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Real Estate Marketing Dude
Your Personal Brand Is Your Unique Selling Proposition with Tonya Eberhart

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 38:57


If you were to open up a taco stand, would you not be screaming the fucking name of that taco stand throughout the top of your lungs in every city you are to get people to buy your shit? But you don't do the same thing with your real estate business. Why not? It's because you haven't identified your brand. What we're gonna chat about today is all about your personal brand, why it matters, then how you identify it, and how you market it.  Today we're bringing on a branding expert from brand face, Mrs. Tanya Eberhart. Tonya is the founder of BrandFace® and Branding Agent to Business Stars. She's also the author of four books on personal branding. Tonya's humble career began while selling vacuum cleaners door to door to pay her way through college. That led to a job in radio, where she observed local business owners who were featured in their own advertising and positioned as local celebrities in the market. That's when she realized the power that personal branding has on a business. Almost two decades and many successful brands later, she founded BrandFace®, a personal branding firm consisting of a book series, speaking series, and personal branding program that is designed to help business stars differentiate themselves.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeThe importance of your personal brandHow to identify your personal brand and what to do with itThe impact you can leave on everyone you meetResourcesLearn more about Brand FaceDiscussYourBrain.comReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas to real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get started What's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude, podcast. We are joined here today by unbelievable gas somebody that I've seen over the last few years and finally we did fucking show together. Should have done this a long time ago. But yeah, we should. Where have you been? I don't know, just some of these things. That's just one of these things. But um, anyways, what we're going to be chatting about the summer books. So one of the things I know everyone's talking about is like, you know, the last two weeks of the year, what do we do we sit around, what are we gonna do next year? What do we do differently, and I got a newsflash for you. Nobody is hiring you based upon the broker you hang your license with. I will just go ahead and tell you that, let me repeat it one more time. Nobody is going to hire you over the broker that you're associated with, quite frankly, no one gives a shit who your broker is, or what the hell they do. And quite frankly, neither do you. Because today, more than anything, brokers are not really earning their splits, so to say, but that's why they're as 100% brokerages and companies like exp have been growing so much is because agents are looking for more, but that's another episode. So what we're gonna chat about today is all about your personal brand, why it matters, and then how you identify it, how you market it. And first off, what is it the problem that so many of our own clients have a lot is? Well, what do you mean, I'm a brand, I'm just a human being? I have a family, I have kids, I have a breeding? Well, let me ask you a question. If you're open up a taco stand, would you not be screaming the fucking name of that taco stand throughout the top of your lungs in every city you are to get people to buy your shit. But you don't do the same thing with your real estate business. Why not? It's because you haven't identified your brand. So what we're going to be doing today is bringing on a branding expert from brand face. And let's go ahead and introduce her name is Mr. Mrs. Tanya Everhart. Welcome to the show.Thank you so much, Mike. I've also been following you and so happy to be here today.Thanks. Yeah. Finally, why don't you tell everybody a little bit who you are and what you do? And then let's get into this.Yeah, okay. All right. So I'm going to take you back just for a moment, way back to my early days in in my career, I was selling vacuum cleaners door to door to pay my way through college. And that's really where the first taste of personal branding came into play. And I realized I can't just walk up to the door and say, Give me your wallet. Right, I'd be arrested. Somy vacuum cleaner in your hand.arrested with a deadly weapon. So I had to kind of come up with my own story. And when I realized how impactful that was when I just kept getting these sales awards, and then I was discovered, if you want to call it that by a guy in the radio industry, he was actually an engineer at a radio station, and I sold him he and his wife a vacuum cleaner, and shampoo, or I might add, it was a nice combo. And they called me a couple of weeks later and said you need to apply for a sales position in radio. Well, I did, I got the job very quickly, I saw that there were these people walking into these networking meetings or in events. And they were like rockstars. And I thought Who are these people? My God, you know, they're, they're just business owners. But what they all had in common was they were all the voice and the face of their own business. In other words, they put their personality, their personal brand out there as a representative of or spokesperson of their business. And that's really when I began to understand how much of an impact personal branding had on business. So fast forward many years later, actually comes with the idea of brand face because I had had a common thread throughout all of my experiences throughout the media world of bringing clients into a studio helping them create their own commercials become more of a face of their business. And then brand face began in 2013. It started out as just a book and about halfway through the book, I thought, this is a business. This is my passion. And so that's when I met my now business partner, Michael Carr, who was in the real estate world. And I worked with him on his brand very quickly. He shot to the top of his market. And I thought hmm, you know what, this works in any genre. And so, but that's kind of how we got headed into the real estate space. was really was Michael's industry. He was a real estate auctioneer, a broker and an investor. And my challenge at that time was pulling all of those brands into one to say, here's what this human being has in common with these three businesses he created. Here's why He created him. What is his why, you know, and that's what we've been doing together ever since and enjoyed every single day on it.Love it. Um, I need to go back and ask you a question. All right, folks, you selling vacuum cleaners door to door like you guys are complaining about going out and like lead generation like to try selling a vacuum cleaner door to door, you sell a vacuum cleaner door to door in Chicago, like you're getting shotgun put in your face, you can knock on my door, maybe in San Diego, might be able to get a company will open the door. But that's a tough sale. What was your story refer to? At that time, she mentioned, people fell in love with my story. So I might as a vacuum cleaners at your brand face at this point, right? Your vacuum cleaner salesperson door knocking pushing vacuum cleaners? What story did you have that copy would be like I really liked her vacuum cleaners.It wasn't about the vacuum cleaners at all. And I think I've heard you say that in previous podcasts. It's not about what you're selling. It's about you, right? And it was, hey, you know what, I'm a student, I go to Florida State University. So I wasn't selling in Chicago. So it wasn't cold. I can't you know, say I went uphill, you know, to sell a vacuum both ways in the snow. But, but it was hot. So, so it was I'm a student at Florida State University. And I would like to demonstrate this vacuum shampoo for us no obligation. You don't have to buy it. But I do get points toward school. If you could help me out. I would greatly appreciate it. Lesson number one people want to help you. If you ask for help people instinctively want to help. I was a young person, I was very young girl. I obviously wasn't a threat to anybody. So it was a little easier for me than it might be you know somebody else. But it was easy because they understood Hey, this girl just needs some help. She's in college. Then when I got in the door, I knew my product backward and forward. Nobody was gonna beat me not rainbow, not Kirby, nobody.And gotta get in the door first, how to getin the door first. And it's not about the product that gets you in the door.We have a lot in common. In college, I sold soap to get through my daddy Sona soap factory and these three packaging soap. So my dad's like, Hey, you want to stay in college? I'm going to drop you off about 100 pills of soap. And you're gonna have to repackage and shut up and go sell them door to door restaurant to restaurants to sell $5 gallons 25,000 gallons of soap. And you're right. That's why people hired me was because of the soap. They felt sorry for me because I was a broke college kid hustling and they appreciated it very much. So it wasn't the soap I was selling. They were they knew my story right? Just made me think of that. Love it. What do you think? Let me just say this first, I want to get your opinion on it. So guys, when when you're talking about your nobody hires you because you have a real estate license like that just gives you the legal right to collect money. They hire you because of how you practice your real estate license. But like she said, You got to get your foot in the door first. And nobody's remembers who's a real estate agent unless you're always out creating content or you have a brandy of something that they remember you by so people don't hire you for what you do that how you how you do it. How do you identify one's brand and let me just tee you up with an example. I'm a agent 33 years old been in the business for three years. I work for Keller Williams. I'm just a salesperson chasing a check. What do you mean, I have a brand. I don't have a brand. I'm working a job. I'm trying to make my ends meet here if you my kids, brand, Keller Williams has the brand. How do you answer that?I would answer Keller Williams does it does have a brand but it's not yours. And you come at life with your own story with your own unique points that differentiate you from everybody else. So when we look at where do you start, we have a process that we call our 3d freedom formula because once you figure this out, the world is your oyster right? It does give you freedom and is called define develop and display and we can go into that in a minute. But I did like the first part of what you're asking here belongs in the Define space and that Define Phase. Because what you're doing is you're taking a look at two things when you're trying to define your brand. And you're taking a look at okay first of all, who is it you're trying to attract? Because that is truly important if you say well, I just want to you know, sell sell a home or to anybody who fogs a mirror. We'll get out of this business because that's not going to get you very far. That's a that's, you know, a 1,998,000. Right? So what you got to do first is define who it is you're trying to attract? What is important to them? What are they seeking? What phase of life? Are they in? What lifestyle? Do they want all a lot of those things, then you take a look at yourself and you say, Okay, what is it about me that makes me unique? What things that are different about me that also appeal to that person that I'm trying to attract. And so that's kind of where you put the basis of your brand. It has to meet those two criteria, it has to be both important to your ideal customer, and unique to you in the marketplace. And so once you determine what that is it really like that's the starting point. And I think it's you your brand, at first glance has to be enough to just kick open the door for somebody to say that looks interesting. Let me learn more. Or even better yet, that looks interesting. But it's not for me. That's perfectly okay. Brands are great brands are polarizing. You are not for everybody. Right? So I don't know if I answered your question there. Butum, two questions. You're right. The problem and people have tried to cater to everyone, you're not the jack of all trades. You're not God, you're not perfect. I don't ever try to be because you resonate with zero. But I also think you can't fake your brand too. So for example, like I get one of the things I always get questions, oh, I want to trust me. And when I was in real estate, I'm 22 years old, I got my license was doing a keg Stan seven days before I found myself walking down Michigan Avenue in a suit, work in a new job, like a graduate college awesome shit happen fast and like, oh my god, what the hell just happened. And trust me at that point years old, of course, I want to sell million dollar properties. But folks, you know, like I only start selling higher end properties to my friends start making more money, period. That was it. It wasn't I can't I couldn't pick my brain. I couldn't just plot myself at that time into the luxury market, because I had nothing to do with luxury. So people have to also in real estate, would you agree that people have to like also be true to whom they are naturally before you can't pick your brand, God's picked it for you already, all you can do is embrace it and scream it from the damn rooftops.Couldn't agree more with that. It's what we call authenticity. And that authenticity. I mean, it's not like you're creating your brand from the ground up. But I also want to say what's interesting is a lot of people say your customers will decide your brand. I say that takes too damn long. It takes too long. And innocence that is correct. Right? That that because that's the authenticity coming out in you and your customers will know either you're a kind soul, you're very approachable, you're very action oriented, you're there's certain characteristics about you that formulate that brand. But what if you could say okay, here's the essence of me, based on that. This is really what I want to be known for. And you can create that create what it looks like sounds like feels like and, and that's what we call your brain preceding you. That's when you send a video to somebody introducing yourself and introducing yourself as hey, I'm the lifestyle um, your lifestyle locater. Right, that's who I am. I know this lifestyle and Whistler British Columbia better than anybody else. This is what I do every day, and my videos are about this. And all of those things. And and that's authentic. And it's also drawing in the kind of people who are seeking that type of lifestyle. So, so you're absolutely right, the authenticity is a big thing. But you can also create your brand as well create what you want it to look like, instead of waiting three years for your customers to finally tell you what your brand is. I don't agree with that.Totally. I remember. I it's funny. So I had a guy we brought on today. And he had like a cartoon character. And I was telling him the story about in 2012 when I switched into a cartoon, and I start calling myself the Chicago real estate dude. And people are like, You're nuts. You're crazy. And I'm like, I don't really care. I'm burned Dallas, either at work, or it's not. But what gave me the confidence to do that was because I averaged my last 10 clients. And there's a reason why I became beer guzzling drinking buddies with all of them. It's because we all attract like people. So whether you guys want to admit it or not, you have a brand, you just have to learn what it is, and embrace it. And but you can't be scared either to like, be it and it won't work. You have to have a theme. Like for those of you that we create video content for somebody, we build your branding strategy off of your theme of who it is, if you're servicing your military, I'm focusing on the top three military friendly neighborhoods, name my shows called salute some. If I'm focusing on I'm pcse, right people PCs going into a market if you're a dad or a mom that focus on schools, focus on kid friendly stuff. like you are the brand, like don't overthink the, the whole aspect of it, it's usually would you agree? It's usually what you're doing on the weekends?You absolutely would because who you are as a real human being you can never hide and you shouldn't want to write it because I don't want to be somebody on Facebook or Instagram or Tik Tok, that I'm not when I'm sitting with my family at dinner. I don't want to be somebody different. Do you show different things? Yes. I mean, in the content that you show is different things. But you're the same person. And they should see that all the way through, you know, and I'll give you a case in point. So and I also heard you say this on a on a podcast, and I absolutely loved it. When you said people do not remember the boring professional things. They remember the personal things about you. So a lot of times when I go speak in front of a crowd, I wait until the very end. And I say okay, I want to somebody around here to shout out what will you remember me for when I leave this room? Do you know what they are? It's vacuum cleaner sales. And it's coming from the family of moonshiners. They remember those two things about me? Because those are the things that are interesting, right? And the fact that we do personal branding is awesome, but that's not the most interesting. That's not why they're gonna remember me, which is why it's called Personal Branding. Yeah, so so that's what makes it so unique is the pulling in those other sides of you that you want people to remember because there are a million real there are 2 million real estate registered real tours, over 2 million in the United States alone.Yeah, 90% of them don't do any business. 