupefying as they were, to most Jews, repellent. No more shocking a reversal of their most devoutly held assumptions could possibly have been imagined. Not merely blasphemy, it was madness.Even those who did come to acknowledge Jesus as ‘Christos', the Anointed One of the Lord God, might flinch at staring the manner of his death full in the face. ‘Christians', as they were called, were as wise to the connotations of crucifixion as anyone. ‘The mystery of the cross, which summons us to God, is something despised and dishonourable.' So wrote Justin, the foremost Christian apologist of his generation, a century and a half after the birth of Jesus. The torture of the Son of the Most High God was a horror simply too shocking to be portrayed in visual form. Scribes copying the gospels might on occasion draw above the Greek word for ‘cross' delicate pictograms that hinted at the crucified Christ, but otherwise it was left to sorcerers or satirists to illustrate his execution. Yet this, to many across the Roman world, was not as deep a paradox as perhaps it might have seemed. So profound were some mysteries that mortals had no choice but to keep them veiled. The naked radiance of the gods was far too dazzling for the human eye. No one, by contrast, had been blinded by the spectacle of the Son of the Most High God being tortured to death; but Christians, although accustomed to make the sign of the cross as a gesture of piety, and to contemplate with wide-eyed reverence the gospel accounts of their Saviour's sufferings, seem to have shrunk from seeing them represented in physical form.Only centuries after the death of Jesus—by which time, astonishingly, even the Caesars had been brought to acknowledge him as Christ—did his execution at last start to emerge as an acceptable theme for artists. By AD 400 the cross was ceasing to be viewed as something shameful. Banned as a punishment decades earlier by Constantine, the first Christian emperor, crucifixion had come to serve the Roman people as an emblem of triumph over sin and death. An artist, carving the scene out of ivory, might represent Jesus in the skimpy loincloth of an athlete, no less muscled than any of the ancient gods. Even as the western half of the empire began to slip away from the rule of the Caesars and fall to barbarian invaders, so in the eastern half, where Roman power endured, the Cross provided assurance to an embattled people that victory would ultimately be theirs. In Christ's agonies had been the index of his defeat of evil. This was why, triumphant even on the implement of his torture, he was never shown as suffering pain. His expression was one of serenity. It proclaimed him Lord of the Universe.Carrying His Cross to GolgothaJesus carries his cross out of Jerusalem to a place called Golgotha. Jews and Romans alike performed executions outside of a town. The Romans made a spectacle of it, in which soldiers would march the prisoner while crowds of spectators gathered to watch.John tells us that Jesus “carr[ied] his own cross.” The Roman custom was to have the prisoners carry their own patibulum—the transverse beam of the cross. This beam was later affixed over the upright stake (the palus, stipes, or staticulum). So, Jesus probably did not carry the entire cross as we normally see it depicted in paintings or movies. The Romans would often continue to scourge the prisoner. Given that Jesus had already been severely scourged, this may not have happened. If the lashings had continued, Jesus could have died before ever reaching the cross.The Synoptics tell us that someone else carried the cross:As they led him away, they seized Simon of Cyrene, who was coming in from the country. They placed the cross on his back and made him carry it behind Jesus. (Luke 23:26)The texts can be easily harmonized. After the severe scourging Jesus received, he was probably unable to carry the cross the whole way to Golgotha. The Romans quickly conscripted Simon of Cyrene to finish the job. No point in ruining a perfectly sadistic execution. The inference that Jesus was extremely weak is not mere speculation. Crucifixions lasted days with the criminal hanging on the cross. All four Gospels attest to Jesus dying quickly after being lifted. This shows he was mortally wounded well before the actual crucifixion.Golgotha is probably at or near where the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is today. As Britannica explains:Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called Holy Sepulchre, church built on the traditional site of Jesus' Crucifixion and burial. According to the Bible (John 19:41–42), his tomb was close to the place of the Crucifixion, and so the church was planned to enclose the site of both the cross and the tomb.The Church of the Holy Sepulchre lies in the northwest quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem.This is not mere reliance on the tradition that accompanies that church, but on historical evidence. The same evidence weighs against the famous “Garden Tomb”—which some Protestants believe to be Jesus' burial site—from being the correct location.Golgotha was also called “The Place of the Skull.” This could be from the shape of the terrain or, more likely, from the executions carried out there. Why do we, in the English-speaking Christian tradition, call this place “calvary”? As study note 56 in the NET tells us,The Latin word for the Greek κρανίον (kranion) is calvaria. Thus the English word “Calvary” is a transliteration of the Latin rather than a NT place name (cf. Luke 23:33 in the KJV).They Crucified Him Along Two OthersWhat is central to the Christian faith? The crucifixion of Jesus. Christians put crosses on their churches, wear crosses on their necks, and sing hymns like “The Old Rugged Cross.” Yet, in how much detail does the Gospel of John describe the crucifixion? In one. short. sentence.There they crucified him along with two others, one on each side, with Jesus in the middle. (John 19:18)The other Gospels hardly add much detail. Why? Because crucifixion was an unspeakably well-known horror at the time. It was the kind of event with which everyone in John's audience would have been familiar, and the kind of event no one wanted to think about—particularly in relation to someone beloved, much less their Lord!As explained by Tom Holland, crucifixions were intentionally horrific. They sent a public message. Executioners were given free reign to improvise and improve upon them. Sometimes the victim might be tied to the cross, other times they might be nailed to it. When nails were used, they were 5 to 7 inches long. They penetrated the wrist and sunk deep into the wood. The criminal would hang for hours or days. He (or sometimes she) would be unable to swat the flies off his wounds. He could not contain his bodily wastes. All while hanging from a cross anywhere from 6 to 10 feet in height.Jesus was crucified with two others. At first, this may seem surprising. They appear nowhere else in the story. However, this is not an unlikely situation. Crucifixions were a form of government propaganda. What better time to broadcast the message than during a popular festival drawing thousands of people from all over the empire.Jesus, King of the JewsPilate had a tablet made that displayed the charge against Jesus—“king of the Jews.” This would have been somewhat customary. During an execution, one of the soldiers might carry a tabula (tablet) declaring the charge and cause of execution. There is dark humor embedded in this scene. Pilate included the charge provided to him by the Jews themselves. He writes it in Aramaic, Latin, and Greek. Remember that during this festival Jews from all over the empire and some Gentiles would travel to Jerusalem. Many of them may have been more fluent in Latin or Greek. So, Pilate advertises to all there: this is the king of the Jews being crucified.Think of how the situation would have been perceived by those not “in the know.” The king of the Jews is being crucified by the Romans during the most important Jewish festival of the year, while a crowd of Jews—particularly the Jewish religious elite—cheer on. This would be confusing at best and treacherous at worst. It would have looked like the Jewish religious elite were siding with the Romans against the Jewish claim of sovereignty.The chief priests protest. The tablet must be rewritten, they request. “Do not write, ‘The king of the Jews,' but rather, ‘This man said, I am king of the Jews.'” Pilate gets the last laugh. The Jewish leaders may have involved him in a situation with which he wanted no connection; they may have twisted his arm by threatening to accuse him of treason to Caesar; but they certainly cannot direct Pilate's execution of Jesus. “What I have written, I have written” he responds, taking his small revenge on them.There is a subtle theological point made by the message on the tablet. Remember Jesus' words in chapter 12:And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself. (John 12:32)The message, at least on its face, seems serious: “king of the Jews.” And it is written not only in Aramaic (the language of the Jews) but in the “universal” languages. Greek was still the lingua franca and Latin was a close second. They were the languages spoken all over the world, or that's what anyone in John's audience would have thought.The point is that the message of Jesus' kingship is displayed for all the world to see, not just the Jews. Of course, there are many more languages and the Gospel message is still making its way to the whole world today, but the symbolism is powerful. Jesus died so that “everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16, emphasis added)They Took His Clothes—Psalm 22The soldiers proceed to take whatever few possessions Jesus had upon his arrest. Confiscating the goods of an executed prisoner was standard practice. The removal of clothing upon execution was also standard. The Romans executed prisoners naked. In the ancient world just as today, nakedness in the wrong settings can be cause of shame. For the Jews particularly, public nakedness would have especially shameful. Given that Jesus was crucified in a Jewish setting and during a Jewish festival, the Romans could have agreed to keep loincloths on the criminals.The Roman army's basic unit was a contubernium, eight men who shared a tent. Dispatching half a unit, i.e., four men, would have been common for a task such as crucifixion. (This was called a quaternion, a squad of four soldiers.) Hence the need to divide the garments among several soldiers. The NET translation says they “threw dice.” This is possible (that they used actual dice), but as translator's note 74 to the NET explains:Grk “but choose by lot” (probably by using marked pebbles or broken pieces of pottery). A modern equivalent, “throw dice,” was chosen here because of its association with gambling.What the text calls a tunic would be an unfamiliar garment to us. Translator's note 71 in the NET explains:Or “shirt” (a long garment worn under the cloak next to the skin). The name for this garment (χιτών, chitōn) presents some difficulty in translation. Most modern readers would not understand what a ‘tunic' was any more than they would be familiar with a ‘chiton.' On the other hand, attempts to find a modern equivalent are also a problem: “Shirt” conveys the idea of a much shorter garment that covers only the upper body, and “undergarment” (given the styles of modern underwear) is more misleading still. “Tunic” was therefore employed, but with a note to explain its nature.The main point John is making by describing how soldiers divided Jesus' clothes among them is a prophetic one. He reminds us how Psalm 22 is being fulfilled. I quote the entire psalm below (for the sake of legibility, I format it as if it were prose).For the music director, according to the tune “Morning Doe”; a psalm of David.My God, my God, why have you abandoned me? I groan in prayer, but help seems far away. 2 My God, I cry out during the day, but you do not answer, and during the night my prayers do not let up.3 You are holy; you sit as king receiving the praises of Israel. 4 In you our ancestors trusted; they trusted in you and you rescued them. 5 To you they cried out, and they were saved; in you they trusted and they were not disappointed.6 But I am a worm, not a man; people insult me and despise me. 7 All who see me taunt me; they mock me and shake their heads. 8 They say, “Commit yourself to the Lord! Let the Lord rescue him! Let the Lord deliver him, for he delights in him.”9 Yes, you are the one who brought me out from the womb and made me feel secure on my mother's breasts. 10 I have been dependent on you since birth; from the time I came out of my mother's womb you have been my God.11 Do not remain far away from me, for trouble is near and I have no one to help me. 12 Many bulls surround me; powerful bulls of Bashan hem me in. 13 They open their mouths to devour me like a roaring lion that rips its prey.14 My strength drains away like water; all my bones are dislocated. My heart is like wax; it melts away inside me. 15 The roof of my mouth is as dry as a piece of pottery; my tongue sticks to my gums.You set me in the dust of death. 16 Yes, wild dogs surround me—a gang of evil men crowd around me; like a lion they pin my hands and feet.17 I can count all my bones; my enemies are gloating over me in triumph. 18 They are dividing up my clothes among themselves; they are rolling dice [literally, “casting lots”] for my garments.19 But you, O Lord, do not remain far away. You are my source of strength. Hurry and help me! 20 Deliver me from the sword. Save my life from the claws of the wild dogs. 21 Rescue me from the mouth of the lion and from the horns of the wild oxen.You have answered me. 22 I will declare your name to my countrymen. In the middle of the assembly I will praise you. 23 You loyal followers of the Lord, praise him.All you descendants of Jacob, honor him. All you descendants of Israel, stand in awe of him. 24 For he did not despise or detest the suffering of the oppressed. He did not ignore him; when he cried out to him, he responded. 