UNLABELED

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A fact based unique outlook on society and pop culture. Hosted By Jerome Williams and Kendall Washington. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

Jerome Williams


    • May 16, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 48m AVG DURATION
    • 109 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from UNLABELED

    "And Now a Word From our Sponsor"

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 77:01

    Kendrick Lamar... That's it. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Myles Morales and the Little Steppas"

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 63:05

    Today we discuss Kendrick Lamars upcoming album, Nike Suing Stock X, YSL Racketeering and much much more. So Tune in to for a interesting conversation. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Stranger Things"

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 77:09

    RIP Kevin Samuels, today we discuss Dr Strange and the Multiverse of Madness, The NBA Playoffs and Much much more. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?... https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Seis De Mayo"

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 66:35

    Today we talk about Matt Gaetz controversy, Drake's $400 Million Dollar record deal, Kevin Samuels and The Dow Jones taking a 1000 point plunge. Tune in for an interesting conversation.   BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?... https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support.   Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Color Money"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 68:14

    On Today's Episode we talk about The Brooklyn Nets implosion, Johnny Depp and Amber Heard, and Harvards 100 Million dollar settlement. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Dallas Rising Artist ALLNAMESTKN"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 55:40

    Today we are joined by Dallas Rising Artist ALLNAMESTKN for a conversation about what inspired him to be an artist. ALLNAMESTKN: https://www.instagram.com/allnamestkn/ Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/0zQns... BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Biddl3 Interview"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 81:33

    Today we are joined by Milwaukee's own BIDDL3 for a conversation about content creation and digital marketing strategies. So join us for this high level conversation. Tune in! Biddl3's IG: https://www.instagram.com/biddl3/ Biddl3's Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Biddl3 BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Good Friday"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 64:38

    One today's episode we talk about The Lakers being out of the playoff's, Gun reform and practical ways of coping with depression. Tune in for an interesting conversation.    BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    'Tree Sex" (Episode 100 Part 2)

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 72:23

    It's Story time we have to talk about tree sex. We also discuss how annoying some women are when a man is sick, Michael B Jordan's new look and racism (are we surprised) at Virginia Tech. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "100th Episode Part 1"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 63:42

    We did it we finally made it to 100 episodes. thank ya'll for coming on this journey with us. Today we will discuss The Clean Water act, Kentanji Brown's legendary appointment to the Supreme Court and, more SLAPS so tune in for an epic conversation. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Higher Learning"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 99:59

    On todays episode we talk about Jerry Jones getting finessed, AI and Al Harrington launch cannabis brand, reparations and much much more. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "The Slap that Stopped the World"

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 59:08

    Yeah I know we are tired of it too but we going to talk about it; that and Joe Biden plans on tapping the oil reserves. So Tune in for a interesting discussion. BKlear Better World Campaign: https://tinyurl.com/4memvxy9 Follow BKlear IG: https://www.instagram.com/bklearh2o/?hl=en Support our Podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Hip Hop VS The Grammy's"

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 79:45

    On Today's Episode we talk about The Grammy's Latest Controversy, Skin Bleaching, Male Birth Control and Much Much More.   https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Myth Busters"

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 78:53

    This week we collaborate with The Spiritual Sistars for polarizing discussion. Follow them on IG @spiritual_sistars and follow their podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7zgn3mb2mmomgercgDF6Cl?si=S4boaXd4SlKivtMzNC3rgA&context=spotify%3Ashow%3A5tdM2T8VDaa20O7z7DQpBA Grab Merch: nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "The Friendzone"

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 58:09

    This week we discuss managing friendships, Deshaun Watson controversy and much much more. Don't forget to grab merch: nolabelmerch.com. Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChNfa_wvYkv2D0xDL8LjN_g Become a monthly supporter: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Try a little Tenderness"

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 57:21

    Youtube is looking for Podcasters. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Jeen Yuhs" Part 3

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 59:14

    Tonight we discuss Netflix Docuseries "Jeen Yuhs" final episode, Ukraine and much much more. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "A Rose is Still a Rose"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 64:12

    Slow News Week but we have a few things to discuss. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    WWJD "What Would Juwan Howard Do?"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2022 47:49