10% do the vast majority of it. But what are those 10% all have in common? They have a brand? Yes, theydo. They know what that is? And they they get in their lane and they stay in their lane.Why do you think generally, people struggle, it's just a real estate thing. Any referral based business. I mean, this goes for contractors, lenders, attorneys, real estate agents, any local business is really the same thing. Like the, the it's all the same stuff. People in real estate, 80% of them meet with close with the first person they meet with, but you have to be remembered. And we remember the brand. We don't remember the individual like, people always say to me, like, trust me, everyone I know knows what I do for a living. And I'm like, really well then why did fucking you just lose that $1.5 million dollar listening to little cousin Billy who just got his license.So true. I'll give you another story about this. So about seven years ago, I was on the phone with a lady and she said, you know, Tanya, I mean, every everybody. I think I'm really well branded in my area. When I walk into a restaurant. Everybody knows I'm a realtor. And I said, You know what, Sherry, that's wonderful. And you've got a great start, and I'm really proud of you. But let's say I walk into that restaurant and I say oh there Sherry, the realtor. I know she's a realtor. But you look two tables to the right. There's Mike the realtor three tables to the left. There's David the realtor. Yeah. Now who do I choose? Why do I choose that person? Who's the best fit for me? What do I remember about them? When I leave? All of those things are left unanswered if you are content with just being a realtor.Very well put. So let's say we find the brand. Okay, great. I figure out who my brand is. We name it. Some people like to come up with fictitious other people come up with their name as their brand, which is fine, right? But it's it's what's the imagery, right what the brand stands for. So I always like to say like, when we we don't do any logo, we do logos and all that stuff. No do anymore. Too much. Just really lot of videos service. But when I would do a logo, I'm like, it has to do three things. One, it's got to tell story. Two, it's got to reflect personality. And three, it's got to remind people all you do for a living, right? Because your logo and your brand is the number one most it's the most important marketing piece you have, like, I don't have real estate marketing dude without the dude. Right? Right. It doesn't even take off. Like there's no brand behind it. I don't have this damn podcast without to dude, I had to sit down and figure out what the brand was. But how do you market it? Like once you have it? And once you define define it, how do we bring attention to it?Okay, so there's one word that will answer all that. Everywhere. Everywhere. Yeah, we call it Brandon fusion. So, so stop, stop projecting it and be it. Okay, so so so I'll give you a great example. And she's actually works in Michaels office and she's a young young lady who came in into his office as an intern and she's been here about five, six years now she runs now, she is runs three divisions of his company and if $4 million in real estate last year. She watched us put together brands on brand face for a few years. And then she when she got her license, one of the first things she did, came to us and said, I want to brand because she had seen what it had done for other other people. And so when we started to pull her brand together, she was a young, beautiful, super sweet military spouse, she and her husband had just gotten married, he was going to be in the military for at least the next couple of years. She wanted to help first time homebuyers. She wanted to help people in the military. And so for most of the people in our program, you are correct. Some people just kind of use their brand, their name for their brand. But we really like to add that extra, what we call a brand identifier, because your brand is your name is not necessarily what differentiates you. What differentiates you is is what we call the brand identifier. Now, you might call it a tagline or slogan, but her brand identifier is American Dream agent. And so she became the American Dream agent. And when I say she became the American Dream agent, this girl is the American Dream agent. So everything that she does, she does she considers her brand colors red, white and blue. She considers who she's talking to, she considers how she contributes how, you know, any kind of involvement in the community. Every single thing she does down to every single gift she gives to a client everything it is from the American Dream agent. And so it's just being that brand more than anything else. And and you know, and if you take a look at that American dream agent, a lot of people expect a brand identifier or slogan or tagline like real estate marketing dude, right? They expect that, to say everything about who you are the why that everything the whole story needs to be wrapped up in a logo or a name. Nonsense, forget that. of it. What that needs to do is command attention from the very beginning. It just needs to say what's that? Right? It needs to evoke a question, tell me more, what's that? I want to learn more about you. And that's really all it can do. You can never expect three or four words to communicate an entire brand. But as you Case in point of what you do the video marketing, infusing that brand and all of those videos and being that brand and all of those videos. Over time, people will begin to learn more about what you stand for. But that's a good like shot in the arm. Right?I love that. So let's tie this in. Let's tie the video stuff in and she mentioned something about gifts, which is really cool. You have to look at your brand. Or let's switch gears. If you go into a restaurant to go eat. There's a couple different restaurants that we could choose for. Let's say I'm really hungry and it's noon. But I only have half an hour and I'm going to eat tacos. That's what Mexicans do eat tacos. That's my favorite. If I'm in lunch hour, like right now and I have to run I gotta run to the taco stand on the street. I only got 20 minutes. I'm gonna eat that tacos. Good. Tastes really damn good, right? But if I'm hungry, and let's just say it's 435. And then some of the dudes here in the office are like, Hey, let's go out to grab a bite. Well, we're probably going to go to this other place down the street. That's grand margaritas, going to tacos, both are going to fill my my belly. But I'm looking for a different type of experience. Right? So it's yes, I'm eating but I'm going to look for a different experience. Now. The reason why I'm going to the other restaurant is the ambience I want to be served. I want to get margaritas, I want to get margaritas with 18 I want to watch the game a little bit I want to enjoy and spend 45 minutes with my family. But what I'm really looking for is the experience. So I like to tell people's like your brand identity is like the menu for your restaurant. Right? And it's like the drinks you serve like when restaurants go out and they actually go if you guys watch Vanderpump Rules I'm I'm a fan. Okay, don't make fun of me. But Tom and Tom right now are creating a new restaurant. And part of the restaurant they have to create is a drink menu. And they can't create the drink menu because they haven't figured out what their mission statement is for the restaurant yet which means you have to that's what your brand is so she's what she's saying here and she's getting all these awesome things I want you guys to pick up on this because when you once you identify your brand you have to live it out and that's in the experience you provide. Okay, that includes right now it's the end of the year So an easy way to give people stuff right? What would a let's take the American dream girl What does she get for her clients is like a Popeye gift or something like that like a gift like that? It would just give out once a year.Yeah, I think I don't I don't know if she does anything for Christmas specifically but I know she does for New Year's she does her own private labels on champagne that are red, white and blue big you know fireworks surprises the American Dream agent label,probably big big marketing event. Fourth of July Memorial Day, Veterans Day,unfortunately, I wish I had it here. I don't have it handy. But she puts little flags out in three different communities that she farms. And she puts them out with her card attached to them beautiful is very beautifully done. But the flags about probably a two foot flag, it's not a little dinky thing. She she really goes all in on that. And she has definitely gotten business off of that.So let's say I wanted to create a video series for her I would create a buyer bootcamp that I've created seller bootcamp, which would just price it would just be strategies on that if I would create a video series I'm talking about PCs seen in around Fort Benning. I'm talking about the top three neighborhoods near Fort Benning, I'm talking about what you need to do on a military budget, the top five neighborhoods PCs veterans move to, but that's just content, building the brand, but you can't create the content until you first identified the brand. Otherwise, it doesn't stick.Okay, bravo. Because, because that is the biggest challenge that we find with real estate agents, they begin to market before the brand is built. And and you really need to understand to build that brand. First know what it is you are communicating. There's a big difference between building a brand and promoting a brand. Yes. And so you've got to know what it is you're putting out there before you it's kind of like, why would you pack all your suitcases and go stand by the door and think I'm going on vacation? But you don't know where you're going? How do you know what to pack? Right? So or how much money to take, or who's going to go with you or how you're going to get there? You? You know, that's what's missing a lot of times, and that's why people cry and complain and whine about marketing doesn't work. Right? It does work. Videos are the number one marketing tool right now by far there's no question. There's not even anything close to it. Other than podcasts, videos, podcasts, right? Sometimes both in one, right? So you need to know a direction before you just go all crazy, which is why I love what you guys do it you go into it with a direction and a theme and a purpose. And there are so many people who don't do that.You have to be smiling in the content you create. Otherwise, it doesn't like I'm sure the the gal we're talking about here at American Dream. Trust me, guys. I guarantee you she's snapping photos of her placing those flags on social media. I guarantee you she's doing stories and reels about it. I guarantee you she's capturing different stuff around there, which is just micro content. But it's very hard to determine what to create when you first have it. So that's around. Part of that reason though. I'm going to blame the gurus I hate the gurus like the gurus You guys suck. Because teach people to go out there and chase a bunch of leads and do a bunch of old school vacuum cleaner salesman shit, that doesn't work anymore today, unless you have a brand.That's actually what I had to learn the hard way. That's where I had to develop one along the way. And then later when I got to the radio world, I realized, hey, that's what I just did. I just, I just developed my own brand. Now I'm gonna go help all these other people do the same thing. Because I learned from them. You know, I learned from those that went before me. If we're not learning, we're dying. So, you know, I learned from everybody I've learned from you today.I think there's a good way to think of yourself when it comes to content creation as your brand spokesperson, you're just the host of your own show. The guy for our examples, easiest one, he's diners, drives and drives his theme as grease pit food for dudes, diners, drives and drives is the show. He's the host. You're the host, you name a show, and then you that determines how you create content. And that way you never run out of stuff to say, but you should never run out of things to do just by you know, some people aren't gonna videos, be honest. Either cost, you'll be too scared. Or you just don't know how to schedule a demo with the real estate marketing, do WWW dot real estate marketing do.com Schedule a demo Big Blue Button. Or I don't know, I don't know what it is. But it doesn't mean you can't build a brand. But you do have to create content. I don't think you can build a brand without content. What's your opinion?No. Well, in my opinion, is this. You can build the greatest brand in the world. It's kind of like setting up for this elaborate birthday party in this gigantic Victorian mansion is perfect. All the forks are in line everything super shiny. They're earning the lipstick stains on the on the wine glasses. You did not send out the invitations and tell people here's the party here's what's going to be there who's going to be there the music, the food, everything. That's your content. You can't have a party without the content.And today folks, you're in the business of content creation. If trust me if someone's if you're not marketing your network someone else's I guarantee you we said it earlier is 2 million real estate agents out there. And your your network juice has been infiltrated every day not only other agents like in your guys's market, you got the ibuyers You got not Zillow anymore, but you still have open door, you have all the alternatives you have Nokia vz, knock it all of these companies have way more money than you guys do. And trust me, they're in the business of building their brands right now to steal that attention away from you. And the only way you're going to ever compete back is by having your own brand because where you will win is the relationship you already have with the audience you already know. That's what big tech interruption none of those people will ever be able to infiltrate. And I'll give you guys one more example of this. And I'm gonna do a giving back brand. What's the take the same thing? So here's how you here's an unfair competition. Let's just take the American girl girl, okay, I guarantee you she has a near and dear heart. What if we created a program for her called salute? And every time she had a closing 10% would go towards the Wounded Warrior Project. Sorry, you don't stand a chance. Come compete with me next time. Go home. Fuck off. I won.She would do it. And she would feel the same way. I know her. Yeah. I love that idea.You can't compete. You cannot compete. No, you can't.It's standing behind your word to you know, it truly is. And and Mike if I'm if I may I like to address something that you asked you asked why why aren't people doing this? Why don't they schedule a demo and hit that big blue button? Why don't they do more video? Why aren't they doing content? And I think that having done this for so many years and and walking CEOs into a studio, where they're like shivering and wondering what on earth they're going to do, right? It's like, make me do it's like I'm gonna make you rich. So I'm justgonna shut down and take notes.Just do what I say. Right? Yeah. Wouldn't it be nice? But But I think it's a lot of that is just intimidation. And I think we were as a society, we're raised to be very modest people, we're, you know, we still have guilt when we have, you know, when we make more money than somebody else, there's a lot of guilt going around in the world. And there's a lot of modesty. And those are great things to a degree to a degree, they ground us, right. And I think a lot of people feel like, well, if I come out here, and I develop this brand, or if I start doing all of these videos, then people are going to think I'm arrogant, narcissistic, egotistical, that all I care about is my face on another billboard, or whatever it is. And what I say to people is you need to, that's it. That's definitely an antiquated way of looking at things. You need to think of it. As we tell people. We don't this is not about Look at me, look at me, this is about look at what I can do for you. And if you approach it with that kind of spirit, that this is not about me being on video, this is about me helping people, like whoever like like soldiers, like first time homebuyers, like people that have lived in their home for 35 years, and don't know what to do with all that stuff that they need to move out to go into assisted living, right. And there are some real situations out there where people need your help. And if you can express to them why you're the person to help them. Not only does that genuineness come out, but your competitors will never never win. They'll never win against Real, true intent. And I think when you look at it that way, the videos don't seem so daunting. Yeah.Well, it also at the same time, if you truly believe in your heart, that you're the right person for the job, it actually becomes your obligation to scream it from the rooftops. If not, you're a dick. That's just the truth of it. Right? Like I think I'm one of those people for fucking video right now. Like, you don't want to do video with me school? No, I'm just joking. Um, listen, I can help you like I just I'm screaming it from the rooftops. That's why I have this podcast. But I don't feel like I'm selling you anything. You don't have to hire me if you don't want to. But I'm here if you do, right and it's remind, remind, don't tell, get out of the salesmanship, like Quit hitting them right over the head with your damn lockboxes. No one wants to buy or sell real estate. So they're the time to buy or sell. But that doesn't mean you stop communicating with them. Quit being a salesperson chasing the check and start building a brand and a long term. This is a business you're an entrepreneur, you cannot run a business without having a brand. And yeah, that's all I got.No, I love it. And I think I love your approach because I feel I always every time I listened to you, I feel like it's so refreshing. It's like, it's like, okay, stop the nonsense. You know, this is what's really happening. If you need to do this. You can do it with me. You can do it by yourself. You can do it with somebody else, but you need to do it period and I'm the guy you need to do it with. Right because because I know these things, and that genuineness comes out, you know from you. And I think that obviously no doubt is you know, real estate marketing dude. The dude is like, Okay, I'm a laid back guy. I'm intense. Right. But I'm also laid back I'm easy to get along with, we'll go out and have a beer after this. But let's get, let's get moving on these videos right now, because this is gonna change your life. Right? That's how I see the dude.Yeah, trust me, there's a lot of people don't like to do it either, like, great, you know, like, I guess I'm not, I'm not supposed to get along with everyone, and neither is anyone else out there. But I guarantee you, I have a lot more attention than my than some of my competitors. So, you know, it's, it's my job like, so it's my obligation. This is awesome, awesome show, why don't you go ahead and any other closing tips you want to add or anything else you want to mention?No, I just want to say you know, it, it truly is it comes down to one thing, unveiling your inner star. And I think that everybody has a star inside of them. I don't care who you are. And a lot of people will come into our program and say, well, there's nothing really special about me, I don't know, good luck, if you can find it. And I say nonsense. First of all, that's your first problem, right? You need to understand that there truly is there's more than one, we just have to figure out which one we're going to lead with. So there is an inner star inside of you. I think it's you, you deserve getting it out there. And not only that, it's not all about you. Okay, it's about your clients, because the people you set out to help they deserve to have somebody like you to help them. And I love what you do. And thank you for everything you do. I appreciate you having me on this show very much.Appreciate it. Why don't you tell everyone where they can find you, folks, if you guys are looking, if you're stuck on figuring out what the hell your brand is, give them a call called Brand face. I'll give you the website right now. And when you get done with that you come visit me put you on the map, Portugal had Donya tell him how to find youwill work in tandem. Alright, so the main website to learn more about us it's brand face star str.com. And then if you are sitting there thinking, Hey, I just want to talk to these people I'm in I know enough, go to discuss your brand.com and we'll jump on the phone with you and have a chat with you about exactly what it's going to take to get you where you deserve to becool. And folks make an investment in your brand. Like do it. There's no you can't, you can't start a restaurant without building out the restaurant or creating a menu and you can't start a bakery without getting your recipes. You can't start a store without picking up inventory and then naming it so like you have to look at that with your business like you cannot start a real estate business without first identifying how you're gonna practice real estate business so don't be a salesperson chasing a check be someone that serves first and you only do that you have a brand so awesome show love it. Thank you folks for listening another episode of real estate marketing Do feel free to follow us on all our social channels YouTube, Facebook IG and subscribe to the show. We appreciate you guys each and every month and if you need any help with your video marketing please give us a ring seven are not seven so not give me my cell phone number real estate marketing dude.com real estate marketing do.com But my cell phone number is 773-988-6599 to go shoot me a text we have an answer it and talk you into video. Appreciate you Tanya Have a great week and it looks like I'll be doing a show with you guys at the end of the month here to be cool so appreciate you awesome show and you guys take the advice you had here there take action you got 30 days to plan out next year. Do it. Peace everybody. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule a time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

