Podcasts about alice in wonderland

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1865 children's novel by Lewis Carroll

  • 1,696PODCASTS
  • 2,749EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST
alice in wonderland

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Best podcasts about alice in wonderland

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Latest podcast episodes about alice in wonderland

Munch My Benson: A Law & Order: SVU Podcast
92 - She Kind of Gets Mind-Raped by the Hawk (S21E8 We Dream Of Machine Elves)

Munch My Benson: A Law & Order: SVU Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 95:19


This week we watched an episode unlike any other SVU in the catalog. A young girl from Kansas is abandoned by her Fireball-shooting friends, drugged with exotic psychedelics, raped, and forced to dig her own physical and metaphorical grave by the acolytes of a famed radical psychologist who just so happens to have been SVU's own resident Alice-In-Wonderland-expert Amanda Rollins's former guru. Between blue rape avatars, expensive music cues, and extensive literary references, things get pretty weird. This, of course, is all just fuel for the Munch fire as Josh and Adam discuss the hero's journey; pedicab culture; early 20th century Swedish folklore illustrator, John Bauer; famed ethnobotanist and drug user, Terrence McKenna; famed memoirist and sex haver, Anaïs Nin; and whether or not we're too old to pick up trendy new drug habits. This is a wild ride folks. Hold on tight! Sources: DMT - PsychonautWiki Terrence McKenna's Last Trip - Wired John Bauer's Illustrations - WikiArt Music: Divorcio Suave - “Munchy Business” 15:31 - The Misunderstood - "Find A Hidden Door" from Before The Dream Faded (1966) 28:53 - Oriental Sunshine - "Across Your Life" from Dedicated To The Bird We Love (1970) 43:27 - The Byrds - "Mr. Spaceman" from Fifth Dimension (1966) 1:04:48 - Silver Apples - "Lovefingers" from Silver Apples (1968) 1:16:38 - Hawkwind - "The Golden Void" from Warrior On The Edge Of Time (1975) Next Week's Episode: Season 13, Episode 6 "True Believers"

Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture
Don't Look Up Film Symbolism: Nerds, Kabbalah, Occult Doctrine & Science Dogma!

Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 102:03


We talk about the Netflix film "Don't Look Up!" This analysis has a bit of every theory and conspiracy there is: viruses, Alien Disclosure, Alice in Wonderland, Kabbalah, Twin Pillars Boaz and Jachin, Cronos, Saturn and the Death cult! Strap in as we talk about the world's greatest actor and the climate change propaganda (or warning?...)! Check out the photos (*and the ringer 70s ringer shirt I modeled so beautifully) at Instagram.com/IsaacWeishaupt Show sponsors:1. Get discounts while you support the show and do a little self improvement! 2. ATTENTION CRYPTO NERDS!!! CopyMyCrypto.com/Isaac is where you can copy James McMahon's crypto holdings- listeners get access for just $13. Get 10% off your first month of starting your happier life at BetterHelp.com/IlluminatiWatcher 4. Free 30 day trial to great audiobooks at Audible.com/Illuminati (or text “illuminati” to 500-500)Get bonus content AND go commercial free + other perks with 3 options:1. VIP: Due to the threat of censorship, I set up a Patreon-type system through MY OWN website! It's the VIP section of illuminatiwatcher.com! It's even setup the same: FREE ebooks, Kubrick's Code video! Sign up at: https://illuminatiwatcher.com/members-section/ ****LIMITED OFFER: use promo code “nomorelosers” before Jan 31st 2022 (or the first 1,000 to get in, whichever comes first) and you'll get VIP Section Tier 1 access for only $2 for TWO FULL MONTHS! It's a steal- take advantage of this because you'll get the free books with it and everything!2. Patreon: Get free ebooks, bonus content, no commercials at Patreon.com/IlluminatiWatcher! 3. ROKFIN: Check out my new PRIVATE show! You'll get all the premium bonus content of Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture podcast (*now including a 4K HD video version of the show!) AND an exclusive new podcast “INSIDE THE MIND OF A CONSPIRACY THEORIST” (*one subscription gets you all my bonus content as well as all other creators like Tin Foil Hat's Sam Tripoli, Jay Dyer, Crrow777, Eric Dubay, Jason Bermas, Whitney Webb and more!): https://www.rokfin.com/creator/isaac [**Rokfin also gets the uncensored version and commercial free version of my third podcast- “BREAKING SOCIAL NORMS” with Mrs. Weishaupt (we talk about trending topics, marriage and self-help with a dash of conspiracy!)]More from Isaac- special offers:1. Check out another free podcast I make with my wife called the BREAKING SOCIAL NORMS podcast! You can get it free wherever you listen to podcasts (e.g. Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/breaking-social-norms/id1557527024?uo=4). You can get the Uncensored and commercial-free option available at https://www.rokfin.com/creator/isaac or Patreon.com/BreakingSocialNorms3. Signed paperbacks, coffee mugs, shirts, & other merch: Gumroad.com/IsaacW5. Get 3 books for $5: https://illuminatiwatcher.com/how-to-get-free-books/6. ALIENS, UFOS & THE OCCULT IS NOW UP ON AMAZON AND AUDIBLE (*author narrated): https://amzn.to/3j3UtZz7. Enjoy some audiobooks and support the show! Go to Audible.com/Illuminati or text “Illuminati” to 500-500 to start your free 30 day FREE trial8. If you want to hear more from me AND also want to support the show, search for "Isaac Weishaupt" on Audible and pick up my narrated audiobooks! My most popular book- THE DARK PATH! https://www.audible.com/pd/B0759MN23F/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-095441&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_095441_rh_us AND the popular alien books USE YOUR ILLUSION are also on Audible: https://www.audible.com/pd/B08NRXFNDM/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-223105&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_223105_rh_us*Want to advertise/sponsor our show?
We have partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email: sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started. https://www.advertisecast.com/ConspiracyTheoriesandUnpopularCulture*Isaac's Socials:-illuminatiwatcher.com -twitter.com/IlluminatiEyes -https://www.instagram.com/IsaacWeishaupt-facebook.com/illuminatiwatcher-tiktok.com/@isaacweishaupt-youtube.com/c/isaacweishaupt-https://www.amazon.com/~/e/B00CWH6PHQ

Enchanting Book Readings
Willie Bear's Christmas Wish

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 20:55


A world podcast premiere of "Willie Bear's Christmas Wish" children's book by Erik Daniel Shein. Erik is a Visionary, Novelist, Entrepreneur and Animal Welfare Advocate. Willie Bear is a broken ornament who can't participate in a magical event where all of the perfect ornaments are hung on the tree and they come to life at midnight each Christmas Eve. Willy wishes to be hung on the tree with the other ornaments and not be alone in the ornament box. Will Willie Bear get his wish this year? Make a wish with Willie Bear this Christmas :) Forward by Jan and Mickey Rooney (the actor!). Merry Christmas

Pixie Dust Twins Podcast
Johnny Depp: A Brief History

Pixie Dust Twins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 33:51


Welcome to 2022, Pixie Dusters!!! Your favorite hosts are back for Season 4, and to kick off the new year, they are doing a series focused on their favorite weirdo: Johnny Depp! Today, Ashley shares a brief look at Depp's early family life and career, and together she and Sammi review what movies they'll be chatting about more in depth. In the coming weeks, they will focus on the Pirates of the Caribbean series, Alice in Wonderland, and more! Don't forget to find them on Instagram and TikTok @pixiedusttwinspodcast!You're tuned into a show from Limitless Broadcasting! Head over to Instagram @limitlessbroadcasting to check out our other shows! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/LimitlessBroadcasting?fan_landing=true)

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Lewis Carroll Invented Retroactive Public Goods Funding In 1894

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 6:48


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/lewis-carroll-invented-retroactive Retroactive public goods funding is one of those ideas that's so great people can't stop reinventing it. I know of at least five independent inventions under five different names: “social impact bonds” by a New Zealand economist in 1988, “certificates of impact” by Paul Christiano in 2014, “retroactive public goods funding” by Vitalik Buterin a few years ago, “EA loans” by a blogger who prefers to remain anonymous, and “venture grants” by Mako Yass. These aren't all exactly the same idea. Some are slightly better framed than others and probably I'm being terribly disrespectful to the better ones by saying they're the same as the worse ones. But I think they all share a basic core: some structure that lets profit-seeking venture capitalist types invest in altruistic causes, in the hopes that altruists will pay them back later once they've been shown to work. Upon re-reading some old SSC comments, I found a gem I'd missed the first time around: Julie K says that the actual first person to invent this idea was Lewis Carroll (aka author of Alice in Wonderland) back in 1894. She quotes from his book Sylvie and Bruno:

