Podcasts about Victorian

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    Best podcasts about Victorian

    Show all podcasts related to victorian

    Latest podcast episodes about Victorian

    Full Story
    Why did four ministers leave the Victorian government?

    Full Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 19:12


    Five months before a state election, Daniel Andrews' Labor government has faced an exodus of some of its most senior cabinet ministers – taking with them a combined 71 years of political experience. To add to the turmoil, the premier is facing tough questions after multiple secret interviews with the state's integrity commission. Gabrielle Jackson speaks to Victorian state correspondent Benita Kolovos about how the loss of four senior cabinet ministers will impact the chances of Labor in the state election later this year

    Storynory - Stories for Kids
    The Dutch Hotel - The Duel Part 1

    Storynory - Stories for Kids

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 23:05


    The Dutch Hotel in London is haunted - or is it? There are figures like ghosts who appear, including hotel staff from Victorian times, but they are more like time travellers. In this episode, the kids who live in the modern hotel - Nafsi and Yogi - travel back in time to meet some of the hotel staff of the past. They want to know the true story of the duel between the founders of the hotel, the Dutch twins.

    Viewpoints, 97.7FM Casey Radio
    Victorian Principals Association with Andrew Dalgleish

    Viewpoints, 97.7FM Casey Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 21:46


    Henry talks with Victorian Principals Association president Andrew Dalgleish. This conversation was originally broadcast on 3SER's 97.7FM Casey Radio in June 2022. It was produced by Rob Kelly.

    Fall of the House of Sunshine
    Lyman Keys Presents: Victorian Scribblers

    Fall of the House of Sunshine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 52:55


    Hello Lyman Keys here! Do you miss Fall of the House of Sunshine? Have you listened to Land Whale Murders too many times already? Then let Lyman Keys help! Lyman is going to recommend some audio dramas and fun podcasts to you over the next several months. Hopefully you'll find some new favs! This month's pick: Victorian Scribblers Check it out: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/victorian-scribblers/id1254341845 And don't forget other great Roi Gold shows: The Land Whale Murders: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-land-whale-murders/id1577608559 Radio Free Mushroom America: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/radio-free-mushroom-america/id1448597763 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ
    SBS News in Ukrainian - 03/07/2022 - SBS новини українською - 03/07/2022

    SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 11:57


    In this bulletin: Ash Barty named Person Of The Year at the NAIDOC Awards. More floodwaters over Sydney causing evacuation orders. Victorian state Labor party MP Jane Garrett, has died. Former Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd has joined an international advisory group set up by the president of Ukraine. And, in tennis, four Australians are into the last sixteen of the singles at Wimbledon - 3 липня 2022 року. Бюлетень SBS новин українською мовою. 

    Yesterday's London Times
    BONUS EPISODE: The Plant Hunters

    Yesterday's London Times

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 57:27


    This is a companion episode to last week's Exotica Mania. In that episode, we considered the Victorian plant frenzy, especially for exotic plants from faraway lands.But how did the plants come to Britain?  Enter the PLANT HUNTERS. The Indiana Joneses, and sometimes the Jack Sparrows, of their day. Plant hunters were sent off to explore in every direction in search of specimens that might have potential.  They faced weather extremes, illness, thieves, shipwrecks, violence, imprisonment, piracy, disease. In this episode, we'll unearth some stories of:- best laid plans that go awry at high altitudes, - a noted plant hunter who ends up dead, and maybe murdered, in a bull pit,- high level corporate espionage for the British East India Company,- what happens when you run into fifty mules on a narrow mountain trail, - encounters with vampire bats and other creatures,- when plants attack, and- being buried in style, with a crate of whiskey and a complete set of Jane Austen.Photos and links can be found at our show notes HERE.Do you like what you hear?  Please help us find our audience by spreading some good cheer with a 5 star rating and review on Apple Podcasts!Our website  https://yltpodcast.buzzsprout.com/ Email us at yesterdayslondontimes@gmail.comCan you guess our mystery song?  Contact us!Follow us on:Twitter @YLT_PodFacebook @Yesterday's London Times PodcastInstagram @Yesterday's London Times Podcast

    Go Ask Alice
    27: Go Ask Alice the Wicked Truth Behind King Hounds in Sheer Clothing

    Go Ask Alice

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 84:56


    Another week, another strange rabbit hole. This episode will be no surprise to anyone, we started on greyhounds and ended up in wildly different places. Drew does what he does best and gives us the science and history behind truth serum. Sara accidentally does a full 360, with her topic just one jump away from greyhounds on Frederick the Great. And Lindsay delights us with historical commentary on the fashion tend of sheer clothing and dresses with a slit in them **Gasps in Victorian**. Join us everywhere you can increase entropy: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/goaskalicepod Twitter: https://twitter.com/GoAskAlicePod Instagram: https://instagram.com/goaskalicepodcast TikTok: https://tiktok.com/@drsarawebb Discord: https://discord.gg/ESfW2TwY  

    Macabre London Podcast
    Kids really had it bad in the Victorian times! Two tales of terror from old newspapers