The Paper Outpost - The Joy of Junk Journals!
Video Podcast Season 1 Episode 1: My Dirty Little Junk Journal Secret! :)

The Paper Outpost - The Joy of Junk Journals!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 7:11


Video Podcast Season 1 Episode 1: My Dirty Little Junk Journal Secret! :) I love making journals handmade journals, Junk journals, vintage journals, Victorian journals, fabric journals, laced journals, journals for art, journals for writing, journals, journals, journals. And yes more journals :) My name is Pam and come on over to The Paper Outpost on Youtube , & my Etsy Shop! COME FIND ME AT :) ETSY Shop: https://www.thepaperoutpost.comINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thepaperoutpostFACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ThePaperOutpostThe Paper Outpost Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/ThePaperOutpost/The Paper Outpost Podcast!: https://anchor.fm/the-paper-outpostAMAZON STORE: https://www.amazon.com/shop/thepaperoutpostPINTEREST: https://www.pinterest.com/thepaperoutpostTWITTER: https://twitter.com/thepaperoutpostYOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/ThePaperOutpostPaper Outpost Merchandise Store!: https://the-paper-outpost-2.creator-spring.com/

Word Podcast
Sex In The Sixties - let Peter Doggett be your guide

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 39:35


Peter's been on the pod before talking about the Beatles and Crosby Stills Nash & Young, and he's just published a fascinating account of the ‘60s sexual revolution, a time when a new and unimaginable freedom collided spectacularly with the hand-wringing Victorian values of the media. We talked to him at the West Hampstead Arts Club about Mick Jagger v Mary Whitehouse, the Avengers, Jenny Fabian's Groupie, Bond movies, Germaine Greer, the Killing of Sister George, Dirk Bogarde, Cliff Richard as an unconvincing sex symbol, Jane Birkin, Michael Caine in Alfie, John & Yoko, the concept of ‘Kinkiness' and the pop records that sailed close to the wind. @Peter_Doggett Growing Up: Sex In The Sixties …https://www.amazon.co.uk/Growing-Up-Sixties-Peter-Doggett/dp/184792428XSubscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world - alongside Early Bird access to WIYE live tickets!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ye Olde Crime
Can You Crack the Cramp-Word? Everyone Dies in Sunderland

Ye Olde Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 65:05


Lindsay and Madison are joined by John, Claire, and Gareth from the Everyone Dies in Sunderland podcast to see if they can decipher what a couple of Victorian slang terms mean. And the tables get turned when Lindsay and Madison are given some local slang to see if they can figure out what's being said.Listen to Everyone Dies in Sunderland wherever you catch your podcasts.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/yeoldecrime)

Green Room On Air
Michael Gene Sullivan of The San Francisco Mime Troupe

Green Room On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 81:50


The Tony Award-Winning SAN FRANCISCO MIME TROUPE Debuts a NEW Activist Adaptation of the Dickens Classic as a Radio Play A RED CAROL  An Activist Adaptation of the Dickens Classic Written and Directed by Michael Gene Sullivan Begins streaming FREE on Fri. Nov. 26, 2021 - Jan. 9, 2022 (donations accepted) For the first time the SF Mime Troupe presents a Holiday Audio offering with a worker's take on the Dicken's classic in A Red Carol. With its particular blend of activism, comedy, music, and passion the SFMT's labor-oriented adaptation of Dickens "A Christmas Carol” reclaims this revolutionary classic as a story not of the redemption of one bad man, but as the never-ending story of all of us making the world a more progressive place. In A Red Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge is a corporate banker, busy foreclosing on the hapless masses. Bob Cratchit and his beleaguered family live in a chilly tent in an anonymous homeless encampment. The ghost of Christmas future sports a flowing black robe of taped-together trash bags and plastic sheeting. Tiny Tim dies. At least that's how the SF Mime Troupe's resident playwright, Michael Gene Sullivan, has reimagined A Red Carol for the troubled 21st century. A Christmas Carol” has become “the closest thing to a modern myth that we have. It wasn't much of a stretch to place Charles Dickens' Victorian classic into today's Covid-19 world. And that, as Sullivan would be the first to tell you, is exactly the point. Dickens' novella was written in the heart of the “Hungry '40s,” a time of labor unrest, unemployment and starvation across 19th-century Europe. The gap between rich and poor was wide - and getting ever wider. With the limited release of A Red Carol, the San Francisco Mime Troupe hopes it will become an annual alternative holiday tradition for the workers of the world. For more information visit www.sfmt.org or call 415-285-1717.  CRITICS SAY “The play, in its skewering of America's social ills—racism, corporate greed, the plight of the working class—is so funny, and so well acted by the Troupe, including longtime ensemble members Velina Brown, Keiko Shimosato-Carreiro and Brian Rivera , that it comes to life even without visuals and minus the appreciative laughter of a sun-soaked audience. The second half of “The Mystery of the Missing Worker” airs Aug. 29.” SF Examiner - July 6, 2020 ​“As a spoof of serials past, it's solid, quick-witted, and sets the bar high for subsequent episodes, which will satirize other radio-drama templates—namely adventure, horror, and science fiction." KQED - July 8, 2020 _____________________________________________________ MICHAEL GENE SULLIVAN Actor, Director, Teacher, and Resident Playwright Michael Gene Sullivan has performed in, written, and/or directed over thirty SFMT productions. As an actor Sullivan has also appeared in productions at the American Conservatory Theater, Californian Shakespeare Theatre, Theatreworks, San Francisco Playhouse, Denver Center Theater Company, The Aurora Theatre, The Magic Theatre, The Marin Theatre Company, Lorraine Hansberry Theater, San Francisco Shakespeare Festival, Berkeley Repertory Theater, and San Jose Repertory Theater. Michael has been a principal actor in Mime Troupe plays since 1988, performing in Freedomland, Ripple Effect, For The Greater Good, 2012: The Musical, Posibilidad, Too Big To Fail, Making a Killing, GodFellas, Doing Good, Showdown at Crawford Gulch, Mister Smith Goes to Obscuristan, Eating it, Damaged Care, Soul Suckers form Outer Space, Revenger Rat, Escape to Cyberia, Offshore, Social Work, I Ain't You uncle, Back to Normal, Rats, Seeing Double, and Ripped Van Winkle. His directing credits at SFMT include Schooled, For The Greater Good, Red State, Veronique of the Mounties, 1600 Transylvania Avenue, Killing Time, and Coast City Confidential, Michael has also directed for the San Francisco Shakespeare Festival, African American Shakespeare Company, Mystic Bison Theater, and Circus Finelli. Michael is a Resident Playwright for the Playwrights' Foundation, a 2017 Resident Artist at the Djerassi Arts Center, from 2009 - 2016 he was a blogger for The Huffington Post, and Michael has been SFMT's Resident Playwright since 2000. 

Break It Down Show
Carter Wilson – the Dead Husband

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 61:52


Carter Wilson – the Dead Husband - Carter Wilson is the USA Today and #1 Denver Post bestselling author of seven critically acclaimed, standalone psychological thrillers, as well as numerous short stories. He is an ITW Thriller Award finalist, a four-time winner of the Colorado Book Award, and his novels have received multiple starred reviews from Publishers Weekly, Booklist, and Library Journal. Get Carter's latest book The Dead Husband at Amazon For more on Carter Wilson, head to his website at Carter lives in Erie, Colorado in a Victorian house that's spooky but isn't haunted…yet. He's so method. He talks to ol Pedro about when he figured out his voice, writing “dark shit” (his own words), writing his blog and newsletter, his goals such as a book per year, and much more in this fun convo. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Writing the dark stuff Domestic suspense, that is Read The Dead Husband   ​Similar episodes: Bill Mankins  DW Wilber  Mark Sullivan  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

You Made Me Queer
Episode 31: Paul Bellini Makes Me Queer

You Made Me Queer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 53:22


Writer and actor Paul Bellini (Kids in the Hall) talks seafaring hunks, Victorian slang and the lighter side of pup play on our MID-SEASON FINALE. Brought to you By: The Sonar Network

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Vic Ombudsman backs amended pandemic bill, despite 'pretty poor' consultation

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:37


The Victorian government is on the home stretch of replacing the current state of emergency powers with it's contentious purpose built pandemic legislation.

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
Plum and Other Puddings

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 33:29


Tonight, we'll read all about old-fashioned puddings from “The White House Cook Book” written by the house stewards in Washington DC, and published in 1887.The original “pudding” was formed by mixing various ingredients with a grain product or other binder such as butter, flour, cereal, eggs, and/or suet, resulting in a solid mass. These puddings are baked, steamed, or boiled. Depending on its ingredients, such a pudding may be served as a part of the main course or as a dessert.Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner in Britain and British-influenced cultures.Despite the name of "plum pudding", that particular pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word "plums" as a term for raisins.— read by 'V' — Listen Ad-Free on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talk Murdy To Me
CEO of Businessing Your Business

Talk Murdy To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 93:59


Today we dive into the case of suspected (by us and anyone else with a brain) serial killer Pam Hupp. Next we pop across the pond to good ole' England for the Victorian era murder of Mrs. Julia Thomas.

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
How Sharp Is The History Of Scissors? with Teresa Collenette

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 57:59


This week's episode is a cut above the rest, as we explore the history and cultural significance of scissors. Join Jonathan and design historian Teresa Collenette as they talk ancient spring scissors, Victorian-era chatelaines, Jonathan's go-to hair shears, and Teresa's incredible collection of more than 100 pairs of scissors. Teresa Collenette is a design historian, curator and collector. Teresa has curated several exhibitions with the Fashion and Textile Museum, including The Secret Life of Scissors in 2018 and Beautiful People: The Boutique in 1960s Counterculture, which is up now! You can follow her on Instagram @thehouseofscissors. Want to learn more about scissors? Check out these resources: Handmade scissors in Sheffield at Ernest Wright Scissors being made at Ernest Wright Scissors maker William Whiteley & Sons, Sheffield Scissor Collecting MagazineDial M For Murder The Secret Life of Scissors exhibition in The New York Times Find out what today's guest and former guests are up to by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN. Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com.Check out Getting Curious merch at PodSwag.com.Listen to more music from Quiñ by heading over to TheQuinCat.com.Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook.

Mark and Pete
Can we survive without Pantomime?

Mark and Pete

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 9:16


Simply put, the answer is yes. You should definitely go to a pantomime!Commonly known as “panto,” pantomime is a kind of comedy show that is a crucial part of British Christmas tradition.Pantos are intentionally silly and over-the-top. All the characters wear outrageous costumes and the actors typically dress in “drag,” meaning that the men dress as women and the women dress as men. No matter what the story is, there is always a bumbling hero, a clumsy villain, and the promise that the hero will fall in love.Audience participation is vital. The most famous line in all pantos is, “He's behind you!” The audience yells this at the hero, trying to warn him that the villain is about to pounce on him. The hero always replies, “No he isn't!”The tradition of comedy theatre at this time of year goes back to the Victorian times. It was similar to modern day pantomime with an emphasis on comedy of the ‘slap-stick' kind. But its origins were in political satire that poked fun at the establishment, often using characters that had many similarities with well-known and disliked nobles, or even the monarchy.This is less the case now with pantomime taking modern stories and well-known tales and putting a humorous spin on them.We need such escapist nonosesen more than ever.

Commuter Bible
Daniel 10-12, Isaiah 45

Commuter Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 25:58


Daniel 10 - 1:14 . Daniel 11 - 5:23 . Daniel 12 - 15:40 . Isaiah 45 - 18:53 . Contrary to Victorian era illustrations and Michelangelo's chubby cherubs in the Sistine Chapel, angels are always described as glorious and fear-inducing.  Whenever someone sees a vision of an angel in Scripture, the person who sees them is dumbfounded and crippled by fear. In most instances, the angel has to tell the person not to fear and followed by supernatural help to recuperate. Such is the case with Daniel, who receives an interpretation of his vision from an angel. There's far too much to talk about concerning the historical fulfillment of Daniel's vision, but the prophesy moves from near future to the end of days when it is mentioned that the king will do whatever he wants.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by Bobby Brown, Eric Williamson & the Christian Standard Biblefacebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

PreserveCast
A 1970s British Kitsch Christmas at Kiplin Hall with James Etherington

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 24:15


Christmas at a historic home normally conjures up images of a roaring Victorian fireplace or perhaps even an early 20th century Christmas with tin toys and pleasant smells coming from the kitchen. But, what about the kitschy charm of the 1970s? On this week's PreserveCast we're revisiting with James Etherington, the Director of Kiplin Hall – a historic site in England which interprets the ancestral home of the Calverts, one of Maryland's earliest and most prominent colonial families – to hear about their very 1970s Christmas and what we can learn from the way we celebrated exactly 50 years ago. James previously joined us on PreserveCast to talk about how Kiplin Hall, a historic site in the UK, addresses the story of the Calverts, one of the earliest European families in Maryland. When Kiplin Hall reached out about their unique 1970s Christmas celebration – it seemed the perfect fit as we here in the states' begin to grapple with preserving the vestiges of that decade as it becomes eligible for preservation 50 years later.