    On today's episode we talk about Part two of Netflix docuseries Jeen Yuhs, Ukraine and much much more. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "We Need to talk about Bill Cosby"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 71:25

    On today's episode we talk about Showtimes "We need to talk about Bill Cosby" docuseries, Dave Chappelle's new Netflix specials and much much more. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Tommie Smith and John Carlos

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 3:42

    There wasn't a specific plan on that day in Mexico City in October 1968, when 24-year-old Tommie Smith won the Olympic gold medal in the men's 200 meters and approached the podium alongside fellow American John Carlos. But both men knew they would protest racial injustice in some form. What they didn't know is that their actions would spark a legacy of athlete activism for decades to come. “We were preparing to walk across the track and get on the victory stand and receive the award. John Carlos and I had talked and we knew we were going to do something,” says Smith, now 76. “But nobody knew exactly what Tommie Smith and John Carlos were going to do, including Tommie Smith and John Carlos.” Smith and Carlos' gesture on a warm October night has become immortalized in Olympic lore over the last five decades. Their fists in the air have come to symbolize strength in the face of injustice, solidarity against our society's greatest ills. The raising of Smith's fist was a truly spontaneous act. Though the plan for a demonstration had been years in the making. Smith, the son of a field worker and cowboy in north Texas, made his way to California in 1965 as he joined the San Jose State track team. And he quickly helped the program become a national powerhouse. Smith set a world-record in May 1966 as he ran the 200 meters straight in 19.5 seconds, and he won the NCAA men's outdoor track and field championship one month later. Yet Smith's excellence didn't lead to admiration throughout the community. Smith and his fellow athletes were treated as second-class citizens the second they left the track. “San Jose State was the strongest track and field team in history. But nothing was really done about the negatives of being treated less than,” Smith says. “We would break a world record or run a good meet and we would still be relegated back to second-class status when we returned to campus or returned to our communities.” The athletes at San Jose State quickly became tired of the treatment they received outside of the track. And in October 1967, Smith and Co. chose to fight back. Smith and Carlos joined the the Olympic Project for Human Rights, a group founded by sociologist Harry Edwards in an attempt to protest against racial segregation in America and abroad. The group's aims weren't radical, especially by modern standards. But to Smith, they were revolutionary. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Jeen-Yuhs" Part 1

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 58:42

    On today's episode we talk about Kanye West new Netflix documentary, Tinder Swindler and much much more. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Why Black Women don't feel protected" (with Spiritual Sistars)

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 101:30

    Spiritual Sistars Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/5tdM2T8... If you would like to support this podcast click here: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Sarah Rector"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2022 4:23

    Born as the daughter of freedmen in 1902, Sarah Rector rose from humble beginnings to reportedly become the wealthiest black girl in the nation at the age of 11. Rector and her family where African American members of the Muscogee Creek Nation who lived in a modest cabin in the predominantly black town of Taft, Oklahoma, which, at the time, was considered Indian Territory. Following the Civil War, Rector's parents, who were formerly enslaved by Creek Tribe members, were entitled to land allotments under the Dawes Allotment Act of 1887. As a result, hundreds of black children, or “Creek Freedmen minors,” were each granted 160 acres of land as Indian Territory integrated with Oklahoma Territory to form the State of Oklahoma in 1907. While lands granted to former slaves were usually rocky and infertile, Rector's allotment from the Creek Indian Nation was in r the middle of the Glenn Pool oil field and was initially valued at $556.50. Strapped for cash, Rector's father leased his daughter's parcel to a major oil company in February 1911 to help him pay the $30 annual property tax. Two years later, Rector's fortune took a major turn when independent oil driller B.B. Jones produced a “gusher” on her land that brought in 2,500 barrels or 105,000 gallons per day. According to Tonya Bolden, author of Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America (Harry N. Abrams; $21.95), Rector began earning more than $300 a day in 1913. That equates to $7,000 – $8,000 today. She even generated $11,567 in October 1913. Rector's notoriety ballooned just as quickly as her wealth. In September 1913, The Kansas City Star local newspaper published the headline, “Millions to a Negro Girl – Sarah Rector, 10-Year-Old, Has Income of $300 A Day from Oil,” reports Face 2 Face Africa. In January 1914, the newspaper wrote, “Oil Made Pickaninny Rich – Oklahoma Girl With $15,000 A Month gets Many Proposals – Four White Men in Germany Want to Marry the Negro Child That They Might Share Her Fortune.” Meanwhile, the Savannah Tribune wrote, “Oil Well Produces Neat Income – Negro Girl's $112,000 A Year”. Another newspaper dubbed her “the richest negro in the world.” Her fame became widespread, and she received numerous requests for loans, money gifts, and four marriage proposals. At the time, a law required Native Americans, black adults, and children who were citizens of Indian Territory with significant property and money were to be assigned “well-respected” white guardians. As a result, Rector's guardianship switched from her parents to a white man named T.J. Porter. Concerned with her wellbeing and her white financial guardian, early NAACP leaders fought to protect her and her fortune. In 1922, she married Kenneth Campbell, the second African American to own an auto dealership. The couple had three sons and were recognized as local royalty, driving expensive cars and entertaining elites like Joe Louis, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie at their home. They divorced in 1930 and Rector remarried in 1934. Rectors lost most of her wealth during The Great Depression. When she died at age 65 on July 22, 1967, she only had some working oil wells and real estate holdings. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Richard Williams"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 2:15

    “When something bad happens, you have three choices. You can either let it define you, let it destroy you, or you can let it strengthen you.” Richard Dove Williams embodies that statement born February 14, 1942, Richard is an American tennis coach and the father of Venus and Serena Williams. He took tennis lessons from a man known as "Old Whiskey" and decided his future daughters would be tennis professionals when he saw Virginia Ruzici playing on television. Williams says that he wrote up an 85-page plan and started giving lessons to Venus and Serena when they were four and a half and began taking them to the public tennis courts. He would later add that he felt like he took them too early, and the age of six would have been more suitable. Soon he got them into Shreveport tennis tournaments. In 1995, Williams pulled them out of a tennis academy, and coached them himself. Serena won the US Open in 1999; Venus beat Lindsay Davenport to win the 2000 Wimbledon title. After that victory, Richard shouted "Straight Outta Compton!", in reference to a song by N.W.A based in Compton, California, the same area in Los Angeles where the family once resided. He jumped over the NBC broadcasting booth, catching Chris Evert by surprise and performing a triumphant dance. Evert said that the broadcasters "thought the roof was coming down. As a coach Richard has 122 singles titles and 28 doubles titles Thanks to his two amazing daughters. If you would like to learn more about Richard, check out 2021's King Richard starring Will Smith. Or check out 2014's Black and White: The Way I see It Which chronicles his extraordinary life and his relationship with daughters and tennis superstars Venus and Serena Williams. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Toni Morrison"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 5:01

    Chloe Ardelia Wofford, the second of four children from a working-class, black family, was born in Lorain, Ohio, to Ramah (née Willis) and George Wofford.Her mother was born in Greenville, Alabama, and moved north with her family as a child. She was a homemaker and a devout member of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. George Wofford grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. When Wofford was about 15, a group of white people lynched two African-American businessmen who lived on his street. Morrison later said: "He never told us that he'd seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him." Soon after the lynching, George Wofford moved to the racially integrated town of Lorain, Ohio, in the hope of escaping racism and securing gainful employment in Ohio's burgeoning industrial economy. He worked odd jobs and as a welder for U.S. Steel. Traumatized by his experiences of racism, in a 2015 interview Morrison said her father hated whites so much he would not let them in the house. In 1949, she enrolled at Howard University in Washington, D.C., seeking the company of fellow black intellectuals. It was while at Howard that she encountered racially segregated restaurants and buses for the first time. She graduated in 1953 with a B.A. in English and went on to earn a Master of Arts from Cornell University in 1955. Her master's thesis was titled "Virginia Woolf's and William Faulkner's treatment of the alienated."She taught English, first at Texas Southern University in Houston from 1955 to 1957, and then at Howard University for the next seven years. The Bluest Eye was published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston in 1970, when Morrison was aged 39. It was favorably reviewed in The New York Times by John Leonard, who praised Morrison's writing style as being "a prose so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry ... But The Bluest Eye is also history, sociology, folklore, nightmare and music." The novel did not sell well at first, but the City University of New York put The Bluest Eye on its reading list for its new Black studies department, as did other colleges, which boosted sales Morrison died at Montefiore Medical Center in The Bronx, New York City, on August 5, 2019, from complications of pneumonia. She was 88 years old.A memorial tribute was held for Morrison on November 21, 2019, At this gathering she was eulogized by Oprah Winfrey, Angela Davis and Ta-Nehisi Coates.  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Stokely Carmichael

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 4:29

    Kwame Ture born Stokely Carmichael; June 29, 1941, was a prominent organizer in the civil rights movement in the United States and the global Pan-African movement. Born in Trinidad, he grew up in the United States from the age of 11 and became an activist while attending the Bronx High School of Science. He was a key leader in the development of the Black Power movement, first while leading the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), then as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party (BPP), and last as a leader of the All-African People's Revolutionary Party (A-APRP). Carmichael was one of the original SNCC freedom riders of 1961 under Diane Nash's leadership. He became a major voting rights activist in Mississippi and Alabama after being mentored by Ella Baker and Bob Moses. Like most young people in the SNCC, he became disillusioned with the two-party system after the 1964 Democratic National Convention failed to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as official delegates from the state. Carmichael eventually decided to develop independent all-black political organizations, such as the Lowndes County Freedom Organization and, for a time, the national Black Panther Party. Inspired by Malcolm X's example, he articulated a philosophy of Black Power, and popularized it both by provocative speeches and more sober writings. Carmichael became one of the most popular and controversial Black leaders of the late 1960s. J. Edgar Hoover, director of the FBI, secretly identified Carmichael as the man most likely to succeed Malcolm X as America's "black messiah”. The FBI targeted him for personal destruction through its COINTELPRO program, so Carmichael moved to Africa in 1968. He reestablished himself in Ghana, and then Guinea by 1969. There he adopted the name Kwame Ture, and began campaigning internationally for revolutionary socialist Pan-Africanism. Ture died of prostate cancer in 1998 at the age of 57. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Cup of Joe"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 64:19

    This week we discuss Whoopi Goldberg's holocaust controversy, Joe Rogan's use of the "N Word" and much much more. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Angela Davis

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 4:46

    Before the world knew what intersectionality was, the scholar, writer and activist was living it, arguing not just for Black liberation, but for the rights of women and queer and transgender people as well. In 1969, when Davis, then an assistant professor in the philosophy department at the University of California, Los Angeles, was fired at the beginning of the school year for her membership in the Communist Party, and then, after a court ruled the termination illegal, fired again nine months later for using “inflammatory rhetoric” in public speeches. She had recently become close to a trio of Black inmates nicknamed the Soledad Brothers (after the California prison in which they were held) who had been charged with the murder of a white prison guard in January 1970. One, George Jackson, was an activist and writer whom Davis befriended upon joining a committee challenging the charges. In August 1970 — after Jackson's younger brother, Jonathan, used firearms registered to Davis in a takeover of a Marin County courthouse that left four people dead — Davis immediately came under suspicion. In the aftermath of that bloody event, she was charged with three capital offenses, including murder. Overnight, she became an outlaw. Within two weeks of the shootout, J. Edgar Hoover placed Davis on the F.B.I.'s Ten Most Wanted list, making her the third woman ever to be included. A national manhunt ensued before she was detained two months later in a New York motel. President Nixon congratulated the bureau on capturing “the dangerous terrorist Angela Davis.” After her arrest, the chant “Free Angela!” became a global battle cry as the academic — who had studied philosophy in East and West Germany in the late '60s and had been a vocal supporter of the Black Panthers and the anti-Vietnam War movement — became widely viewed on the left as a political prisoner. She spent 18 months in jail before being found not guilty on all charges. During the trial, Davis's profile transformed. Before, she had been a noted scholar. After, she became an international symbol of resistance. In a period when images of Black women in major newspapers or on network television were scarce, Davis's was both ubiquitous and unique. Whether in journalistic photos, respectful drawings or disrespectful caricatures, her gaze was uniformly stern — as if focused on her offscreen accusers — and unbowed. No matter the platform or the publication, she radiated rebellion and intelligence. The consistent theme is a woman both radical and chic. Davis was more likely to be seen than read or heard at the time, but her very existence complicated the white and Black male gaze of what Black women could be. The impact of this representation has lingered in the culture. Consider this: For 50 years, Davis has existed as a pop-cultural reference point as well as a serious academic, one whose ideas were once thought of as extreme but are now part of the popular discourse. TODAY, DAVIS'S HAIR is gray, though it still circles her head like a crown. From the garden of her modest eucalyptus-tree-shaded second home in Mendocino, Calif., she expresses a relaxed optimism about the country's direction. As befits a professor who has taught history of consciousness, critical theory and feminist studies for five decades. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    James Baldwin