    Macabre London Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 23:20


    Kids really had it bad in the Victorian times! Two tales of terror from old newspapers.Old newspapers carry a wealth of strange stories and help us to learn about how things really were back in the day.Today I'll be revealing what I've found whilst doing my research for other episodes. This time on Macabre London, we uncover two tales of terror from Victorian newspapers.Video version: https://youtu.be/vDEbsmYW9AsPodcast: www.acast.com/macabrelondonThanks so much for watching!If you are new here, you may not know that Macabre London is a fortnightly podcast and YouTube show that delves into Londons haunted and gruesome history alongside discovering Macabre mini Mysteries from all over the world! In between fortnights we post travel vlogs & other fun content.If you like it here, then come and join our ghoul gang, hit that subscribe button and come to the dark side, it's fun here, we have stories!----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PATREON——————————-If you like the podcast and YouTube shows and would like them to continue then please support us on Patreon. You can donate for as little as a price of a cup of coffee and you'll get even more Macabre London.www.patreon.com/macabrelondonThank you to our executive producer patrons - Amy, Barry, Kate, Kevin, Mary, Ren, Sam, Sarah and VeronicaAnd to all of our wonderful $5 tier patrons...AlexisAndrewChristineDavidDeniseHelenJenniferJoKathrynKristieRy FrSSabrinaShannonWendyAnd thanks to all other patrons too!ONE OFF DONATIONS————————————————You can make a one off donation to support the show via the PayPal link here:paypal.me/macabrelondonAMAZON WISHLIST——————————————————If you'd like to purchase something that will help the production of the show or help with research then please visit my Amazon wish list.http://amzn.eu/dJxEf1V​​​​​​SOCIAL MEDIA---------------------------------------------Insta: @macabrelondonpodcastTwitter: @macabrelondonFacebook: @macabrelondonEmail: macabrelondon@hotmail.comWebsite: www.macabrelondon.comFREE STUFF / DISCOUNTS!(Grab yourself a bargain and I get a teeny percentage back which helps the channel)--------------------------------------------Lucy & Yak (cool clothes): https://lucy-yak.mention-me.com/m/ol/ge7nn-nikki-druceGo Puff (Grocery delivery): https://sign-in.gopuff.com/user-registration?coupon_code=GOZVXZNNZX&gpat=0ofhPHoney (Money saving browser extension) joinhoney.com/ref/k1ylwofHello Fresh (Meal Kit): HelloFresh. Claim this £42 discount! Start your cooking adventure today and use the following promo code: HS-5WT8YAAE0. Happy Cooking! https://www.hellofresh.co.uk/pages/raf_lp11?c=HS-5WT8YAAE0&utm_campaign=native-share-panel&utm_couponvalue=42&utm_invitername=Nikki&utm_medium=iOSReferral&utm_source=raf-share Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/macabrelondon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Nevers Podcast
    The Nevers Podcast | Huzza! We're back! Well, sort of.

    The Nevers Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 64:01


    Jason joins Laura and Chirag for a brief chat, catching up on what they've been up to since they last recorded together, the future of The Nevers, and the new showrunner. They also try to figure out when the series will return and announce a new project. Plus, they answer your submitted letters. Please rate, review and subscribe to The Nevers Podcast. Your support goes a long way in helping us to grow our community and reach more listeners. For even more content on The Nevers, visit our website at hbothenevers.com and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube @hbothenevers and @theneverspodcast Your feedback is always appreciated. Send comments, questions and topic suggestions to: theneverspodcast@gmail.com Music by: Guilherme Moraes Produced & edited by Matthew at Culture Inject Studios.

    History Hack
    History Hack: Cholera - The Victorian Plague with Amanda Thomas

    History Hack

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 59:20


    Amanda Thomas joins us to discuss the history of a Victorian nemesis, and of course, we'd be idiots not to discuss the parallels with Covid-19 today.  Buy Amanda's book, Cholera: The Victorian Plague, at the History Hack Bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781526781819 Support us: https://www.patreon.com/historyhack Tips: https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Merch: https://shop.historyhackpod.com/  

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
    My White Coat Doesn't Fit

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


    “My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget

    The West Live Podcast
    This Australian whiskey is a world beater

    The West Live Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:53


    A Victorian whisky distillery has been crowned best in the world at an international spirits competition. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Real Outlaws
    Ned Kelly Part 3: The Iron Man

    Real Outlaws

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 43:43


    The Kelly Outbreak nears its bloody end. The Kelly Gang has successfully remained hidden and out of the reach of the law for over a year… but all that is about to change. Fearing betrayal and feeling the heat of the law closing in - Ned is determined to go out swinging. He devises a high stakes plan to turn the tables on the Victorian police force, resulting in an epic siege and a high-octane gunfight that will go down in history, and cement Ned Kelly as an outlaw legend for centuries to come.  A Noiser production, written by Danny Marshall. This is Part 3 of 3. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+, now available on Apple Podcasts. All shows are also available for free. If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, press the ‘+' icon to follow the show for free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Briefing
    The first day on the job for 35 new members of Parliament

    The Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 20:20


    So, you've been elected to Parliament.  What next?  How do you navigate the 75,000 square metres of Parliament House in Canberra?  Where do you get a coffee?  And where's your office?  Annika Smethurst, the Age newspaper's Victorian parliamentary correspondent and the Briefing's Canberra insider, worked in the halls of federal parliament for more than a decade.  She explains 35 new members of the House of Reps start their new jobs today…and what they face as they start their new career. They'll be given an office, an advisor, and a showbag.  So what's it like to be a brand new MP? Today's Headlines PM to attend NATO summit Census: Less than half the population is Christian Dads could get 20 weeks leave Teacher's Pet creator on the stand More protest action planned following Sydney traffic chaos Follow The Briefing DON'T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR THE BRIEFING NEWSLETTER. LINK IS IN OUR BIO ON INSTAGRAM Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Somehow Related with Dave O'Neil & Glenn Robbins
    Portsea and the start of WW1

    Somehow Related with Dave O'Neil & Glenn Robbins

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 38:59


    The swanky Victorian beach town and The Great War (of Europe). Portsea would've been many thousands of miles from ANY Archduke back in the early 1900s, let alone Mr Ferdinand from Austria. Right?    Wikipedia: Harold Holt's disappearence Gallipoli (1981) TRAILER   Thinking Music Make Believe! A trip around the bay.   Link to the Answer ABC.net.au   Check out the Somehow Related Facebook Group. Or the website for more! www.nearly.com.au/somehow-related-podcast-with-glenn-robbins-and-dave-oneil/   Somehow Related is produced by Nearly Media. Original theme music by Kit Warhurst. Artwork created by Stacy Gougoulis.   Looking for another podcast? Out Of The Question - Adam Zwar's fantastic interview podcast The Junkees with Dave O'Neil & Kitty Flanagan - The sweet and salty roundabout! Junk food abounds! Confessions Of The Idiots - laugh along with Sam Petersen and friends as he reads outragous confessions from people you'll never meet.