Overdue
Ep 505 - Fingersmith, by Sarah Waters

Overdue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 64:15


This contemporary Victorian story is chockablock with twists and turns, backstabs and broadsides, as well as Dickensian pornfiends. It also features a steamy lesbian romance between two women desperate to escape their own circumstances. We dive into what makes Fingersmith memorable, as well as where its structure overstays its welcome. Our theme music was composed by Nick Lerangis. Advertise on Overdue See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Only in OK Show
December Events in Oklahoma

Only in OK Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:29


On today's episode of the Only in OK Show, we discuss some of the fun events happening throughout the Oklahoma during December.  If you want to find something new to do this month, check out the show.   Holiday in the Ark is a brand new for 2021. This festive event welcomes everyone out to the Endangered Ark Foundation in Hugo for a special meet and greet with Santa, Mrs. Claus, elves, the Grinch and elephants. Guests will be able to feed and interact with the elephants and shop for everyone on their Christmas list.   The Endangered Ark Foundation is a private nonprofit dedicated to ensuring the future of Asian elephants in North America, providing a retirement ranch for circus elephants, and educating the public about this endangered species.   Hugo, OK started as a railroad hub in the early 1900s, was a hotbed of activity, with a vivid mix of dance hall girls, hustlers and gunfighters, a Harvey House Restaurant, and at one time, a dozen circuses wintering nearby to take advantage of the moderate climate and easy rail access. The Frisco Depot Museum in the restored former Harvey House Restaurant captures some of this rollicking past, and Mount Olivet Cemetery showcases the final resting places for rodeo greats. The cemetery also features a special area known as "Showmen's Rest," which features unique headstones and gravesites for circus performers and owners.   Pollard Theatre is a 501c3 nonprofit, whose mission is to produce professional theatre that engages and inspires Oklahoma's audiences, and contributes to the quality of life and economy of our community and state.   As Oklahoma's territorial capital, Guthrie's ongoing restoration efforts make the town's downtown area the largest Historic Preservation District in the nation. Take a trolley tour through downtown to find fascinating history, one-of-a-kind stores and more than a dozen bed and breakfasts housed in charming Victorian-era buildings, or hear the history behind local hauntings on a spooky Guthrie Ghost Walk. Discover the diverse collections of Guthrie's many museums, including the Oklahoma Territorial Museum & Carnegie Library.   At Tulsa Botanic Garden's Garden of Lights event you can escape the holiday hustle and bustle and make memories with family and friends as you stroll the Garden illuminated with colorful lights. Open Thursday - Sunday nights, 5 - 10 p.m. through Jan. 5. Every night S'more kits, hot chocolate and cider (with spiked options), beer and wine will be available.   Tulsa is Oklahoma's second-largest city, where visitors will find world-class attractions including the acclaimed Tulsa Zoo, the Philbrook and Gilcrease museums among other top cultural attractions such as the Tulsa Ballet and Tulsa Opera, lively entertainment, casinos, sporting events, dining, shopping, family fun and outdoor escapes.   The Luther Pecan Festival is a family-friendly festival with a full day of art, food, music and of course, tons of pecans as downtown Luther puts on a hometown harvest celebration. In addition to great food from local establishments, take in a variety of mobile cuisine from some of the metro's best food trucks.   Luther, OK is located in far northeastern Oklahoma County on historic Route 66, and is home to the historic Threatt Filling Station.   The Minco Honey Festival features a large arts & crafts fair, tours of the Ross Honey Company and Great Plains Cotton Gin, carriage rides, free food samples, entertainment from Lucas Ross, a kid's toy tractor pull, great local shopping and restaurants, food trucks, a honey bake-off, Santa Claus and more.   Established in 1902, Minco is known as the land of milk and honey. Minco hosts an annual Honey Festival every December. Located in Grady County only 40 miles southwest of Oklahoma City along the Chisholm Trail, this old railroad town is buzzing with rich history and boutique shopping.   2 Hip Chicks Roadshow is a traveling event show bringing you the latest in fashion, crafts, salvaged, upcycled, repurposed furniture, good ole junk and more.   Tulsa Expo Square hosts hundreds of events every year.   River Spirit Casino Resort is a multi-million dollar casino features more than 300,000 square feet of gaming entertainment with over 2,500 slot machines, 24 blackjack tables, 15 poker tables, four restaurants, and regular live music. C   The Tulsa Shootout in Tulsa, Oklahoma is the largest event for micro sprint racing in the world. Going into the 36th year of this prestigious event, many drivers dream of bringing home the Golden Driller.   #TravelOK #onlyinokshow #Oklahoma #MadeinOklahoma #oklaproud #podcast #okherewego #traveloklahoma #Attraction #events  #December #Christmas #wildwest #rt66 #elephants #plays #festival #concert #racing #trains

You're Booked
Miranda Cowley Heller - You're Booked

You're Booked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:51


This week we're delighted to present this fun and fascinating conversation with author and producer Miranda Cowley Heller! After a career in publishing and head honcho at HBO, Miranda's debut novel The Paper Palace has been a runaway bestseller, a Reese Witherspoon book club pick and is now being adapted as a TV mini-series. We talked to her about parenting in the 1970s, classic kids books, dream adaptations and naughty Victorian reads.BOOKSDaisy Buchanan - InsatiableDaisy Buchanan - CareeringMiranda Cowley Heller - The Paper PalaceSally Rooney - Normal PeopleLaurie Colwin - Family HappinessJane Austen - Pride and PrejudiceF Scott Fitzgerald - The Great GatsbyF Scott Fitzgerald - Tender is the NightMary Renault - The King Must DieMary Renault - The Bull From the SeaHarper Lee - To Kill a MockingbirdTheodore Dreiser - Sister CarrieCarson McCullers - The Heart is a Lonely HunterMark Twain - Huckleberry FinnHarriet Beecher Stowe - Uncle Tom's CabinCurtis Sittenfeld - American WifeWalter - My Secret LifeGeorge Eliot - MiddlemarchJRR Tolkien - Lord of the RingsVarious - Illustrated Fairy TalesAda Calhoun - Why We Can't SleepThe Editors - The Incomplete Framley ExaminerMario Puzo - The GodfatherGarth Williams - The Rabbit's WeddingJane Austen - PersuasionThomas Hardy - Far From the Madding CrowdStephenie Meyer - TwilightNancy Mitford - The Pursuit of LoveJoan Aiken - Wolves of Willoughby ChaseJoan Aiken - Necklace of RaindropsJames Fenimore Cooper - Last of the MohicansAlexander Dumas - Three MusketeersElizabeth George Speare - Witch of Blackbird PondScott O'Dell - Island of the Blue DolphinsFrances Hodgson Burnett - A Little PrincessFrances Hodgson Burnett - Secret GardenFrances Hodgson Burnett - Little Lord FauntleroyCharlotte Bronte - Jane EyreEmily Bronte - Wuthering HeightsDiana Gabaldon - OutlanderWinston Graham - PoldarkMM Kaye - Far PavilionsAnthony Doerr - All the Light We Cannot SeeAli Smith - AutumnJames Salter - Light YearsJames Salter - A Sport and a PastimeJames and Kay Salter - Life is Meals See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WonderBinge
45 - Sewer Yikes

WonderBinge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:42


LISTENER SUGGESTION - Primary lesson of this epsiode: you can only learn some things the hard way... at least the first time around. During the Victorian and Edwardian Eras, there were several inventions created with the intent to make life easier, but ended up cutting lives short. Thank the stars that our ancestors have learned from their mistakes. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wonderbingepod/message

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
Introducing: The Gilded Gentleman

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 2:10


Presenting a new history podcast produced by Tom Meyers and Greg Young from the Bowery Boys: New York City History. If you're a fan of Downton Abbey, The Age of Innocence or Upstairs Downstairs, then we know The Gilded Gentleman podcast will be your cup of tea. You're cordially invited to join social and culinary historian Carl Raymond for a look behind the velvet curtains of America's Gilded Age, Paris' Belle Époque and England's Victorian and Edwardian eras. The food, the music, the architecture -- the scandals! The first two episodes arrive promptly on December 7.  Please RSVP by subscribing to The Gilded Gentleman wherever you get your podcasts -- so you don't miss an episode.      Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

parkrun adventurers podcast
Episode 262 - All the good things

parkrun adventurers podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 69:30


This week TOC returns to guest host with Mel and brings an update on palm22. We've got big announcements, both good and bad plus roving reports from Sarah @ Burswood Peninsula, Tracey @ Bargara and Grette @ Copper Trail parkrun. It's a good week to be a Victorian.

Antiques Freaks
201 Epergnes

Antiques Freaks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:12


Exquisite. Precarious. Whimsical. Join us as we explore the history of epergnes, from Georgian and Regency dining to Victorian flower-arranging and mid-century modern Fenton mistakes.

Shedunnit
Dorothy L Sayers Solves Her Mystery (Queens of Crime at War 6)

Shedunnit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:10


Why did she stop writing detective fiction as WW2 approached? This is the sixth and final episode of Queens of Crime at War, a six part series looking at what the best writers from the golden age of detective fiction did once that period came to an end with the start of the Second World War. The Pledge Drive gift offer is now over, because we have smashed the 100 member goal already! But if you'd still like to join the Shedunnit Book Club members, and get access to the special Christmas livestream I'm doing with my husband on 15th December just for members, visit shedunnitbookclub.com/join. There are very minor spoilers in this episode for the eventual outcome of the Harriet Vane-Peter Wimsey plot line. Books referenced: — Busman's Honeymoon by Dorothy L Sayers — The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers — The Floating Admiral by Members of the Detection Club — The Documents in the Case by Dorothy L Sayers and Robert Eustace — Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L Sayers — Gaudy Night by Dorothy L Sayers — The Zeal of Thy House by Dorothy L Sayers — Dorothy L. Sayers: Her Life and Soul by Barbara Reynolds — He That Should Come by Dorothy L Sayers — Begin Here: A Wartime Essay by Dorothy L Sayers — Whose Body? by Dorothy L Sayers —Thrones, Dominations by Dorothy L Sayers and Jill Paton Walsh — Striding Folly by Dorothy L Sayers — "The Haunted Policeman" and "Talboys" in Lord Peter Wimsey Investigates by Dorothy L Sayers — The Wimsey Papers by Dorothy L Sayers — The Man Born to Be King by Dorothy L Sayers — The Mind of the Maker by Dorothy L Sayers — Clouds of Witness by Dorothy L Sayers — Strong Poison by Dorothy L Sayers — Have His Carcase by Dorothy L Sayers — A Presumption of Death by Dorothy L Sayers and Jill Paton Walsh — Women's Fiction of the Second World War: Gender, Power, Resistance by Gill Plain Thanks to today's sponsor: — Dear Holmes, a mail-based Victorian mystery game. To give this as a gift or to join for yourself, visit dearholmes.com and enter promo code Shedunnit to get $5 off your first order. To be the first to know about future developments with the podcast, sign up for the newsletter at shedunnitshow.com/newsletter. Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/dorothylsayerssolveshermysterytranscript. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice. The original music for this series, "The Case Of The Black Stormcloud", was created by Martin Zaltz Austwick. Find out more about his work at martinzaltzaustwick.wordpress.com. Links to Blackwell's are affiliate links, meaning that the podcast receives a small commission when you purchase a book there (the price remains the same for you). Blackwell's is a UK independent bookselling chain that ships internationally at no extra charge.

Square Mile of Murder
92: Amelia Dyer & Victorian Baby Farming

Square Mile of Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 51:54


Taylor's voice is still on the mend so we're bringing one another one from our archives, this time from way back in June 2020! This week's episode digs into the details of the Victorian practice of baby farming and the woman who killed over 200 babies in her care. We even have a fun discussion about all the different ways people in the Victorian Era were exposed to and ingesting poisons! Listen in as we discuss baby farming and the infamous Amelia Dyer, a truly terrifying and despicable character with an equally terrifying photograph! FURTHER READING: https://blogs.bl.uk/untoldlives/2014/09/arsenic-cyanide-and-strychnine-the-golden-age-of-victorian-poisoners.html (Arsenic, Cyanide and Strychnine - the Golden Age of Victorian Poisoners) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arsenic_Act_1851 (Arsenic Act 1851) https://www.crimemuseum.org/crime-library/serial-killers/amelia-dyer/ (Amelia Dyer "The Reading Baby Farmer") https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_farming (Baby farming) https://www.ranker.com/list/the-deadliest-baby-farmers-in-history/cat-mcauliffe (The 9 Deadliest Baby Farmers In History) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amelia_Dyer (Amelia Dyer) ----------------------------------------------- https://square-mile-of-murder.captivate.fm/listen (Like the show? Give us a rating and review!) Join our Patreon: https://patreon.com/squaremileofmurder (Patreon) Check out our merch store: https://squaremileofmurder.store/ (Square Mile of Murder Merch) Get our newsletter: https://squaremileofmurder.com/newsletter (Newsletter) Send us an email: info@squaremileofmurder.com Follow us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/pg/squaremilepod/ (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/squaremileofmurder/ (Instagram) https://twitter.com/squaremilepod (Twitter) https://squaremileofmurder.com/ (Squaremileofmurder.com) Music provided by https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary?feature=blog (YouTube Audio Library) and https://artlist.io/Taylor-2050697 (Artlist.io) Support this podcast

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik
Clay Clark Provides the Proof that the COVID-19 “Vaccines” are Satanic

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 31:03


Clay Clark, the mastermind behind the ReAwaken America Tour, returns to share some practical tools that every American can use to wake up their family and friends to what's really going on. During the course of this conversation, he provides the evidence to support his belief that The Jab is nothing short of Satanic.Sponsor: Freedom First Coffee is the official coffee of The Jeff Dornik Show. Using only organic coffee beans and fire-roasting them in an antique Victorian era coffee roaster, it actually tastes like FREEDOM. Use code JEFF for 10% off at http://freedomfirstcoffee.com. Save even more on auto-ship.