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2022 4:23

    Who Was James Baldwin? Writer and playwright James Baldwin published the 1953 novel Go Tell It on the Mountain, receiving acclaim for his insights on race, spirituality and humanity. Other novels included Giovanni's Room, Another Country and Just Above My Head, as well as essays like Notes of a Native Son and The Fire Next Time. James Baldwin was born on August 2, 1924, in Harlem, New York. One of the 20th century's greatest writers, Baldwin broke new literary ground with the exploration of racial and social issues in his many works. He was especially known for his essays on the Black experience in America. 'Go Tell It on the Mountain' Baldwin had his first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, published in 1953. The loosely autobiographical tale focused on the life of a young man growing up in Harlem grappling with father issues and his religion. "Mountain is the book I had to write if I was ever going to write anything else. I had to deal with what hurt me most. I had to deal, above all, with my father," he later said. Gay Literature In 1954, Baldwin received a Guggenheim Fellowship. He published his next novel, Giovanni's Room, the following year. The work told the story of an American living in Paris and broke new ground for its complex depiction of homosexuality, a then-taboo subject. 'The Fire Next Time' In 1963, there was a noted change in Baldwin's work with The Fire Next Time. This collection of essays was meant to educate white Americans on what it meant to be Black. It also offered white readers a view of themselves through the eyes of the African American community. In the work, Baldwin offered a brutally realistic picture of race relations, but he remained hopeful about possible improvements. "If we...do not falter in our duty now, we may be able...to end the racial nightmare." His words struck a chord with the American people, and The Fire Next Time sold more than a million copies. Later Works and Death By the early 1970s, Baldwin seemed to despair over the racial situation. He had witnessed so much violence in the previous decade — especially the assassinations of Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. — caused by racial hatred. This disillusionment became apparent in his work, which employed a more strident tone than in earlier works. Many critics point to No Name in the Street, a 1972 collection of essays, as the beginning of the change in Baldwin's work. He also worked on a screenplay around this time, trying to adapt The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley for the big screen Baldwin also remained an astute observer of race and American culture. In 1985, he wrote The Evidence of Things Not Seen about the Atlanta child murders. Baldwin also spent years sharing his experiences and views as a college professor. In the years before his death, he taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and Hampshire College. Baldwin died on December 1, 1987, at his home in St. Paul de Vence, France. Never wanting to be a spokesperson or a leader, Baldwin saw his personal mission as bearing "witness to the truth." He accomplished this mission through his extensive, rapturous literary legacy. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Fred Hampton

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2022 4:54

    In a 1969 speech Fred Hampton declared, “We say you don't fight racism with racism — we're gonna fight racism with solidarity.” He and his allies knew that the forces against them were so powerful that only by working together would they even begin to achieve equality and justice. The youngest child of Francis and Iberia Hampton, Fred was raised in the Chicago suburbs with his brother and sister. Among his family's acquaintances was Emmett Till, a Black child whom Iberia had babysat. In 1955, when Till was a teenager visiting relatives in Mississippi, he was lynched by local white men. The Hampton family's connection with Till, along with their experience of racial inequity in their suburban community, made Fred keenly aware of racial injustice. While attending high school in Maywood, Illinois, Hampton organized a student section of the NAACP, served on his school's Interracial Cross Section Committee (a club that helped white students confront their racist beliefs), and protested the unjust arrest of Eugene Moore, a classmate who would later become the area's first Black state representative. After graduating from high school with honors, Hampton enrolled in a prelaw program at Triton College, a public college near Maywood. After experiencing a series of negative, occasionally violent, interactions with the police at rallies and demonstrations, in 1968 Hampton parted ways with the by-the-book NAACP and joined the Black Panther Party as one of the Illinois chapter's original members. The party, founded two years earlier in Oakland, California, by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, had originally been intended to organize patrols of Black neighborhoods and protect residents from police brutality. It quickly evolved into a Marxist revolutionary group that called for paying reparations to African Americans for the centuries of exploitation they had endured, for exempting African Americans from the military draft, and for arming African American communities. According to FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, the Black Panthers were “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.” No sooner had the Chicago Black Panthers begun than the FBI began monitoring their activity. Hampton was a possible suspect for what Hoover considered the threat of an emerging “messiah,” a leader who could “unify, and electrify, the militant black nationalist movement.” Fred Hampton was assassinated Dec 4th 1969 at age 21as depicted in 2021's Judas and the Black Messiah. If you would like to learn more about Chairman Fred Hampton check out 2015's The Black Panthers Vanguards of a revolution. Also Jeffrey Haas's “The Assassination of Fred Hampton” : How the FBI and the Chicago Police Murdered a Black Panther --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Ida B Wells

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 3:44

    Ida B. Wells-Barnett was a prominent journalist, activist, and researcher, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In her lifetime, she battled sexism, racism, and violence. As a skilled writer, Wells-Barnett also used her skills as a journalist to shed light on the conditions of African Americans throughout the South. Ida Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi on July 16th, 1862. She was born into slavery during the Civil War. Once the war ended Wells-Barnett's parents became politically active in Reconstruction Era politics. Her parents instilled into her the importance of education. Wells-Barnett enrolled at Rust College but was expelled when she started a dispute with the university president. In 1878, Wells-Barnett went to visit her grandmother. While she was there Wells-Barnett was informed that a yellow fever epidemic had hit her hometown. The disease took both of Wells-Barnett's parents and her infant brother. Left to raise her brothers and sister, she took a job as a teacher so that she could keep the family together. Eventually, Wells-Barnett moved her siblings to Memphis, Tennessee. There she continued to work as an educator. In 1884, Wells-Barnett filed a lawsuit against a train car company in Memphis for unfair treatment. She had been thrown off a first-class train, despite having a ticket. Although she won the case on the local level, the ruling was eventually overturned in federal court. After the lynching of one of her friends, Wells-Barnett turned her attention to white mob violence. She became skeptical about the reasons black men were lynched and set out to investigate several cases. She published her findings in a pamphlet and wrote several columns in local newspapers. Her expose about an 1892 lynching enraged locals, who burned her press and drove her from Memphis. After a few months, the threats became so bad she was forced to move to Chicago, Illinois. In 1893, Wells-Barnett, joined other African American leaders in calling for the boycott of the World's Columbian Exposition. The boycotters accused the exposition committee of locking out African Americans and negatively portraying the black community. In 1895, Wells-Barnett married famed African American lawyer Ferdinand Barnett. Together, the couple had four children. Throughout her career Wells-Barnett, balanced motherhood with her activism. Wells-Barnett traveled internationally, shedding light on lynching to foreign audiences. Abroad, she openly confronted white women in the suffrage movement who ignored lynching. Because of her stance, she was often ridiculed and ostracized by women's suffrage organizations in the United States. Nevertheless, Wells-Barnett remained active the women's rights movement. She was a founder of the National Association of Colored Women's Club which was created to address issues dealing with civil rights and women's suffrage. Although she was in Niagara Falls for the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), her name is not mentioned as an official founder. Late in her career Wells-Barnett focused on urban reform in the growing city of Chicago. She died on March 25th, 1931. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Assata Olugbala Shakur

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 6:26

    Assata ("She who struggles") Olugbala ("for the people") Shakur ("The Thankful One") aka Joanne Chesimard. On May 2 1973, Black Panther activist Assata Shakur, was pulled over by the New Jersey State Police, shot twice and then charged with murder of a police officer. Assata spent six and a half years in prison under brutal circumstances before escaping out of the maximum-security wing of the Clinton Correctional Facility for Women in New Jersey in 1979 and moving to Cuba. In the 1960s, she participated in various struggles: the black liberation movement, the student rights movement, and the movement to end the war in Vietnam. She joined the Black Panther Party. By 1969 the Black Panther Party had become the number one organization targeted by the FBI's COINTELPRO program. because the Black Panther Party demanded the total liberation of black people, J. Edgar Hoover called it "greatest threat to the internal security of the country" and vowed to destroy it and its leaders and activists. Shakur has lived in Cuba since 1984, despite US government efforts to have her returned. She has been on the FBI Most Wanted Terrorists list since 2013 as Joanne Deborah Chesimard and was the first woman to be added to this list In an open letter to Castro, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus Representative Maxine Waters of California later explained that many members of the Caucus (including herself) were against Shakur's extradition but had mistakenly voted for the bill, which was placed on the accelerated suspension calendar, generally reserved for non-controversial legislation. In the letter, Waters explained her opposition, calling COINTELPRO "illegal, clandestine political persecution". --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Percy Lavon Julian

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 4:53

    Born in Montgomery, Alabama, the son of a railway mail clerk and the grandson of enslaved people. In an era when African Americans faced prejudice in virtually all aspects of life, not least in the scientific world, he succeeded against the odds. Inadequately prepared by his high school, he was accepted at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, as a sub-freshman, meaning that he had to take high-school courses concurrently with his freshman courses. Majoring in chemistry, he graduated as valedictorian of his class in 1920. After graduation he taught chemistry at Fisk University for two years before winning an Austin Fellowship to Harvard University, where he completed a master's degree in organic chemistry. After Harvard he returned to teaching at West Virginia State College and Howard University. In 1929 Julian traveled to the University of Vienna, Austria, to begin doctoral studies on the chemistry of medicinal plants. Two years later, with degree in hand, he and a Viennese colleague, Josef Pikl, took positions back in the United States at Howard and two years later moved to DePauw. There they accomplished the first total synthesis of physostigmine, the active principle of the Calabar bean, used since the end of the 19th century to treat glaucoma. Physostigmine, an alkaloid, eases the constriction of outflow channels from the eye's aqueous humor to relieve high pressure there, which, if left untreated, damages the retina and eventually causes blindness. Meanwhile researchers in many countries were seeking innovative and cost-effective ways to synthesize steroids, including cortisone and the sex hormones. German chemists discovered that the steroid stigmasterol, which Julian had obtained as a by-product of the physostigmine synthesis but was also obtainable from soybeans, could be used in the synthesis of certain sex hormones, including progesterone, a female sex hormone that was important in helping pregnant women avoid miscarriages. In pursuit of this lead, in 1936 Julian wrote to the Glidden Company in Chicago, requesting samples of their soybean oil. Through a series of events he wound up being hired by Glidden instead, as their director of research in the Soya Division, where he set about figuring out ways to make new products from soybeans. In 1948 scientists at the Mayo Clinic announced their landmark discovery of cortisone, which had remarkable effects on rheumatoid arthritis, and Julian jumped into the exciting competition to synthesize cortisone inexpensively. Cortisone is a cortical hormone of the adrenal gland. In 1949 Julian developed a new synthesis for a related substance (called “Substance S”) also present in the adrenal cortex and differing from cortisone by only an oxygen atom. From this substance he was able to synthesize both cortisone and hydrocortisone. Hydrocortisone and its derivatives today are more widely prescribed than cortisone products, and most industrial syntheses still begin along the same route that Julian pioneered. Julian located a wild sweet potato in Guatemala. He figured out how to synthesize cortisone from yams, for pennies a gram. Julian remained at Glidden until 1954, when he founded his own company, Julian Laboratories of Franklin Park, Illinois, and Mexico City (which he eventually sold to Smith, Kline and French) for Millions of dollars. Throughout his life he was socially active in groups seeking to advance conditions for African Americans, helping to found the Legal Defense and Educational Fund of Chicago and serving on the boards of several other organizations and universities --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    Carter G Woodson "The Father of Black History"

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 4:11

    Carter G. Woodson (December 19, 1875 – April 3, 1950) The son of an enslaved African, Carter G. Woodson was born in New Canton, Virginia is the reason for Black History Month. His father helped Union soldiers during the Civil War, and moved his family to West Virginia when he heard that Huntington was building a high school for blacks. Coming from a large, poor family, Carter could not regularly attend school. Through self-instruction, Woodson mastered the fundamentals of common school subjects by age 17. He began high school at the age of 20 and he received his diploma in less than two years. He then proceeded to study at Berea College, the University of Chicago, the Sorbonne, and Harvard University, where he earned a Ph.D. in 1912. He recognized and acted upon the importance of a people having an awareness and knowledge of their contributions to humanity. Dr. Woodson is known as the Father of Black History. Carter G Woodson founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1915 to train Black historians and to collect, preserve, and publish documents on Black life and Black people. He also founded the Journal of Negro History (1916). He spent his life working to educate all people about the vast contributions made by Black men and women throughout history. After earning a doctoral degree, he continued teaching in the public schools, later joining the faculty at Howard University as a professor and served as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. After leaving Howard University because of differences with its president, Dr. Woodson devoted the rest of his life to historical research. He worked to preserve the history of African Americans and accumulated a collection of thousands of artifacts and publications. He noted that African American contributions "were overlooked, ignored, and even suppressed by the writers of history textbooks and the teachers who use them." He concluded that the history books were written to conclude that the Negro has never contributed anything to the progress of mankind. In 1926, Woodson single-handedly pioneered the celebration of "Negro History Week", for the second week in February, to coincide with marking the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The week was later extended to the full month of February and renamed Black History Month as we know it today. At the time Carter G. Woodson argued that the teaching of black history was essential to ensure the physical and intellectual survival of the race within broader society. "If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. The American Indian left no continuous record. He did not appreciate the value of tradition; and where is he today? The Hebrew keenly appreciated the value of tradition, as is attested by the Bible itself. In spite of worldwide persecution, therefore, he is a great factor in our civilization" --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Resetting the Room"

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 22:30

    Ever so often we have to remind you what we are here for. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "VID PAIN PAPI"

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 61:30

    On today's episode we discuss Regina King, "Bumble Date", Judge Timothy Walmsley and much much more.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Blacks for Trump?"

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 69:16

    On today's episode we talk about China's artificial sun, Hostage situation in DFW and much much more. This weeks playlist: https://music.apple.com/us/playlist/p... To support this podcast go to: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Ball Drop"

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 66:33

    HAPPY NEW YEAR! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Algorithm"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 58:22

    Happy Holiday's from the unlabeled family. This week we discuss New Music, more Metaverse talk, opportunities and investments. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Spiderman Into The Metaverse"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 72:09

    This week we discuss Gervonta Davis new opponent, The Meta Verse and Rick Ross alleged beef with Meek Mill.   --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Welcome to Atlanta"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 67:29

    Today we Discuss Tiger Woods finally addressing Media, Felcia Moore plans to shut down Atlanta Strip clubs "allegedly" and much more. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Internet Down"

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:33

    RIP Virgil Abloh! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Proper Preparation"

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 95:06

    Today we the untimely demise of Young Dolph, Dababy domestic dispute and how to handle situations like that and Much Much More. If you like what we do here and would like to support click here. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "KA'RON"

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 73:53

    Today we discuss Kanye West Drink Champs interview, Travis Scott's ASTRO WORLD Tragedy, and Much Much More. If you like what we do here and would like to support click here. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Where There's a Will There's a Way"

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 55:00

    Today we discuss Will Smith Memoirs. By discuss I mean we only talk about his love for Stockard Channing. We also discuss Joe Budden controversy. Download The friend of the show Nicole aka Body Me Nicole's app here: https://ericanicole.app/ https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    " I hate it here"

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 62:56

    I give up! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Black Dynamite"

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:48

    This week we discuss a few things Joe Biden has done or hasn't done for the black community. We also have a brief discussion about the DC Fandome event and the Upcoming Gervonta Davis Vs. Rolando Romero fight. If you like what we do here and would like to support click here. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Norwegian Jeremy Renner"

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 59:50

    The whole crew is back. If you like what we do here and would like to support click here. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Squid Pro Quo"

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:32

    After a long hiatus we are back to discuss where we have been. If you like what we do here and would like to support click here. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

    "Trash Bag Chronicles"

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 61:28

    Today we discuss Bum Boyfriends, Minority Mindset and much much more. https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support. Don't forget to grab merch at: https://www.nolabelmerch.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unlabeled/support

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