    New Books Network
    WikiVictorian

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:37


    Helena DiGiusti talks about @WikiVictorian, the Twitter account that she runs. More than a traditional wiki, it embodies the randomness and miscellaneous nature of so much of Victorian cultures. She talks about the origins of the account in her interest in Victorian fashion, art, and history, and how the account has been embraced by enthusiasts across the professional spectrum and around the world. Like William Morris, she favors the simple criteria of interest and beauty. Per Morris, “If you want a golden rule that will fit everything, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” Perhaps more Twitter accounts ought to be like Kelmscott Manor. Behind WikiVictorian hides someone deeply fascinated by art, history, photography, old things… and specially, everything about the Victorian era and the 19th century. Her name is Helena, and she is a 23 year old anthropologist from Granada, in the south of Spain. Image: Fall and Winter Catalogue, H. O'Neill and Co. Music used in promotional material: ‘winter smoke' by The Owl Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    High Theory
    WikiVictorian

    High Theory

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:37


    Helena DiGiusti talks about @WikiVictorian, the Twitter account that she runs. More than a traditional wiki, it embodies the randomness and miscellaneous nature of so much of Victorian cultures. She talks about the origins of the account in her interest in Victorian fashion, art, and history, and how the account has been embraced by enthusiasts across the professional spectrum and around the world. Like William Morris, she favors the simple criteria of interest and beauty. Per Morris, “If you want a golden rule that will fit everything, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” Perhaps more Twitter accounts ought to be like Kelmscott Manor. Behind WikiVictorian hides someone deeply fascinated by art, history, photography, old things… and specially, everything about the Victorian era and the 19th century. Her name is Helena, and she is a 23 year old anthropologist from Granada, in the south of Spain. Image: Fall and Winter Catalogue, H. O'Neill and Co. Music used in promotional material: ‘winter smoke' by The Owl Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Talking Gut with Dr Jim Kantidakis
    Ep 28 Jackie Berryman & Renuka Clarke on Stoma Therapy

    Talking Gut with Dr Jim Kantidakis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 63:51


    Welcome to another Episode of Talking Gut. Todays talk is about Entero-stomal Therapy. My two guests today are both Stomal therapy nurses at the Epworth Hospital in Richmond  Melbourne.   Jackie Berryman is one of two Stomal Therapy Nurses at Epworth Richmond. Jackie came to nursing later in life after many years within the corporate world. She utilized her Arts Degree to enter a Masters of Nursing Science which is a 2 year entry to practice course. In 2011, at the age of 48, Jackie did her graduate nursing at Peter MacCallum and then went on to complete the Graduate Certificate of Stomal Therapy Nursing. Jackie has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Melbourne (also completed as a mature age student), a Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management from Swinburne University of Technology, Masters in Nursing Science and a Graduate Certificate in Stomal Therapy Nursing. She is currently the Treasurer for the Victorian branch of the Australian Association of Stomal Therapy Nurses. Renuka Clarke is the other Stomal Therapy nurse at Epworth Richmond. Renuka has been a nurse for 40 years and still loves it.  The last 12 years has been as a Stomal Therapy Nurse. Renuka has a diverse nursing background commencing in Townsville and then a post graduate placement with Mother Teresa in Kolkata, India.  She returned to Melbourne to work in a variety of general nursing roles culminating in Stomal Therapy.   In todays talk we discussed what a stoma is, what's involved in the process of getting a stoma and the role of the nurses that help patients pre and post-surgery. We also discussed some of the challenges individual with Stomas can face and how these incredible nurses help them manage them.

    Drive With Tom Elliott
    Victorian healthcare workers being attacked, assaulted and abused at 'disturbing' rate

    Drive With Tom Elliott

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:28


    Victorian healthcare workers are increasingly at risk of being attacked and abused at work. Tom Elliott is hosting 3AW Mornings this week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    GO TEAM VIDEO
    The Handmaiden (2016) - Go Team Video (EP. 37)

    GO TEAM VIDEO

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 106:32


    The Handmaiden (Korean: 아가씨; RR: Agassi; lit. '"Lady"') is a 2016 South Korean erotic psychological thriller film directed by Park Chan-wook and starring Kim Min-hee, Kim Tae-ri, Ha Jung-woo and Cho Jin-woong. It is inspired by the 2002 novel Fingersmith by Welsh writer Sarah Waters, with the setting changed from Victorian era Britain to Korea under Japanese colonial rule. The film was selected to compete for the Palme d'Or at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. It was released in South Korea on 1 June 2016, to critical acclaim. It grossed over $38 million worldwide. You can watch the video podcast on YouTube, listen on Spotify or Apple Music & catch us next week live on twitch.tv/ampmvideo Drop a comment, like & hit the subscribe button. Give us a follow @ampm.video & @goteamvideo BIG shoutout to @gubbsmusic for our intro/outro music & BIG shoutout to @shotfromthepit for our fun promo photos! ⚡️ If you would like to support @ampm.video & @goteamvideo for all we do & so that we can keep creating more content, check out patreon.com/ampmvideo