Everything Is Awful Forever
Working It Out

Everything Is Awful Forever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:17


As we approach Black Friday, join Jess and Philippa as we dive into one of the many ways in which labour has been exploited in the name of profit. It's time at last to work out what they really did in the Victorian workhouse.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/Awfulforeverpodcast)

We Make Books Podcast
Episode 72 - Vampiric Influences on Marsupial Child-rearing (Writing Influences)

We Make Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:52


We Make Books is a podcast for writers and publishers, by writers and publishers and we want to hear from our listeners! Hit us up on our social media, linked below, and send us your questions, comments, and concerns for us to address in future episodes. We hope you enjoy We Make Books! Twitter: @WMBCast  |  @KindofKaelyn  |  @BittyBittyZap Instagram: @WMBCast  Patreon.com/WMBCast Episode Transcript (by TK @_torkz) [Upbeat Ukulele Intro Music] Rekka: This is We Make Books, a podcast about writing publishing and everything in between. Rekka is a published Science Fiction and Fantasy author, and Kaelyn is a professional genre fiction editor. Together, they'll tackle the things you never knew you never knew about getting a book from concept to finished product, with explanations, examples, and a lot of laughter. Get your moleskin notebook ready. It's time for We Make Books. Kaelyn: My sister just finished reading the Grisha trilogy. And she was, of course, more of a fan of the Six of Crows after reading that. But one of the things she messaged me- she was like “yeah, the ending was kind of whatever, but it is very clear that this person was reading Harry Potter when they wrote this.” R: [laughs] K: And I said “Yeah, that definitely comes through.” She gave me this whole list of like, book two is basically just The Order of the Phoenix, and the end battle with all of the Grisha and the stand downs, all this stuff, and I was like “Yeah, I guess you're right.” To be honest with you, I kinda limped through the end of that book, I wasn't thinking about that too much. But anyways, it got me thinking about influences in writing and how writers are influenced and how in some cases that's something that we're like “Yes! You can tell that this writer was influenced by such-and-such, and they weave it so beautifully into their story.” And sometimes you get my sister calling me to complain about how she basically just read Harry Potter with Russian witches.  R: So was your sister accusing the author in any way of plagiarism? K [overlapping]: Not plagiarism. R [overlapping]: As a reader I'm curious, like how the reader perceives it when it's that clear when someone's been influenced.  K: I should've asked her before we started recording this - and this is something we'll get to in there - I couldn't tell if my sister was accusing the author of laziness or unoriginality.  R: Okay. K: That's one of the things I wanted to talk about today as we're talking about influence. What is influence, how are writers influenced? How's the best way to leverage and utilize that influence? And when does influence cross into the realm of the negative? When is it no longer praise worthy? When is it, for instance, lazy, contrived, unoriginal, or, in worst case scenario, bordering into plagiarism?  R: Yeah, because that's a tricky thing - if we always wrote a completely original story, you wouldn't have something like Joseph Campbell's The Hero's Journey. Because we wouldn't have a set format that a story would take. So when somebody accuses a fantasy book of being “Star Wars with elves,” well, Star Wars was a Greek epic in space.  K: Oh, I would've called it a Western. R: Okay fine. [overlapping] I mean, people have called it a Western. K: [overlapping] I mean, both work. Both work. [laughs] R: Yeah, but I'm just saying, The Hero's Journey, Joseph Campbell is, he's studying the ancient literature, so that's why I decided to say Greek. But if we could always write something that was completely original, there would be no way to study literature with comparisons and contrasts. There are always going to be parallels between stories written in a similar culture by people who are writing in a similar society. Like, a hundred years apart, you would not necessarily detect the influence of Harry Potter in the Grishaverse. But they're not written a hundred years apart - it was maybe a decade, probably not. K: I'd be curious to go back and try to time out when these books were being written, and when that coincides with the release of the latter half of the Harry Potter books. But anyways, real quick, I'm big into definitions, so let's talk about definitions. Influence is the capacity of something - a person, a situation, a circumstance - to have an effect on another person, on the development of the situation, on the behavior of someone or something. Or, in some cases, even the effect itself. You'll notice there that influence is kind of framed as both proactive and reactive. You can influence something, or you can be influenced. We're talking today about being influenced.  R: And we're not talking about Instagram.  K: [laughs] Oh, God. You know what's funny? I went through this whole thing and I didn't even think about the concept of influencers, and now I'm depressed. R: Because you didn't or because now you are? K: [laughs] Because now I am. R: Okay. I'm sorry. I take it back, I didn't say anything.  K: [laughs] So, writers don't write in a void. It's sort of a reverse Heisenberg principle, which is “whatever you study will also change.” Whatever you read changes you, or whatever you consume changes you. So, writers don't write in a void. If you took a baby and raised them in a box with no interaction with the outside world whatsoever, well, to be honest I'm not sure they'd be capable of putting together an interesting story because they've had no influence.  R: You know what's funny, that's why I don't have kids. Because I thought about this kind of thing frequently in high school, like “what would happen if you raised a child in a padded room? And you never interacted with them, and they never saw another human?” So you're welcome, world, that I have not raised any children. Those children are welcome because I did not abuse them in such a manner.  K: [laughs]  R: But it's good to hear that someone else has had these thoughts. Although, Kaelyn and I did originally bond over the fact that we're terrified of the idea of raising children.  K: Pregnancy is just - R: And pregnancy. It's not for everybody. I recognize that for some people it's a beautiful process, but for Kaelyn and for me, it is body horror.  K: Yeah. Yeah, I mean, there's an entire nother skeleton in your skeleton. [laughs] R: Yes. And it's growing. [overlapping] It's getting larger.  K [overlapping]: It keeps getting bigger. R: And if you've never seen an MRI of a baby's skull, there's a lot of teeth in there.  K: Yeah, also they're squishy. R: Well, the MRI doesn't necessarily show that. It just shows all those chompers, waiting. Waiting.  K: Yeah. There's a lot of extra teeth in there.  R: Okay. [laughs] Where were we going? K [overlapping]: So for our writing- R [overlapping]: A child raised in a padded cell would probably write a different kind of story than somebody who's been exposed to Harry Potter.  K: Yeah, and if you take out every third word, it's their plan to destroy the world with their laser beams.  R: This reminds me of the book The Artist's Way. I think it's a month-long program designed to improve your creativity and I think maybe even to come up with… it's like NaNoWriMo but it's very classist and elitist.  K: [laughs] R: But the first thing it asks you to do is swear off all media for the month. K: Okay. R: And I put the book down right there. K: [laughs] R: Because I was like, that is literally impossible. I was in art school at the time, so I could not promise that I wasn't going to have to look at media. And also, this was written in 1992, before anybody was logging onto the internet daily.  K: Yeah, it was much easier to walk away from media for a month.  R: And I was trying to read it, I think, in 1999 or 2000, and it was even easier, at that point, to walk away from media than it would be now.  K: Yep. R: But, yes, it's called The Artist's Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity by Julia Cameron. And I imagine that Julia Cameron has a very nice life and is able to unplug from media whenever it is convenient for her to do so. K: Well, in 1992 that meant “turn off the TV.” R: Right, it meant “don't pick up a newspaper” or, you know. K: Yeah. R: In 2016 they re-released a 25th anniversary edition, and I can't imagine they did much to it, but it really probably needed a lot of re-examining to - K: Yeah. It's -  R: - to even be relevant in 2016, I can't even imagine.  K: Now, was the purpose of this to do a detox of influence from your life? R: Yes. That is exactly what it was, to avoid influence for the month and find out what you write, not what the world around you influences you to write. But I think in her case, she was treating world influence and media and current events as a negative.  K: Mhm. R: And I would argue that if you are responding to the world around you, then the politics of your creativity is going to be more relevant and more well-informed. And I think that's a good thing.  K: Well, yeah. And this is something that we can certainly talk about with influence - current influence versus longevity. You'll see a lot of writers that go out of their way to not incorporate things that might later be considered an anachronism in their writing, so that they're not influenced by that.  R: Mhm. K: So that's another good example of influence. So, let's get the elephant in the room out of the way here: influence is not copying. As we were talking about, writers don't write in a void. You're absorbing everything that you interact with and consume every day, and, whether you know it or not, it's influencing and incorporating itself into even your way of thought.  R: You hear that? So if you were following an Instagram influencer, do not copy everything they do.  K: [laughs] Yes. Please don't. But, again, it's the reverse Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Whatever you're consuming changes you. There are entire PhD programs dedicated to studying and understanding the influence that certain parts of literature have had on larger parts of literature. Influence is not a bad thing. In many ways, it's a scholarly pursuit. Go to any Wikipedia page for any sort of well-known novel, and I guarantee you there's going to be a section in there that says “Influence.”  R: Oh yeah, yeah. K: And it's going to be a couple paragraphs talking about the history of the genre, or the subject material leading up to this. Influence is, apart from being an important part of writing, an academic pursuit. So all of that said, we are talking about influence in a very positive way here. We're saying it's great to read things, and to consume and internalize them so that this can help enrich your writing. Something that you really enjoyed, something you thought was maybe unique, or something that you were like, “Oh, what if I applied that to a character that I already have?” That's a good thing. I think it enriches your writing, I think it shows layers and growth, etcetera. K: That said, sometimes influence goes the opposite way. [laughs] Sometimes you've read something and you're like, “this is terrible,” or “this was such a ridiculous ending,” or “I hated that this happened.” And that might compel you to go through your manuscript and scrub absolutely everything having to do with that. The whole point is that whether you mean to or not, you are going to be influenced by external components in your writing. You could never read anything else, and you will still be influenced by things in the world just by existing in it. But we are talking more about influences in writing here, so we'll stick with that.  R: And we assume that you are being influenced by books because, as we say, if you want to be a writer you need to also be a reader. So we're telling you, go read widely in your genre, and part of that is that we expect you to absorb some of those elements and some of those styles. On a conscious level, we want you to look at the covers, we want you to look at the themes and the tropes and everything like that, but we also expect that on a subconscious level that's going to influence you and hopefully make you a better writer within your genre. K: And if you read a lot within your genre, you will start to notice trails of influence yourself. If you read a lot of - especially maybe a really niche kind of fantasy or science fiction genre, you're going to be able to chronologically put some things in order, like “Oh yes, I can see that book A came out at this time, and then three years later this book came out, and there are certainly elements from book A that I can see coming through in book B even though they were written by different authors.” K: So, I was telling Rekka before we started recording–I went down a little bit of a rabbit hole with this, because for reasons unbeknownst to me and possibly the influence of vampiric elements, I, for whatever reason, picked up my copy of Dracula off the shelf and I've just been flipping through random parts. And then we were talking about doing this, and I was like, vampires are a really really good example of influence through literature. They're something that has always been around - the Mayans actually had a god that was basically a vampire, even though they didn't acknowledge that, bat wings and all. And there's something that–I think you'd be hard pressed to find a significant culture of any sort of longevity from history that didn't have some sort of mythological being that displayed vampire-like qualities. K: In the late 1700s, early 1800s, though, there was the vampire craze in western Europe. There were a lot of short stories and things written about vampires, even though they've been codified as part of the mythos for a long time. But even then, they were sort of holding up the folklore and traditions of vampires–they were reanimated corpses, they were bloodsuckers that came out at night to drain people of their very lifeforce. In some cases, actively rotting bodies, hunched back and demonic looking, claw-fingered and fangs and scary eyes. A lot of this was the traditional folklore. Then we start getting into sexy vampires. [laughs] R: [laughs] I was just going to say. K: [laughs] And there were a couple specific novels that did this. In 1819, John Polidori published a short story called The Vampyre, and this was the first one where the vampire was more of a character rather than just a mindless bloodsucking dead creature. R: Right. This was a vampire worthy of Bela Lugosi's eyes.  K: Oh, no one's worthy of Bela Lugosi's eyes. [laughs] R: You know what I'm saying. K: I know, I'm teasing. So, it was very popular. So then, a lot of vampire short stories and short novels were coming out where the vampires were getting a little more sophisticated, and all of these were drawing influence from Polidori's short story. It was a very successful short story. So then, in 1872, an Irish author named Joseph Sheridan [with a mock-French accent] Le Fanu - I'm assuming it's French which is why I did that accent - published Carmilla, which was a fantastic novel. And this is, I would say, probably a turning point where vampires are unabashedly being associated with a sexual element at this point. It has a not-very-subtle vampiric lesbian... stalking, I guess, going on through this book. It's fantastic, it's not that long. If you ever get a chance to read it, it's great. K: And then of course, a couple decades later in 1897, we come to Bram Stoker's Dracula. I should, by the way, say that Bram Stoker and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu were both Irish. Ireland had a shockingly strong folklore of vampires. In some cases they were fae, which is a whole different category of supernatural elements in Ireland, and in some cases they were just reanimated corpses. Anyways, then we get Bram Stoker, who of course gives us Dracula. And this is considered the preeminent vampire guideline bible, if you will. I think when most of us - granted, Rekka and I are older millennials, but - R: [laughs] How dare you? K: I think the first vampire we heard of was Dracula.  R: Mhm. K: I actually remember, growing up, that there was a kid in my neighborhood who just thought vampires were called Draculas.  R: Yeah. I think that was probably a… Not that I thought Dracula was a noun, but I never expected Dracula to look the same way twice.  K: Yeah. Yeah, Dracula was just like - Dracula, vampire. They were interchangeable.  R: Mhm. K: And that's how synonymous this became. Now, look at all the stuff that lead up to this in order for us to get the seminal vampire novel of the time. Stoker was absolutely influenced by all these novels that came before. Something else that's really interesting that Stoker was influenced by is the sexual component of vampires in this. Like I said, that came through hard and strong. Well, maybe I should say most popularly with Carmilla. Here's something else really interesting about Stoker: he was probably gay. It's difficult and inappropriate to go back and retroactively categorize people these ways, but there's a lot of very strong… I'm trying not to say “homoerotic,” I'm trying to say… There's a lot of very - R: Queerotic? [laughs] K: Yeah, there's a- R: There's not a queer person in the universe that will argue this point with you.  K: Yeah. R: I think the LGBTQIA+ are very, very ready to claim vampirism.  K: [laughs] Absolutely. And that's a great part of the influence of this. Some of Stoker's best friends were Oscar Wilde and Walt Whitman. Actually, I believe Stoker either started writing or finished writing Dracula right after Oscar Wilde was imprisoned, and they were exchanging letters while he was in prison.  R: Mhm. K: You have to keep in mind, this was the mid-Victorian period, there's very repressed sexuality, but there was also this burgeoning underground masculine sexual component to it, where everyone - R: See people, this is what happens when you don't let people reveal their ankles.  K: Yes. Yes, exactly. [laughs] So, one of the things through Dracula is this secretiveness, this sense of penetration. Not only the fangs in your throat, but a lot of them get into your head and screw with you that way. This was not something we saw in previous iterations of vampires, who were gross, for lack of a better term. [laughs] R: [laughs] Yeah.  K: So, this influence comes through in a lot of different ways. And as I'm talking more about Dracula I can say like, “Okay, well there's a lot of very… what we would now consider queer sexual elements that we see in Dracula, coming through with the relationship between Dracula and Johnathan Harker and Dracula and Mina.” But there's also the influence of other writers who were starting to make vampires actually people, rather than Nosferatu-style monsters.  R: Right. K: Dracula, I would argue, then in turn really helped influence the next generation of common horror. At that point we're getting into H.P. Lovecraft and existential horror. Lovecraft, who, by the way, wasn't quite a contemporary of Stoker's, but was very aware and actually wrote some reviews of his writing. He didn't really like a lot of it. [laughs] I would argue that that was probably part of what influenced Lovecraft: it was a hard turn from these very sterile, white-marble, gothic horror novels to a lot of raw, and ocean, and dark mold, steam spaces.  R: You can literally write the sentence “I can't describe this.” and people are like “Woo, that is scary.” K: Yeah exactly. So much of Lovecraft is like, “it's too horrible to describe!” but it's like “Yeah, but can you tell me anyway?” [laughs] R: You mentioned earlier that an influence can be “I don't want to do this.” K: Yes. R: So, here we are. This is Lovecraft saying  “Well, Stoker wasn't racist enough for me, so I'm gonna write my own thing.” K: [laughs] Oh, God, Lovecraft. It's so hard to read some of that stuff. [sighs] Psychologists would be better at trying to figure out Lovecraft's influence than me, I'm certainly not going to. To say the man had issues is an understatement. He was more of a collection of neuroses formed into a human. Anyways, this is just something I was thinking of as a pretty-easy-to-track set of influences. We go from vampires being very loosely defined and having inconsistent characteristics based on what region the stories are being told in, to some stories published that codify certain rules about them, to their evolution from “Eww, it's a rotting, blood-drinking corpse” to “Huh, maybe I'd like date that person.” R: [laughs] Maybe I would like those lips on my bare neck! K: Yes, exactly. Which is a pretty interesting leap that really did not take that long to get from point A to point B. But all of this was just building on influence and influence, after that.  R: Yeah, all you needed was for one author to pick it up and go, “What if vampires, but sexy?” K: [laughs] Yeah. You know what's funny, we have this sort of modern-day depiction of Dracula as a very suave, debonair… what's the word I'm looking for? High-society type person.  R: Sophisticated.  K: Sophisticated, yeah. In the novel, he is those things a little bit, but he is very off-putting and he is... weird to look at, I guess I should say. R: Yeah, there's that first scene where Johnathan is eating in front of him, and you definitely get a vibe that this dude is not right.  