25 You are the reason I offer praise in the great assembly; I will fulfill my promises before the Lord's loyal followers. 26 Let the oppressed eat and be filled. Let those who seek his help praise the Lord. May you live forever!27 Let all the people of the earth acknowledge the Lord and turn to him. Let all the nations worship you. 28 For the Lord is king and rules over the nations.29 All the thriving people of the earth will join the celebration and worship; all those who are descending into the grave will bow before him, including those who cannot preserve their lives.30 A whole generation will serve him; they will tell the next generation about the Lord. 31 They will come and tell about his saving deeds; they will tell a future generation what he has accomplished.Look, Here is Your MotherWho is standing near Jesus as he is crucified? All the disciples except the “beloved disciple” have deserted him. The women are the ones who remain with him. This is not entirely surprising from a historical standpoint. Roman soldiers would probably have permitted women followers to remain with the convicted criminal. There would have been many bystanders anyways, and women—even if followers of the criminal—may not have been viewed as active revolutionaries. In the Ancient world, women were allowed more latitude in mourning, and women were executed far less often. (Less often—but not never. The female followers of Jesus were still putting themselves at risk by openly supporting a crucified revolutionary.)Only the Gospel of John mentions the presence of a male disciple at the cross. We have discussed the identity of the “beloved disciple” before. Christian tradition is that the beloved disciple is John himself (the author of this gospel). The fact that only John mentions his presence at the cross makes sense. The other gospel authors focus on the crucifixion itself. John adds a short description of a touching moment he had with Jesus and Jesus' mother.Caution, a short rant is incoming: Nowadays, there are different proposals as to the identity of the beloved disciple. But, frankly, nowadays we can't even agree on what is a woman, so scholarly disagreement on any given point is not as weighty as it once was. Moreover, biblical scholarship is staunchly opposed to tradition. Scholars seem to go out of their way to suggest non-traditional hypotheses, even if they are quite weak or nonsensical. At any rate, I will proceed as if the beloved disciple is John. I don't think the other proposals are even worth discussing, but may this short rant serve as a disclaimer that you should look into those if you are interest. Ok, rant over. Back to the text.Remember that Jesus began his ministry at the behest of his mother, although she did not understand what she was requesting.When the wine ran out, Jesus' mother said to him, “They have no wine left.” Jesus replied, “Woman, why are you saying this to me? My time has not yet come.” (John 2:3-4)In chapter 19, Jesus' mother is present at the end of his earthly ministry.Recall that Jesus is Mary's oldest son, or only son if you take the Catholic approach. Joseph is absent from the narrative, which means he is probably deceased. This further means that the responsibility of caring for Mary fell on Jesus' shoulders. We may have a difficult time understanding the legal position of women in ancient Jewish society, but I will attempt to provide a short explanation. They were “connected” to society through the men in their lives: as the daughter of a man, as the wife of a man, or as the mother of a man. A woman left with no man in her life, either as a father, husband, or son, was a woman that belonged to no household. And a woman without a household had no support group. She was most often destitute. (A younger woman might be expected to remarry or return to her father's household if he was still living. With Mary, those choices were clearly not available.)Consequently, the duty of a son, particularly the eldest, was to care for her aging parents, especially his mother. Moreover, from what we understand of Jewish custom, a dying man was allowed and encouraged to settle the legal status of the women for which he was responsible. A crucified man could make his testament even from the cross.In the ancient world, both Jew and Roman, friendship could create a bond almost as meaningful as kinship. There are several ancient stories in which a dying man asks his friend to become like a son to the decedent's mother. Consequently, the exchange between Jesus, Mary, and John would not have seem odd to an ancient audience.Lastly, we need to understand that adoptive ties would have been taken seriously. A man adopting a woman as his mother is not mere poetry, but an honorable and serious commitment to care for her for the rest of her life.It is with all that in mind that we need to read the conversation in verses 26 and 27. “'Woman, look, here is your son!' He then said to his disciple, ‘Look, here is your mother!'” This was a serious command in which Jesus discharged his last duty—caring for his mother. There is a poetic beauty in that fact that as Jesus was crucified, he went to the grave with no earthly possessions. He had nothing to write a will about, except to settle the legal status of his mother. His mother is all he had and he gave her away as well.One notable detail in this exchange is that Jesus entrusted his mother to his disciple, not to a sibling (whether full or half-sibling, if the Catholic approach is taken). At this point in the narrative, Jesus' ministry has cost him his family. He is now closer to his faith family than he is to his “real family.” This would become a model for many Christians to this very day, when families would disown their own fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, and children because they placed their faith in Jesus Christ.I Am ThirstyEven on the cross, Jesus is working. He is careful with his words in order to “fulfill the scripture.” He exclaims, “I am thirsty.” On its face, this statement is a visible symbol of Jesus' mortality. The more biblically literate in John's audience, however, would recognize a reference to either Psalm 69 or Psalm 22. Psalm 22 was quoted above. Here I quote Psalm 69 in its entirety, again in the form of prose for easier legibility:For the music director, according to the tune of “Lilies”; by David.Deliver me, O God, for the water has reached my neck. 2 I sink into the deep mire where there is no solid ground; I am in deep water, and the current overpowers me.3 I am exhausted from shouting for help. My throat is sore; my eyes grow tired from looking for my God.4 Those who hate me without cause are more numerous than the hairs of my head. Those who want to destroy me, my enemies for no reason, outnumber me.They make me repay what I did not steal. 5 O God, you are aware of my foolish sins; my guilt is not hidden from you. 6 Let none who rely on you be disgraced because of me, O Sovereign Lord of Heaven's Armies. Let none who seek you be ashamed because of me, O God of Israel.7 For I suffer humiliation for your sake and am thoroughly disgraced. 8 My own brothers treat me like a stranger; they act as if I were a foreigner. 9 Certainly zeal for your house consumes me; I endure the insults of those who insult you.10 I weep and refrain from eating food, which causes others to insult me. 11 I wear sackcloth and they ridicule me. 12 Those who sit at the city gate gossip about me; drunkards mock me in their songs.13 O Lord, may you hear my prayer and be favorably disposed to me. O God, because of your great loyal love, answer me with your faithful deliverance. 14 Rescue me from the mud. Don't let me sink.Deliver me from those who hate me, from the deep water. 15 Don't let the current overpower me. Don't let the deep swallow me up. Don't let the Pit devour me.16 Answer me, O Lord, for your loyal love is good. Because of your great compassion, turn toward me. 17 Do not ignore your servant, for I am in trouble. Answer me right away.18 Come near me and redeem me. Because of my enemies, rescue me. 19 You know how I am insulted, humiliated, and disgraced; you can see all my enemies. 20 Their insults are painful and make me lose heart; I look for sympathy, but receive none, for comforters, but find none.21 They put bitter poison into my food, and to quench my thirst they give me vinegar to drink. 22 May their dining table become a trap before them. May it be a snare for that group of friends.23 May their eyes be blinded. Make them shake violently. 24 Pour out your judgment on them. May your raging anger overtake them. 25 May their camp become desolate, their tents uninhabited. 26 For they harass the one whom you discipline; they spread the news about the suffering of those whom you punish.27 Hold them accountable for all their sins. Do not vindicate them. 28 May their names be deleted from the scroll of the living. Do not let their names be listed with the godly.29 I am oppressed and suffering. O God, deliver and protect me. 30 I will sing praises to God's name. I will magnify him as I give him thanks. 31 That will please the Lord more than an ox or a bull with horns and hooves.32 The oppressed look on—let them rejoice. You who seek God, may you be encouraged. 33 For the Lord listens to the needy; he does not despise his captive people.34 Let the heavens and the earth praise him, along with the seas and everything that swims in them. 35 For God will deliver Zion and rebuild the cities of Judah, and his people will again live in them and possess Zion. 36 The descendants of his servants will inherit it, and those who are loyal to him will live in it.So is Jesus' thirst and vinegar drink a reference to Psalm 22 or Psalm 69? The Gospel of Matthew seems to connect Jesus' statement with Psalm 69. In the Greek, Matthew describes the drink as being mixed with cholēn, translated as gall or bile in English. This is the same Greek word used in the Septuagint translation of Psalm 69:21. Notice that Matthew probably based his gospel on the Gospel of Mark, which uses the word esmyrnismenon (myrrh), so using the word cholēn seems like a deliberate interpretation by Matthew. On the other hand, the Gospel of John (and the Gospel of Mark in verse 15:34) makes a reference to Psalm 22 just a few verses before. Interpreting the reference as connected to Psalm 22 shows more literary consistency with the rest of chapter 19. Of course, as your resident fence-sitter, I must also suggest that the reference could be to both psalms. Jewish understanding of prophecy fulfillment was much more fluid than our modern sensibilities would like.Most importantly, both Psalms place us in the context of the suffering servant, persecuted for his service to God. One psalm ends in hope for the oppressed. The other in judgment for the oppressors.Gave Up His SpiritAfter fulfilling scripture, Jesus exclaims “It is completed!” and gives up his spirit. Allow me to begin the discussion of verse 30 with its latter half.John has emphasized time and time again that Jesus is in control, not the Jews, not Pilate, not anyone else but himself. He goes to the cross willingly and deliberately. The second half of verse 30 is the culmination of that theme. Jesus does not simply die. He gives up his spirit. Even at the moment of death, he is in control. Jesus, being God himself, sacrifices himself willingly.The verb used by John to refer to Jesus' giving up of his spirit is paredōken. This is the same verb (although different voice) as the verb used twice in Isaiah 53:12 (paredothē). In Isaiah, the verb is used passively (he is “given up”), while in John the suffering servant is active (he “gives up” his spirit). Nonetheless, the reference is fairly clear, particularly when we consider than John has referenced Isaiah 53 before (John 12:38).Isaiah 53 is a key passage to understanding the death of Jesus. As I did before with Psalm 22 and Psalm 69, I quote Isaiah 53 here as if it were prose:Who would have believed what we just heard? When was the Lord's power revealed through him?2 He sprouted up like a twig before God, like a root out of parched soil; he had no stately form or majesty that might catch our attention, no special appearance that we should want to follow him. 3 He was despised and rejected by people, one who experienced pain and was acquainted with illness; people hid their faces from him; he was despised, and we considered him insignificant.4 But he lifted up our illnesses, he carried our pain; even though we thought he was being punished, attacked by God, and afflicted for something he had done. 5 He was wounded because of our rebellious deeds, crushed because of our sins; he endured punishment that made us well; because of his wounds we have been healed.6 All of us had wandered off like sheep; each of us had strayed off on his own path, but the Lord caused the sin of all of us to attack him.7 He was treated harshly and afflicted, but he did not even open his mouth. Like a lamb led to the slaughtering block, like a sheep silent before her shearers, he did not even open his mouth.8 He was led away after an unjust trial—but who even cared?Indeed, he was cut off from the land of the living; because of the rebellion of his own people he was wounded. 9 They intended to bury him with criminals, but he ended up in a rich man's tomb because he had committed no violent deeds, nor had he spoken deceitfully.10 Though the Lord desired to crush him and make him ill, once restitution is made, he will see descendants and enjoy long life, and the Lord's purpose will be accomplished through him.11 Having suffered, he will reflect on his work, he will be satisfied when he understands what he has done. “My servant will acquit many, for he carried their sins. 12 So I will assign him a portion with the multitudes, he will divide the spoils of victory with the powerful, because he willingly submitted to death and was numbered with the rebels, when he lifted up the sin of many and intervened on behalf of the rebels.”

Brand the Interpreter
Mindful Interpreting with Francisca (Mana) Hoces

Brand the Interpreter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 81:25


Francisca Hoces (Mana) is a Spanish consecutive remote interpreter. She is a certified yoga teacher with Yoga Soul Monkeys, RYS 200 hrs. She taught for years at an addiction recovery center, both acting and yoga. Francisca has a passion for learning and is continuously working to improve. Now, she is working towards becoming a translator for yoga, meditation and related topics. Francisca joins the Brand the Interpreter Guest list all the way from  Santiago de Chile, Chile in South America.Tune in! Only on the Podcast that brings you your stories about our profession; Brand the Interpreter!Francisca's media handles: https://www.instagram.com/mana.bene.gesserit/https://www.linkedin.com/in/francisca-hoces/ Episode Resources:Walking Meditation: https://interpreterscpd.eu/health/walking-meditation/Medito App: https://meditofoundation.org/medito-app Thanks for tuning in, till next time!

Den of Rich
Olga Ivashchuk | Ольга Иващук

Den of Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 139:27


Olga Ivashchuk is a Doctor of Philosophical Sciences, Associate Professor, and Professor at The Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), Moscow, Russia. Author of the monograph "I as a conceptual form" (Rostov-on-Don, IRU, 2005). Translator of Hegel's early work "Faith and Knowledge" (Moscow: Center for Humanitarian Initiatives, 2021). A graduate of the Rostov State University, a representative of the Rostov School of Philosophy, whose traditions were laid down by E.V. Ilyenkov, M.K. Petrov, and A.V. Potemkin, in which a particular place has always been occupied by dialectics, classical philosophy, criticism of the “diatribe tradition” (A.V. Potemkin) and attention to the socio-historical constituent of knowledge, primarily scientific. This spectrum determines her research interests. FIND OLGA ON SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook ================================ SUPPORT & CONNECT: Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/denofrich Twitter: https://twitter.com/denofrich Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/denofrich YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/denofrich Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/den_of_rich/ Hashtag: #denofrich © Copyright 2022 Den of Rich. All rights reserved.

Dr. James White on SermonAudio
Sam Gipp Versus the KJV Translators, Mormonism Review Including the Book of Abraham

Dr. James White on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 102:00


A new MP3 sermon from Alpha and Omega Ministries is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Sam Gipp Versus the KJV Translators, Mormonism Review Including the Book of Abraham Subtitle: The Dividing Line 2023 Speaker: Dr. James White Broadcaster: Alpha and Omega Ministries Event: Podcast Date: 1/17/2023 Length: 102 min.

Alpha and Omega Ministries
Sam Gipp Versus the KJV Translators, Mormonism Review Including the Book of Abraham

Alpha and Omega Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 102:00


Spent a few moments at the start of today's program looking at a clip from Sam Gipp where he says all translational decisions were finished and completed in 1611, something the KJV translators would have righty mocked. Then we dove into Isaiah and Jeremiah for key texts to present to Mormons, then took a brief look at the Book of Abraham, one of the clearest examples of the fact that Joseph Smith was most assuredly not a prophet of God. Over 90 minutes today-

All Saints Podcast
Meeting Pastor Jan Prorok: Church Planter, Pastor, and Translator

All Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 49:03


Pastor Jeffery talks with Pastor Jan Prorok, who serves as Pastor of the Reformed Congregation of the Most Holy Trinity (CREC) in Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic (reformovani-kv.cz).… The post Meeting Pastor Jan Prorok: Church Planter, Pastor, and Translator appeared first on All Saints Presbyterian Church, Fort Worth.

The Bert Show
Cassie: Toddler Translator And She Has Feeling For Her Best Friends BF

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 12:12


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ethnically Ambiguous
We Are Saadia Khan

Ethnically Ambiguous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 64:50


In episode 284, the girls are joined by podcaster and activist Saadia Khan! We get into Saadia's upbringing in Pakistan, her choice to immigrate to the United States, her podcast Immigrantly, and so much more. It is a fun conversation!! Check our her podcast and also follow Saadia on Twitter at @swkkhan and follow Immigrantly on Twitter at @Immigrantly_pod and on Instagram at @immigrantlypod.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BIBLE IN TEN
Acts 13:33

BIBLE IN TEN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 12:01


Friday, 13 January 2023   “God has fulfilled this for us their children, in that He has raised up Jesus. As it is also written in the second Psalm: ‘You are My Son, Today I have begotten You.' Acts 13:33   Paul just proclaimed to those at the synagogue, “And we declare to you glad tidings.” He then went on to say, “that promise which was made to the fathers.” With that, he now explains his words, saying, “God has fulfilled this.”   The word he uses is found only here in Scripture, ekpléroó. It means more than just fulfilled, but that it is completely fulfilled in every detail. In other words, God made promises that were to be realized in the coming of the Messiah. In the sending of Jesus, they are not just fulfilled here or there, but entirely. He is the fulfillment of every messianic expectation that God had laid before His people. Understanding this, Paul continues with, “for us their children.”   The Greek is very precise and emphatic. It reads, “to the children of them, to us.” Some manuscripts say, “to our children.” As such, it seems that one of the scribes attempted to align Paul's words with those of Peter when he spoke to those in Jerusalem –   “For the promise is to you and to your children, and to all who are afar off, as many as the Lord our God will call.”   Of this change, Cambridge rightly says, “...this weakens the language greatly, for what the audience whom St Paul addressed would desire was a fulfilment for themselves. Their children would inherit what they received, but a promise to be fulfilled to their children would not move them so much as one of which they were to be sharers themselves.”   The focus is on the fulfillment of the promises by Jesus and that it is now available to be appropriated by the people of Israel. This is confirmed in Paul's next words, saying, “in that He has raised up Jesus.” The KJV adds in the word “again” in this clause, saying, “in that he hath raised up Jesus again.”   The reason they appear to have done this is probably that it puts the focus on the resurrection rather than the incarnation. In other words, Jesus was “raised up” by God at the incarnation. He was then “raised up” by God again at the resurrection. However, by not italicizing the word “again,” the KJV translators have illegally added to Scripture a presupposition, even if that presupposition is correct. The translation is therefore not acceptable.   With that noted, Paul will next go to the Hebrew Scriptures to demonstrate that what he is saying is something that was anticipated in the coming of Jesus. The messianic expectations are fulfilled in His resurrection.   Concerning that thought, Albert Barnes rightly states, “He does not say that every part of the promise had reference to his resurrection; but his being raised up completed or perfected the fulfillment of the promises which had been made respecting him.” That is validated next in Paul's citation from Scripture. To introduce the thought, he starts off by saying, “As it is also written in the second Psalm.”   Here, some manuscripts simply say, “in the first Psalm.” Cambridge explains the variation, saying, “What we now call the first psalm was formerly regarded as an introduction to the whole and not counted in the numbering. The quotation which follows is, according to the present order of the Psalms, taken from Psalm 2:7.”   Either way, the ordering of the psalms as they are now laid out goes back to an undetermined time in antiquity. It has remained in that state since. The actual quotation of Paul says, “You are My Son.”   Paul indicates that the Father/Son relationship referred to in the psalm is a messianic expectation. Someone may attempt to deny that, but the other words of the psalm confirm that it is so. In Acts 4, Peter cites the psalm while speaking to the people of Israel, clearly presenting it as a messianic psalm. And more, it was understood that way by the people when Peter cited it. Therefore, it was to be taken as an axiom that Paul's citing of these words was messianic as well. With that, he continues with, “Today I have begotten You.”   Albert Barnes poignantly notes concerning these words –   “It is evident that Paul uses the expression here as implying that the Lord Jesus is called the Son of God because he raised him up from the dead, and that he means to imply that it was for this reason that he is so called. This interpretation of an inspired apostle fixes the meaning of this passage in the psalm, and proves that it is not there used with reference to the doctrine of eternal generation, or to his incarnation, but that he is called his Son because he was raised from the dead.”   He is correct in this. Despite that, this does not negate the Sonship of Jesus as defined through either eternal generation or the incarnation. It is simply a point of Sonship that is derived from the resurrection. Paul states this elsewhere as well –   “Paul, a bondservant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated to the gospel of God 2 which He promised before through His prophets in the Holy Scriptures, 3 concerning His Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who was born of the seed of David according to the flesh, 4 and declared to be the Son of God with power according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.” Romans 1:1-4   When the Lord spoke out the Psalm, He declared “Today.” It is an affirmation that the event was proclaimed and thus it was so. Christ Jesus is the Son of God, but the affirmation points to resurrection which confirms that it is so. He is the Son within the Trinity. He is the Son through the incarnation.   The resurrection proves that these things are so because only the Lord (Yehovah) could accomplish those things necessary to fulfill the Law of Moses. And more, only the Lord Jesus was first born without sin, meaning that God is His Father and that He is the God/Man. Though these things were already true, the resurrection proves that they are so. No other man could resurrect as He did. As Peter said in Acts 2 –   “Men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a Man attested by God to you by miracles, wonders, and signs which God did through Him in your midst, as you yourselves also know— 23 Him, being delivered by the determined purpose and foreknowledge of God, you have taken by lawless hands, have crucified, and put to death; 24 whom God raised up, having loosed the pains of death, because it was not possible that He should be held by it.” Acts 2:22-24   It is not possible that a man bearing sin could resurrect. Likewise, it was not possible that a sinless Man could be held by death. This is what Paul is now conveying to the people in the synagogue.   As a point of theology, for those who are in Christ, the sin debt has been paid. We are now deemed sinless before God. As such, it is not possible that death can hold Christ's redeemed.   Life application: Regardless of the intent of the KJV translators concerning the addition of the word “again” as noted above, it is not their place to do this without noting that it is an added word. Their failure to italicize that word after adding it into Scripture has changed the word of God. If they felt there needed to be clarity, that is what italicizing additions is for.   Further, that is the purpose of Bible commentaries. They are given to explain what is going on in Scripture, clarify difficult passages, etc. Translators are not given this right unless they clearly identify words they have added to Scripture. Without doing this, their presuppositions replace the word of God as it has been given.   This is something the Jehovah's Witnesses have done in verses such as Colossians 1:16 in their failed New World Translation. It is inappropriate, and it is the mark of a poor translation. In this case, the King James Version has perfectly failed to give a suitable rendering of the Greek. But this is not unique to that translation. It is often sloppy, inconsistent, contradictory, and just plain wrong.   Be careful to read many translations as you study the Bible. It is fine to read the Bible and enjoy the poetic nature of what is written. And this is often the case with an archaic translation like the KJV because it is soft on the ears. But that does not mean the theology to be derived from the translation is correct. So be on guard and diligently study the word.   A small error like the one noted above will not lead you down a false path, but it is nonetheless an illicit addition. If you read the KJV, be sure to annotate this in the margin. And be sure to read other, better, translations as well to get a fuller understanding of what God's word says.   Lord God, we can know Your word is true through a careful study of it. Although there are things we may not understand, we can still have faith that those things that are difficult have a suitable resolution, even if we have not yet found it. Thank You for Your precious word. Help us to contemplate it all our days and to grow in our knowledge of You through it. Amen.  

WE THE PEOPLE
THE MALE TRANSLATOR

WE THE PEOPLE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 38:34


Today we discuss how men are thinking when women say certain things. What better way to understand men than from a man himself? I will honest & realistic with my reactions. Hope you enjoy. Have a nice day. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

John Solomon Reports
Afghan translator says his brother gave 'everything for this country' and is now facing deportation

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 35:40


Sami Safi, Afghan translator for the U.S. military, shares the story of his brother, who served alongside U.S. forces in Afghanistan, but faced hardships in coming to America and is currently in jail despite his service. He says the government has not helped, and that "they have no reason to treat him this way," and that if this is how the government treats American allies, "no one outside of America will trust the American government or our mission." On 'Just the News, No Noise," John Solomon and Amanda Head talk to Erich Pratt, Senior Vice President of Gun Owners of America, about the latest on gun control and constitutional carry. To see the daily show, go to americasvoice.news each Monday through Friday at 6pm Eastern Time or watch any time at JustTheNews.com/tv.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Split Party Podcast
Episode 35A - The Hero's Fee

The Split Party Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 195:13


Seeler, 24th of Gracos, 301 YODThis is episode 35A, which follows Rylon, Eamon, and Ilfharyn. After defeating The Beast; the party says there farwells to the Translator with a bit of guilt knowing the potential cataclysm they could of unleashed. Join the Split Party today in our ever growing community: https://linktr.ee/splitpartyAnd remember... Never split the party!Music used in Episode 35A: Give these guys some support for their awesome scores!To the end of time - Ean GrimmThe Forsaken Throne - Adrian Von ZieglerMists of Ravenloft - Sword Coast SoundscapesWere Once Was a Heart - Adrian Von ZieglerThe Path - Adrian Von ZieglerIndomitable - Adrian Von ZieglerThe Secret Garden - Adrian Von ZieglerGrief - Adrian Von Ziegler*All music used in this episode have been given the approval by their original composers for commercial use*For Business Inquiries contact us at: thesplitpartypodcast@gmail.comArtist Info: https://www.artstation.com/danielfabrogomes

The Mercy Minute
The Translator

The Mercy Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 1:00


We could not do our life-changing medical work without the help of translators.

The Colin McEnroe Show
Lost in translation: Our ode to the art of translating

The Colin McEnroe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 50:00


Translators help open up our worlds by bringing us stories from around the globe. But often they're not given very much credit for their work. This hour, the art of translation. Plus, a look at the challenges of translating movies and TV shows through subtitles and dubbing for international audiences. GUESTS: Jennifer Croft: Writer and translator and the winner of the 2018 Booker International Prize for her translation of Olga Tokarczuk's Flights Denise Kripper: Translation editor for Latin American Literature Today and an associate professor of Spanish at Lake Forest College Emily Wilson: Chair of the program in comparative literature and literary theory at the University of Pennsylvania and translator of works such as The Odyssey The Colin McEnroe Show is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Colin McEnroe, Jonathan McNicol, and Cat Pastor contributed to this show, which originally aired June 23, 2022.Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Caravan of the Heart
Julia Butterfly Hill, Revolutionary Champion for the Planet, Tree Translator, Legacy of Love in Action

Caravan of the Heart

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 123:12


In this episode, we are in the presence of a Champion…Our Shero…a revolutionary advocate for this planet and its people, Julia Butterfly Hill!For 738 days Julia Butterfly Hill lived in the canopy of an ancient redwood tree, called Luna, to help make the world aware of the plight of ancient forests. Her courageous act of civil disobedience gained international attention for the redwoods as well as other environmental and social justice issues, which is chronicled in her bestselling book The Legacy of Luna: The Story of a Tree, a Woman, and the Struggle to Save the Redwoods.Our souls are transformed by a Super-Shero of Resilience! Bear it all...push at edges even when it's uncomfortable because that's where growth happens.We find a conscious "No" to one thing is a conscious "Yes" to something else!We don't have to hold it all... just allow it to flow through.Discover a pufferfish transform into a butterfly!With waste, there is no "away". Indigenous cultures don't even have a word for "trash".We don't need more stuff, we need to find more courage, more love. more           connectivity!We dispel the idea of "We the People" and expand to "We the Planet"!Today we strive to do our best to live love in action in every moment. Today we ask  "what kind of world do I want to leave behind with the life that I have led?"Julia, with the great help of steelworkers and environmentalists, successfully negotiated to permanently protect the 1,000 year-old tree and a nearly three – acre buffer zone.On December 18, 1999 Julia Butterfly Hill, then 26, came down to a world that recognized her as a heroine and powerful voice for the environment.Her courage, commitment and profound clarity in articulating a message of hope, empowerment, and love & respect for all life, has inspired millions of people worldwide. After she returned to the ground, Julia toured the world speaking about her experience, and about the many lessons she learned, to the media and audiences large and small.The recipient of numerous prestigious awards and distinctive honors, Julia Butterfly Hill is one of the most internationally recognizable figures in environmental activism.Julia founded the non-profit organization, Circle of Life and was the visionary of We The Planet, setting the standards for green festivals, events, and tours in the US.  She co-founded the Engage Network and is the inspiration behind What's Your Tree. She has addressed the United Nations, lobbied congress, and has continued to stand on the front lines of environmental and social justice issues all over the world.    JULIA SAYS, “When I entered the majestic cathedral of the redwood forest for the first time, my spirit knew it had found what it was searching for. I dropped to my knees and began to cry because I was so overwhelmed by the wisdom, energy and spirituality housed in this holiest of temples”Julia Butterfly Hill is most known for living in a tree, but she has had a wild and full life before and after. She “cusses like a sailor and prays to trees.”Personal Websitewww.juliabutterfly.comSocial Media linkhttps://www.facebook.com/JuliaButterflyHillOfficialSupport the showBECOME A MEMBERhttps://ko-fi.com/caravanoftheheart/tiersYour monthly support helps further this outreach and keeps this Caravan moving to amplify love in all things! LOVE IS SPOKEN HERE

Martial Arts Studies
Conversation with Jin Yong translator Gigi Chang

Martial Arts Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 38:34


Conversation with the translator of Jin Yong novels, Gigi Chang.  Also available as a video on the Martial Arts Studies YouTube Channel. Theme music, 'Eejeb', by Ronin E-Ville (http://ronineville.com) used with permission.

The Daily Office Podcast
Saturday // December 31, 2022

The Daily Office Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 23:14


Morning Prayer for Saturday, December 31, 2022 (Saturday after the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ: Christmas Day; John Wyclif, Priest and Translator of the Bible into English, 1384). Psalm and Scripture readings (2-year lectionary; 60-day Psalter): Psalm 148 Song of Songs 8 Luke 24:13-53 Click here to access the text for Morning Prayer at DailyOffice2019.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dailyofficepodcast/support

Brand the Interpreter
Season Finale with Mireya Pérez

Brand the Interpreter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 29:12


It's surreal to think that another season came and went for Brand the Interpreter. This season was filled with so many more amazing guests. I had the chance to speak with professionals of all stages in their interpreting journeys. I feel so honored and humbled that people have chosen this platform to share their story and that you, the audience, has welcomed it with open arms. To my amazement, the podcast continues to grow, spreading its message of interpreter stories across the globe. I get messages from people in places I never imagined would listen. We're out there, in small corners of the world, feeling like specs in such a big place, waiting to connect to a bigger network, to find deeper meaning, and as long as this podcast continues to connect us, I will continue to show up. I've put together a compilation of this year's stories for this season's episode finale. I hope you enjoy it.I also hope you come back next year for an even bigger and better Brand the Interpreter Podcast.  Thanks for tuning in, till next time!

The Bert Show
She Has Feeling's For Her Friend's Boyfriend and Toddler Translator

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 12:11


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Viewpoint on Mormonism
Interview with Sandra Tanner and Joseph Smith as Translator Part 5

Viewpoint on Mormonism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 14:00


Bill and Eric interview Sandra Tanner on Joseph Smith's ability as a translator. Conclusion: The record is not very good. This is a repeat broadcast from August 2021.

Viewpoint on Mormonism
Interview with Sandra Tanner and Joseph Smith as Translator Part 4

Viewpoint on Mormonism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 14:00


Bill and Eric interview Sandra Tanner on Joseph Smith's ability as a translator. Conclusion: The record is not very good. This is a repeat broadcast from August 2021.

Sinica Podcast
Author Rebecca Kuang on her novel Babel, or on the Necessity of Violence: An Arcane History of the Oxford Translators Revolution

Sinica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 52:20


This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Rebecca Kuang (who writes under the name R.F. Kuang), the author of the best-selling historical fantasy novel Babel. Set in the 1830s in England, the novel's Chinese-born protagonist sets out to prevent a war with China over the opium trade. It's a novel about the industrial revolution, labor activism, revolution, and — surprisingly — language, etymology, and translation.2:28 – On Rebecca's own connections to China and her anxieties about losing the Chinese language8:27 – What historical insights Rebecca hoped her readers would take away from Babel14:37 – Parallels between the U.K. of the early 19th century and the U.S. of the early 21st20:26 – Refections on revolution and revolutionaries25:48 – Silver working: the magic system in Babel and its relation to language30:37 – Issues with translation theory presented in the book38:04 – How Rebecca's background in debate influenced her writing style45:03 – Rebecca's forthcoming novel YellowfaceA transcript of this podcast will be available soon at TheChinaProject.com.Recommendations:Rebecca: The film Banshees of Inisherin and other works by its director, Martin McDonagh, including the dark comedy In Bruges (2008).Kaiser: The new novel by Cormac McCarthy The Passenger, and a review of it by James Wood in The New Yorker.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Viewpoint on Mormonism
Interview with Sandra Tanner and Joseph Smith as Translator Part 3

Viewpoint on Mormonism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 14:00


Bill and Eric interview Sandra Tanner on Joseph Smith's ability as a translator. Conclusion: The record is not very good. This is a repeat broadcast from August 2021.

Shabbat Night Live
The Bethlehem Birth Certificate

Shabbat Night Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 54:33


Translators of many English Bibles put poison tricks into their translations in order to disconnect the English name “Jesus” from the Hebrew Yeshua. Keith Johnson reveals “the Bethlehem birth certificate” that forever solidifies Yeshua's name with his mission as Messiah. Get your notes HERE! https://bit.ly/3Vnq2Nb Watch more on the Michael Rood TV App! https://bit.ly/2X9oN9h Join us on ANY social media platform! https://aroodawakening.tv/community/s... Your Donation keeps these videos going! Thank you! https://aroodawakening.tv/donate/ Support us by visiting our store! https://roodstore.com/ Support us with purchases on Amazon!* https://amzn.to/3ldvQJN Have Questions? Ask us Here! https://aroodawakening.tv/support/con... "PLEASE NOTE: This is an affiliate link. This means that, at zero cost to you, A Rood Awakening! International will earn an affiliate commission if you click through the link and finalize a purchase."See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Viewpoint on Mormonism
Interview with Sandra Tanner and Joseph Smith as Translator Part 2

Viewpoint on Mormonism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 14:00


Bill and Eric interview Sandra Tanner on Joseph Smith's ability as a translator. Conclusion: The record is not very good. This is a repeat broadcast from August 2021.

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation
954: Cultivation Story: [English Minghui] Using My Bilingual Skills as a Minghui Translator

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 9:59


A young practitioner overcomes attachments to become more diligent in their work on the Minghui translations, minding details and emphasizing quality over quantity. Original Article from Minghui.org: “[English Minghui] Using My Bilingual Skills as a Minghui Translator”

Viewpoint on Mormonism
Interview with Sandra Tanner and Joseph Smith as Translator Part 1

Viewpoint on Mormonism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 14:00


Bill and Eric interview Sandra Tanner on Joseph Smith's ability as a translator. Conclusion: The record is not very good. This is a repeat broadcast from August 2021.

Essentially Translatable
Christmas with Lutheran Bible Translators

Essentially Translatable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 45:45


It's that time of year! Cozy up by the fire or in your favorite chair and take a Christmas tour around the world with Lutheran Bible Translators.

Brand the Interpreter
The Messy Side of Interpreting with Razan Roumany

Brand the Interpreter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 56:15


Razan Roumany is a medical interpreter who is also trained in remote simultaneous interpretation. Although she specializes in medical interpretation, she has also interpreted for lawyers, teachers, social workers, and even a psychologist in a correctional facility. Having grown up as an Arab-American and hearing her family speak in both French and Arabic is what sparked her passion for interpretation and language learning.  She attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she obtained a masters degree in Translation and Interpretation studies. Razan also obtained a bachelor's degree in Spanish and Pre Med (Pre-physician assistant) from Southeast Missouri State University.   She currently works as a Freelance Spanish and Arabic interpreter and a Spanish translator. Her ultimate goal is to work as an Arabic to Spanish simultaneous interpreter.Tune in! Only on the podcast that brings you your stories about our profession. Brand the Interpreter!-----------------------------Connect with Razan RoumanyWebsiteInstagram Thanks for tuning in, till next time!

The Bert Show
TODDLER TRANSLATOR GAME

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 8:20


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Techtonic with Mark Hurst | WFMU
Darren Byler, co-translator of "The Backstreets: A Novel from Xinjiang" from Dec 19, 2022

Techtonic with Mark Hurst | WFMU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022


Darren Byler, co-translator, "The Backstreets: A Novel from Xinjiang." Tomaš Dvořák - "Game Boy Tune" - "Interview with Darren Byler" [0:06:46] - "Mark's comments" [0:43:51] Dennis Young - "Paradigm Shift" [0:56:03] https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/122870

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 139: Tango Alpha Lima: Retired Navy Commander and counterterrorism expert Youssef Aboul-Enein

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 69:15


IN THE NEWS Jeff and Ashley celebrate 75 years of Toys for Tots. THIS WEEK'S GUEST Retired U.S Navy Commander Youssef Aboul-Enein shares highlights of his 28-year military career, including his own 9/11 experience at the Pentagon, the pivot of his career from medical planner to Arabic linguist, which eventually led him to becoming the Defense Intelligence Agency subject matter expert on counter-terrorism and violent Jihadi groups in the middle-east. RAPID FIRE National Guard Helps Santa in Alaska, House passes Veterans Service Recognition Act, and the oil that fueled the Hanukkah Miracle. Special Guest: Youssef Aboul-Enein.

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Communicating with Your Child's Teacher for Spanish Speakers

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 3:55


What tools are available to parents and caregivers who do not speak the same language as their child's teacher? Ernesto Zepeda shares resources that your school can provide to facilitate better communication, tips and tricks for using technology to help translate important messages, and more. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38113]

Brand You Personal Branding
359: Why Your Business Needs Translators, Amplifiers, and Producers, with Michael Roderick

Brand You Personal Branding

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 25:11


While you probably know the common meanings of “translator, amplifier, and producer”, you'll find immense value in understanding Michael Roderick's take on these terms. Michael, the guest on this week's episode, is the CEO of Small Pond Enterprises, which helps thoughtful givers become thought leaders by making their brands referable, their messaging memorable, and their ideas unforgettable. He is also the host of the podcast Access to Anyone which shows how you can get to know anyone you want in business and in life using time-tested relationship-building principles. Michael's unique methodology comes from his own experience of going from being a Highschool English teacher to a Broadway Producer in under two years. So, be sure to tune in this week as Michael and Mike share the mic. You'll be glad you did. Get up to speed on: How it is that business really works by referrals. How to become “referrable”. What “translators, amplifiers, and producers” mean, in relation to helping you form lasting connections. How you can get much better at explaining what you do. Why the perspective of an “outsider” is vital to your business. Why it's important to challenge the “dominant narrative” without being combative. What “referability radar” is, and how it can benefit you and your business. Don't miss this amazing interview. As Mike Kim says, “Relationships are rocket ships.” Resources: http://www.smallpondenterprises.com/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-roderick-1161571/  https://www.facebook.com/mike.roderick.940  https://twitter.com/MichaelRoderick  http://www.myreferabilityrater.com/ Brand You Funnels Info Session: I created an all-in-one online marketing and customer management platform for people who are ready to get real business systems in place. This includes calendars, customer onboarding, email marketing, online courses, and more. Every month I am hosting a free live training on how I've used this system to run my business. Learn more and sign up at brandyoufunnels.com Connect with Me on Social: Instagram LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube EPISODE CREDITS: If you like this podcast and are thinking of creating your own, consider talking to Danny Ozment. Find out more at emeraldcitypro.com

Dancing Buddhas
# 123 Transformation into a Buddha

Dancing Buddhas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 8:20


This episode is about our transformation into a Buddha, about true faith and true trust.How can we come out of darkness, which is synonymous with ignorance, and in this way attain clarity and truth? (from Daily Reminder 8174)How can we begin to shine all by ourselves as virtue grows? (Daily Reminder 8174)You will learn this and more from the Daily Reminders by Ji Kwang Dae Poep Sa Nim that I am reading to you today.Thank you very much Ji Kwang Dae Poep Sa Nim

Mrgentleman lifestyle podcast
Episode 110 - Poetry And Conversation With Jaylan Salah 12/18/2022

Mrgentleman lifestyle podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 62:38


On This Winter Finale Episode, We Have Jaylan Salah Salman On The Show Who is An Author, Poet, Feminist, Translator and Film Critic. We Will Be Discussing Her Life Journey, Why She Wanted To Be An Writer, Her 2 Poetry Books and Many More. Season 6 Episode 12 Of MrGenetleman Lifestyle Podcast Returns In 1/28/2023 Jaylan Salah Salman Contact Info: instagram: @jaylansalman Twitter: @jaylansalman Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jaylansalmanwrites/ Check Out Her Poetry: https://theprose.com/JaylanSalah Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/@jaylansalahsalman/featured Workstation Blues (Her Book) : https://www.amazon.com/Workstation-Blues-Jaylan-Salah-ebook/dp/B07YMZVDGL/ref=sr_1_3?qid=1671320268&refinements=p_27%3AJaylan+Salah&s=digital-text&sr=1-3&text=Jaylan+Salah Bury My Womb On The West Bank (Her Book): https://www.amazon.com/Bury-My-Womb-West-Bank-ebook/dp/B095NBRNF6/ref=sr_1_2?qid=1671320425&refinements=p_27%3AJaylan+Salah&s=digital-text&sr=1-2&text=Jaylan+Salah My Contact Info: instagram: @ken_mrgentleman Podcast IG: @mrgentlemanlifestylepodcast Email: kenypgent@gmail.com Website: https://realmrgentlemanlifestylepodcast.com All My Social Media: https://linktr.ee/ken_mrgentleman Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpd6jM9ZrdHmZoLViCJ_ANw MrGentleman Lifestyle Merch At Teepublic: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mrgentlemanlifestyle?ref_id=11668 Shoutout LA - Meet Ken "Aka MrGentleman" Pyle (Read Now): https://shoutoutla.com/meet-ken-aka-mrgentleman-pyle-entrepreneur/ IHaveAPodcast Present Featured Podcast Of The Week (Read Now): https://ihaveapodcast.com/mrgentleman-lifestyle-podcast-ken-pyle/ Podcast Sponsorship Newsly: https://newsly.me and the promo code MRGENTLEMAN --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mrgentlemanlifestylepod/message

Talking Translations
An Interview with Aga Zano, Polish Translator

Talking Translations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 39:08


On this episode, Polish translator Aga Zano discusses using Google Maps to describe cities she hasn't visited, how her love for literary translation began as a kid creating subtitles for cartoons, and why she thinks Megan Nolan is Sally Rooney's dark twin.  Aga Zano spent two weeks in Dublin in October 2022 as Literature Ireland's translator-in-residence. During her time here, she worked on Sebastian Barry's upcoming novel Old God's Time.

Innovating Music
If I Hadn't Been a Translator on a Wild Boar Farm . . . with Jessica Powell

Innovating Music

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 48:34 Transcription Available


Jessica's journey -- what a ride!  Music change agent Jessica Powell shares her Roads Taken, ranging from following a now-ex boyfriend across countries to using her languages at CISAC and on a wild boar farm (!!) -- to Google London, Google Asia, and to her current AI and Stems startup, AudioShake.   And even that founding with her co-founder Luke Miner began as a "What If" exercise around bass lines and karaoke, before landing with Billy Mann and peermusic to experiment with AIs and stems to create a next-generation stem separation platform for artists and new creative technologies.  We ran into her at Music Tectonics' annual conference as AudioShake won the "Swimming with Narwhals" Tech Startup Pitch Competition, the latest in a recent series of wins for this new company. Guest: Jessica Powell, CEO and Co-Founder, AudioShake Jessica Powell is the CEO and co-founder of AudioShake, which uses AI to separate songs into instrumentals and stems so that they can be opened up for new opportunities in sync licensing, remixing, and emerging immersive, education, and social media formats. The company won Sony's Demixing Challenge, and was called the “cleanest stem separation tech” by DJ Mag. Powell spent over a decade at Google, where she sat on the company's management team, reporting into the CEO, and ran the company's global communications organization. She began her career at CISAC, the International Society of Authors and Composers, in Paris. She is also an author and essayist, whose work has have been published in the New York Times, TIME, WIRED, and elsewhere. Mentioned Links: Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/themoku and https://twitter.com/AudioshakeAI LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/audioshake/ and Website: https://audioshake.ai and https://indie.audioshake.ai Music Tectonics' Swimming with Narwhals Music Tech Startup Pitch Competition: https://www.musictectonics.com/pitchcompetition Billy Mann: https://www.billymann.com/ Mary Megan Peer and peermusic: https://www.musicbusinessworldwide.com/mary-megan-peer-named-as-new-chief-executive-officer-of-peermusic-as-ralph-peer-ii-shifts-to-executive-chair/ Donovan's Season of the Witch: https://youtu.be/GU35oCHGhJ0 CISAC (International Confederation of the Societies of Authors and Composers): https://www.cisac.org/ Her book, The Big Disruption: A Totally Fictional but Essentially True Silicon Valley Story - https://www.amazon.com/Big-Disruption-Jessica-Powell-ebook/dp/B07PK5S8D9/ Canadian Music podcast interview: https://www.canadianmusicianpodcast.com/episodes/audioshake-jessica-powell Webby Awards info: https://www.webbyawards.com/news/jessica-powell-co-founder-audioshake/ Magnetic Magazine interview:

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast
HOST JACKIE TANTILLO - Four Strong Women's Lifetime Commitment To Making The Invisible More Visible With Guest Author And Translator Kathryn Spink

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 30:00


Kathryn was born in the Himalayas. However, both her parents were English and had the same desire of "going out to India, spreading the Gospel message and serving the poor," explains my guest.Living in Vienna as a young girl, Kathryn remembers her parents taking in refugees who were seeking political asylum and it was normal to have refugees sleeping on their floor regularly. These memories had a profound effect on Kathryn and she was certain that this is how her interests in helping the less fortunate  came to be. Kathryn shares that her mother was not warm and fuzzy but she was from the generation of tough and strong women. Kathryn always felt very loved. Ruby was a teacher and taught her daughter and other children from the Embassy. Ruby was determined that Kathryn would not be spoiled. Kathryn was soon sent to boarding school because her parents were working and traveling regularly."A little pencil in God's hand" is how Mother Teresa would refer to herself. She never wanted credit  or accolades for her work. "She could be a tough cookie," Spink reflects however, "she was difficult to deal with sometimes, because God was so definitely on her side and that could make things tough. Mother Teresa was so determined, nothing could get in her way.""Poverty saddened Mother Teresa the most according to Kathryn,  "I don't think it angered her not in relation to God. Waste most likely angered her the most but never with God."Mother Teresa was always seeing the presence of God in the poor and it helped her persevere.  "Tolerance was deeply ingrained in Mother Theresa" explains Ms. Spink. "Mother Teresa believed that God was at work in every soul, so it wasn't up to her to try and convince others of the 'correct/best religion."My guest remarks "Mother Teresa used to say "come to Calcutta and I'll put you to work".  This is what this demure but mighty  woman believed with her whole body, mind and spirit.Kathryn even shared stories of the similarities between Mother Teresa, whose birth name was Agnes, and her mother Drana. "The family that prays together, stays together" was one of Drana's favorite expressions according to Spink. Caring for the sick was a common thread for the two woman. "It's not always about the physical suffering, but the whole process of being abandoned by people" was one of the toughest things for Mother Teresa to comes to terms with, comments Spink.Mother Teresa founded the order, "The Missionaries of Charities." She wanted to give shelter to  abandoned babies and to help the poorest of the poor. In 1979 she received the Nobel Peace Prize and after her death was canonized as Saint Teresa. I could have listened for hours to my guest share her stories of all of these selfless women.Mother Teresa was known as 'Mother' because when a nun/sister is appointed to a superior position within  the church, they are known as 'Mother.'INFORMATION:Kathryn Spink is the author of several books on the work of Mother Teresa and her coworkers, as well as other inspiring contemporary figures, including Brother Roger of Taize, Beede Griffiths, Dominique LaPierre, Prince Charles' and Lady Diana Spencer and more.  My guest is also the chronicler of the “South African Women's Human Rights Organization.” https://www.kathrynspink.com/https://www.harpercollins.com/blogs/authors/kathryn-spink-20167212026170 

Chillbooks: Audiobooks with Chill Music
Table Talk of the Prophet Muhammad by Stanley Lane-Poole

Chillbooks: Audiobooks with Chill Music

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 35:47


Table Talk of the Prophet Muhammad, a collection of quotes and speeches by the prophet, chosen and translated by Stanley Lane-Poole (London, 1882) This is an excerpt from the complete book titled “Speeches and Table-Talk of the Prophet Muhammad“, and it includes another section focusing on the Qur'an, which is not included in this edition. Follow Chillbooks accounts: - Social links (opens in relevant apps): https://solo.to/chillbooks - YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Chillbooks - Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6sN19fGxResr0cOr3ihXph Chapter List 00:00 Title 00:18 Translator's Preface 01:37 Of being merciful 04:09 Concerning Prayer 06:05 Of Charity 09:30 Of Fasting 10:36 Of Reading the Qur'an 11:38 Of Labour and Profit 16:22 Of War 17:00 Of Judgement 18:03 Of Women 19:15 Of Animals 20:58 Of Hospitality 22:27 Of Government 25:35 Of Vanities and Sundry Matters 29:04 Of Death 30:54 Of The After Life 32:16 Of Destiny About The Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him) Muhammad (Arabic: مُحَمَّد) was an Arab religious, social, and political leader and the prophet of Islam. According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet divinely inspired to preach and confirm the monotheistic teachings of Jesus, Moses, Abraham, Adam, and other prophets. (Wikipedia) About Stanley Lane-Poole Stanley Edward Lane-Poole (18 December 1854 – 29 December 1931) was a British orientalist and archaeologist. Poole was from a famous orientalist family as his paternal grandmother Sophia Lane Poole, uncle Reginald Stuart Poole and great-uncle Edward William Lane were famous for their work in this field.(Wikipedia) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chillbooks/support

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
What Does It Mean To Possess The Skill of The Translator?

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 4:26


What exactly does it mean to possess the skill of the translator? Listening and communication has never been more important than it is now. Today, there are so many distractions around us like our phones, computers, social media, and more. You need to make sure you're listening intently and not distracted. Also, you need to make sure your message is getting across, regardless of the platform or channel you're using. This is what the skill of the translator is all about: listening and communication. --------------------- This episode is sponsored by Cornerstone. Cornerstone combines best-in-class learning with growth-centric talent capabilities and the power of AI to make talent leaders champions of engagement, growth, and transformation. Learn more about how Cornerstone TXP can help you build your future ready workforce at https://bit.ly/FOWCornerstone ------------------ Get ad-free listening, early access to new episodes and bonus episodes with the subscription version of the show The Future of Work Plus. To start it will only be available on Apple Podcasts and it will cost $4.99/month or $49.99/year, which is the equivalent to the cost of a cup of coffee.  ________________ Over the last 15 years, I've had the privilege of speaking and working with some of the world's top leaders. Here are 15 of the best leadership lessons that I learned from the CEOs of organizations like Netflix, Honeywell, Volvo, Best Buy, The Home Depot, and others. I hope they inspire you and give you things you can try in your work and life. Get the PDF here. --------------------- Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

Somatic Primer Podcast
Jeando Massero: Initial Alexander Technique, Translator

Somatic Primer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 79:33


Jeando is a master Alexander teacher and historian. He translated all of Alexanders books into French. While working on these translations Jeando discovered that Alexander had studied the Delsarte method.  Jeando focused on this early work and created his own version of the Alexander Technique called the Initial Alexander Technique.In this episode we discuss:What is the Alexander TechniqueWhy the Alexander technique is not somaticThe origins of the technique FM Alexander & the Delsarte techniqueIdentity or ethos in movementIf you'd like to find about Jeando and his work you can visit his website initial-alexandertechnique.com where he publishes an insightful blog about the work and history of the method. For classes & private lessons with me please visit somaticprimer.com 

Broads You Should Know
ReBROADcast: Sacagawea — Navigator, translator, & mother during Lewis & Clark expedition

Broads You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 30:35


As we wrap up our revisit of some of our previously-aired Indigenous Broads, today we bring you Sam's deep dive on Sacagawea. While she's best known as the navigator during Lewis & Clark's expedition of the Louisiana Purchase, the truth is a bit more complicated than that. As a young girl Sacagawea was kidnapped and sold into slavery by a neighboring tribe, and was eventually sold to her now-husband, whom brought on the expedition. She played the role of navigator at some points during the journey, but she also had never been to most of the land they were exploring and had never seen the ocean. Her primary role on the expedition was actually as a translator and a beacon of peace to the other Indigenous tribes they encountered along the way. Listen now for the full story of Sacagawea and the truth about these "brave explorers" of North America.

Smart Habits for Translators
Episode 75: Smart Habits for Forming and Maintaining a Translator Collective

Smart Habits for Translators

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022


Episode 75: Smart Habits for Forming and Maintaining a Translator CollectiveToday, we're thrilled to share with you a concept that we know is something our colleagues are interested in. In fact, we have not only one guest, but two here to tell us more about it! We're excited to be sharing the microphones today with our colleagues and friends, Jamie Hartz and Nathalie Reis, who are here to chat with us about translation collectives.Jamie Hartz is an ATA-certified Spanish to English translator who specializes in legal and commercial translation and transcription. She has been a freelancer since 2013, and in 2016 Jamie helped to found the Black Squirrel Translator Collective, which currently consists of herself and three fellow alumni of Kent State University's master's in translation program: Mary McKee, Hannah Sampson, and Nancy Cabrera.And Nathalie Reis is a full-time freelance translator and copywriter specializing in the creative industries (travel & tourism, art & culture, leisure & wellness, and fashion & beauty) as well as the humanitarian field (including human & social rights, women & children's health). She runs Nathalie Reis Translations in Northwood and works from English into French. She is a Member of the CIoL, an Associate of the ITI, a Member of the Society of Authors, and acts as Publicity Officer for the ITI London Regional Group. Nathalie also co-founded the Creative Translation Hub with Carolina Casado Parras and Adriana Tortoriello, a small collective of translators focused on the creative industries and working mainly from English into French, Spanish and Italian. Tune in to hear our conversation on:• What services Jamie and Nathalie offer and how their translation businesses have evolved over time• What smart habits have been crucial in their careers• What systems, processes, and habits help them stay organized, and how they set priorities• What boundaries they set in their professional lives and how they maintain them• What translator collectives are and how they work• Why it can be helpful for freelance translators to work together in this way• What positive results Nathalie and Jamie have seen as well as some challenges related to being in a translator collective• Jamie and Nathalie's tips for freelance translators who want to form and maintain a translator collectiveResources we mentioned in this episode:• Our next virtual business retreat with a special guest, Dorothee Racette• Creative Translation Hub• Connect with the Creative Translation Hub on LinkedIn and Instagram• Learn more about Jamie's translation services and connect with her on LinkedIn and Twitter• Black Squirrel Translator Collective• Pomodoro technique• Get Fit for the Future of Transcreation: A Handbook on How to Succeed in an Undervalued Market by Nina Sattler-Hovdar• The Mother Tongue: English and How It Got That Way by Bill BrysonSee the full list of links and resources for this episode: https://smarthabitsfortranslators.com/podcast-episodes/75

Resourceful Designer
Outsourcing: Hiring Subcontractors - RD306

Resourceful Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 26:17


One of the perks of running your own design business is the freedom it provides. You have nobody to answer to but yourself. Ok, sure, there are the clients. You do have to answer to them, to a degree. But it's your business, so you can dictate how you respond to them. If you don't want to work Friday afternoons, you can take them off. Nobody is stopping you if you want to try a new design technique or different software. And you get to decide how much you charge for your services and can change your rate any time you like. The freedom of working for yourself is one of, if not the main reason people choose the life of, and I'm going to say it, even though I disagree with the term, the life of a freelancer. It felt dirty just writing that. Want to know why? Listen to episode 17 of the podcast titled “Being a Freelance Graphic Designer Could Hurt Your Business.” It will make you rethink calling yourself a freelancer. But where was I? Ah, yes, the freedom of running your own design business. For many of us, it's the ultimate dream. I will never work for an employer again. And I know many who feel the same. But, just because you're working for yourself, running your own business, doesn't mean you've made it. I hate to burst your bubble, but the purpose of every business is to grow. A business that doesn't grow will eventually fail. Many business studies have proven this. And your business will never grow to its full potential because of one thing holding it back. And that one thing is you. Yes, without you, there wouldn't be a business. However, you are also one of your business's most significant liabilities. How can that be? It's because of your limitations. Your limitations may include skills you lack. It may be a lack of time, the time to do things or learn things. Your knowledge may be limiting you. You can't expect to know everything. Or it could be any number of things. Don't feel bad. I'm not singling you out. Everyone has limitations. What will help your business grow is knowing your limitations and finding a way to overcome them. And one of the best ways for business owners to overcome their limitations is by working with people who offset those limitations. In other words. Your business will grow when you learn to outsource and hire subcontractors to do what you can't or shouldn't do. I know this may seem like a foreign concept. The whole point of going at it alone is just that, to be alone. But being alone will only get you so far. You need a team if you want to grow beyond your limited capabilities. I speak from experience. I ran my design business for several years, all by myself. In my mind, it was my business. Therefore I had to do everything myself. My clients were hiring me, after all. I didn't take on the project if a client asked for something I couldn't do. I was limiting my growth. I once turned down a $50,000 website project because I wasn't confident in my skills with PHP and MySQL. I kick myself to this day for that one. But I couldn't do it, so I said no. And I kept at it, Trudging away, taking on only the projects I could do and passing on the ones I couldn't. At the time, I was making decent money and thought I was doing well. But my business wasn't growing. Year after year, my income was pretty much the same. It wasn't going up as needed for growth. I had reached what I like to call now, my solo limit. I could only take my business so far on my own. I didn't know it then, but I was holding my business back. It wasn't until I started reading more business books and listening to business-related podcasts that I realized that most successful entrepreneurs don't work alone. They have a team that works with them to accomplish their business goals and help them grow. If I wanted my business to grow, I would have to build a team. Now I didn't jump in with both feet and hire a bunch of people. I took it slow. The first job I outsourced was when I ran into an issue with a client's e-commerce website. I wasn't sure how to handle the problem. Given enough time, I could probably fix it, but I had no idea where to start or how long it would take. Instead of spending hours researching and troubleshooting it myself. I hired a sub-contractor online who was an expert in that e-commerce platform and paid them to fix it for me. It cost me $100 for what I'm sure would have taken me an entire day's work to accomplish, if not more. Plus, I could charge my client a premium fee for the fix