Topic Lords
115. Intrusive Thought Simulator

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 79:40


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * CisHetKayFaber * https://twitter.com/CisHetKayFaber * https://www.upturnedtable.com/weekly-podcast-2/ * Dan * https://strangecurrencies.org/ * https://twitter.com/SCReviewsDan Topics: * Learning something by doing, so you don't understand the theory behind it * The lonely realization that most people don't really care that much about the things that make you unique (not depressing) (I promise) * Shrek got a ten minute standing ovation at Cannes in 2001. * The Jabberwocky * https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/42916/jabberwocky * Cursed connectors and adapters * Vacationing alone is extremely efficient * Seeking Mr. Eaten's Name Microtopics: * A name that has nothing to do with wrestling. * Upturned Table. * Topic hunger. * Hearing something and playing it back. * The particular rat-a-tat of that ratio. * The difficulty of making art compelling and simple at the same time. * In C. * A proc-gen song that is different every time you hear it but you have to pick just version to put on the record. * Meeting a group of people who all learned a skill in a certain context and being unable to convince them that you also have the skill but you learned it in a different context. * Not wanting to tell your family that you are trans because they would be very interested. * The dream of owning a board and card game store. * Trying to convince an extremely modest person to tell you something interesting about themselves. * Doing an interesting thing but not making a mental note to tell your friends about it because you never learned to tell stories. * A guy whose family fled a corrupt governmental regime being surprised that you think that's interesting, because he knows hundreds of people who lived under a corrupt governmental regime. * Discovering a viable competitor to Disney. * Devaluing the Cannes Standing Ovation. * The Sarcastic Standing Ovation. * Shepard Tones. * How many people you need to pay to stand and clap to extend a standing ovation indefinitely. * Being the one guy who is yelling at everyone to stop applauding. * Moving the last scene to after the credits roll so that people have to find out who the key grip is to see the whole story. * Reading a game credits list on MobyGames and giving a standing ovation at the end. * Vorpal, manxome, uffish, frabjous and other words that didn't exist at one point but now do. * Understanding the rhythm of language even if the words don't make sense. * Alice Liddel. * A faithful musical TV adaptation of the entire Alice in Wonderland series. * An adapter from pneumatic air to stereo XLR. * Speakers and microphones as adapters between air pressure and electrical signal. * Using a microphone as a speaker and a speaker as a microphone. * The downsides of USB-C. * A sticker with induction coils on it. * Counting the pins on a Famicom cartridge. * How you're supposed to blow into cartridges differently in the United States and in Japan. * Breathing into your NES cartridge to apply a layer of condensation to the pins and improve connectivity. * Dry vs. wet exhale. * Bagpipe to stereo XLR connectors. * A vacation where you go exactly where you want when you want and never need to form a consensus. * The kind of AAA vacation that a 4000 person team of Ubisoft employees would go on. * Spending most of your vacation listening to podcasts in your hotel room. * Going on a vacation in order to scout out potential locations for future vacations. * Walking into a book store and going to the zine section and downloading some bespoke local podcasts. * Asking the concierge at the hotel what podcasts are good to listen to around here, and they suggest This American Life and Radiolab. * A cloud of scenarios that you can choose to interact with. * Whether the Last Constable is really last or whether she's just called that. * Paying for a second candle. * Waking up in the middle of the night to spend the turns you've accumulated so they don't go to waste. * Sailing the Unterzee in a majestic pleasure yacht. * Dreaming about going north. * Breaking into a dentist's office to steak the jar of teeth from the cupboard in the back. * Building up your Obscurity to endgame levels. * Knowing that to solve the mystery you'll need to destroy yourself, and choosing to do it anyway. * Playing the game to get to the text that you're trying to read. * The grindiest content in the game. * Selling your soul to devils and then realizing that you need to get it back so you can destroy it yourself. * Hammering on the button until it tells you where to go. * Whether anyone knows the plot of World of Warcraft. * A great place to discuss topics with people who might become your friends.

Cambria Pulpit
What is a Mature Christian? (Foundations 2022: Spiritual Disciplines)

Cambria Pulpit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 41:54


In his 1865 children's novel, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Lewis Carrol presents a striking scene which contains an important lesson for us today. In the scene, Alice continues her travels through Wonderland. However, she comes to a fork in the road. As she contemplates which direction she should take, she is flummoxed. Looking at each road from different sides presents different possibilities. As she contemplates her decision, she notices the Cheshire cat sitting in the tree. Being in wonderland she does the logical thing and speaks to the cat. She asks the cat which direction she should take. The cat looks at her through his yellow eyes and his maniacal grin and asks her, “That depends on where you are going.” Alice thinks for a moment and responds, “Well, I don't really know where I am going.” To which the cat answers, “Then it really doesn't matter which road you take.” The lesson is that unless you know where you are going, you cannot know how to arrive there. You are destined to wander aimlessly around until you figure out your destination.The kids of today will never understand the joys or frustrations of traveling in the days years before GPS. When you wanted to take a trip you had to get out a map. The first thing you would do when you took out the map wasto locate your destination. Then you would locate your starting point. Once these two points had been determined, you could proceed to design a route between the two. Sadly, many Christians live like Alice in Wonderland. We don't know where we are headed. So we wander aimlessly and when we come to crucial decisions, we are flummoxed. Each January we pause our current study to look at some foundational lessons for life. This year we will spend some time speaking about Spiritual Discipline as the path to maturity. In order to become mature Christians, we must first figure out the goal, the destination. Once we have figured out what a mature Christian looks like, we can then come to a realization of where we are at. When this has been completed, we can then chart a path between the two.In today's message we seek to ask and answer the questions: Where are we aiming as Christians? What is a  disciple supposed to look like? What is a mature Christian? While the list could be a long one, we will focus on 5 marks of a mature Christian:

We Read Movies
Strapped

We Read Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 65:33


This week, we watched the too-pretentious-even-for-Chris 2010 movie Strapped. When a hustler becomes trapped in an Alice in Wonderland like apartment building, he's gotta unsexily bone his way out, changing his personality and name with each encounter. And maybe, just maybe, the studio execs will decide that he needs to find love along the way. Topics discussed: How did Nixon like to self-pleasure? Mythical creatures The patron saint of bottoms How much would you charge for a kiss? Would Kirby give better head than Nancy Reagan? We Read Movies This podcast is hosted by ZenCast.fm

Parel Radio
#179 - Alice in Wonderland - een sprookje voor volwassenen

Parel Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 45:14


Een zangspel uit 1946, geschreven door de Harry Bannink van de jaren 40, de componiste Else de Groot en verteld door Dieuwertje Blok. Hoe bijzonder het was dat een vrouw componeerde, en dat we dit zangspel nu weer kunnen beluisteren,  hoor je in deze Parel. Om bij weg te dromen. Gemaakt door Frans van Gurp - NTR, Het Radio Filharmonisch Orkest en Het Groot Omroepkoor. Voor meer podcast Hilversumse Muziekschatten: https://www.nporadio4.nl/podcasts/verhaal Parel Radio brengt twee wekelijks een selectie van de mooiste radioverhalen. Host Stefanie Visjager. Laat je reactie achter op social media of stuur ons een mail met je suggesties of reactie op radioparel@gmail.com  

Life's But A Song
Ep. 88 - Alice in Wonderland (1985) (w/ Broadway Bob)

Life's But A Song

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 68:55


As a late Christmas gift, The Broadway Bob comes on the pod and introduces to Jon the 1985 TV miniseries Alice in Wonderland. Jon's mind exploded everywhere to the point where he may babble a few times on this episode and repeat things - don't judge him. And that Jabberwocky costume needs to win an EGOT.Broadway Bob's Socials - Instagram/TikTok: @thebroadwaybobLinktree: https://linktr.ee/BroadwayBobPodcast Socials -Email: butasongpod@gmail.comInstagram: @butasongpodTwitter: @butasongpodFacebook: @butasongpodNext episode: Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga!

Champagne and Complain
Escaping Wonderland

Champagne and Complain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 97:55


We are back at it again with  a Ruby pick this week  with Escaping Wonderland by Tiffany Roberts. Yes, the same Tiffany Roberts who gave us Spider Porn. This time we are posed the question ,Have you ever wondered what Alice in Wonderland would be like in space?... Yeah, we hadn't wondered ether. Reading- Escaping Wonderland By Tiffany RobertsDrinking-Finks Demi Sec sparkling by Winc  

Find Your Flow Podcast
Find Your Flow Podcast - Absinthe

Find Your Flow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:43


I was just sitting out back drinking absinthe and smoking a tobacco pipe. This is for adults only. 18+ please.

Life's But A Song
Ep. 87 - White Christmas (w/ Sierra Rein; Special Guest: My Mom!)

Life's But A Song

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 66:58


And just like that the holiday episodes come to a close with the holiday classic White Christmas (or is it a holiday classic?). New friend of the pod Sierra Rein comes on to discuss the differences between the film and the stage version, the problems with some of the song choices, and Sally Struthers. Also, Jon brings his mom on because it's her favorite holiday movie (potentially favorite movie of all time) and she brings some insight to this movie.Sierra's Instagram: @sierrareinManhattan Holiday Carolers: @mhcarolersMarquee Five: @marqueefiveDead Man's Toe Productions Instagram: @dmt.prodMom's Instagram: @barbara_j_reillyPodcast Socials -Email: butasongpod@gmail.comInstagram: @butasongpodTwitter: @butasongpodFacebook: @butasongpodNext episode: Alice in Wonderland (1985)!

Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker
S3: Client 27 - I Saw Mommy Pegging Santa Claus w/sex educators Dr. Lauren Lichty and Dr. Kris Gowen

Law Offices Of Quibble, Squabble & Bicker

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 70:47


Milk and cookies have no place at the Law Offices of Quibble, Squabble and Bicker at the consultation of this week's client, I Saw Mommy Pegging Santa Claus, when two well-educated guest fake lawyers arrive to provide appropriate counseling. From the podcast B4USwipe, Dr. Kris Gowen and Dr. Lauren Lichty provide their unique perspectives on numerous important matters including catfish dancing, Gary Busey, Spuds McKenzie, peach seeds, wild crazy anarchists, love theme from Commie land, UB40, bus wipe, Guided by Tight Pants, played bagpipes, red pill person, Boxcar Willie, lizard curious, mammalian, Alice In Wonderland, wizard cat, world of modern dating, unsolicited dick pics, Hinge queue, Harold and Claude, Bumble, Paul Newman, eating paint, dirty Sanchez, Tinder, soulful telepathy, Christmas hamster, confused about the holes, cribbage, Steely Dan, William Burroughs, crazy flipping fingers, nihilism, Frosty the Snowman, femdom, TikTok, Santa Claus 1959, Etsy and chicken nog. For other episodes, go to www.qsblaw.org. They are also internettable on: Instagram - @lawofficesofquibble; Twitter - @qsblaw; TikTok - @qsblaw; Uhive - https://www.uhive.com/web/shares/z/QTTCLFU; Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quiblle.bicker.3; Tumblr - quibblesquabblebicker; Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/QuibbleSquabble or watch them on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/LawOfficesofQuibbleSquabbleBicker --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/qsb/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/qsb/support

Leal Legacy's Radnarok
Alice In Wonderland (1951) | Watch Along

Leal Legacy's Radnarok

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 86:04


The thirteenth release of Disney's animated features, Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 American animated musical fantasy comedy film based on the Alice books by Lewis Carroll. The film Continue readingAlice In Wonderland (1951) | Watch Along The post Alice In Wonderland (1951) | Watch Along first appeared on Leal Legacy.

Euromaxx
Three exhibition highlights of 2021

Euromaxx

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 4:19


Even if Europe's museums were struggling with the pandemic in 2021, they hosted thrilling exhibitions, including a fashion photography show curated by former supermodel Claudia Schiffer.

Enchanting Book Readings
Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 8:21


A hilarious and fun reading of Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer by the #1 Children's book reader Lady Twizzelton a friend of Sir Herbert Sneakies. Check out our books and merchandise :) https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ Rudolph is a small reindeer with a bright shiny nose that isolated him from the other reindeer. The other reindeer made fun of Rudolph's shinny nose. But this foggy Christmas eve Santa assigned his top reindeersto guide his sleigh and be on his team. Everyone was assigned a job for Santa's big day to deliver toys but Rudolph. A storm brewed and Santa offered Rudolph the lead position on Santa's sled team! Rudolph finds that being unique brings great rewards. What makes you unique? Shine bright. Your pal, "Jack the Bear and Golden Hair" story book by Sir Herbert Sneakies at Amazon's children's books. PUBLIC Domain :) Merry Christmas Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast. https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies

Westview Church Podcast
EXHORTATION - Follow Christ More

Westview Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 6:45


"Which way ought I go from here?" "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to." "I don't much care where." "Then it doesn't matter which way you go." This exchange from "Alice in Wonderland" is worthwhile to consider in our pursuit of following Christ in all of life. If you don't care where you go, you'll never get there. Listen to Pastor Haakon's exhortation for more.

Felipes Garage
Episode 200- Take The Guacamole

Felipes Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 126:14


Well...we did it. Ended season 4 with..not a bang...a bong maybe?  Either way, this might just be the vibeyest most chill episode we've ever done.  It was great for us...hopefully you enjoy it too! Guacamole forever!!!   Please join our patreon! It's the way the podcast will survive! go to www.patreon.com/felipesgarage & select which tier you want to be a part of.  Each one has better & better percs for y'all!  Thanks for the support! FOLLOW US! IG FB YT EMAIL US! FelipesGarage@gmail.com WE LOVE YOU ALL, MECHANICS! THANK YOU FOR 4 GREAT SEASONS!  

New Books Network
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Popular Culture
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in Film
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Art
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books in Japanese Studies
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Japanese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/japanese-studies

It’s Just A Show
106. Not a Sausage. [MST3K 1206. Ator, The Fighting Eagle.]

It’s Just A Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:54


Ator, The Fighting Eagle absolutely refuses to admit to the existence of prehistoric hang-gliders, leaving Adam and Chris with nothing to talk about except Cave Dwellers, Joe D'Amato, prurient films, Rodney Dangerfield, and D&D.[cw: This one got weirdly blue, and also there's some brief mentions of potentially upsetting interactions between adults and children. Just FYI.]SHOW NOTES.Ator, The Fighting Eagle: IMDB. MST3K Wiki. Trailer. Watch on Netflix.Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland.Ant-Man.An overview of the Season 13 films.Our episode on The Million Eyes of Sumuru.Dr. Mordrid.Charles Band's son's song.Our discussion of The Batwoman.H.G. Wells' The Shape of Things to Come.Munchie.We talk about Gamera vs. Jiger in our episode on the KTMA Gamera vs. Zigra.Adam talks about The Mask on his other podcast.Santo in The Treasure of Dracula.Our episode on Cave Dwellers.The Legend of Zelda timeline.Joe D'Amato.Joe D'Amato interview. [NSFW!]A picture of Joe.Anthropophagous trailer [gross, NSFW]Stage Fright.Warrior Queen.Best Worst Movie.Terminator II [a.k.a. Shocking Dark]Simone Pirone: Runn.Our episode on Warrior of the Lost World.Whatever happened to the “Don't Tase Me Bro” guy?Skull and Bones.Grant Bociocco's Instagram.Ladybugs.Rover Dangerfield.My 5 Wives.BONUS.Support us on Patreon and you can hang out with us in a little Slack and you can listen to a bonus bit about the guy who plays Griba.

COMMNTD
Deconstructing Disney: Alice in Wonderland

COMMNTD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 65:15


Join us as we take a deep dive into the making, origin, music & adaptations of Disney's 1951 animated film Alice in Wonderland. 

All Of It
'Annie Leibovitz: Wonderland'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 19:32


This past month legendary photographer Annie Leibovitz released her newest book, a collection of her long-spanning work in fashion photography, the first compilation of her work in the industry. In Annie Leibovitz: Wonderland, inspired by the story of Alice in Wonderland, Leibovitz journeys through over 300 photos from her career in fashion, including photographing models, designers like Tom Ford and John Galiano, to important political figures and athletes, though, as she would tell it, she never considered herself a fashion photographer at all. Leibovitz joins us to talk the new collection of her work.

Your Brain on Facts
From Panto to Python (do-over, ep. 174)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 38:16


From music hall to Red Dwarf, pantomime to Absolutely Fabulous, we look at the history of British comedy, the names, shows, and historical events that made it what it is today. Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.  . Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website. Podchaser: Moxie got me through 2,500 miles. I listened to every episode regardless of audio quality from the vault. I got my fix of facts with a personality that kept me entertained the entire time. I shared it with everyone I knew that would appreciate the facts, wit and hilariously subtle segues. Profile avatar 2 months ago byBoredatwork23 Book: David Nowlin 5.0 out of 5 stars Be prepared to be amazed at what you needed know, but did not. Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2021 Great book. Read it cover to cover, but am planning to reread it again and again. It is so full of such wonderful pieces of information that I use to interject conversations whenever I can. Thank you Moxie for such a wonderful gift, and the book is great too Gift and merch “The story so far: In the beginning the Universe was created.  This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”  Thus begins Douglas Adams' Restaurant at the End of the Universe, sequel to his culture touchstone The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.  That's the book that gave us the answer to life, the universe and everything, though not the question.  Welcome to episode number 42, which I have decided to devote to [drumroll] the history of British comedy.  That means we're going to try to cram hundreds of years, thousands of performers, and a dozen mediums into a half-hour show.  But don't panic.  My name's Moxie and this is your brain on facts.    British comedy history is measured in centuries, from chase scenes and beatings into Shakespeare's comedies to the misadventures of Mr. Bean.  Even as times, tastes, and technologies changes, some themes are eternal.  Innuendo, for example, has been a staple in the literature as far back as Beowulf and Chaucer, and is prevalent in many British folk songs.  King Charles II was such a fan of innuendo that he encouraged it to the point that Restoration comedy became not only its own genre, but an explicit one at that.  The repressive Victorian period gave us burlesque, though not in the same form as the shows you can see today - more vaudeville than striptease.  Absurdism and the surreal had always been an undercurrent, which firmly took root in the 1950's, leading Red Dwarf, The Mighty Boosh, and Count Duckula.  Though the British Empire successfully conquered ¼ of the globe, but its individual people struggled and suffered.  Plagues, wars, poverty, class oppression, and filthy cities gave rise to, and a need for, black humor, in which topics and events that are usually treated seriously are treated in a humorous or satirical manner.  The class system, especially class tensions between characters, with pompous or dim-witted members of the upper/middle classes or embarrassingly blatant social climbers, has always provided ample material, which we can see in modern shows like Absolutely Fabulous, Keeping Up Appearances, and Blackadder.  The British also value finding humor in everyday life, which we see in shows like Father Ted, The IT Crowd, and Spaced, which also incorporates a fair amount of absurdity.   But there's nothing the Brits do better than satire and nobody does it better than the Brits.  “The British, being cynical and sarcastic by nature do have a natural flair for satire,” says BBCAmerica.com writer Fraser McAlpine.  “There's a history of holding up a mirror to society and accentuating its least attractive qualities that goes back hundreds of years...Sometimes the satire is biting and cold, sometimes it's warm and encouraging, but if you want someone who can say a thing that isn't true, but also somehow IS true in a really profound way. You need look no further.”  There are three principal forms of satire.  Menippean satire uses fantasy realms that reflect back on modern society.  Everything from Alice in Wonderland to the works of Terry Pratchett fit here, as would Dr. Who.  Horatian satire skewers cultural moments of silliness using parodic humor.  These are the kind of thing you tend to see most of in comedy TV shows, like The Office.  We're laughing at people being inept and harassed, but not evil.  Juvenalian satire skewers everything with abrasive, often bleak, wit.  If there's an element of horror at the topic being discussed, that's a clue that it's Juvenalian.  John Oliver is a fair hand with Juvenalian satire.  Most political cartoon and black humor fall under this heading.   Though comedy is as old as laughter, we're going to begin today's time travel with the music hall.  (FYI, the narrative today is going to overall linear, but there will be a fair amount of bouncing around.)  Music halls sprang up as an answer to proper theater, which was at the time heavily monitored and censored by the government.  It took place in humble venues like the backs of pubs and coffee houses.  By the 1830s taverns had rooms devoted to musical clubs. They presented Saturday evening Sing-songs and “Free and Easies”. These became so popular that entertainment was put on two or three times a week.  Music in the form of humorous songs was a key element because dialogue was forbidden.  Dialogue was for the theater and if you had speaking parts, you'd be subject to censorship.  The Theatrical Licensing Act of 1737 empowered the Lord Chamberlain's Office to censor plays; this act would be in force until 1968. So, no speaking parts, less, though still some censorship.  Music halls also allowed drinking and smoking, which legitimate theaters didn't.  As the shows became more popular, they moved from the pubs into venues of their own.  Tavern owners, therefore, often annexed buildings adjoining their premises as music halls.  The usual show consisted of six to eight acts, possibly including a comedy skit (low comedy to appeal to the working class), a juggling act, a magic act, a mime, acrobats, a dancing act, a singing act, and perhaps a one-act play.  In the states, this format was essentially vaudeville.  The music hall era was a heyday for female performers, with headliners like Gracie Fields, Lillie Langtry, and Vesta Tilley.  The advent of the talking motion picture in the late 1920s caused music halls to convert into cinemas to stay in business.  To keep comedians employed, a mixture of films and songs called cine-variety was introduced.     The other critically important tradition of that era was panto or pantomime, but not the Marcel Marceau type of pantomime you might be picturing, but a type of theatrical musical comedy designed for family entertainment.  Modern pantomime includes songs, gags, slapstick comedy, dancing, and gender-crossing actors.  It combines topical humour with well-known stories like fables and folk tales.  It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers.  It's traditionally quite popular around Christmas and New Years.  In early 19th century England, pantomime acquired its present form and featured the first mainstream clown Joseph Grimaldi, while comedy routines also featured heavily in British music halls.  British comedians who honed their skills at pantomime and music hall sketches include Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel.  The influential English music hall comedian and theatre impresario Fred Karno developed a form of sketch comedy without dialogue in the 1890s, and Chaplin and Laurel were among the young comedians who worked for him as part of "Fred Karno's Army". VODACAST   Hopping back to famous ladies of music hall, one such was Lily Harley, though her greatest claim to fame is having given birth to Charles Spencer Chaplin.  When Lily inexplicably lost her voice in the middle of a show, the production manager pushed the five-year-old Charlie, whom he'd heard sing, onto the stage to replace her.  Charlie lit up the audience, wowing them with his natural comedic presence.   Sadly, Lily's voice never recovered, and she was unable to support her two sons, who were sent to a workhouse.  For those of us who don't know workhouses outside of one reference in A Christmas Carol, think an orphanage or jail with indentured servitude.  Young Charlie took whatever jobs he could find to survive as he fought his way back to the stage.  His acting debut was as a pageboy in a production of Sherlock Holmes.  From there he toured with a vaudeville outfit named Casey's Court Circus and in 1908 teamed up with the Fred Karno pantomime troupe, where Chaplin became one of its stars as the Drunk in the comedic sketch A Night in an English Music Hall.  With the Karno troupe, Chaplin got his first taste of the United States, where he caught the eye of a film producer who signed Chaplin to a contract for a $150 a week, equivalent to over three-grand today.   During his first year with the company, Chaplin made 14 films, including The Tramp, which established Chaplin's trademark character and his role as the unexpected hero.  By the age of 26, Chaplin, just three years removed from his vaudeville days, was a superstar.  He'd moved over to the Mutual Company, which paid him a whopping $670,000 a year to make now-classics like Easy Street.   Chaplin came to be known as a grueling perfectionist.  His love for experimentation often meant countless takes, and it was not uncommon for him to order the rebuilding of an entire set or begin filming with one leading actor, realize he'd made a mistake in his casting and start again with someone new.  But you can't argue with results.  During the 1920s Chaplin's career blossomed even more, with landmark films, like The Kid, and The Gold Rush, a movie Chaplin would later say he wanted to be remembered by.  We'll leave Chaplin's story while he's on top because his private life from here on out gets, in a word, sordid.   Though Chapin was English, his film were American.  British cinema arguably lagged decades behind, but they began to close the gap in the 1940's.  Films by Ealing Studios, particularly their comedies like Hue & Cry, Whisky Galore! and The Ladykillers began to push the boundaries of what could be done in cinema, dealing with previously taboo topics like crime in comedic ways.  Kitchen sink dramas followed soon after, portraying social realism, with the struggles of working class Britons on full display, living in cramped rented accommodation and spending their off-hours drinking in grimy pubs, to explore controversial social and political issues ranging from abortion to homelessness.  These contrasted sharply with the idea of cinema as escapism.  This was the era of such notable stars as actor/comedian/singer-songwriter Norman Wisdom.  Beginning with 1953's Trouble in the Store, for which he won a BAFTA (the British equivalent to an Oscar), his films were among Britain's biggest box-office successes of their day.  Wisdom gained celebrity status in lands as far apart as South America, Iran and many Eastern Bloc countries, particularly in Albania where his films were the only ones by Western actors permitted by dictator Enver Hoxha to be shown.  He also played one of the best characters in one of my favorite and most hard to find films, “The Night They Raided Minsky's.”   There are few institutions in British history that have had such a massive role in shaping the daily lives of British citizens as the British Broadcasting Corporation, which for decades meant the wireless radio.  “For many it is an ever-present companion: from breakfast-time to bedtime, from childhood through to old age, there it is telling us about ourselves and the wider world, amusing and entertaining us,” says Robin Aitkin, a former BBC reporter and journalist.  The BBC solidified its place in the public consciousness from its beginnings in 1922 to the end of the Second World War in 1945 is of special interest because these pivotal years helped redefine what it means to be British in modern society.  This was especially true during the high unemployment of the 1920's, when other forms of entertainment were unaffordable.  The BBC was formed from the merger of several major radio manufacturers in 1922, receiving a royal charter in 1927, and governmental protection from foreign competition made it essentially a monopoly.  Broadcasting was seen as a public service; a job at the BBC carried similar gravitas to a government job.  Classical music and educational programs were its bedrock, with radio plays added to bring theater to the wireless.  The BBC strove to be varied but balanced in its offerings, neutral but universal; some people found it elitist nonetheless.  Expansion in offerings came slowly, if at all, in the early years.     Trying to bring only the best of culture to the people meant that bawdy music hall acts had little to no place on the radio.  Obscenity was judged by laws passed as early as 1727.  British libel and slander laws are more strict than in the US, so making fun of public figures was taboo even in forms that would have been legal.  And blasphemy?  Lord, no.  In 1949, the BBC issued to comedy writers and producers the Variety Programmes Policy Guide For Writers and Producers, commonly known as "the Green Book."  Among things absolutely banned were jokes about lavatories, effeminacy in men, immorality of any kind, suggestive references to honeymoon couples, chambermaids, fig leaves, ladies' underwear, prostitution, and the vulgar use of words such as "basket".  (Not an actual basket, the Polari word “basket,” meaning the bulge in a gentleman's trousers.  More on that later.)  The guidelines also stipulated that "..such words as God, Good God, My God, Blast, Hell, Damn, Bloody, Gorblimey, Ruddy, etc etc should be deleted from scripts and innocuous expressions substituted."  Where the independently tun music halls gave people what they wanted, BBC radio gave people what it felt they needed.  But comedy writers are nothing if not clever and there is always a way to slip past the censors if you try.   In the very beginning of radio, comedies lampooned the poor, because only those with money had radios.  As radio ownership grew, the topics of shows broadened.  First half-hour comedy program in 1938, Band Wagon, included musical interludes, was effectively a sitcom and set the stage for much of what came after.  By then, nearly every household had a radio.   WWII had an enormous impact on British comedy and entertainment in general.  Unlike WWI, which was fought on the continent, WWII was right on top of them, with the Blitz, blackouts, rationing, et al.  All places of amusement, which by their nature meant lots of people would gather and could be a target for bombings, were closed.  But the government soon realized comedy had an important role to play in helping its people to keep calm and carry on.  Bonus fact: The iconic 'Keep Calm and Carry On' poster was designed months before WWII began, but was never officially sanctioned for display.  It only achieved its prominent position in the public imagination after its rediscovery in 2001.  All the parody t-shirts still annoy me though.   Theater was allowed to continue, but television service was suspended.  This brought radio back to the forefront for communication and diversion.  The most popular show was It's That Man Again, which ran on BBC radio from ‘39-'49.  It's humor was a great unifier during the war, helping people to laugh at the things they were scared of.  People would often listen huddled around their radio during a blackout.  In its character archetypes, it offered a more comprehensive range of social representation than what had come before it, with characters ranging from east end charwomen to the upper class.  It was so universally popular that supposedly its catch-phrases, which is regarded as the first to really succeed with, were used to test suspected German spies.  If you didn't know who said what, they'd be shot.      During the war, Britain fought back against the Nazi propagandists' ferocious scaremongering with things like a song about the fact that Hitler may or may not have only one testicle, the other of which we were storing in a London theatre for safe keeping.  This attitude, combined with having had enough authority to last them a while, would extend to their own government at the start of the 1960's when Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Alan Bennett, and Jonathan Miller made fun of the prime minister in their stage show Beyond The Fringe, with the PM in the audience.  This would open the door for satirical news programs like 1962's That Was The Week That Was, grandfather to The Daily Show and The Colbert Report.  There was also The Frost Report, whose staff of writers included five names many of know well and you know we're going to get into more detail on - Chapman, Jones, Idle, Palin, and Cleese.   The war would remain subject to comedy, either as the primary setting or a recurring plot point for decades to come in shows like Dad's Army, Allo Allo, and even Are You Being Served?, one of my personal favorites.   If you've ever seen me at my customer service day jobs, I pattern my behavior on Mrs. Slocombe, though I don't reference my pussy as often. [clip]  Experiences in the war led to the prominence of absurdism/surrealism, because nothing could match what they men had been through.  One of the most famous example was The Goon Show, with Spike Milligan, Harry Secombe, and Peter Sellers.  The scripts mixed ludicrous plots with surreal humour, puns, catchphrases and an array of bizarre sound effects. Some of the later episodes feature electronic effects devised by the fledgling BBC Radiophonic Workshop, who also created the theme to Dr Who.  The Goon Show and other such programs were popular with those who were students at the time, seeding their sense of humor into the next generation.  Spike Milligan in particular had wide-reaching cultural influence.  The Goon Show was cited as a major influence by The Beatles, the American comedy team The Firesign Theatre, as well as, among many others, Monty Python.   PATREON   Do you remember how I said in episode #39, Short-Lived, Long Remembered that Jackie Gleason's Honeymooner's was the first TV sitcom?  I was mistaken and I don't mind issuing a correction.  Pinwright's Progress, which ran for ten episodes starting in 1946, was the first half-hour television sitcom, telling the tale of a beleaguered shop-owner, his hated rival and his unhelpful staff.  By 1955, ⅓ of British households had a TV.  That year saw the launch of ITV, I for independent, because it was *not run by BBC with its war vets with good-school educations, but by showmen and entertainers.  Where the BBC did comedies for and about the middle-class, ITV brought full-blooded variety to TV.  The BBC was forced to loosen its tie a bit to keep up.  ITV also had commercials, which BBC shows never did -a concept that is quite foreign to the American brain- so writers had to learn to pace their shows differently to allow for the break.  One stand-out was Hancock's Half-hour, which began on radio and moved to TV.  Fom 54-61, it pushed sitcoms with a focus on character development, rather than silly set-ups, musical interludes, and funny voices of radio plays.  Two writers on the show, Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, would leave to create Comedy Playhouse in 1961, ten half-hour plays.  One of these grew into the TV show Steptoe and Son (1962–74), about two rag and bone men, father and son, who live together in a squalid house in West London.  This was the basis for the American series Sanford and Son, as well as version in Sweden, Netherlands and Portugal.  For those not in the know, a rag and bone man collected salvageable rubbish from the streets, making it a bizarre name choice for a clothing company but oh well.    The tone and offerings changed considerably with the cultural revolution of the 1960's.  Rock music, the birth control pill, civil rights, everything was changing.  Round The Horne, which aired on BBC radio on Sunday afternoons was chock full of brazen innuendos and double-entendres.  Some of them were risque to the point of being ironically safe -- people who would have objected to them were not of the sensibility to catch the joke it the first place.  Their most remarkable characters were Julian and Sandy, two very obviously gay characters in a time when it was still illegal to be gay in Britain.  Julian and Sandy got away with the bawdiest of their jokes because they spoke Polari, a pidgin language made up a words from Romani, French, Italian, theater and circus slang and even words spelled backwards.  They might refer to someone's dirty dishes and the squares would have no idea that “dish” meant derriere.  Bonus fact: You probably use Polari words without even realizing it, if you describe a masculine person as “butch” or something kitchy as “camp,” even “drag” meaning clothes, particularly women's.    The Carry On Films, a franchise that put out nearly a movie a year for three decades and spun off a TV series, held up a cartoonish mirror to the depressed and repressed Britain of the 1950s and 1960s.  They blended the rapid-fire pace of music hall sketches with topicality and a liberating sense of directness.  Carry On also filled the gap left as music halls as an institution collapsed.   Monty Python's Flying Circus aired from 69-74 and enjoyed a unique watershed success not just for British comedy but also for television comedy around the world. Monty Python was unlike anything that had appeared on television, and in many ways it was both a symbol and a product of the social upheaval and youth-oriented counterculture of the late 1960s.  The show's humour could be simultaneously sarcastic, scatological, and intellectual.  The series was a creative collaboration between Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin, and Terry Gilliam, the sole American in a group of Oxford and Cambridge graduates.  The five Brits played most of the roles, with Gilliam primarily contributing eccentric animations.  Although sketch comedy shows were nothing new, television had never broadcast anything as untraditional and surreal, and its importance to television is difficult to overstate.  Their free-form sketches seldom adhered to any particular theme and disregarded the conventions of comedy that writers, performers and audiences had been accustomed to for generations.  Even the opening title sequence didn't follow the rules; it might run in the middle of the show or be omitted entirely.  Over the run of the series, a *few characters recurred, but most were written solely for one sketch.  The show spun-off a number of feature films, like Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), Life of Brian (1979), and the Meaning of Life (1983) and even a Tony Award-winning musical comedy Spamalot, first produced in 2005, as well as books and albums like Instant Record Collection.  Decades after the show's initial run, the mere mention of some dead parrots, silly ways, Spam or the Spanish Inquisition is enough to prompt laughter from even casual fans.  All the members who continue on to successful careers, but let's follow John Cleese to his next best-known project.  I put my favorite sketch in Vodacast; see if you can guess it before you look.  And tell me yours, soc med.   Fawlty Towers has been described as the sitcom by which other sitcoms must be measured, voted number one in the BFI's 100 Greatest British Television Programmes in 2000. Its main character, Basil Fawlty, was inspired by a seethingly rude hotel proprietor John Cleese encountered while filming abroad with the Monty Python team.  Cleese actually tested the character on another show in 1971, Doctor At Large, a comedy about newly-graduated doctors, based on the books of Richard Gordon.  The setting for Fawlty Towers was a painfully ordinary hotel that Basil constantly struggling to inject a touch of class into.  His escapades included trying to hide a rat from a hygiene inspector, keeping a dead customer hidden, and pretending that his wife Sybil was ill during their anniversary party, when in fact she's walked out on him).  Basil was the perfect vehicle for Cleese's comic talents: mixing the biting verbal tirades against his wife and guests with the physical dexterity utilised to charge about between self-induced disasters.  Part of the success of the show is arguably the fact that it ran for a mere twelve episodes, so never ran out of steam.  It's been remade in other countries, but those version never really capture the success of the original.  That's one of the key differences between British and American TV series.  A British show might have 2 writers for a season of 6-10 episodes, whereas an American show will have a team of writers for a season of 13-25 episodes.  Quality over quantity, I suppose.  In part, this is a reflection of the difference between the size of the TV audience in the two countries, and the economics of television production; for decades sitcoms on US television that delivered the highest ratings, whereas; in Britain the highest ratings figures were normally for soap operas.   The tone shifted again as the 60's gave way to the 70's.  The anger of 60's revolution gave way to a more comfortable feeling in the 70's.  One of the stand-outs of the decade, which continued into the 80's, was The Two Ronnies.  A sketch show starring Ronnies Barker and Corbett, it moved away from the long-standing comic and straight-man format.  It was the BBC's flagship of light entertainment, the longest running show of its genre.  If we're talking modern comedy duos, we need to talk about Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders.  Even in alternative comedy scenes, women had trouble gaining the same notoriety as their male peers.  A step in the right direction was 1987's French and Saunders, a sketch show that displayed the wilful amateurishness of much alternative comedy, but shunned both the violence and scatology or the strident politics that were staples of the big-name performers.  The duo's humour was distinctively female, but not feminist, and most of their jokes were at the expense of themselves or each other.  As audiences and budgets grew, the pair increasingly favoured elaborate spoofs of pop stars and blockbuster movies.  After the show French starred in The Vicar of Dibley and Saunders to the role she's probably best known for, Edina in Absolutely Fabulous.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  Don't be surprised if this topic spawns a sequel.  I left out Punch and Judy, skipped right over literature, had to forgo luminaries like Morecambe and Wise, didn't get to the panel show format, and said nothing of Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, which may actually be a crime, I'm not sure.  Well, it's like they say in the biz, always leave them wanting more.  Thanks for spending part of your day with em.     Sources: https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/truth-behind-keep-calm-and-carry-on https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2016/feb/17/the-five-stages-of-british-gags-silliness-repression-anger-innuendo-fear https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Goon_Show https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Wisdom https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hancock%27s_Half_Hour https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/apr/17/gender.filmnews https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Round_the_Horne http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/1011109/index.html https://www.britannica.com/topic/Monty-Pythons-Flying-Circus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galton_and_Simpson http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/fawltytowers/ http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2014/06/history-brits-better-satire https://www.britannica.com/art/music-hall-and-variety https://www.biography.com/people/charlie-chaplin-9244327 https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1107&context=ghj https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U77CXPANrCc&list=PL9e1sByp65ixpMQlW9hpMMdomwSwGK9-Y

tv corbett western restaurants gift victorian office theater producers night american german guide music christmas god world war ii saunders english simpson french italian dad tony award wisdom army modern dialogue england british south america rock iran shakespeare hell meaning universe brainiac united states nazis bbc films palin sanford lord galaxy hancock drunk netherlands punch beatles sweden stan laurel chapman portugal wwii bean reach jennifer saunders hang cambridge progress bfi blast classical bonus horne jackie gleason honeymooners american tv new years mrs plagues sherlock holmes beowulf terry pratchett douglas adams chaucer sing damn british empire python oxford tramp blitz bloody peter sellers spam kitchen fyi britain dibley adolf hitler trouble monty python green book bbc america brits broadcasting edina wise tavern profile experiences basil hitchhiker albania stephen fry itv carry on charlie chaplin restoration absolutely fabulous fawlty towers terry gilliam gilliam britons holy grail decades chaplin john oliver spamalot alan bennett alice in wonderland marcel marceau colbert report panto red dwarf expansion gold rush innuendo easy street terry jones allo allo count duckula hugh laurie absurdism moxie michael palin two ronnies my god father ted jonathan miller john cleese romani christmas carol bafta idle dudley moore spaced cleese slocombe alan simpson bbc radiophonic workshop basil fawlty spike milligan hopping blackadder daily show good god west london king charles ii ray galton eric idle fom morecambe eastern bloc goon show peter cook flying circus norman wisdom firesign theatre charles spencer chaplin half hour it crowd young charlie vicar ladykillers mighty boosh graham chapman ruddy steptoe richard gordon galton keeping up appearances obscenity spanish inquisition are you being served polari dawn french lord chamberlain at large british broadcasting corporation ealing studios whisky galore enver hoxha that was the week that was
Programmed to Chill
Bonus Episode 06 - the Politics of the Politics of Pedophilia, feat. Philip Fairbanks

Programmed to Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 145:37


Today I interview Philip Fairbanks, journalist and author of "Pedogate Primer: the Politics of Pedophilia" about his book and the topics therein. We have a freewheeling episode where we discuss JM Barrie and Peter Pan, Lewis Carroll and Alice in Wonderland, Oscar Wilde and the Cleveland Street Scandal, the Iowa Monster experiments, MKULTRA, NXIVM, the F*nders, the Children of God cult, #MeToo, D*sney and N*ckelodeon, Adam Parfrey, and a number of other topics I'm sure I left out. It's a great episode, folks, and we tried to stay non-explicit and positive, or as positive as is possible given the topic. cw: pedophilia, obviously Philip Fairbanks: @kafkaguy on Twitter https://philfairbanks.com/ https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/55937282-pedogate-primer songs: "Psycho" by Eddie Noack "The Ballad of Charles Whitman" by Kinky Friedman [note: I didn't want to pick "pedophile" songs or episode art, so I picked vaguely MK-related songs, though I suppose Psycho touches on it. I'm not implying anything negative about either artist]

Fearless - The Art of Creative Leadership with Charles Day
Ep 335: Chris Hirst - 'The No Bullsh*t Leader'

Fearless - The Art of Creative Leadership with Charles Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 28:52


This week's guest is Chris Hirst. He's the Global CEO of Havas Creative - they describe themselves as the world's most integrated advertising and communications business. He's also the author of an award winning book, No Bullsh*t Leadership. Which means he's given a lot of thought to the art of leading a creative business. So much has been written and said about leadership. Libraries full of thinking and advice. Strategies and objectives and theories and case studies and oceans-full of best practices. We humans are complex beings. Biological entities fueled by emotions and very often willing to make decisions and take actions which, even after a moment's thought, work against our own best interests. No wonder that the Doomsday Clock is set at 100 seconds to midnight. Leadership requires you take people on a journey. From where we are today. To a better version of tomorrow. A lot of attention gets paid to the destination. Justifiably so. After all, to slightly misquote Alice in Wonderland, if you don't care where you're going, any road will do. But as Chris points out, the other end of the journey, the honest acknowledgement of where you are today, is often missing for fear that someone will be upset or offended or will judge the progress so far as inadequate. Honesty about the challenges you're trying to overcome is where leadership begins. Without that honesty, at least two things become true. First, every time you think you're making a decision, you're making it through a distorted lens. Which means they're not decisions, it's a guess. And second, if you won't trust yourself with the truth, why should anyone else trust you? So, trust yourself and start with truth.

Fearless - The Art of Creative Leadership with Charles Day

Edited highlights of our full conversation. This week's guest is Chris Hirst. He's the Global CEO of Havas Creative - they describe themselves as the world's most integrated advertising and communications business. He's also the author of an award winning book, No Bullsh*t Leadership. Which means he's given a lot of thought to the art of leading a creative business. So much has been written and said about leadership. Libraries full of thinking and advice. Strategies and objectives and theories and case studies and oceans-full of best practices. We humans are complex beings. Biological entities fueled by emotions and very often willing to make decisions and take actions which, even after a moment's thought, work against our own best interests. No wonder that the Doomsday Clock is set at 100 seconds to midnight. Leadership requires you take people on a journey. From where we are today. To a better version of tomorrow. A lot of attention gets paid to the destination. Justifiably so. After all, to slightly misquote Alice in Wonderland, if you don't care where you're going, any road will do. But as Chris points out, the other end of the journey, the honest acknowledgement of where you are today, is often missing for fear that someone will be upset or offended or will judge the progress so far as inadequate. Honesty about the challenges you're trying to overcome is where leadership begins. Without that honesty, at least two things become true. First, every time you think you're making a decision, you're making it through a distorted lens. Which means they're not decisions, it's a guess. And second, if you won't trust yourself with the truth, why should anyone else trust you? So, trust yourself and start with truth.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Gilded: Marissa Meyer's reimagining of Rumpelstiltskin

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 26:12


American author Marissa Meyer has spent much of the past decade reimagining the classic fairy stories we think we know so well, and turning them into smash hits. Her first novel, Cinder, became a New York Times bestseller, and she followed it up with three more installments in her Lunar Chronicles series. Then came an Alice in Wonderland prequel - Heartless; her own superhero series, Renegades; and last year she released Instant Karma, which is being adapted for TV by HBO. Marissa spins a new take on Rumpelstiltskin in Gilded - giving the "miller's daughter" from the original tale a name and quite a backstory. She joins Kathryn from Washington state to talk about her love of fantasy writing.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Gilded: Marissa Meyer's reimagining of Rumpelstiltskin

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 26:12


American author Marissa Meyer has spent much of the past decade reimagining the classic fairy stories we think we know so well, and turning them into smash hits. Her first novel, Cinder, became a New York Times bestseller, and she followed it up with three more installments in her Lunar Chronicles series. Then came an Alice in Wonderland prequel - Heartless; her own superhero series, Renegades; and last year she released Instant Karma, which is being adapted for TV by HBO. Marissa spins a new take on Rumpelstiltskin in Gilded - giving the "miller's daughter" from the original tale a name and quite a backstory. She joins Kathryn from Washington state to talk about her love of fantasy writing.

Film Addicts
David Zannoni *Business Owner of Zannoni Media, Film/TV Consultant & Latin America Representative for Fintage House*

Film Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:00


David Zannoni is a business owner, consultant and representative for Fintage House and specializes in Collection Account Management CAM for independent film and TV productions. Moguls you can learn more about David Zannoni by going to zannonimedia.com and about Fintage House by going to fintagehouse.com. Thank you for listening & please support the podcast :) https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/anonymouscontent (Marylin Hebert/Royal Girl) Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com https://www.patreon.com/sneakies Please give us 5 star reviews for our time ;) Thanks! Our podcasts: Enchanting Book Readings, Film Addicts & Thrilling Stories. Support us by subscribing to our YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos Buy a book & give 5 stars :) Skip Boots Big Safari Adventure - a funny animal book like Jungle Book meets Minions. https://www.amazon.com/Skip-Boots-Big-Safari-Adventure/dp/1729091547 Jack the Bear and Golden Hair -a fairy-tale like Snow White & Alice In Wonderland. https://www.amazon.com/Jack-Bear-Golden-StorytellerUK2017-Adventures-ebook/dp/B010E479GE Adventures Of Mooch the Pooch- a funny dog book like Marley and Me. https://www.amazon.com/Mooch-Pooch-Adventures-ebook/dp/B01LR86FK2 Blueber Goober the Monster in My Closet! Monsters Inc. meets Casper the Friendly Ghost. https://www.amazon.com/Blueber-Goober-Monster-My-Closet-ebook/dp/B01LW1VMPQ Middle grade book series: Margaret Merlin's Journal The Battle of the Black Witch Book 1 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK Unleashing the Dark One Book 2 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Unleashing-Dark-ebook/dp/B01J78YH6I Mask of the Parallel World Book 3 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Parallel-World-ebook/dp/B01KUGIZ8W/ Quest for the Golden Key Book 4 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Quest-Golden-ebook/dp/B076FTTDQN/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/filmaddicts/support

Enchanting Book Readings
The Biggest Christmas Tree

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 14:13


#1 Australia, #1 Canada, #1 UK, #1 Brazil, #1 Japan, #3 Italy #5 Mexico, #4 Germany #5 France #10 Sweden #16 Norway #1- #15 USA! https://www.paypal.me/anonymouscontent :) Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com $Paypal $1 $https://www.patreon.com/sneakies https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos "Skip Boots Big Safari Adventure"* - a funny animal book like "Jungle Book." "Jack the Bear and Golden Hair"* -a fairy-tale like Snow White & "Alice In Wonderland." *"Adventures of Mooch the Pooch"*- a funny dog book like "Marley and Me" meets "A Dogs Life."

The Katie Black Show
Episode #137: Joni Deutsch

The Katie Black Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 60:30


Episode 16 TONIGHT on The Katie Black Show…Joni Deutsch! EPISODE: HOGWARTS, WEST VIRGINIA, EVOLUTION OF RADIO, SCOTLAND FOOD, BRITNEY SPEARS AND MUCH MORE. WE RECORDED OVER ZOOM. ENJOY! (*recorded 11.18.21*)

Enchanting Book Readings
Snowy the Snowflake

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 15:37


Snowy the Snowflake by Sir Herbert Sneakies. Winter is coming and the school Christmas play is being cast! Who will Miss Dinkerton cast as the lead? Miss Dinkerton picks her favorite students Sara and Bobby as the leads and Penny is only cast in a small role as a snowflake. Penny is so excited even thouh it is a small part with only a few words. Penny's Mom Cindy Parkerson reads her a story about a town with no snow until a magical snowflake Snowy arrives. The story is heart warming and teaches kids that your start shines bright if you have a big heart. Copyright 2021 Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast! Thank you for letting us hit #1 around the world! Top 1.5% globally!!! We love you ;) Your pal Sneakies, Sir Herbert Sneakies, Lady Twizzelton & Marylin Hebert. :) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ https://www.patreon.com/sneakies https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/anonymouscontent (Marylin Hebert/Royal Girl) Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com You can Support us by giving us 5 stars or buying a book :) Subscribe to our YouTube channel:Skip Boots Big Safari Adventure - a funny animal book like Jungle Book meets Minions. https://www.amazon.com/Skip-Boots-Big-Safari-Adventure/dp/1729091547 Jack the Bear and Golden Hair -a fairy-tale like Snow White & Alice In Wonderland.https://www.amazon.com/Jack-Bear-Golden-StorytellerUK2017-Adventures-ebook/dp/B010E479GE Adventures Of Mooch the Pooch- a funny dog book like Marley and Me meets Trolls. https://www.amazon.com/Mooch-Pooch-Adventures-ebook/dp/B01LR86FK2 Blueber Goober the Monster in My Closet! Monsters Inc. meets Casper the Friendly Ghost. https://www.amazon.com/Blueber-Goober-Monster-My-Closet-ebook/dp/B01LW1VMPQ Middle grade book series: Margaret Merlin's Journal The Battle of the Black Witch Book 1 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK Unleashing the Dark One Book 2 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Unleashing-Dark-ebook/dp/B01J78YH6I Mask of the Parallel World Book 3 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Parallel-World-ebook/dp/B01KUGIZ8W/ Quest for the Golden Key Book 4 https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Quest-Golden-ebook/dp/B076FTTDQN/ https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos Copyright material 2019 Marylin Hebert https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/

Talk Nerdy to Me
Alice in Wonderland We‘re All Mad Here Stacked Statue Unbox & Review

Talk Nerdy to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 5:58


At the time of this video it has an MSRP or $75. It sells out every time SideShow is able to get it back in stock. The level of detail is about what you would expect for a statue in this price range. I kinda like that the patterns on the statue are actually etched into it rather than just painted on. This statue will look great on the shelf of any Alice in Wonderland fan. Manufacturer Description Sideshow and Enesco are proud to present the Alice in Wonderland Stacked Figurine! Alice and her friends build a tower of astonishment in this colorful piece by Jim Shore. Twiddle Dee and Dumb form the tower's base while Alice, The Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat, and Dormouse balance above. This crew makes Wonderland even more wonderful! Product Specifications License: Disney Product Type: Figurine Manufactured by: Enesco, LLC Product Size: 10.25" H (260.35mm) x 3" W (76.2mm) x 4" L (101.6mm)  SUBSCRIBE to watch more videos like this one! LET'S CONNECT! -- Talk Nerdy to Me Facebook -- Zia Comics Facebook -- Zia Comics Twitter -- Zia Comics Instagram -- Talk Nerdy to Me website -- Zia Comics website LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST! - iTunes - RSS Feed - Stitcher - Google Play - Podbean - Spotify - Tune In/Alexa - Pandora #ziacomics #sideshow #enesco #aliceinwonderland #allmadhere #unbox

Enchanting Book Readings
Italian Bop!

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:41


Italian Bop dance by Sir Herbert Sneakies. Are you baking cookies, cakes and pies for the holidays? Well this song is sure to get you in the holiday spirit and help you burn off some calories too! Dance, laugh and enjoy. Repeat. Happy Thanksgiving and have a Delightful Holiday! Your pal, Sneakies & Lady Twizzelton. From the world famous top 1% global kids podcast :) Check out our books and merchandise at Enchanted Books at https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ :)

Quilt Buzz
Episode 043: Veruschka of @prideandjoyquilting

Quilt Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 34:41


Show Notes:1:23 - Los Angeles1:29 - Palm Springs2:41 - University of California [UC], Riverside3:37 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing4:36 - Memory quilts5:34 - QVC 6:26 - Alice in Wonderland 6:30 and 6:45 - YouTube6:47 - Fons and Porter6:51 - Fat Quarter Shop6:53 - Missouri Star Quilting 7:57 and 8:16 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing8:36 - Home Depot10:15, 10:41, 10:50, 11:18 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing11:01 - prideandjoyquilt.com11:10 - YouTube12:03 - Applique12:08 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing12:24 - Veruschka's FPP unicorn quilt12:44, and 13:32 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing13:45 - English Paper Piecing 14:05 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing15:26 - prideandjoyquilt.com15:45 - Veruschka's FPP unicorn quilt17:04 - Audrey Hepburn 17:08 - Audrey Hepburn movies17:16 - Puerto Reican 17:17 - Cuban17:38 - UNICEF18:45 - Veruschka's Audrey Hepburn quilt18:53 - LA [Los Angeles]19:04 - MLK [Martin Luther King]19:05 - Veruschka's MLK portrait quilt19:14 - Veruschka's Audrey Hepburn quilt19:35 - Bisa Butler 19:38 - Applique19:45 and 19:56 - Veruschka's MLK portrait quilt20:10 - Kona Cotton charm pack (5 inch precut squares) 20:54 - Veruschka's MLK portrait quilt21:05 - Adobe Illustrator 22:41 and 23:19 - QuiltCon27:00 - Agatha Raisin 27:21 - Sour Patch Kids27:30 - Bella Solids by Moda Fabrics 27:52 - Bella Solids in Terrain Iris 28:04 - Tula Pink 28:06 - Vanessa Christenson of V & Co28:16 and 28:42 - V & Co's Ombres29:10 - [FPP] Foundation paper piecing29:28 - Adobe Illustrator 29:43 - Mary Fons30:04 - Jitka of Jitka Design (@jitkadesign)30:05 - Czech Republic 30:07 - Canada 30:26 - Allie McCathren of Exhausted Octopus (@exhaustedoctopus)30:47 - Erika Bea of Hello Erika Bea (@hello.erikabea)31:39 - Pride and Joy Quilting Etsy shop33:06 and 33:11 - Joan of Arc 33:15 - LightsaberFollow Erin: Instagram - @prideandjoyquiltinghttps://prideandjoyquilting.com/Follow us:Amanda: @broadclothstudio https://broadclothstudio.com/Wendy: @the.weekendquilter https://the-weekendquilter.com/Anna: @waxandwanestudiohttps://www.waxandwanestudio.com/Quilt Buzz: @quilt.buzzhttps://quiltbuzzpodcast.com/Intro/Outro Music:Golden Hour by Vlad Gluschenko

The NeverEnding Movie Marathon
Speed Racer (2008) - Planes! Trains! And Automobiles!

The NeverEnding Movie Marathon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 102:53


In 2008, the Wachowskis presented pure, uncut, psychedelic exuberance on screen for 2+ hours... and the world shrugged their stupid shoulders. But now, we're reclaiming the masterpiece that is 'Speed Racer' for its incredible cast (John Goodman, Susan Sarandon, Christina Ricci, Rain, and who could forget young Paulie Litt? Not us!), its eye-popping visuals (a neverending fall down an Alice in Wonderland rabbit hole), and the Wachowskis' form-breaking filmmaking that has us stoked for 'The Matrix Resurrections'!Go, Speed Racer! Go, Speed Racer! Go, Speed Racer, goooooooooooo!Throughout November, the NeverEnding Movie Marathon crew will answer that query with three of their favorites-- starting with the Nicolas Cage crashterpiece (or trashterpiece?), 'Con Air' (1997), then continuing with Bong Joon-ho's sleeper(car) hit, 'Snowpiercer' (2013),  coming in third is Speed Racer, before we wrap things next week with 'Planes, Trains, and Automobiles' (1987).The NeverEnding Movie Marathon is a weekly podcastic celebration of cinema. Dive deep into fan-favorite films (#NoStinkers!), thematically curated to enhance your movie viewing by hosts Matt Detisch, Alex Logan, and Michael Rocco.Find us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or at neverendingmoviemarathon.com

Stuff The British Stole
Strange Fowle

Stuff The British Stole

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 34:54


It's become a symbol for extinction; the dodo is a semi-mythical creature which most of us know only through Alice in Wonderland. But one particular dodo was the victim of a crime – murder. Its skull now sits in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. And it holds the clues to a thrilling mystery which illustrates a little-known colonial legacy.

Enchanting Book Readings
Jungalou Crew And Riely Too!

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 14:29


A Sir Herbert Sneakies special story presentation of Jungalou Crew and Riley Too! Were celebrating our top 1% global ranking. "Ready? Trunks up, let's go!" With a little bit of magic, your little ones will follow the Jungalou Crew on a new adventure where they'll meet Riley, the surfing hippo and learn a little about being responsible while having fun. Children's book by Visionary storyteller and animal activist, Erik Daniel Shein. And Melissa Davis and Karen Fuller. Erik is a trained herpetologist, studying reptiles and amphibians and therefore we know you'll find this story enchanting for your wee little ones. Happy Holidays from your pal Sneakies & Lady Twizzelton :) Check out our books and merchandise at Enchanted Books at https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ Thank your for your generous support by: donating, subscribing, down loading and giving us five stars :) Thank you!! Sir Herbert Sneakies was in a bad injury to hands/arms/fingers/leg/back so your support is appreciated.

The John Batchelor Show
1795: How to NFT Alice in Wonderland; & What is to be done? Alice Fulwood @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:50


How to NFT Alice in Wonderland; & What is to be done? Alice Fulwood @TheEconomist https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2021/10/30/the-market-for-non-fungible-tokens-is-evolving?frsc=dg%7C

Short Stories for Kids: The Magical Podcast of Story Telling
PROMO! ABC Story Sisters Episode 1: The Wizard of Oz- The Cyclone

Short Stories for Kids: The Magical Podcast of Story Telling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 8:06


ABC Story Sisters Episode 1: The Wizard of Oz- The CycloneLooking for a new, family-friendly podcast? ABC Story Sisters brings classic children's literature to life for the littlest of podcast fans! Join young sisters Alexa, Bristol and Charlotte as they travel down the yellow brick road in the Wizard of Oz, or jump down the rabbit hole in Alice in Wonderland! Subscribe to ABC Story Sisters on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you're listening, today!https://abcstorysisters.com/

Economist Radio
Money Talks: Is the future non-fungible?

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 29:36


This week The Economist auctioned off an Alice in Wonderland-inspired NFT for charity. Host Rachana Shanbhogue finds out how the sale went and explores the promise and pitfalls of this dizzying new market. Plus, the financial landscape in Africa is changing fast: we ask why the unicorn population has more than doubled this year and speak to Sim Tshabalala, head of the continent's largest lender, Standard Group Bank. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.