K: Like, he's talking about his hairy ears. [laughs] R: [laughs] Yeah. K: His weird skin, he looks ill, as if when he's making his way to the castle all of the peasantry crying and pressing crucifixes into his hands wasn't red-flag enough for him. R: No, no, no. It's just a quaint little village, this is the thing they do. There is the aspect of vampirism having the power of glamour, and I think this is probably the most effective display of it. The way that he's describing Dracula, there's nothing attractive about this man, and yet. K: He's very drawn to him. R: Mhm. K: And he wants to help him. R: As is Mina. [laughs] K: And Lucy, and all of them. So yeah, vampires. Great example of influence in literature over the course of a relatively short time, shaping something that we now consider to be commonplace.  R: Mhm. K: We've even narrowed it down farther. One of my favorite things about Dracula is, there's nothing that necessarily says he can't go in the sun in that book.  R: Right, right. [laughs] K: It's just that he has no powers after noon, I think, or he loses his powers at sunrise. So he can be outside, but he's just a regular guy at that point.  R: Mhm. K: So, obviously things continued to change and evolve there, the “no going out during the day” is held over from the much older vampire myths. Anyways. So, all of that said, how do we see influences in writing? When can we pick these out? One of the obvious is the story itself, the plot. Maybe some story arcs. R: I would argue that people tend to pick it up faster when it's a similar setting. When it's the worldbuilding, I think people notice it more. K: Okay. R: And I think, again, plot arcs and character arcs are things that we do have to recycle.  K: Absolutely. I think it's rare these days to see completely original, never-before-imagined setting. In terms of world-building, both the world itself, and in my notes here I put “world systems.” Anything from the way magic functions, or government functions, or society functions. There's only so many ways you can organize people, essentially. [laughs] So there may have been something that you came across and you're like “Oh, that's interesting. What if I did this instead?” The characters- anything from the archetypes and tropes of characters to their storylines and their redemption arcs, or even just the relationships, how they interact with each other. How the characters are broken out either into family groups or groups of friends or hierarchies within that. I think we see that a lot. With plot, we can kind of go back to what I said at the beginning of the episode: sometimes there are things in there where it's like, “this is clearly Order of the Phoenix.”  R: Mhm.  K: [laughs] We're just seeing it presented a different way. R: And again, an agent loves this, because you can say “this is my list of story comps.” And if they're successful books, the agent can use that to sell the story and then the publisher can use it to sell the book. K: Mhm. R: So even though sometimes it sounds like we are poo-pooing derivative work, if it comes across as fresh, nobody's going to poo-poo that you have a great list of comps to start with.  K: Definitely, yeah. R: And I would like to note that that is the first time we have said “poo-poo” on this podcast. I feel like that should be marked. K: That definitely needs to be denoted for posterity. R: And now it's been said three times. K: [laughs] Then there's two other areas of influence I'd like to talk about that are a little harder to quantify. One is style. And this comes more to writing style, and how you're presenting your story. For instance, being influenced by the way the author just writes in general, their style, I will harken back to one of our favorite examples here. If you've read Gideon the Ninth it is a very very unique writing style, not something I've ever come across before and I'm sure there are a lot of people who are currently in the process of attempting to imitate it; I don't know how successful they're going to be, but I bet they're trying. R: And then there are others who are influenced by it to say “Oh, I can let loose like that?” K: Yeah. Exactly. Or, “I can try something completely different that I didn't think anybody would be interested in, but if they're willing to do this then maybe they would.” Point of view or viewpoint in the book - if you've read the second book in the Locked Tomb series, Harrow the Ninth, a lot of that is written second person. The Broken Earth series, large portions of that are in second person. R: Well, the Broken Earth series, the amazing thing is it's written in all three. K: Yes, yeah. R: So if you haven't read that I can't go any further, I do not wanna spoil that, even though it's been out for years, the culmination of that book is so good that I refuse to ever spoil it. But go read it, if you haven't read it, for sure. It's a big one - K: It's a lot - R: But it is so worth it. I listen to it on audio, and I can recommend that too. K: Yeah. So both of those books have instances of strange, or - R: Disorienting? K: Disorienting's an excellent word. I remember reading Harrow the Ninth and texting Rekka and going like “Is this like this the entire time?” R: And my only response is “Did you get to the soup yet?” K: [laughs] And it was a mentality shift, and once I just was like “Okay, I fixed my brain to a point that it can accept and read this now.” But another style quality is dialogue. How you incorporate and how you use dialogue in your writing is something that I think is very easily influenced by how other people do that. This can also start feeding into the character influence there as well, how the characters talk and interact with each other is very influenced by dialogue. So then the last kind of nebulous part that I'd like to talk about, and this is a little bit different but it is worth bringing up, is historical influence. There are a lot of books and stories that are nominal retellings of either one or a series of historical events. I'll use Game of Thrones here as an example, and spoilers for anybody who hasn't read or watched - R: I don't care if we spoil Game of Thrones. [laughs] K: George R. R. Martin, well first the basis of a lot of this is the War of the Roses, which was the English Civil War. It was also called the Hundred Years' War; it was just a long, bloody, drawn-out battle of constantly changing kings and powerful families trying to get their person on the throne of England. R: And the interesting part is, it is a hundred years, so the people who started this have cast this war upon the generations to follow, and if that doesn't tell you something about where George R. R. Martin is going to be forced to take the end of the books, I don't know what will, because HBO managed to make the show take what, the war take five years or maybe ten years if that? Just the fact that it was ten seasons, right? Was it ten seasons or nine? K: It was eight seasons. R: Okay, so at most, because of the children aging on the show, it was a nine-year hundred-year war. So if George R. R. Martin is following intentionally the framework of the Hundred Years' war, none of the characters that you're rooting for are going to make it. Just in the nature of aging. K [overlapping]: And there's - you can go through and just read a brief history of the Hundred Years' War, and you'll be able to identify characters in there. Like Tyrion has some very clear Richard III vibes to him. But then there's other historical events and groups of people that he took and pulled into this. The Lannisters are such a clear parallel of the Borgia family that it's almost difficult to know that and read this and know what happened to the Borgias. The Red Wedding was based off of a famous event in Scotland where something very very similar happened to that. Some Scottish lords were invited to dinner by a Scottish lord with English leanings, and he killed all of them, to get in good with the English. R: After serving them bread. K: After serving them bread, exactly. But again, historical influence - the concept of guestright is very important in most cultures and especially in Scotland. So there's so many examples of people taking strong influence from either actual historical events or folklore and mythological events, like the Trojan War and things like that, and incorporating it into their writing. There are a lot of writers who decide “I'm gonna do a modern interpretation of such-and-such,” because maybe - for instance the Trojan War, they're very interested in classic Greek mythology and decide “Hey, that's a great story to tell; I'm gonna set it in a different place but still tell the story.” K: So that's some elements of influence, and before we wrap up here, let's address the thing we started to talk a little bit about but should definitely round out. When is influence just becoming copying, at a certain point? This is hard. Because it's really about finesse and originality. It's about taking something that you liked and putting your own spin on it, so to speak. If you're just re-creating the same story and sticking your characters into it, you're going to get called at best lazy, at worst a plagiarist. R: Yeah, there are plenty of books out there - and I have one to include in the list - that are retellings of a classic story. The problem is when you don't approach it as “how do I make this my story?” K: Yes. I'm gonna use young adult genres here because it's a little bit newer and easier to trace through this, and I'm not going to name books in this apart from the first series that I will name because that author is wildly successful. The Mortal Instruments trilogy - you could probably say series at this point, there's so many books in that world at this point - by Cassandra Clare, is one of the early and premiere urban fantasy young adult novels. This was copied so many times. Some of the authors were a little more original with where they were setting it, some of them were a little more original with where they were putting the characters or who the characters were, but the magical teeenagers who are part of a secret society that protects humanity was everywhere. ‘Cause these books were a runaway success. They were very original; no one had really seen something like this before. The Mortal Instruments created so many tropes that I can't and will not try to name them. R: And I think it's, part of that, somebody loves a book that they experienced so much that they want to hold onto that feeling forever, and one way to do that is to create something completely inspired by that same world. And this is where fanfic comes from, and fanfic is healthy, and it's a great way to express feelings of “I don't want to leave this book world.” But when you take it to a publisher and you say “This is going to sell really well because the other one that already did it sold really well,” as they say - don't follow trends in publishing, because you're five years behind. K: Conversely, a lot of people were able to get things like this published because the market wasn't inundated with this yet. R: Right, you had to be among the first to imitate a successful book, which is why they say don't follow the trends, because you won't be among the first. There are so many people out there writing that there are easily 500 people ahead of you in the queue for the publisher slush pile. K: Yeah and I wanna be clear, the first book of this entire - I'm not joking, I think there's over 20 books within this world at this point - the first one came out in 2007. So yes, the Internet was very alive and well at that point; it was not what it is now. Writing communities on the Internet were not what they are now. But all of this is to say that there were people who just straight up copied this genre, this book in some way. Either in terms of setting, in terms of characters, in terms of the magical elements of this, they just straight up copied this and I gotta be honest with you, a lot of them were not terribly successful. [laughs] Some of them were, though, and some of them made some money off of this. R: Well, for other readers who are not writers, when the same thing happens they come out of a book series and they have to wait for the next book, they want more. K: Exactly, they were looking for more. R: This is not unlike when the animation company puts out a very similar cheap animation to the latest Disney release. I worked at Blockbuster, and I saw this all the time. You'd have a big animated Disney release, and you'd have this tiny company out of who-knows-where that put together an animated copy, and they rely on parents and grandparents to grab the wrong one. This is not like trying to give the kids more of what they want, this is like “If we are gonna be next to this Disney movie on the shelf, someone will pick us up by accident and we will make money.” K: Well I always remember because a lot of Disney's classics, like the Disney renaissance movies, they were all like public domain stories. So they would just make that and they could get it out on VHS faster than Disney could - R: Yeah, they were made direct to video. K: Because Disney left it in - like everyone knew what the upcoming Disney movies were. So if you knew there was gonna be Aladdin, well, the story of Aladdin is public domain, you start making Aladdin right away. [Brief interlude of car noises] R: I literally believe that Mike's apartment is built on an overpass. K: No, just next to a road with a lot of people who drive like idiots. R: Well that was like a garbage truck, but anyway. K: That was a motorcycle. R: That was a motorcycle?? It sounded like it had at least 16 wheels. K: Yeah. R: Alright, sorry, so Aladdin - K: So everyone knew what movies Disney was making well in advance, and of course these would take years after they were announced to actually be finished and put in theatres. So if Disney says “we're making Aladdin” - R [overlapping]: Before it's in theatres! K: - well then, another small studio can also make Aladdin. The animation isn't gonna be great but then Aladdin's gonna be in the theatres and then a week later the imitation Aladdin are going to be on shelves, and grandparents are gonna go “Oh my grandchildren want to see -” R: Or “They've been talking about this movie and here it is on VHS,” and they don't know how theatre releases work and so they grab it and buy it, and they spend $18 or $15, seems like a really good deal on a Disney movie, and the animation studio makes their money back. So they do it again. K: So don't be that cheap animation studio. Don't be the person that's taking something that somebody put a lot of time, thought, and creativity into, and churning out the cheap, fast, easy-to-consume version of it. R: Yeah and I don't think, when it comes to writers - I mean I'm sure there are people out there who go “Okay this is the newest thing, I am going to behave like an algorithm and I am going to make another version of it and then release it, and I will make lots of bucks.” There are those writers that–they do that on purpose. So don't be them. But I don't think any of our audience are going to be them. And if you were thinking that that was a great way to make a successful book, let us correct you. But if you are inspired by Gideon the Ninth, or by Mortal Instruments, or anything like that - take the time to develop a story just like you would a completely inspired out of left field story, and take the time to put it together in a considerate and thoughtful and unique way, and then we approve. You get our approval. We're not promising to buy the manuscript, but we are approving a heartfelt influenced work, not an imitation that is intended to ride the wave of success of someone else. K: Exactly. R: Now when we're saying “copying,” are you talking about the publishing houses out there who literally lift the copy and try to sell it on Amazon, and just do it again and again and again as they get caught and cancelled? K: [laughs] No, no. Copying has, I think the way I'm defining it, more to do with not adding any creativity or original elements of your own, just saying “I liked what this person did, I'm going to do it too.” And listen - it's a fine line. One of the things that's really interesting about plagiarism is it's either very obvious - somebody had too many parts in a book, a novel, a poem, that are clearly just from another book - or, you've gotta go through a whole process of proving that somebody had access to something you were working on and directly lifted elements from that and put it into their book. Plagiarism is either very straightforward or very difficult. R: And, with plagiarism, they have plagiarism checkers on the Internet; I think a lot of teachers appreciate that because they can't read everything. So they can run an assignment from a student through a plagiarism checker, and that plagiarism checker can do its best with whatever it has access to in its database to catch - K: Plagiarism checkers are very good now, by the way. R: But we're talking word-for-word plagiarism. Sometimes what we refer to in the publishing world as plagiarism is actually trademark infringement. K: Yes. R: And that is difficult because if you write a story with Harry Potter in it, but you change his name and all the words are your original words, how do we run a plagiarism checker against that? K: Yes. So it's like I said, either very easy or very difficult to prove plagiarism; there's rarely a middle ground there. R: Although there are books that have been caught lifting a paragraph or two, from different books. So like the entire thing is plagiarized, but it's plagiarized from different sources. K: Yeah. You see instances of plagiarism tend to show up more in academic and scientific publishing than in fiction and genre-writing. It definitely does happen, though. R: Yup. Because, again, there are people out there who are confused about what is allowed and what is advisable in writing.  K: There are some really significant seminal works in American literature especially–I'm sure globally but I just happen to know the American ones–that are just plagiarized in certain places. And a lot of them were written in a time where it wasn't as easy to check this, so we- R: Find out much later, when it is easier, how much that was widespread. K: Yup. Exactly. R: There are nefarious people. I was referring, in my last statement, to the innocent, naive new writer, who just does not understand what is and isn't acceptable. Or, they didn't intend for it to go widespread, and they wrote a little thing for fun and end up finding out that they are not welcome and doors are being shut in their face because they crossed the line and it got noticed. K: Yeah, exactly.  R: That's the thing, a little baby writer learning about things the very hard way. It's a shame. That would be someone that you would hope would find a mentor who would guide them in the right direction before that kind of thing gets shot in their face. But with a pen name you can be reborn, as long as you reiterate yourself in better forms than the previous mistakes that you made. K: Yeah, and plagiarism should be very easy to avoid. R: Mhm. K: If you're looking at somebody else's work and saying “I wish this was mine, I'm going to make this mine,” don't do that. You should never be copying text from somebody else. Everything should be written on your own.  R: Yeah, don't go, “How did that person write it? I loved that so much.” Well yes, you did, but that's not your voice. So write it yourself. And I would say that if you close a book and you go, “Oh, I'm so inspired to write,” and you sit down and you start writing right away, don't publish that. [laughs] K: Yeah. R: There is a process to developing your own ideas even if it's mostly internal and you never grab a notebook and work out the story itself. The process of coming up with your own ideas is not “I just read this, I'm going to go write because I'm inspired and I'm going to finish that book before I do anything else.” [laughs] That's probably going to be a very derivative, if not plagiaristic, book. So don't do that. I always recommend you sit with your ideas for a while before you sit down and write it.  K: Absolutely. I mean, that's important in general. R: Carry it around like a baby, pretend you're some kind of marsupial and you have your twelve-day gestation period but you still carry that little joey around for a while before it's ready to enter the world. That's kind of the process that I recommend for a writer. K: [laughs] So there you go. Be a marsupial. R: Be a marsupial. The opossum tail has its own fingerprints which are unique to it, so there's that. Grow a prehensile tail and commit crimes with it so that you can be tail-printed later. Alright, I don't know where this story's going.  K: I like it, I like it. R: Yeah, I like it too, but it's not a good way to wrap up an episode because all we can do is just stop. [laughs] So, if you have any questions about plagiarism or inspiration, or you just want to share your inspirations and influences, you can @ us on Twitter or Instagram @WMBcast. You can find us on patreon.com/WMBcast, and we will have some more marsupial facts for you in two weeks. K: [laughs] R: [laughs] Thanks everybody for listening, and I hope this was a helpful discussion. Kaelyn and I have to go sit at a desk and figure out- have we fulfilled the promises that we made to you when we started this podcast? Because we feel like we've just kind of been indulging ourselves in what topics we bring up, so if you feel like, “Hey, you said you were going to cover this, and you never covered that,” definitely tell us that too, because we want to go back to our mission statement and make sure that every once in a while we give you an episode that's in line with that. So if you have input to that regard, please let us know. Otherwise, marsupial facts in two weeks! Thanks everyone!