    Mornings with Neil Mitchell
    Mornings with Tom Elliott: Victorians Party co-founder blasts politician pay rises

    Mornings with Neil Mitchell

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 4:11


    The co-founder of the Victorians Party — a fledgling party hoping to be a new force in Victorian politics at the state election — has taken aim at pay rises for politicians. Tom Elliott is the host of 3AW Drive.He's filling in on Neil Mitchell's Mornings program this week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    3AW Breakfast with Ross and John
    'Bloody amazing': Victorian distillery named best in the world

    3AW Breakfast with Ross and John

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 4:52


    A Victorian distillery has taken out the title of Most Awarded Distillery of the Year at the 2022 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Les Oderants
    12 - Getting Conceptual

    Les Oderants

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 92:45


    This week we're talking about the concepts behind the perfumes. Can a good concept make or break a good perfume, or is it all just a pile of pretentious guff, cooked up by an eccentric during a fever dream? From historical Navy battles to the sterility of the 9-5 workplace, there's seemingly a concept that can appeal to anyone, but is that really a good thing? There's also a remarkable number of perfumes that try to conjure up our filthy bits, what's that all about? Also, why it's important to listen to Pappy Houdini, Ben sings the praises of the new Zoologist and Dan throws down the gauntlet to any potential sponsors who may wish to send us to Esxence 2023 so he can stop watching through the window like a Victorian orphan. You can contact us via email at lesoderants@gmail.com or via Instagram: Dan: fragrance_weirdo James: houdini_sotd Ben: talking_scents During the show we may mention perfumes that were sent to us for review. We will, at all times, be completely transparent about this when it is the case and I hope you'll come to trust us enough to see that whatever the method of acquisition, we will always speak our own minds about said perfume and/or house.

    3AW Remember When with Philip and Simon
    Philip Brady and Simon Owens ep 911 (Remember When) - Sun 26 June, 2022

    3AW Remember When with Philip and Simon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 74:02


    : Kevin Trask takes us to 1972 in Trask's Time Tunnel : Music montage of the hits of 1991 : Maree Coote unveils her new book : Your calls on great Victorian women . Produced by Bianca Johnston With Alex Riddell in news See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KIC POD
    What is a Doula? with Tess Batchelor

    KIC POD

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:18


    If you've heard the term ‘Doula' but aren't exactly sure what's involved, this is the episode for you.Steph chats with Victorian-based Doula, Tess Batchelor about how a Doula can support you from conception right through pregnancy and into the wildy beautiful postpartum period.Tess shares the different levels of support available, her experience with a variety of parents and births and the surprisingly affordable costs!SPECIAL GUESTTess Batchelor  Save 50% off with KIC$25 for 3 months when you sign up via www.keepitcleaner.com using the code WIW50

    And That's Why We Drink
    E281 A Gossip Corner Dinner Trap and Facts Served Up on a Celery Dish

    And That's Why We Drink

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 98:38


    It's episode 281 and celery vases are so out but celery plates are in! First Em dishes it out with their story on the Emlen Physick Estate in Cape May, adding a personal twist as well as a deep dive into the history of the high end Victorian celery market. Then Christine covers the notorious cold case, the Springfield Three. And if anyone has a lead on a celery vase from the Titanic, please hit us up... and that's why we drink!

    STAGES with Peter Eyers
    STAGES LIVE @ VIVID - 'All kinds of weather, we stick together, the same in the Rain or Sun' - Drag Royalty; Cindy Pastel (Ritchie Finger) and Miss 3D (Glenn R. Lewis)

    STAGES with Peter Eyers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 43:12


    In the bohemian world that is drag, few artists can lay claim to the exulted and ebullient eccentricity that is Cindy Pastel. The alter ego of performer Ritchie Finger, Cindy has been delighting, thrilling and astonishing audiences for close to 45 years.A unique talent, Finger has inspired generations of drag performers who have followed in his fabulous footsteps - whether they be in stilettos or on skates.Ritchie Finger arrived in Sydney from Melbourne in 1979 and became one of the many young drag addicts to work at ‘Patch's' Nightclub on Sydney's celebrated Oxford street.In the early part of the A.I.D.S. crisis Pastel was a tireless worker for HIV/AIDS organisations and charities. The decimation of community was enormous and Pastel, alongside many drag artists, kept everyone smiling.Cindy Pastel has been recognised by the DIVAs - The Drag Industry Variety Awards - twice in her illustrious career. A career that has reached incredible peaks and challenged with occasional obstacles. But through it all Ritchie Finger and Cindy Pastel have danced, paraded, twirled and taken centre stage, to ensure that ‘Everybody's happy!”Recently celebrating a 72nd birthday, Miss 3D is still going strong, embracing every opportunity to perform and entertain an adoring fanbase. The alter ego of Glenn R. Lewis, Miss 3D has been at the pinnacle of Drag performance for over 40 years. Recognised as a matriarch of Sydney Drag performers, she has entranced with a vibrant and unique style; and incredible artistry, eternally mesmerising with opulent and eccentric costume.Growing up in a rural Victorian town, a diet of community theatre and ballet classes shaped a desire to command a stage. Study at the Australian Ballet school followed, before a quick visit to Sydney seduced Glenn and he met his drag tribe through performers such as Doris Fish, Teresa Green and Danny Aboud. Miss 3D quickly established herself on the scene as an artist of superior talent and invention.A holiday to New York City landed a permanent gig at the iconic Anvil Club where 3D performed for two years, wowing the American crowd.Returning to Australia Miss 3D continued to navigate the stages of venues such as Stranded and Patchs, eventually taking up residence at the iconic Albury Hotel with a trio called The Showbags, alongside Drag Legends, Cindy Pastel and Pat Gently.It was a privilege and a delight to feature these two iconic performers in the STAGES ‘Live' series at The Powerhouse Up late for VIVID Sydney. They are an essential part of Sydney's Gay heritage and elders of the community who must be celebrated and applauded for an immense contribution.The STAGES podcast is available to access and subscribe from Whooshkaa, Spotify and Apple podcasts. Or from wherever you access your favourite podcasts. A conversation with creatives about craft and career. Recipient of Best New Podcast at 2019 Australian Podcast Awards. Follow socials on instagram (stagespodcast) and facebook (Stages).www.stagespodcast.com.au

    KSL Greenhouse
    Canterbury Bells

    KSL Greenhouse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 19:19


    The Plant of the Week is the Canterbury Bells. Canterbury Bells was a popular Victorian era garden plant that self-seeds. Deadheading this plant will allow it to bloom longer. To learn more about the Canterbury Bells you can find an article on this plant on the KSL Greenhouse Show Facebook page.  Welcome to The KSL Greenhouse Show! Hosts Maria Shilaos and Taun Beddes tackle your gardening questions, talk plants, and offer tips for an amazing yard. Listen Saturdays 8am to 11am at 1160 AM & 102.7 FM, kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL Newsradio App. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram at @kslgreenhouse. #KSLGreenhouse  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    It is Discernable®
    Kirsten Finger: 20 Year RN and Paramedic Goes from Hero to Zero

    It is Discernable®

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 76:58


    Kirsten is a 20 year veteran in the Victorian health system. Her dream was always to become a paramedic, and after 7 years as a registered nurse in critical care she achieved her goal and went on to serve as a paramedic for a further 13 years. In late 2021 she was given an impossible choice - submit to Ambulance Victoria's vaccination mandate for Covid-19 and risk serious consequences due to her pre-existing medical condition, or be fired from the organisation that she loved. Leading up to the launch of Covid-19 vaccinations in Australia, Kirsten chose to undertake additional training to be ready to assist in the vaccine rollout but despite 20 years of dedication and passion, her termination was cold and sudden. This is her story. ------------------------------------- DISCERNABLE The Video Archive: https://discernable.io Prefer audio? Search for 'It Is Discernable' on Spotify and Apple Podcasts Join our Private Community: https://discernable.locals.com Purchase tickets (and replays) to our Town Halls: https://discernable.io/townhall

    Yesterday's London Times
    Exotica Mania: a Victorian Plant Craze

    Yesterday's London Times

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 69:40


    How can something as mundane a plant tell us about a culture?We may start talking about plants, but soon we will be in mired in a reaction to the Industrial Revolution, colonialism, imperialism, exoticism, Darwinism, social order and class, surreptitious societal coding, a rising middle class, the concept of leisure time, and a culture caught up in the allure of seeking and getting. Phew!We'll look at:the rise in London's public parks, squares, and gardensa Whitechapel physician who catapults Britain's economythe complicated daily life of Victorians and their plants a teenage girl centuries ahead of her timehow plants provided women with a foot in the door of careers in scienceplants that influenced the creators: designers, authors, illustratorsan Amazonian lily pad that inspired an architectural marvela secret form of communication: social coding through flowersOscar Wilde and his green carnationNote: Next week, we'll be adding a bonus episode that acts as companion to this one. Stay tuned for the thrilling adventures of The Plant Hunters.  Photos and links can be found at our show notes HERE.Do you like what you hear?  Please help us find our audience by spreading some good cheer with a 5 star rating and review on Apple Podcasts!Our website  https://yltpodcast.buzzsprout.com/ Follow us on:Twitter @YLT_PodFacebook @Yesterday's London Times PodcastInstagram @Yesterday's London Times Podcast

    Then Again with Ken and Glen
    E115 Victorian Seances

    Then Again with Ken and Glen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 22:21


    In our latest episode of Then Again, Marie interviews Lesley Jones, the Collections and Archives Manager of the Northeast Georgia History Center, about séances. More specifically, Victorian seances in late 1800s London, which is the focus of Lesley's recent Master's thesis titled Home is Where the Haunt is: The Cultural History of the Domestic Séance in Victorian London. Generally, when we think of seances our mind sends us to spooky corners, filled with evil spirits. But Lesley is here to offer a different perspective, that of the Victorian age, where people sought to communicate with loved ones who had passed. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    Beer Sessions Radio (TM)
    Wild Brews: The Craft of Home Brewing, From Sour and Fruit Beers to Farmhouse Ales With Jaega Wise and Jeff Lyons

    Beer Sessions Radio (TM)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 62:43


    This week, Beer Sessions Radio welcomes two homeschooled brewers — Jeff Lyons from Endless Life Brewing in Brooklyn, and Jaega Wise from Wild Card Brewery in East London, who also happens to be the author of “Wild Brews.” The gang will bang out lessons on homebrewing and sour beers, before revealing the secrets to the water section of Jaega's latest book. The episode starts with Jaega's and Jeff's introduction to the homebrewing world as well as their backgrounds outside of the beer industry. While Jaega grew up in the Midland region in UK, noted for Burton-on-Trent, with a CAMRA beer festival as her first, Jeff hung out with the Beer Judge Certification Program gang in the back room of Jimmy's No. 43. Jaega also shared her unexpectedly perfect journey to beerdom, studying chemical engineering and going to water school for her previous job in water treatment. She went on to explain the keys to controlling what she considers the most underappreciated ingredient in brewing — water. The gang then goes deeper into sour beer and the history of homebrewing, with Jimmy admitting to only being able to make “the no hygiene beer” inspired by the Victorian era's Tudor. They also discuss the revival of cask beers along with the brewing scene in London, with a tiny surprise about water in Scotland and whisky distilling. Grab your headset and listen in on the secrets right now!Photo Courtesy of Jaega Wise.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Beer Sessions Radio by becoming a member!Beer Sessions Radio is Powered by Simplecast.

    Sesho's Anime And Manga Reviews
    Podcast Episode 269: From the Red Fog Volume 1

    Sesho's Anime And Manga Reviews

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 13:16


    My review of this twisted manga take on Dickensian England.

    Just the Gist
    The disappearance of Julian Buchwald & Carolynne Watson featuring Zara from Shameless

    Just the Gist

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 50:50


    In March 2008, young couple Julian Buchwald & Carolynne Watson went on a picnic in the Victorian bush and didn't come home. They spent the next week battling exhaustion and exposure to try and find their way out of the bush with only a sleeping bag and a jar of peanut butter to keep them going. When they stumbled out of the bush a week later with a wild story of hostage and kidnapping, it didn't take police to figure out who was behind it.  Jacob shares the story with guest host Zara McDonald. Follow Zara on Instagram @zamcdonald and @shamelesspodcast Listen to her podcast 'Shameless Presents: The Books That Changed My Life'. We recommend you start with their episode with comedian Wil Anderson: https://www.listnr.com/podcasts/shameless-presents-the-books-that-changed-my-life/how-wil-anderson-overcomes-regret Skip straight to the story: approx 8:11 We give you Just The Gist, but if you want more, there's this: You can read all the details of the investigation process and the trial by reading the court report on Julian's unsuccessful appeal https://jade.io/article/259257 You can watch a video with lots of images from news reports here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLzD7IrZq70 Read a news report from the week the couple were missing, appealing for info from the public https://www.theage.com.au/national/missing-couple-planned-marriage-at-years-end-20080309-ge6tnh.html A report about Julian's escape attempt https://www.deccanherald.com/content/213097/man-kidnapped-girlfriend-sex-loses.html This episode gets pretty dark. If it brings anything up for you and you'd like to talk to someone about it, you can contact 1800 RESPECT on 1800 737 732. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Castle of Horror Podcast
    Castle Talk: Ava Reid, author of Juniper & Thorn (Out 6/21)

    Castle of Horror Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 14:31


    Tonight we're chatting with Ava Reid, author of JUNIPER & THORN (on sale June 21 from Harper Voyager), a gothic horror retelling of the Grimm Brothers fairytale “The Juniper Tree” and follows a young witch as she seeks to escape her abusive wizard father in Oblya, a city based on Victorian-era Odessa, Ukraine. Reid expertly weaves themes of femininity, desire, oppression, and progress into the dark fantasy of JUNIPER & THORN. Marlinchen and her sisters are the last true witches in the terrifying city of Oblya, where magic has given way to industry. Though their tyrannical, xenophobic father keeps them sequestered from the outside world, they sneak out at night to explore the city, where Marlinchen meets a dancer who captures her heart. As Marlinchen's feelings deepen for Sevas, the threat of her father's rage and magic grows; at the same time, a monster begins leaving dead bodies in its wake. Marlinchen must draw upon her magic to keep her city safe and find her place within it. It's a haunting horror fantasy tale with a layered, complex heroine – amid gruesome twists and turns, Reid crafts Marlinchen's story with compassion, exploring her trauma and building her tender romance with Sevas. And just as she did in her debut, Reid examines nationalism through the lens of magic and fantasy, combining her Ukrainian heritage and academic background to craft the city of Oblya, based on the port city of Odessa in Ukraine, and explore what it means for a city to develop and progress. JUNIPER & THORN has already been described as “darkly enchanting” in a starred Publishers Weekly review. A full list of content warnings is available here. I can't wait for you to dive in and hope you'll consider covering in June.Ava Reid was born in Manhattan and raised right across the Hudson River in Hoboken, but currently lives in Palo Alto. She has a degree in political science from Barnard College, focusing on religion and ethnonationalism.

    Sport Today
    Friday, 24 June - Double delight for Aussie swimmers as a Victorian gets set for the NBA Draft

    Sport Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 9:48


    Sport Today is a weekday sports news podcast and newsletter that puts sports lovers ahead of the game.O'Callaghan winStubblety-Cook winArtistic diver savedDid someone say KFC?Sign up to the Sport Today newsletter hereFollow Don't Forget Your Tips! on Apple and SpotifyFollow Sport Today on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

    Get Off The Bench Podcast
    Elaina Domagala - Inspiring girls to follow their dream

    Get Off The Bench Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 47:34


    Elaina Domagala is a 15 year old who is super passionate about football. She started playing football after 8 years of training and competing in Kyokushin Karate.Her karate journey led her to become 4 time Australian full contact champion, 5 time Victorian state champion, as well as other regional wins for her dojo.In 2019, a school round robin competition was the turning point, and after one game of football she was hooked, and joined local club, West End - where she played for 3 years with a mixed sexes team.Elaina was successful amongst 250 Victorian school girls to make the girls team through School Sports Victoria, and played in the 2021 Gippsland Youth girls premiership team and was awarded Most Determined.In December 2021, Elaina tried out for the Gippsland Power Under 19's Nab league team but was unsuccessful at this first attempt. However through hard work and determination during training and reserve games, she made her debut in Round 2, 2022 in the Gippsland Power Under 19's senior Nab league team at the young age of 15.Elaina has appeared in television and radio marketing campaigns for local youth girls football, as well as an appearance on Melbourne's Smash FM podcast as an advocate for women's football.Addicted to the passion of the game, Elaina immerses in the challenge of constant improvement, and relishes in the sisterhood and support network, particularly the support she can offer others.Socials:Insta: Elaina Domagala @elaina_doma Mentions:Gippsland Power Penny Cula-Reid Play Like a Girl Australia Enjoy the visual here on Youtube

    The History of Literature
    419 Christina Rossetti

    The History of Literature

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 61:46


    It's the Christina Rossetti episode! Jacke finally musters up the energy to finish what he started, and takes a look at one of the great poets of the Victorian era (and the creator of "Goblin Market," one of the strangest poems he has ever read. How did this seemingly prim, even matronly woman, known for her religious devotion and for rejecting three suitors on mostly religious grounds, come to write such a bizarre and hedonistic poem? What did she say about posing for the pre-Raphaelites and their paintings? What did John Ruskin and Virginia Woolf say about her? Let's find out! Additional listening suggestions: 415 "Goblin Market" by Christina Rossetti 306 Keats's Great Odes (with Anahid Nersessian) Living Poetry (with Bob Holman) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    San Francisco Damn Podcast with Dee Dee Lefrak
    Pride 2022 & the Progressive paradox

    San Francisco Damn Podcast with Dee Dee Lefrak

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 9:01


    It's great to see the children are back in town with their lovely colors and joie de vivre!… But progressive policies have the streets of downtown San Francisco looking like a Victorian freak show! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sanfranciscodamn/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sanfranciscodamn/support

    Richard Skipper Celebrates
    Creativity In An Ever Changing World Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz 6/21/2022

    Richard Skipper Celebrates

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 74:00


    For VIdeo Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/hsACCMyN4Zc Marc Acito writes about history, whether it's chronicling the World World II incarceration of Japanese-Americans with Broadway's ALLEGIANCE, creating THE SOUND OF THE SILK ROAD in China for Nederlander Worldwide, or adapting Victorian literature on film with MAD / WOMAN, which he directed. He's also an award-winning novelist, a former commentator for NPR's All Things Considered and a proud mentor at Renaissance High School in the Bronx. Dr. Judi Bloom is a practical, interactive, solution-focused therapist specializing in relationships and in navigating through major life transitions. Tina Marie Casamento's multifaceted career in professional theatre includes credits as a Director, Casting Director, Performer, Teacher and Producer. A self-professed "musical theatre geek",  Denis Jones is a two-time Tony Award nominated choreographer and his work has been seen on Broadway in Tootsie, Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn and Honeymoon in Vegas. Karen Mason has starred on Broadway, Off-Broadway, television, and recording: and “has few peers when it comes to ripping the roof off with her amazing voice that knows no bounds!” (TheatreScene.net) Ruby Rakos got her start in the Broadway production of Billy Elliot at age twelve. She has since starred as Judy Garland in several productions of the musical Chasing Rainbows: the Road to Oz, about Judy's early years at MGM, most recently at the Paper Mill Playhouse. She is a graduate of the Professional Performing Arts School in Manhattan and is a New Jersey native. Richard Skipper is fast approaching 43 years in the entertainment industry. Richard has been blessed to excel in many areas of show business.

    Gone Medieval
    Anglo-Saxon Treasures at Norwich Castle

    Gone Medieval

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:28


    Norwich Castle was designed by William the Conqueror to be a royal palace. But no Norman kings ever lived in it. Instead it became a gaol and then - in the Victorian era - a museum, which is today packed with archaeological finds that lift the lid on life in Anglo-Saxon East Anglia.In this edition of Gone Medieval, Dr. Cat Jarman takes an exclusive tour of Norwich Castle with Dr. Tim Pestell and learns more about its extraordinary history and collection.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited by Seyi Adaobi.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Real Outlaws
    Ned Kelly Part 2: Outbreak

    Real Outlaws

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 44:24


    Ned Kelly, along with his brother Dan and two friends Steve and Joe are forced into hiding deep in the Victorian bush. Left to their own devices, perhaps things might cool off and settle down. I guess we'll never know. When the police come knocking, all they'll find is trouble. Deadly trouble. An incident will spark a crimewave that will split loyalties and pit the public against the authorities - it'll go down in history as the Kelly Outbreak. A Noiser production, written by Danny Marshall. This is Part 2 of 3. For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+, now available on Apple Podcasts. All shows are also available for free. If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, press the ‘+' icon to follow the show for free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Full Story
    Why Australia is running out of teachers

    Full Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 23:52


    Australia is facing a national teacher shortage, with federal government modelling predicting a shortfall of more than 4,000 teachers over the next four years. Victorian state reporter Adeshola Ore tells Jane Lee what's causing this crisis and what can be done about it

    The Folklore Podcast
    BOOK CLUB 25: Calling the Spirits

    The Folklore Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 55:25


    In this episode, we examine the history and development of the seance, and our fascination with trying to communicate with the dead, from ancient Greek necromancy through to the Victorian parlour and beyond to the modern day.Joining us is author Lisa Morton, whose book "Calling the Spirits: A History of Seances" provides the background for her conversation with podcast book reviewer Hilary Wilson.Lisa Morton is a screenwriter, author of non-fiction books, Bram Stoker Award®-winning prose writer, and Halloween expert whose work was described by the American Library Association's Readers' Advisory Guide to Horror as “consistently dark, unsettling, and frightening.” She has published four novels, 150 short stories, and three books on the history of Halloween. Her recent releases include Weird Women: Classic Supernatural Fiction from Groundbreaking Female Writers 1852-1923 (co-edited with Leslie S. Klinger) and Calling the Spirits: A History of Seances; her latest short stories appeared in Best American Mystery Stories 2020, Final Cuts: New Tales of Hollywood Horror and Other Spectacles, and In League with Sherlock Holmes. Her most recent book is the collection Night Terrors & Other Tales. Lisa lives in Los Angeles and online at www.lisamorton.com.Support the Folklore Podcast on Patreon to help us to keep creating and making available free folklore-related content.

    Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
    Bernard Keane's Canberra

    Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 12:25


    The final Senate lineup is now known, with the last of the votes counted. The newest enators include a former Afghan refugee from Perth, for Labor; and a Victorian conspiracy theorist for the United Australia Party. The Energy Security Board has recommended a new capacity mechanism. And school chaplains are no longer compulsory.

    The Other Stories | Sci-Fi, Horror, Thriller, WTF Stories

    This episode has been sponsored by our next Getting Started Writing Short Horror Stories MiniCourse, head over to theotherstories.net/courses and sign up today. Limited spots available.Lady Stardust'Dysphoria amplified, David enters a Victorian cemetery. A tiger and time conspire to present a different reality where there are lives to be saved... including her own.'Written by Paul D. Coombs (www.pauldcoombs.com)Narrated by Jasmine Arch (https://jasminearch.com/)Edited by Duncan Muggleton (http://soundcloud.com/duncanmuggleton)With music by Blear Moon (https://blearmoon.bandcamp.com/)And Thom Robson (https://www.thomrobsonmusic.com/)The episode illustration was provided by Luke Spooner of Carrion House (https://carrionhouse.com/)And sound effects provided by Freesound.orgA quick thanks to our community managers, Joshua Boucher and Jasmine ArchAnd Carolyn O'Brien for helping with our submission reading.And to Ben Errington for blasting everybody with his social media gamma rays and turning us into hulking green content monsters/superheroes.Paul D Coombs is a writer of stories mired in the strange, the gothic, and the dark. Discover more about Paul, his published stories, and what he is currently working on at www.pauldcoombs.com.Jasmine Arch is a writer, poet, narrator, podcaster and all round chaos-for-brains Jasmine Arch lives in a nook of Belgian countryside with two horses, four dogs, and a husband who knows better than to distract her when she's writing. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Other Stories, NewMyths.com and Hybrid Fiction, among others. Find out more about her or her work at JasmineArch.com.You can help support the show over at Patreon.com/HawkandCleaverYou can join our Bookclub, Movieclub, and writing exercises over at Facebook.com/groups/hawkandcleaverT-shirts, mugs, posters, and comic books are available at www.gumroad.com/hawkandcleaverGet help with your short stories and your podcasts by heading to TheOtherStories.Net/servicesThe Other Stories is a production of the story studio, Hawk & Cleaver, and is brought to you with a Creative Commons – Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. Don't change it. Don't sell it. But by all means… share the hell out of it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Selected Shorts
    Dangerous Women

    Selected Shorts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 58:30


    Host Meg Wolitzer presents three works about women who defy the status quo and might therefore be perceived as “dangerous.”  In Margaret Atwood's “Unpopular Gals,” fairy-tale archetypes reclaim their power. The reader is Ann Harada.  A boisterous and brilliant student threatens to upend the order of her high school in Shanteka Sigers' “A Way with Bea,” performed by Pascale Armand.  And a Victorian-era wife fights for her sanity in Charlotte Perkins Gilman's classic “The Yellow Wallpaper,” performed by Carrie Coon.  The show also includes commentary by the Egyptian-American journalist and activist Mona Eltahawy.   Join and give!: https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/symphonyspacenyc?code=Splashpage See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Whoa!mance: Romance, Feminism, and Ourselves
    Episode 136: French Pharmacy - "The Duke Makes Me Feel" by Adriana Herrera

    Whoa!mance: Romance, Feminism, and Ourselves

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 39:52


    Bon-joooor, mess aymees! Yr grls are dusting off their berets to make a novella-sized meal of "The Duke Makes Me Feel" by Adriana Herrera, originally pubbed in "Duke I'd Like to F" but now its very own thing! Victorian business woman Marena works hard to keep clientele and kiss'n'tell separate. Enter Duke of Linley and a trip to The City of L'amour and some very fancy lace to shake prod her boundaries. Can making the political explicit be exploitative? Is there a new shape of historical romance or is it just contemporaries in older clothes? And is it just Isabeau or are they all full of Henry Cavill? The bordelaise isn't the only thing getting creamed in this one!

    Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan
    S2 Ep10: Murder in the Name of Love: Alice & Freda Part 1 (Pride Series)

    Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:46


    When 19-year-old Alice Mitchell jumped from a carriage and slit the throat of 17-year-old Freda Ward one fateful day in 1892, a rampant fascination over the drama soon followed. Alice loved Freda and killed her accordingly –to the crazed confusion of nearly everyone in Memphis, Tennessee and beyond. In the first half of our pride series, we'll go over the story of their sapphic relationship, how it functioned in the American South during the Victorian era and how it unraveled to the point of tragedy. This week's sponsors: Calm - Go to calm.com/strange for 40% off unlimited access to Calm's entire library. GhostBed - Get 30% off site-wide by going to ghostbed.com/strange. Hungryroot - Go to hungryroot.com/strange to get 30% off your first delivery and a free gift with every delivery. PrettyLitter - Head over to prettylitter.com and use code STRANGE to save 20% on your first order. 

    Broken Simulation with Sam Tripoli
    Broken Simulation #53: "Elizabethan Victorian Time-Traveling Hooker Wench"

    Broken Simulation with Sam Tripoli

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 147:28


    Sam Tripoli encounters a time-traveling hooker, reveals how he betrayed Steve Byrne, and Bobblehead Alert returns (briefly).Also this week Johnny Woodard reads listener reviews and a few insane news stories, including one that leaves Sam depressed.More stuff:Get episodes early, and unedited, plus bonus episodes: www.rokfin.com/brokensimulationWatch Broken Simulation: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCob18bx1jaU1HYPCPNRnyogSocial media:Twitter: @fatdragonpro, @johnnywoodardInstagram: @samtripoli, @johnnyawoodard