Paranormal Punchers
Ep. 126 - Lincoln Park Zoo

Paranormal Punchers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:34


The Lincoln Park Zoo is a 35-acre zoo located in Chicago, IL that was founded in 1868 on the same spot as where a cemetery had been located. This cemetery once held the remains of 35,000 people and when the cemetery closed, they moved most of the bodies to another location, but experts believe that there could be around 12,000 bodies that remain there. Throughout the years, several bodies have been exhumed during different construction projects, with some getting put back in the ground where they were found. Because bodies have been left here and buildings built over top of them, the zoo has become a haunted hot spot.People have witnessed flickering lights and had doors slam on them. Various EVP's have been captured here, including the voice of the zoo director even though he is still very much alive. There is a floating pocket of negative energy that makes people physically sick that moves throughout the park, and several full body apparitions have been seen in Victorian period clothing. There are some that believe that the paranormal activity in the park isn't just related to dead bodies still in the ground under the zoo. There used to be a bridge going across the lagoon right next to the zoo that was dubbed the "suicide bridge" due to hundreds of people killing themselves there. Join us on episode 126 to hear about the very haunted Lincoln Park Zoo! Sources: wikipedia, illinoishauntedhouses.com, lpzoo.org, wgntv.com, 1035kissfm.iheart.com, wbez.org, karlasullivandotcom.wordpress.com, theresashauntedhistoryofthetri-state.blogspot.com/, mysteriousuniverse.org, terrordaves.com ###Follow Us:https://www.paranormalpunchers.comhttps://twitter.com/ppunchershttps://instagram.com/paranormalpunchershttps://www.facebook.com/paranormalpunchersSupport the Show:https://www.teepublic.com/stores/paranormal-punchershttps://www.patreon.com/paranormalpunchers

Terrible Book Club
The Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette and Manual of Politeness by Cecil B. Hartley *Special Guest Ken from Antiques Freaks* - Episode 125

Terrible Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:51


Ken from Antiques Freaks joins Chris for a very special Gentleman's Club episode! No girls are allowed as Chris & Ken probe the depths of The Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette and Manual of Politeness: Being a Complete Guide for a Gentleman's Conduct in all his Relations Towards Society by Cecil B. Hartley published in 1875. If you miss Paris, be sure to check out the Ladies Night episodes of Antiques Freaks where Paris replaces Ken: Antiques Freaks Episode 191 - Uranium Glass Antiques Freaks Episode 193 - Faberge Eggs Content Warnings: Our usual barnyard language, plus: Victorian-era racism and sexism.

Paranormal UK Radio Network
Paranormal Concept Show - Spirit Photography

Paranormal UK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 105:48


In the week's show Kerry, Paul and Richard look into the history and controversy surrounding Spirit Photography. Images that apparently captured deceased relatives supposedly visiting the living. But are the photos real or clever fakes? The show traces their history from the Victorian era to more modern times.

LitReading - Classic Short Stories
Three Thanksgiving Kisses by Edward Payson Roe

LitReading - Classic Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 42:55


Unlike Christmas stories Thanksgiving stories are sparse. To celebrate the season, here is the tale of a proper New England celebration combined with a classic love story.The 19th century novels and stories of Edward Payson Roe were very popular in their day. Being a Presbyterian minister, his works had a religious and moral foundation. One of his greatest criticism were the sermonly characteristics of his stories which may explain their wide acceptance during the Victorian age.

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

It had to be during the hottest time in New Orleans, a sweltering summer, but Buck Meek had his reasons. Producer Andrew Sarlo oversaw the conditions under which the band recorded Meek’s second LP, within an old Victorian home by the Mississippi River. The band recorded live to an 8-track tape machine, sans headphones. Just […]

Nightmares & Daydreams Podcast
Ep. 82: Patreon Bonus: Spring Heeled Jack!

Nightmares & Daydreams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:46


In England, in Victorian times, the people were troubled by a most curious haunting, a vicious man or devil who could leap tremendously, and often did so to escape apprehension. Take a sip of tea and join Roq and Max in the drawing room as they discuss the troubling mystery of Spring-heeled Jack! Enjoy this Patreon Only bonus episode.  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Patreon Page is live with bonus episodes & scary sleep stories. Also, you may support our pod by buying us a coffee. Caffeine power for all! And remember to subscribe on Youtube. Y'all are the ones who help us grow and we appreciate the heck out of you!  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- New fancy-pants link to everything Nightmares & Daydreams! Click for all the things! We'd LOVE to hear from you! New Merch available now!  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Please, take the quick second and rate, review and subscribe at ITunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nightmares-daydreams-podcast/id1476373753

New Books in History
Jeremy Black, "England in the Age of Dickens, 1812-70" (Amberley, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:30


Jeremy Black, who recently retired as professor of history of Exeter University, has just published the two latest installments of his series of works on writers of literary fiction. England in the Age of Dickens, 1812-70 (Amberley, 2022) is an outstanding discussion of the worlds in which the most famous "Victorian novelist" engaged - even as it questions that reputation by reminding us that Dickens was often writing about an older England. In The Importance of Being Poirot (St Augustine's Press, 2021), Black turns his attention to Agatha Christie, showing how she sustained the moral framework that drove her detective fiction even as the world changed, sometimes in fundamental ways, around her.  Crawford Gribben is a professor of history at Queen's University Belfast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Jeremy Black, "England in the Age of Dickens, 1812-70" (Amberley, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:30


Jeremy Black, who recently retired as professor of history of Exeter University, has just published the two latest installments of his series of works on writers of literary fiction. England in the Age of Dickens, 1812-70 (Amberley, 2022) is an outstanding discussion of the worlds in which the most famous "Victorian novelist" engaged - even as it questions that reputation by reminding us that Dickens was often writing about an older England. In The Importance of Being Poirot (St Augustine's Press, 2021), Black turns his attention to Agatha Christie, showing how she sustained the moral framework that drove her detective fiction even as the world changed, sometimes in fundamental ways, around her.  Crawford Gribben is a professor of history at Queen's University Belfast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Vlad Solomon, "State Surveillance, Political Policing and Counter-Terrorism in Britain, 1880-1914" (Boydell Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:04


In 1850 Charles Dickens wrote that Great Britain had “no political police,” adding that “the most rabid demagogue” could speak out “without the terror of an organised spy system.” In his book State Surveillance, Political Policing, and Counter-Terrorism in Britain: 1880-1914 (Boydell Press, 2021), Vlad Solomon describes how Britain gradually developed a system of “high policing” during the late Victorian and Edwardian eras that contradicted Britons' popular belief in their tolerant society. As Solomon demonstrates, contrary to Dickens's blithe assurance, Britain had irregularly employed political policing prior to the 1880s. The threat posed by Fenian terrorism, however, compelled the British home secretary, William Harcourt, to create a specialized section of the London Metropolitan Police in response. This evolved into Special Branch, which subsequently found its remit expanded to include monitoring political radicals, aliens, and even militant suffragists. Yet despite their increased range of duties, the number of detectives assigned to such tasks remained limited until espionage concerns and the prospect of war prompted the government to overhaul political policing with the creation of a new agency – the future MI5 – in order to provide more effective monitoring of the political threats facing the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Law
Vlad Solomon, "State Surveillance, Political Policing and Counter-Terrorism in Britain, 1880-1914" (Boydell Press, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:04


In 1850 Charles Dickens wrote that Great Britain had “no political police,” adding that “the most rabid demagogue” could speak out “without the terror of an organised spy system.” In his book State Surveillance, Political Policing, and Counter-Terrorism in Britain: 1880-1914 (Boydell Press, 2021), Vlad Solomon describes how Britain gradually developed a system of “high policing” during the late Victorian and Edwardian eras that contradicted Britons' popular belief in their tolerant society. As Solomon demonstrates, contrary to Dickens's blithe assurance, Britain had irregularly employed political policing prior to the 1880s. The threat posed by Fenian terrorism, however, compelled the British home secretary, William Harcourt, to create a specialized section of the London Metropolitan Police in response. This evolved into Special Branch, which subsequently found its remit expanded to include monitoring political radicals, aliens, and even militant suffragists. Yet despite their increased range of duties, the number of detectives assigned to such tasks remained limited until espionage concerns and the prospect of war prompted the government to overhaul political policing with the creation of a new agency – the future MI5 – in order to provide more effective monitoring of the political threats facing the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Literary Studies
Jeremy Black, "England in the Age of Dickens, 1812-70" (Amberley, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:30


Jeremy Black, who recently retired as professor of history of Exeter University, has just published the two latest installments of his series of works on writers of literary fiction. England in the Age of Dickens, 1812-70 (Amberley, 2022) is an outstanding discussion of the worlds in which the most famous "Victorian novelist" engaged - even as it questions that reputation by reminding us that Dickens was often writing about an older England. In The Importance of Being Poirot (St Augustine's Press, 2021), Black turns his attention to Agatha Christie, showing how she sustained the moral framework that drove her detective fiction even as the world changed, sometimes in fundamental ways, around her.  Crawford Gribben is a professor of history at Queen's University Belfast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Vlad Solomon, "State Surveillance, Political Policing and Counter-Terrorism in Britain, 1880-1914" (Boydell Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:04


In 1850 Charles Dickens wrote that Great Britain had “no political police,” adding that “the most rabid demagogue” could speak out “without the terror of an organised spy system.” In his book State Surveillance, Political Policing, and Counter-Terrorism in Britain: 1880-1914 (Boydell Press, 2021), Vlad Solomon describes how Britain gradually developed a system of “high policing” during the late Victorian and Edwardian eras that contradicted Britons' popular belief in their tolerant society. As Solomon demonstrates, contrary to Dickens's blithe assurance, Britain had irregularly employed political policing prior to the 1880s. The threat posed by Fenian terrorism, however, compelled the British home secretary, William Harcourt, to create a specialized section of the London Metropolitan Police in response. This evolved into Special Branch, which subsequently found its remit expanded to include monitoring political radicals, aliens, and even militant suffragists. Yet despite their increased range of duties, the number of detectives assigned to such tasks remained limited until espionage concerns and the prospect of war prompted the government to overhaul political policing with the creation of a new agency – the future MI5 – in order to provide more effective monitoring of the political threats facing the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Into the Woods with Holly Worton
435 Chris Bedford ~ Adventures With Abandoned Railways

Into the Woods with Holly Worton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:17


I'm excited to introduce this week's guest, Chris Bedford—also known as Dumpman. I first discovered Chris and his work when I walked the Downs Link back in 2016. Chris is the owner of Dumpman Films, and he makes documentaries about disused railways in southern England. Back when I was researching my book on the Wey-South Path, I bought one of his films on the Hardham canal tunnel, and I found it really fascinating. You may know that two of my favorite trails are the Wey-South Path (which goes along a mostly disused canal) and the Downs Link (which follows a disused railway). I love exploring these bits of history, and I find abandoned transportation routes especially interesting. Outdoor adventures don't have to be about physical fitness and endurance. They can also be about exploration and reconnecting with history. I hope you're inspired to explore your area's history after listening to this episode!   About Chris Bedford Chris Bedford is an explorer and documentary filmmaker. His business, Dumpman Films, is based in Sussex and specializes in hunting out hard-to-find scenes, views, and journeys and making them available. If it's interesting and awkward, he's in there. Although based in Sussex, the material is by no means limited to Sussex. Chris makes homemade films about odd places. Abandoned railways/disused railways feature heavily; what magic there is in seeing an abandoned railway station or tunnel or other such relic left behind as a result of Dr Beeching's axe. However, wartime bunkers, sewers, canal tunnels, collapsing piers, disused industrial sites, old roads and ruined Victorian asylums crop up too. Learn more about Chris and the history of his films here. Website Facebook group: Disused Railways of Sussex   Listen To This Episode        What You'll Learn How to get access to abandoned sites How Chris turned his passion for disused railways into a small business The equipment Chris uses for filming and editing videos Some of Chris's favorite places to visit How you can get started exploring abandoned railways   Things We Discussed Okehampton reopened line in Dartmoor Michael Portillo Railway Journeys  Bluebell Railway  Beeching cuts  Meon Valley Railway  The Bald Explorer  Paul and Rebecca Whitewick videos Disused Stations website Hi8 camcorders   Related Episodes 410 Holly Worton ~ Adding a New Layer to Your Outdoor Adventures (now with downloadable transcript!) 402 Cynthia Radford ~ Do You Know How to Leave No Trace? (now with downloadable transcript!) 393 Holly Worton ~ Staying Safe in the Outdoors (now with downloadable transcript!) 383 Anne Malambo ~ How Solo Travel Can Change Our Lives (now with downloadable transcript!) 369 Holly Worton ~ Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone With Outdoor Adventures (now with downloadable transcript!)   Connect With Holly Website Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn   How to Subscribe Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via RSS Click here to subscribe via Stitcher   Help Spread the Word If you enjoyed this episode, please head on over to iTunes and kindly leave us a rating and a review! You can also subscribe, so you'll never miss an episode.

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
Entertaining Luncheons

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 45:29


Tonight, we'll read from “For Luncheon and Supper Guests” written by Alice Bradley published in 1923.“Luncheon” is the formal word for lunch, a light mid-day meal.In the Middle Ages, before electric lighting and industrialization, the mid-day meal was large and considered dinner. There was no lunch, so later in the evening a lighter meal was had called “supper”.But by the 1800s, the large meal of dinner was pushed into the evening and thus, not only was supper squeezed out, but there was a need for something to eat in between breakfast and dinner.Up until the early 1800s, luncheon was generally reserved for ladies, who would often have lunch with one another when their husbands were out. The meal was often made up of left-overs from the previous night's plentiful dinner. Beginning in the Victorian era, afternoon tea supplemented this luncheon at four o'clock.— read by 'V' — Listen Ad-Free on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Life This Side of Heaven
Stir Up Sunday

Life This Side of Heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 4:33


Did you know that tomorrow is known as “Stir Up Sunday”?  It's a tradition that dates back to Victorian times. It involves a special recipe and a family activity. But it points beyond tasty baking to all of the special ingredients that God has bought together to bring us salvation and savor the opportunities to share His mercy and love with those in our midst.

Forgotten Stories: Historical Crimes and the Unusual
Honorable Mentions: Cover with Lanolin

Forgotten Stories: Historical Crimes and the Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 11:33


Strange headlines this week include an odd natural phenomenon, baby how-to's, answers to health questions, and an unfortunate cigar fire. 

Ye Olde Crime
Can You Crack the Cramp-Word? Historical AF

Ye Olde Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 21:50


Lindsay is joined by Kyna from the Historical AF podcast to see if she can decipher what a couple of Victorian slang terms mean. Listen to Historical AF wherever you catch your podcasts.Instacart - Groceries delivered in as little as 1 hour. Free delivery on your first order over $35.Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREESupport Our Show with Tee Public Use our special URL to purchase merch and help support our show at the same time!Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/yeoldecrime)

Vaccine: The Human Story
5. Resistance and Fear

Vaccine: The Human Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:53


In the final years of the 19th century, a vast crowd takes to the streets of the city of Leicester, in an outburst of anger at the medical and political establishment. In this episode, we look at the birth of the anti-vaccination movement. With the threat of smallpox absent from our lives, it's difficult to relate to those who resisted the vaccine in the past - but against the backdrop of Victorian class conflict and new sweeping public health measures, the revolutionary new technology became interlinked with concepts of subjugation and control in the minds of many of society's most downtrodden.

In Our Time
The Decadent Movement

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 51:22


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the British phase of a movement that spread across Europe in the mid-19th and early 20th centuries. Influenced by Charles Baudelaire and by Walter Pater, these Decadents rejected the mainstream Victorian view that art needed a moral purpose, and valued instead the intense sensations art provoked, celebrating art for art's sake. Oscar Wilde was at its heart, Aubrey Beardsley adorned it with his illustrations and they, with others, provoked moral panic with their supposed degeneracy. After burning brightly, the movement was soon lost its energy in Britain yet it has proved influential. The illustration above, by Beardsley, is from the cover of the first edition of The Yellow Book in April 1894 With Neil Sammells Professor of English and Irish Literature and Deputy Vice Chancellor at Bath Spa University Kate Hext Senior Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Exeter And Alex Murray Senior Lecturer in English at Queen's University, Belfast Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Culture
The Decadent Movement

In Our Time: Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 51:22


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the British phase of a movement that spread across Europe in the mid-19th and early 20th centuries. Influenced by Charles Baudelaire and by Walter Pater, these Decadents rejected the mainstream Victorian view that art needed a moral purpose, and valued instead the intense sensations art provoked, celebrating art for art's sake. Oscar Wilde was at its heart, Aubrey Beardsley adorned it with his illustrations and they, with others, provoked moral panic with their supposed degeneracy. After burning brightly, the movement was soon lost its energy in Britain yet it has proved influential. The illustration above, by Beardsley, is from the cover of the first edition of The Yellow Book in April 1894 With Neil Sammells Professor of English and Irish Literature and Deputy Vice Chancellor at Bath Spa University Kate Hext Senior Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Exeter And Alex Murray Senior Lecturer in English at Queen's University, Belfast Producer: Simon Tillotson

New Books Network
About Maternal Health Studies: A Conversation with Bethany Johnson

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 84:10


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: Bethany Johnson's simultaneous journey through graduate school and motherhood, her struggles with infertility, the history of birth-care access, why Black women have worse maternal health outcomes, the consequences for pregnant people in a pregnancy-surveillance culture, and a discussion of the book You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise. Today's book is: You're Doing it Wrong: Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise by Bethany L. Johnson and Margaret M. Quinlan, which explores how new mothers face a barrage of confounding decisions. Whatever they “choose,” experts ranging from health practitioners to social media influencers tell them they're making mistakes. Johnson and Quinlan draw from their own experiences, the history of mothering advice from the newspapers, magazines, doctors' records and personal papers of the nineteenth-century to today's websites and Instagram feeds. Johnson and Quinlan find surprising parallels between today's mothering experts and their Victorian counterparts, and explore how social media pressures pregnant people, even as it offers social support. Our guest is: Bethany L. Johnson, a doctoral student in the history of science, technology and the environment at the University of South Carolina and an associate member to the graduate faculty and research affiliate faculty in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research examines medical technologies and public health policies as tools of institutional power from the 19th-century to the present, with a focus on epidemics and reproductive health. She has published in journals such as Health Communication, Women & Language, Departures in Critical Qualitative Research, Journal of Holistic Nursing, and Women's Reproductive Health. She is the co-author of You're Doing it Wrong! Mothering, Media and Medical Expertise. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, co-producer of the Academic Life. Listeners to this episode might also be interested in: --Dr. Quinlan and Bethany Johnson's Medical “Humanities Mamas” articles for Psychology Today  --Dr Quinlan and Bethany Johnson's website, including their greeting cards for people experiencing infertility  --This website by a pregnant graduate student --The Unequal Impact of Parenthood in Academia --Fixing Parental Leave: The Six Month Solution, by Gayle Kaufman --“Families Devalued: Black Academic Women and the Neoliberal Era's Family Tariff,” in Lean Semesters, by Sekile M. Nzinga --I Had a Miscarriage, by Dr. Jessica Zucker --You're the Only One I've Told: The Stories Behind Abortion, by Dr. Meera Shah --Our interview about gender-free childrearing You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Southern Haunts
Bedtime Haunting: The Oval Portrait

Southern Haunts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 12:02


Written in 1845, Edgar Allan Poe's The Oval Portrait is often compared to The Picture of Dorian Gray because that is the only other old timey story folks can think of. Honestly, I can't name another one. But the Oval Portrait clings to the creepy aesthetic that readers of the Victorian author have come to love and one that surrounds a pretty spooky quote from Poe himself. In his book  “Philosophy of Composition,” Poe talks about how “poetry as art is the rhythmical creation of beauty, and that the most poetical topic in the world is the death of a beautiful woman” So, cuddle up, dim the lights, and let me read to you. --Listen to my guest episode on The Silver Linings Playlist.--Want ad free episodes? Listen HEREShop Southern Haunts Merch HERE--IG: @SouthernhauntpodcastFB: Southern Haunts PodcastTwitter: @s_hauntspodcast--Subscribe to Oh! That's A Scary Movie--Music in this episode:https://uppbeat.io/t/kisnou/name-of-the-nighthttps://uppbeat.io/t/ak/midnight-stroll License code: WNT8HKI1FBYUZJMGhttps://uppbeat.io/t/danijel-zambo/friendly-ghost License code: HXQWQMBPM7FB232F"The Haunting Of Lake" originally composed and produced by "VivekSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/southernhauntspodcast)

The Brian Nichols Show
383: What Has Happened to Australia?! -with Stuart from LibertyDownUnder.

The Brian Nichols Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:52


Stuart (LibertyDownUnder): "I see this over the place... see certain people stopping them [pro-liberty activists) from speaking out. We've had police coming to people's houses door-knocking for memes that they've made online. In Melbourne, we had the police who went to the house of a woman who was pregnant, because she shared one post on Facebook about the protests. People being locked up, a guy who got eight months behind bars, who ran Instagram account that was anti-lockdown. He got eight months behind bars because of it. When we had the treaty protests, Facebook stopped the live streams. So you couldn't even do live streams to show what's happening on the ground. At the same time, the Victorian police got a no-fly order over Melbourne. So the civilian helicopters couldn't fly over it and get aerial shots of having the protests were. So it's their collaboration by the media outlets, social media and the police." Today, Stuart from LibertyDownUnder joins the program to highlight what is happening in Australia during an era of COVID. We've all seen the pictures and videos, but to hear the stories coming from someone on the ground, first-hand is truly eye-opening. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The History of Literature
358 The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature (with Farah Jasmine Griffin) | Charles Dickens's Gospel (with Scott Carter)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 64:57


In her new book Read Until You Understand, beloved professor Farah Jasmine Griffin entwines memoir, history, and art in exploring the culture of Black genius and the lessons and legacies of Black lives and literature. In this episode, Professor Griffin joins Jacke for a discussion of her father, the role literature played in her life after her father's untimely death, and the lifetime she's spent traveling through literature in search of a deeper understanding of concepts like mercy, love, justice, rage, beauty, and joy. PLUS Scott Carter, author of the play Discord: the Gospel According to Thomas Jefferson, Charles Dickens, and Count Leo Tolstoy joins Jacke for another look at three famous historical figures who each wrote their own version of the gospels. In this installment, Scott tells Jacke about the approach taken by Victorian supernova Charles Dickens. Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices