Podcasts about United Airlines

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Airline in the United States

  • 1,724PODCASTS
  • 2,835EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 11, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about United Airlines

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Latest podcast episodes about United Airlines

AVIATE with Shaesta
Vanessa Blacknall-Jamison was the first woman and non-pilot Chairwoman of OBAP. Mentorship has been her brand her entire career.

AVIATE with Shaesta

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 55:58


Vanessa Blacknall-Jamison is our podcast guest today. Some of you may be familiar with Vanessa's leadership from OBAP (the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals) or her advocacy and hard work with the FAA.Vanessa grew up in Denver, Colorado, and was introduced to aviation by her mother, a Flight Attendant talent recruiter. Inspired by her mother's ability to connect with people and her work in aviation, Vanessa started her career as a Flight Attendant. In the last 40-plus years, Vanessa has worked for United Airlines, the FAA, a Member of the Board of Trustees Foundation for the Civil Air Patrol, and the first woman and non-pilot Chairwoman of OBAP. Mentorship and connecting with people are at the core of everything Vanessa does.In this conversation, Vanessa and I talk about her bringing, work-life balance, commitment to lifting minorities and women in aviation, and plans for the future.

KGO 810 Podcast
Mark Thompson: Passenger Slides Down Emergency Wing During Flight

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:30


A United Airlines passenger opened an emergency exit on a moving plane and slid down the emergency wing in Chicago. Mark Thompson reviews the unbelievable decision in "Stories From The Sky". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
Mark Thompson: Passenger Slides Down Emergency Wing During Flight

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:30


A United Airlines passenger opened an emergency exit on a moving plane and slid down the emergency wing in Chicago. Mark Thompson reviews the unbelievable decision in "Stories From The Sky". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Don't Buy Freedom, Buy Memories That Freedom Will Give You

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 21:45


Are you an entrepreneur who wants to scale your business without all the stress and hassle?    In this episode, Steve Rozenberg discusses how to protect your portfolio and achieve long-term success, as well as how to find a good real estate partner who can help you grow. He also talks about if you're not able to scale your business, it's not a business. It's a hobby. So make sure you have the right people in place and focus on monetization, focus on product, and focus on sales. After that, you can worry about the rest of the business stuff!     [00:01 - 06:41]  If You Own One Rental Property, You Own a Business  How Steve became a commercial real estate coach and influencer Steve learned that his safe and secure career was nowhere near as safe and secure as he thought How people don't understand the goal of owning an apartment complex  To make money and have it sold to someone else for a higher value    [06:42 - 15:05] Own Your Job, Not Your Business  The keys to understanding your customer's buying process Start with monetization Systemize your business so that repetitive tasks are done perfectly and efficiently, and outsource any necessary tasks to help grow your business If you are the bottleneck of your business, work to remove yourself from that position so that your business can grow How freedom can be lackluster if it's not used to create purpose Tips to avoid feeling overwhelmed   [13:42 - 20:59] Gain Your Freedom with Virtual Assistants   Steve talks about how he and his team had to unite their definition of their goals  Why you should create processes and procedures and outsource to virtual assistants The importance of communication and accountability between you and your VA's  The benefits of outsourcing and why it will gain back your freedom    [21:00 - 21:47] Closing Segment Reach out to Steve!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “So they think they want freedom… Let me just say I think that's **** because you can sell all of your *** tomorrow. Go live in your car, and you can have all the freedom you want. But what you won't have is the memory that you want. So we're not buying freedom. We're actually buying the memories that freedom is giving us.” - Steve Rozenberg  “You can have the best product in the world. But if you don't understand how to not only get the money, but to get the right money from the right target of grading your clients… You need to understand that common thread of what is their problem and how does your product solve their problem.” -  Steve Rozenberg  -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Steve Rozenberg LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/steve-rozenberg-20593553 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/steven.rozenberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rozenbergsteve Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCck4Ww77C6IoZQDPne9fHgQ  Webiste: https://steverozenberg.com    Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Steve Rozenberg  00:00 So they think they want freedom, right? You hear all the time, like, why do you want this? I want freedom to live my life? Well you know what? Because you could sell all of your *** tomorrow, and go live in your car and you can have all the freedom you want, right? But you know, what you won't have is you won't have the memory that you want. So we're not buying freedom, we're actually buying the memories that that freedom is giving us.   Intro  00:23 Welcome to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.    Sam Wilson  00:34 Steve Rosenberg is an international commercial airline pilot, who after the tragedies of 911, was forced to realize that his safe and secure career was nowhere near as safe and secure as he thought it would be. He chose commercial real estate, and he's been able since then, to control his own destiny. Steve, welcome to the show.   Steve Rozenberg  00:51 Hey, thanks for having me, man. Appreciate it.   Sam Wilson  00:52 Hey, the pleasure is mine. Three questions I ask every guest to come to the show in 90 seconds or less. Where did you start. Where are you now? And how did you get there?   Steve Rozenberg  00:59 I started my real estate path on the day after two days after 911 When I got my furlough notice from an airline. And that was where I started. Where I am now is I am a coach and an influencer working with businesses and real estate people. I was showing them how to grow and scale their business to run without them. And how I got there is the last 20 years in between of a lot of fucking mistakes, a lot of hard work and a lot of listening to smarter people than myself to learn how to scale and grow a business.   Sam Wilson  01:29 Got it, man, that's awesome. And maybe I miss interpreted this in your bio there. Do you actively invest in commercial real estate or no?   Steve Rozenberg  01:37 I do. Yeah.   Sam Wilson  01:37  Okay, cool. All right. I thought that was the case. It was like, wait, I think I added that part in your bio on my own ad lib. Hey, that's fantastic. You are currently still a pilot with United Airlines. And you fly around the world all the time.   Steve Rozenberg  01:50 Yep. Yeah, I fly a Boeing 777. Actually, as we speak. Right now I'm in Maui, Hawaii, on a layover. And so I get to travel the world, I get to do what I want to do. I don't have to worry about money, I don't have to worry about anything except doing what I want to do when I want to do it. Because I built in scale the business that basically can take care of me for the rest of my life.   Sam Wilson  02:09 What business have you built in scale that is your primary driver of revenue?   Steve Rozenberg  02:14 So my initial business that I built, scaled, and eventually sold to venture capital was a property management company out of Texas. We were the fastest growing management company at the time sold that to venture capital did that whole thing with stock options and all that stuff. That was kind of the thing that got me accelerated to the next level of my life. So the next level of my life now is I show people how to do what I did, because I show... The way that we built our business was we built it on the fundamentals of what I've been trained for the past 30 years, which is an airline pilot. So understanding how systems structure procedures, checklists, to make a business truly run without you, so that you don't have to be involved.    Steve Rozenberg  02:58 And when I say business, look, if you own one rental property, you own a business, you just may not know it, if you own an apartment, syndication, whatever it is, that is a business. And if you don't have a business plan, you don't have a structure, you don't have a model, you will fail, that business will run you into the ground, or you will die with that business on your back, and you will not have the life you wanted. Because you chose not to do the work on the forefront to be successful. So you know, fail to plan, plan to fail, all that stuff you hear but the reality is, is I have learned that you have got the devils in the details and how you do the little things is how you do everything, especially in business, I'm sure as you know.   Sam Wilson  03:35 Absolutely. And we see so much of that in the you know, the mom and pop operators. Yeah, I mean, yeah. And that's quite honestly, where a lot of value is created. For those of us coming in with a more sophisticated approach. You go…   Steve Rozenberg  03:50 Well, here's an example, right? You buy an apartment complex, what is that you're basically buying a business that is not being run correctly. And you feel that you can come in and run it correctly. It's the same, for all intents purposes, it's the same four walls in a roof. It's the business model running inside the four walls of the roof. Now you could take it make a lot of money, sell that same business to someone else, and they run it into the ground. So when you look at how people get so caught up in the actual strategy, meaning the house, the apartment, the syndication, whatever it is, but they don't realize they don't take the time to focus on building the business around it for a successful exit and a successful outcome. And that's where people fail.   Sam Wilson  04:30 Where do you start with people when they come to you and say, Hey, Steve, I need your help. I don't even know where to start. What's the first thing you look at?   Steve Rozenberg  04:38 First, I want to know what the hell did you do and how bad is the situation because people don't come for help because they want to help they come for help because they've totally screwed something up. And they go, I need you. I need you to save me is what they're saying. You know, people don't do what they want to do. They do what they have to do. So when they're at that position, they have to do something. So my first question to anybody is I want to know, where does this go? What is the goal of this?   Steve Rozenberg  05:04 Now, here's the thing, a lot of times people don't understand the goal, a goal has to be something that is a date and time that has a result. For example, you may say, like, I want to sell this deal for, you know, 25x of what I bought it for, based on these derivatives of NOI cap rate everything else, right? Or if it's a business, it doesn't matter, I want to know, what does that look like to you? And can you clearly define that to me? Then what I do is everyone they work with, I will leave, have them stay out of the room. And I will ask each one of them, you tell me, what does this look like? What is the goal of what we're doing? Everybody has a different answer. So I'm like, this is your problem, you guys are all going in different directions. Nobody knows what you, the leader are trying to impart upon your team. So you have bad leadership, you know, there's no bad team members, there's bad leaders. And so if you look at people that are bad leaders, they don't, they're not leaders, they're managers. And people mistake that. And so my first question when I work with people is I want to know,    Steve Rozenberg  06:03 There's three things to make a successful business three things. And if you're watching this, I would suggest you write this down. The first thing is monetization. So monetization is the sales and marketing, this is getting the frickin money, right? You can have the best product in the world. But if you don't understand how to not only get the money, but to get the right money from the right target of grading your clients A through D, firing the D's, keeping the C's and understanding the common thread between A's and B's, and I won't go into the detail, but understanding that common thread of what is their problem? And how does your product solve their problem? And that's the marketing message to the A's and B's because that's who you're going after. So that's monetization, then you got to figure out how do you get recurring revenue from your A's and B clients? And more importantly, they hang around like minded people? How do you create a referral system to get your A's and B's to refer people to you, because that brings down what's called your client acquisition costs. Right? So the first thing is monetization, and becoming that go to brand like that in the spa industry. You think of Jacuzzi in the tissue industry, you think of Kleenex, in your industry, who do they think of are you that go to brand. So that's the first thing. The second thing is the systematization and the admin of your business. So what I mean by that is, you know, a business is made up of repetition tasks done over and over again to perfection. And the definition of a business is a commercial, profitable enterprise that runs without you, and it has a sale date on it. So if you break down that sentence, commercial, profitable, enterprise is monetization. It running without you part is the systematization of your business, and having a sale date, I'll explain about that in a minute. So let's talk about the systematization of your business. First thing you have to do when you own a business is you've got to systemize it, then you automate it, and then you outsource it right now, that could be outsourcing to a company and employee or virtual assistant, whatever. If you have to be there involved in your business every day, well, you don't own a business, you own a job, right? And so you have to understand, are you the bottleneck, there's so many people, I'm sure as you do, so many people I've talked to that I work with, and I'm talking to them, and I tell them, You know what you are the problem. You are the reason this business is not growing, because you have ego and pride. And you think you're more important than the business. And the reality is, is when you're a leader and you're the leader of the business, you have to be selfless. And a lot of people who run a business syndications apartments, they want to pound their chest and say how proud they are. And it's their deal and get out of their way. That's ego. That's pride. That's the success inhibitor. So the last part of that sentence is the third thing you need, which is the scalability and scalability of your business. Meaning, what is the sale date of that business. And when I say that, if somebody cannot give me a specific date, like February 1 2023, I am selling this deal. If you can't do that, then that goes into Sunday calendar, which is the busiest day on the calendar because it never happens. So the reason you have to have that is you have to have a finite date and work everything backwards from that sale date. And the scalability side is could I sit in any role in your business in your operation structure, sit down at a desk, open up their systems manual, read the manual, pull out the checklist Operations Guide, do that job without ever having to talk to you? Because if not, how do I do this in multiple cities? So when we built our business, we scaled in multiple cities, and 60% of our company was outsourced to Mexico with virtual assistants. So we had to master and understand how do you outsource that role, so that we could grow exponentially by having a command center that we could go into any city and so I tell people could you go into Tulsa, Dallas, Denver and exactly imprint your business model without having to talk to anyone that's a far fetched I get, I get that's pie in the sky. But if you don't even have a semblance of that you are never going to grow to scale your company, which means it will run you into the ground. That's the reality. It's not a company, it's a job.   Steve Rozenberg  10:06 And the problem a lot of times is many people go into real estate, right? So a lot of times, I'll ask people, you asked me the first question, and I'll ask people, why are you doing this? And they will go on maybe a five minute rants of them telling me what they don't want in life. I don't want to be told what to do. I don't want to have a nine to five. I don't want this. I don't want that. And I'll sit there. I'll listen. And when they're done, I'll you know, you don't. And they're like, yeah, like, Okay, my question was, what do you want? You just went through a whole story of what you don't want. That wasn't what I asked you. Right? Tell me what you want. And so what happens is, they'll tell me, I don't know. Like, the really, I'm like, think about this, what do you want? So they think they want freedom, right? You hear all the time? Like, why do you want this? I want freedom to live my life? Well, you don't let me just say, I think that's ***. Because you could sell all of your *** tomorrow, go live in your car, and you can have all the freedom you want, right? But you know, what you won't have is you won't have the memory that you want. So we're not buying freedom, we're actually buying the memories that that freedom is giving us. Let's say I buy multifamily. I'm making a *** of money. And I go, I have the freedom. But what am I going to do? Well, I want to go have dinner in Greece with my wife on the Mediterranean. Now, that's the memory I want to create. Right? The Freedom does, you could go do that. But you may not like the results, you know, maybe you're flying and coach, whatever. So I tell people do not focus on the freedom, you're cutting yourself shy of that focus on the memory because look, at the end of the day, I can't take back last week, if it was a good memory or a bad memory, all I can do is have it in my mind. So when I sold my business, yeah, I made a *** of money, seven figures. That was great. But it didn't change the memory of it. And there's nothing I could do. I can buy more cool memories, but there's nothing else I could do. I have all the freedom I want. And once you have that freedom, and I tell people this and it's like it's hard to explain it to people that don't have it. But I tell them, once you have that freedom, it's very lackluster. Having the freedom to do what you want. If you're aimlessly walking around doing nothing, there's no purpose. So create memories. So that was my long story.   Sam Wilson  12:08 No, I love it. Man. That was a good sermon right there. That was good stuff. I love that because it is pointless. I mean, you know, there's no perpetual novelties. And so when you don't have any reason, it's like, it's why retirees work at Walmart, you know? Exactly. You know, come on, welcome to Walmart, because otherwise, I made a bunch of money, and I don't have to do anything. And now I'm bored to tears. So and that doesn't sound like any fun. Is it challenging for you when you sit down next to your co pilot? And I mean, you guys are operating in just completely different universes. You got a guy that's probably on a career track work in the airlines. That's all he knows. I mean, how do those conversations shake out in the cockpit? I'm just curious.   Steve Rozenberg  12:49 Yeah, it's interesting for me, because, you know, I love flying. I love what I do. But I also know it's a job. And it can be taken away at any moment.  And I'm aware of that, and I don't really give a ***, right. I love what I do. But I'm okay if that happens, because I'm fine. So when I hear people talking about, oh, the union and this now, don't get me wrong, as airline pilots, you can make anywhere between, you know, 250 to $500,000 a year living a good life, right? I mean, it's not small amount of money. So it's not like these guys are paupers. They're not unintelligent people. But you know, what they are, is their employees, their employees by nature. And so what happens is, it's hard for me any employee that is living out of fear of them taking away from you, it's always hard to have that conversation. Because as a business owner, I kind of understand sometimes when the airline makes a decision and does something from a business owner perspective. Now, as a union employee, I may be like, yeah, that's ***. But as an owner, I go kind of get it. So to answer your question, I do something that's a little bit different. And I'm a published author. So some people have actually read my books that know me from the airline, and some would just kind of awkward. But what's interesting is I do a lot of compartmentalizing in my life. And I'm not saying this is the right thing or wrong thing to do. But what I do is, if I am talking to someone about flying, I keep it in that box. If I'm talking to someone about real estate, I keep it in that box. And if I'm talking to someone about the gym, I keep that in that box. I don't cross over like people flying don't really give a *** about me working out and people working out really don't care about real estate. I don't cross those over. Because I don't think a lot of times when we're starting to get into this world of real estate, we want to shout from the rooftops. We want to tell everybody, not everybody cares, or even wants to see us do good, right? Because it's a self reflection on us. If all of a sudden if you're like, Hey, man, I'm killing it in real estate. And we started together. I'm gonna go like, "Aw man, I should have done that one. And I like I'm so lazy." Where if you fail, I go see, I told you, you shouldn't have done it. You should get a job like we have. So instead of fighting that fight of the perpetual employee, I just don't say anything. I listen to them and they talk Yep, whatever. And I just do my deal. That's just me.   Sam Wilson  14:54 That's interesting. I mean, again it because it's a lot less stressful. I was just curious if those conversations ever run full or like...    Steve Rozenberg  15:02 look, I'm sure like when you go see family, and they're like, What do you do again? How do you, you know, try to explain it like, oh, that you know, is it legal? Is it immoral? It? But you know, but you have to have that conversation. Otherwise, I just don't say anything. I'm like, "I just do real estate."    Sam Wilson  15:16 Bingo. Yeah, I get that question all the time. Like, you run a like, even for my own siblings, you do a podcast? Yeah. What is that? Yeah. You do the daily real estate? That's interesting.   Steve Rozenberg  15:27 And then move on. Yeah, like, whatever, like, whatever.   Sam Wilson  15:29 I don't know what that means. But cool, man. So what are some of the things you know, after you get through that initial question? You know, drilling down and getting systems and manuals put together is a laborious task. Is there any way around it?   Steve Rozenberg  15:44 No, there's really not, you know, you can template stuff. But the reality is, is, you know, when I first learned about this, we had a guy, I'll tell you, we had a guy come into our office, and we were just we had growing pains. And we had a lot of challenges in our company. And this guy came in and again, he said, tell us what you do. So we told him and had everyone leave the room and did one at a time. And we all had different answers. And he's like, this is your problem. So this guy for two years was in our business, structuring and systematizing, our company. Now, in the Property Management realm, typically every business has anywhere between 8 and 11 systems and processes and procedures that they function with all the time. Every business, it's about 18. In property management, it's about 19. So there's several more because you have almost three clients, you have a tenant, you have an owner, and you have a contractor, and there has to be processes for everybody. And look, nobody likes us in the management company. We're like the Trashman of the industry. They call you to fire you or yell at you. That's the only thing right? So all we can do is have processes and procedures. And that's why we were able to once we did this, we are able to outsource to virtual assistants very effectively, because we knew what we were doing. And we knew.    Steve Rozenberg  16:54 So one of the things I do, I'll give you to answer your question. When I first started coaching people, one of the first things that I have them do and people watching is a great tool for you is I have them do a time study. It's a two week time study. And so there's three parts to this. So again, you want to see how much food you're eating, write down your food, you want to see where your money's going write down your ledger's, you want to see where your time is going to a time study. So what I have them do is from the time they wake up to the time they go to bed, we track every single minute of the day, I don't give a *** what they're doing email, social media driving, don't care. So they have to track it. Okay, that's the first part. Second part of this equation is they have to totalize up driving two and a half hours on the phone for our social media one hour, I don't care. That's not the reason I want them to do it. But we have to block it. The last part is they give me an executive summary, telling me how do you think your day went today? Tell me I think your day one. And after one week of you doing this, and every night, they have to send it to me. So they have to sit and I explained to them, the day you don't send it is the day you will never hear from me again. And yes, you've already paid. So I can't make you want this, you have to want this. I'm not here to be your friend. I'm here to make you successful. So you want this done, we're going to do this, but you're gonna do it on my terms. So that's just my deal. I've got too many people that want my time. And if they don't, then that's fine. So once they do this within week, number one, they will actually come back to me and be like, I know what I'm doing wrong. Week number two is fixing it. So the problem is if I said, Hey, Sam, stop doing all the stupid *** like, you don't need to this, you wouldn't be like, Oh, no, I don't do those things. But when you actually write it down, and it's coming from you, and you have to tell me how your day went, night and day difference. So then what we do is we take those things, and we say, okay, week number two is what are the low level low enjoyment tasks that you're doing that are minimum wage activities? Yep, we start basically separating the egg yolk and the egg white. And then we go, okay, these are things that we can look at outsourcing to virtual assistants. So now we need to create systems on how to do those things. And we start Systemising this for the VA's. And that is how we start systematizing their life in their business.    Steve Rozenberg  19:01 I've got a personal virtual assistant, she actually probably just want to book this call. But she runs my life. She runs my calendar, she runs my flight she runs I mean, you name it, a lot of people think of when they think of a VA they think of just business, right? So wrong way to look at this is an extension of you, everything you do. And so the more that, you know, look, think of it this way, if you get a virtual assistant, right, and I had a company that actually placed them, we got so good at this. But think about this, if I get a VA I'm gaining back 40 hours of my life every single week. How much more productive Could you be? Because here's something that people don't realize, one five minute phone call, one call that is equal to 23 minutes of lost time. So you get 10 calls a day, that's 230 minutes on average of lost productivity when you go oh, man, I don't know what I did today. I was just putting out fires that's living a reactive life and live in a reactive business. Right. So what if you never had to take those calls and you could focus on high income activities. And now you go you know But I don't need to take these calls that's handled. So again, that's how we ran our company. And that's how we were able to scale, which is one of the reasons we got acquired is because they're like, how are you guys doing this. And so we show them what we did and how we did it. Now, we took my knowledge of being a pilot with systems and checklists and procedures. And we basically use that of leverage and scalability to grow our company, which it was the best way. So I kind of took you through a path there. But that's kind of the best way to do it. In my opinion,   Sam Wilson  20:27 Steve, I've enjoyed this man, I love the energy you bring to it. It's your full on. And that speaks to me. So thanks for taking the time to come on today. How fun it is to be an airline pilot, why you love what you're doing, how you've protected and insulated your portfolio so that you really don't care if they fire you, but you get to go out and fly and have fun. And yet at the same time, your ability to scale and build systems and help people all around the world. I think it's absolutely fascinating. So thank you for doing that. If our listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you what is the best way to do that,   Steve Rozenberg  20:59 so they can follow me up on my website, Steve rosenberg.com. They can follow me on all the social media channels, Instagram, @Rosenbergsteve, YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn, all those but I'm very accessible. happy to chat, happy to answer questions. I do coaching. I do masterminds. I speak all over the world. People have a question, feel free to call me and I'll be happy to help   Sam Wilson  21:20 Steve. Thanks again, man. Appreciate it. Thanks, brother. Take care.    Sam Wilson  21:23 Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Podcast if you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple podcast, Spotify, Google podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen, if you can do that for us. That would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories. So appreciate you listening and thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
Unabomber, un fou terrorise l'Amérique

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 24:54


À la fin des années 1970 aux États-Unis, un mystérieux terroriste envoie des colis piégés bourrés d'explosifs. Les deux premiers s'adressaient à des professeurs d'université, le troisième ciblait un avion de ligne, tandis que le quatrième visait le président de la compagnie aérienne United Airlines. Les colis étaient constitués de bombes artisanales qui ont fait des blessés, mais pas de mort.

Trip FM
Lito Sousa: Desmistificando os mistérios da aviação

Trip FM

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


Dono do canal Aviões e Músicas, que soma mais de 2 milhões de inscritos, o mecânico fala sobre acidentes, medo de voar e o impacto O que realmente aconteceu no acidento com os Mamonas Assassinas? Qual é o aeroporto mais perigoso? Quantos litros um Boeing 777 faz por quilômetro? Todas essas perguntas são respondidas no canal do YouTube Aviões e Músicas, com mais de 2 milhões de inscritos. Lito Sousa, um mecânico de aviões com 36 anos de profissão transformado em influenciador digital, aproveita o conhecimento enciclopédico que adquiriu nas últimas décadas para desvendar de uma forma divertida mitos e acidentes que fascinam não só os aficionados por aviação, mas todos aqueles que gostam de uma boa história. Nascido de uma família pobre do sertão do Rio Grande do Norte, Joselito Geraldo de Sousa começou a carreira aos 14 anos em um curso técnico no Guarujá. Desde lá, foi funcionário da Varig, Transbrasil e United Airlines. Mas no fim do ano passado, ele precisou deixar a profissão para se dedicar exclusivamente aos seus vídeos. Recentemente, já aos 53 anos, realizou também o sonho de se tornar piloto. Em entrevista para o Trip FM, o especialista contou sobre a suas origens, falou do último acidente com a China Eastern, de medo de voar, discordou do documentário da Netflix “Queda Livre”, sobre o Boeing Max, e explicou a ejeção dos pilotos da esquadrilha da fumaça no último dia 28. Confira no play nesta matéria ou procure o Trip FM no Spotify. [IMAGE=https://revistatrip.uol.com.br/upload/2022/05/62753eda67c5a/lito-avioes-youtube-tripfm-mh.jpg; CREDITS=Divulgação; LEGEND=Lito; ALT_TEXT=Lito] Trip. Uma questão delicada na aviação é a emissão de carbono. Pelo que eu consigo enxergar não existe uma solução próxima para isso, ou estou enganado? Lito Sousa. Com o peso das baterias, aviões elétricos não vão passar de duas horas de voo. Aeronaves movidas a hidrogênio são de fato a missão zero, já que o resultado da queima de combustível é a água. A partir do momento em que os aviões desses começarem a voar nós vamos ter um planeta muito mais úmido. Não é algo que só a aviação vai participar, é preciso mudar toda a estrutura do aeroporto. Como você vai abastecer um avião desse com um combustível muito mais volátil e perigoso? Essa já é uma tecnologia avançada. A indústria vai passar por uma transformação. Acho que nem mesmo durante as grandes guerras houve um impacto tão grande na aviação quanto durante a pandemia por Covid-19. Queria que você falasse sobre esse cenário. A aviação tem duas características: é resiliente e aprende com os erros. Antes da pandemia, houve o aprendizado com os ataques do 11 de setembro e com a epidemia de SARS. Foram dois baques que deixaram aviões no chão. O que aconteceu de importante com a Covid-19 foram os protocolos criados dentro do avião para diminuir a contaminação. Uma próxima pandemia já será muito diferente para a aviação. A minha impressão é que acidentes são, na maioria dos casos, causados por erros humanos. É verdade? O fator humano é preponderante nos acidentes de aviação. Cerca de 90% dos desastres são causados por erros de pessoas. Nem sempre é imperícia, mas existem diversos erros que vão se acumulando até se transformarem em um desastre. É por ser complexa a fisiologia de um acidente que eles não acontecem o tempo inteiro.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Man arrested after jumping out of United Airlines plane that was arriving at O'Hare

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 14:32


Also in the news: Mayor Lightfoot expected to select site for the city's first casino; Indiana taxpayers begin to receive extra cash due to budget surplus; bicyclist struck and killed by hit-and-run driver on the Northwest side; Transportation secretary pays visit to launch Joliet bus station; Indiana city to pay former Chicago man millions after wrongful conviction; and much more. 

The Real Estate UnSalesperson
The Introvert Hiding In Plain Sight with Jonathan Pritchard

The Real Estate UnSalesperson

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 37:34


#128 - How can an introvert Realtor get comfortable being the center of attention? How can we perform our best when it's “showtime?”My guest on this episode of The Real Estate UnSalesperson podcast, Jonathan Pritchard, answers these questions. He is a performer and makes his living in front of an audience – and – he is an introvert.We may not perform up on stage like Jonathan, but we have our own showtime in front of buyers and sellers to earn their business.This episode is filled with great information on how we can be at our best when it's showtime.Meet Jonathan PritchardJonathan Pritchard is an author, consultant, and keynote speaker with a client list that includes BP, Discovery, United Airlines, and more. His work focuses on the power of influence and applied psychology in sales, negotiations, presentations, and beyond. When he's not traveling for work you can find him at home in Asheville NC with his wife.Connect with Jonathan and check out his books at ICanReadMinds.com.Get The UnSalesyGramWant ideas on how to sell real estate successfully in an unsalesy manner?   How about a little inspiration and motivation too?  Sign up for me free UnSalesygram Newsletter.Support the show

The Create Your Own Life Show
Mark Meuser | History's Lessons of the Resilience of a Republic

The Create Your Own Life Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 42:27


About This Episode: ​Mark Meuser is a native Californian with a proven record of fighting for your constitutional rights. From a young age, Mark was an entrepreneur when he picked cherries in the morning and then operated a street-side cherry stand in the afternoon. By age 21, he purchased his own pizza restaurant and when the business was thriving he started studying law. As an attorney, Mark secured an important victory for disabled Americans against United Airlines. He then joined the Dhillon Law Group where he has focused on Election, Political and Constitutional Law. He has had the privilege of protecting critical First Amendment rights and as well as unconstitutional usurpation of power as a result of COVID-19 by Governor Gavin Newsom and election integrity when California tried to remove President Trump's name from the primary ballot by unconstitutionally changing the qualifications to run for President. In his free time, Mark loves being outdoors, enjoying California's natural beauty and competing in Ironman competitions. He was ranked third best male in his age group (45-49) in the United States for Ironman in 2020. Mark is also a prolific reader, on average reading one book a week. Find out more about Reverend Mark at: https://www.kamalguptawrites.com/ Check out our YouTube Channel: Jeremyryanslatebiz See the Show Notes: www.jeremyryanslate.com/983 Unremarkable to Extraordinary: Ignite Your Passion to Go From Passive Observer to Creator of Your Own Life: https://getextraordinarybook.com/ Sponsors: Gusto: This episode is sponsored by Gusto. Run your payroll the easy way, the same way we do at Command Your Brand. You'll get a. $100 Amazon Gift Card just for running your first payroll! http://www.jeremyryanslate.com/gusto MyPillow: Use the promo code: CYOL to get up to 60% off https://www.mypillow.com/ Audible: Get a free 30 day free trial and 1 free audiobook from thousands of available books. Right now I'm reading "Don't Burn This Country" by Dave Rubin www.jeremyryanslate.com/book  

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!
[Corrected audio issues] Aidan Monaghan: Were the Planes Remotely Guided on 9/11?

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 94:07


[[[ This version corrects/removes the audio issues. ]]]Electrical Engineer tracks down the answers to questions that most of us wouldn't even think to ask:What were the capabilities of the GPS guided autopilot flight control systems on Boeing 757/767's navigation prior to 9/11? How about its performance on 9/11?What was the capability to remotely deliver flight plan waypoints to aircraft flight management systems before 9/11? And what was the history of remote "backdoor" accessibility to Boeing flight control computers?What was the significance of 9/11 flight transponder activity of the highjacked aircraft on 9/11?What is the significance of United Airline flight 175's observed and measured performance prior to impacting WTC 2?What is the significance of the extreme and low-visibility weather the day before 9/11 on the alleged hijacker's hoped-for outcome?Is the publicly released American Airlines #77 Flight Data Recorder an accurate record of the flight that hit the Pentagon?What was the flying capability of the alleged hijackers? Could they have flown the profiles on 9/11?Aidan Monaghan is a tireless 9/11 researcher of almost 2 decades. He has a degree in Electrical Engineering and had a career in “Electrostatics”! He's been conducting data collection from the government via the Freedom of Information Act requests that have yielded the 9/11 Truth Community a treasure trove of valuable data proving the official narrative of 9/11 can't possibly be true.Visit the RichardGage911 website

Fluggesellschaft.de Podcast
Airline News März 2022

Fluggesellschaft.de Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 2:35


In weniger als 3 Minuten bekommst Du die Übersicht zu den Flugnews aus März 2022 in gesprochenem Wort. Auch wenn ich sie Dir etwas verspätet Anfang Mai liefere, sind diese Luftfahrtnachrichten weiterhin gültig und für die nächsten Wochen und Monate aktuell. Warum ich diese Form wähle und das Nachreichen hilfreich finde, erkläre ich Dir später in einem persönlichen Video im Youtube Kanal von Fluggesellschaft.de. Diesmal mit dabei sind die Fluggesellschaften Eurowings, Wizzair, Tel Aviv Air, ITA Airways, TUS Air, United Airlines, Eurowings Discover sowie Edelweiss. Folgende Flughäfen stehen im Fokus dieser Airline-News: Berlin - Brandenburg München Hamburg Memmingen / Allgäu Dortmund Düsseldorf Weitere Fluginfos findest Du auf meiner Webseite Fluggesellschaft.de Schau Dir auch gerne unsere Luftfahrt-Livestreams im Youtube Kanal von Planemania an.

Around the House with Eric G
New Products at the Hardware Huddle +United Airlines + One drywall screw that costs thousands

Around the House with Eric G

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 26:19


Eric returns from the Hardware Huddle and talks about some great new products for this year plus his United Airlines trip was one for the ages. Plus Caroline talks about a drywall screw that costs thousands of dollars. All this and more in the mid-week special! Thanks for listening to Around the house if you want to hear more please subscribe so you get notified of the latest episode as it posts at https://around-the-house-with-e.captivate.fm/listen (https://around-the-house-with-e.captivate.fm/listen) We love comments and we would love reviews on how this information has helped you on your house! Thanks for listening! For more information about the show head to https://aroundthehouseonline.com/ (https://aroundthehouseonline.com/) We have moved the Pro Insider Special on Thursday to its new feed. It will no longer be on this page. You can find it and subscribe right here: https://around-the-house-pro-insider.captivate.fm/ (https://around-the-house-pro-insider.captivate.fm/ )

Roqe
Roqe Ep#177 - Captain Christopher (Borzu) Behnam, Real Estate Agents

Roqe

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 107:49


Roqe 177 - A feature interview with pilot, aviation expert, motivational speaker, and Iranian human rights advocate, Captain Christopher Behnam. Captain Behnam joins Jian from San Francisco to recount the harrowing tale of saving 381 lives aboard United Airlines 1175 en route to Hawaii in 2018, and his personal story of facing mortality and building resilience since childhood. Plus the Roqe Team discuss the fear of flying and the promotional practices of Iranian real estate agents in the diaspora.

Beyond Clean with GEM
BCWG S6:E27 Jonathan Prichard * Stage, Sales, Communication and a Mentalist.

Beyond Clean with GEM

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 48:19


How does being an entertainer and a mentalist relate to sales and communication?  Jonathan Prichard explains this and more in this episode. We talk about the challenges of LIVE and VIRTUAL conferences. Some of this conversation is around the use of listening, watching, and knowing what people are thinking, and talking about in order to give them the best of what we have when it comes to viable communications.  Jonathan Pritchard is an author, consultant, and keynote speaker with a client list that includes BP, Discovery, United Airlines, and more. His work focuses on the power of influence and applied psychology in sales, negotiations, presentations, and beyond. When he's not traveling for work you can find him at home in Asheville NC with his wife.   Connect with Jonathan through his Website HERE!   There is always more to the story.  Find out what it is in this week's episode of Beyond Clean With GEM For educational videos on healthy and proactive cleaning, be sure to check out the Academy YouTube channel at Academy of Cleaning.   Be sure to subscribe to your favorite podcast app so that you don't miss it or any other podcasts!  

BeyondCleanWithACE
BCWA S6:E27 Jonathan Prichard * Stage, Sales, Communication and a Mentalist.

BeyondCleanWithACE

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 48:04


How does being an entertainer and a mentalist relate to sales and communication?  Jonathan Prichard explains this and more in this episode. We talk about the challenges of LIVE and VIRTUAL conferences. Some of this conversation is around the use of listening, watching, and knowing what people are thinking, and talking about in order to give them the best of what we have when it comes to viable communications.  Jonathan Pritchard is an author, consultant, and keynote speaker with a client list that includes BP, Discovery, United Airlines, and more. His work focuses on the power of influence and applied psychology in sales, negotiations, presentations, and beyond. When he's not traveling for work you can find him at home in Asheville NC with his wife.   Connect with Jonathan through his Website HERE!   "Remember to keep your journey healthy, positive, and proactive." Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram  www.AcademyofCleaning.com There is always more to the story.  Find out what it is in this week's episode of Beyond Clean With ACE For educational videos on healthy and proactive cleaning, be sure to check out our YouTube channel at Academy of Cleaning.   Be sure to subscribe to your favorite podcast app so that you don't miss it or any other podcasts! #BeyondCleanWithACE   

The Optimistic Outlook
United Airlines CEO on sustainable aviation

The Optimistic Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 25:08


Barbara is joined by United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby to take a look back at the first passenger flight powered by sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) in December 2021. You'll learn about United's Eco-Skies Alliance leading a shift to SAF, the aviation industry's commitment to decarbonization, and why Kirby sees climate change as the biggest challenge facing our generation. Show notes: Eco-Skies Alliance Announcement: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/united-airlines-to-lead-industry-switch-to-sustainable-aviation-fuel-with-global-corporations-customers-301267616.html More info: https://www.united.com/ual/en/us/fly/company/global-citizenship/environment/ecoskies-alliance.html Climate action at Siemens: https://new.siemens.com/us/en/company/environmental-society-governance/environmental-action.html Airport modernization: https://assets.new.siemens.com/siemens/assets/api/uuid:ee473003-d731-40f4-b75f-257eb9447eb9/sie2021-airports-federal-funding-flyer-final-12-17-21.pdf?ste_sid=f53d07985316289351cb1470f93e409c Capital campaign to decarbonize SMEs: https://new.siemens.com/us/en/company/about/businesses/financial-services/smes-kickstarter-capital.html      

On Brand with Nick Westergaard
Immersive Content Experiences with Jamie Gier

On Brand with Nick Westergaard

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 31:19


Jamie Gier is CMO of Ceros, helping top brands like NBC Universal, United Airlines, and United Healthcare create immersive content experiences. In our always-on world, customers are looking for greater connection with their brands. This isn't easy as there's more noise than ever. We discussed how brands can stand out with immersive content, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Jamie Gier As CMO of Ceros, Jamie works with many top brands including NBC Universal, Monster.com, JP Morgan, Wall Street Journal, United Airlines, and United Healthcare to create immersive content experiences. With more than 25 years of experience, Jamie has worked with leading tech companies from healthcare to education to grow and scale by creating impactful brands, designing revenue-gathering go-to-market strategies, and leading high-performance teams. Prior to Ceros, Jamie held roles at DreamBox Learning, SCI Solutions (now R1), Microsoft, and GE Healthcare. She also served as a board member for Page Ahead, a nonprofit focused on the literacy needs of at-risk kids in Washington state, and chairs its marketing and fund development committee.   Episode Highlights “Marketing and branding sometimes have a bad reputation,” Jamie noted. This led her to deliberately seek out meaningful industries like education and healthcare. What's an example of an immersive brand experience? Jamie pointed us to Kimpton Properties and their “Summer Like You Mean It” campaign, which offered customers a literal glimpse of what their vacation could look like. Immersive content is engaging content. “You have to start with customers,” Jamie notes. “What's your customer's buying journey? What motivates them? What's their persona?” Too often, marketers start with what they want to create rather than what their customers actually need. You can't afford to make this mistake. What do marketers need to remember about story? “The customer should be the hero of your story,” Jamie notes. She also talked about the power of story to connect people citing work from Atlantic columnist Arthur Brooks and P&G. What brand has made Jamie smile recently? Jamie loves watching Shark Tank with her son and was so impressed with the startup Pluto Pillows that she bought one. When the product arrived, as Jamie notes, the packaging both surprised and delighted (SPOILER ALERT: Candy was involved). To learn more, connect with Jamie on LinkedIn.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders
Media's Next Chapter with Malcolm Gladwell

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 40:22


Join LionTree Co-Head of Growth Alex Michael as he dialogues with best-selling author, pundit and Pushkin Industries President and co-Founder Malcolm Gladwell - literally and figuratively one of the leading voices in the audio space. Hear the celebrated business thinker and intellectual contrarian opine on everything from why it's smart for Pushkin to make big budget audiobooks to what he sees as the future of the workplace. Hot takes a-plenty, so tune in!Find and rate KindredCast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. For more content, follow KindredCast on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. You can hear our radio show on SiriusXM Business Radio, channel 132 and on United Airlines. And you can find all of Kindred Media's podcasts and subscribe to our daily newsletter, “Take a Break with Kindred Media,” here (https://linktr.ee/KindredMediaHQ). Please read before listening: http://www.liontree.com/podcast-notices.htmlSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

RiskWatch
Navigating TPRM Turbulence with Nancy Jacobson

RiskWatch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 26:42


Nancy Jacobson, Counsel, Global Compliance and Ethics at United Airlines, joins Vcheck Global's Seth Harlan to talk third party risk management (TPRM) and the airline industry. Episode highlights include Nancy's non-traditional career path, how United recognizes and remediates risk, and compliance challenges facing the airline industry.This conversation covers:0:45 - 02:47 Nancy's non-traditional path to compliance02:48 - 04:24 United's third party environment04:25 - 07:03 United's third party risks07:04 - 08:57 TPRM platforms08:58 - 12:18 Red flag escalation12:19 - 13:11 United's remediation process13:12 - 14:18 Involvement of investigative teams14:19 - 19:47 Anti-bribery and corruption issues for an international workforce19:48 - 23:28 TPRM pandemic pivots23:29 - 26:09 Supply chain issues facing airlines

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 4/27/2022

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:07


US stocks fell Tuesday. Plus, United Airlines plans to increase its trans-Atlantic service by 25%, while both PepsiCo and UPS beat analyst earnings expectations.

Wickedly Smart Women
The Fight to Walk Again—with Joy Cooper - 168

Wickedly Smart Women

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 28:36


After narrowly escaping death when her plane crashed into a mountain, they told Joy Cooper she would never walk again. But she proved that she would do more than that, she would dance again. Joy Cooper was the sole survivor of a plane crash in Alaska that killed three others, including her best friend. Circling the drain herself, she somehow held on until the rescuers came. But that was just the beginning of her journey. Joy Cooper now has the privilege of sharing her experience of surviving that fatal plane crash. When she was told she would never walk again she dug in, determined to prove the doctors wrong and return to her job as an airport operations manager for United Airlines. On this episode of Wickedly Smart Women, Joy Cooper joins Anjel to share the story of the circumstances that led up to that fateful day in the Alaskan wilderness, her quest for survival while she was alone on the mountainside, and her long journey to be able to walk again. Listen in as Joy walks us through how the accident and her recovery tested her faith and what she learned about grace amid trials. Plus, she shares her grit and determination to overcome the impossible and dance again. What You Will Learn  Joy Cooper's story of her plane crash into a mountain in Alaska How Joy used her overcomer attitude and resilient spirit to survive How the ‘still small voice' helped her navigate her circumstances How Joy kept her positive attitude while facing a dire diagnosis Why it's crucial to give yourself grace while being real with yourself about your circumstances Why Joy surrounded herself with people who would support her dream of dancing again How Joy advocated for herself to direct her own recovery How Joy realized despite her circumstances she could she live a fulfilled life and impact others How grace led Joy from that mountain to dancing the Salsa again Connect with Joy Cooper Joy Cooper Linktree Connect with Anjel B. Hartwell Wickedly Smart Women Wickedly Smart Women Facebook Community Wickedly Smart Women on TeePublic Wickedly Smart Women on Clubhouse The Wealthy Life Mentor The Wealthy Life Mentor on Facebook The Wealthy Life Readiness Quiz Anjel on Twitter Anjel on Instagram Email listeners@wickedlysmartwomen.com  Leave Us A Message On Our listener line:   (540) 402-0043 Ext. 4343 

Marketplace Minute
Businesses bet on future, as capital goods orders rise - Midday Update - Marketplace Minute - April 26, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 1:50


Core capital goods orders rose 1% in March; Case-Shiller home price index shows near 20% annual gain in February; United Airlines increases trans-Atlantic flights; Kevin Hart launches new media company ‘HARTBEAT'

Screaming in the Cloud
To SQL or noSQL, Why is that the Question with Chris Harris

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 40:33


About ChrisChris Harris is Vice President, Global Field Engineering at Couchbase, a provider of a leading modern database for enterprise applications that 30% of the Fortune 100 depend on. With almost 20 years of technical field and professional services experience at early-stage, open source and growth technology companies, Chris held leadership roles at Cloudera, Hortonworks, MongoDB and others before joining Couchbase.Links Referenced: couchbase.com: https://couchbase.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-harris-5451953/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cj_harris5 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the stranger parts of running this show is when I have a promoted guest episode like this one, where someone comes on, and great, “Oh, where do you work?” And the answer is a database company. Well, great, unless it's Route 53, it's clearly not the best database in the world, but let's talk about how you're making a strong showing for number two.It sounds like it's this whole ridiculous, negging nonsense or whatever the kids are calling it these days, but that's not how it's intended. Today's promoted guest is Chris Harris, who's the Vice President of Global Field Engineering at Couchbase. Chris, thank you for joining me and I really hope I got it right and that Couchbase is a database company or that makes no sense whatsoever.Chris: It's great to be on the show, and thank you for the invitation. I'm looking forward to it. Yeah, we're a database company. That's exactly what we do.Corey: I always find it interesting when companies start pivoting from a thing that they were and, “What do you do?” “We build databases.” [unintelligible 00:01:29] getting out of that space it's, “What do you do?” “We're a finance company.” And then there's a period of time in which they start reframing what they do. It's, “We're a data platform.” Or, “We're now a tech company.”Really? Because I don't get that sense in any meaningful perspective. Couchbase was founded as a database company. You went public last year—congratulations on that—and now you continue to say, “Yes, we're a database company,” rather than an everything trying to eat the world all at the same time, mostly ineffectively, company. So, what kind of database are you folks?Chris: So, if you look at the database world, you can see—I've been in the space for quite some time now, a good few years, and I've had the privilege, if you like, of being at other database companies, been in the analytics space, and I'm here at Couchbase. But if you look at the history over the last—let's just not go back all the way that far, but let's go back to, like, ten years ago, everybody was building their applications on traditional relational databases. And what you saw is that the Oracle and MySQL, as traditional databases of the world. And then… probably at the time, we realized that with, talking ten years ago where we had this demand for high throughput of data, next generation of applications will be built, and then people realized the traditional database architectures weren't going to cut it, if you like. And it spawned this industry.You know, a big NoSQL market was created. And you have document databases, and then you have graph databases, and then you have analytics databases, and you have search databases, and then you have every sort of database you could possibly think of type database that's out there in the world.Corey: You have so many kinds you need to keep track of it all inside of the database.Chris: That's what you have to do, right? [laugh]. But the interesting thing is it became different types of database. And even see this in many of the code providers today, right, that you have multiple different types of databases no matter what you're trying to do, right? So, we kind of went—Couchbase kind of took a step back and went, okay, we were originally a cache, right, this is where we came from, and then kind of built that into a document database, and then kind of went to the market and went hold on here, rather than it being let's call it a noSQL versus SQL discussion, why can't it just be a database, right?Why can't you have a SQLite interface on top of a modern architecture? Why can you do that, right? Why can't you have the flexibility and architectural [unintelligible 00:04:16] of a JSON-based database with the interface of—with SQL, and then analytics built on top of that, right? So, why can't you have the power of SQL on the next generation architecture? So, that's kind of where we fit in the world.Corey: When we talk about origin stories and where things come from, well, let's start with you. I guess the impolite version of the question is, “Why on earth would you be in a space like this for so long?” But you've been on a lot of interesting places doing somewhat similar things. You were at Cloudera, you were at Hortonworks until you apparently heard a who or whatnot, you were at MongoDB, you were at VMware, you were at Red Hat. And that's going reverse chronologically, but it's clear that you're very focused on a particular expression of a particular problem. Why are you the way that you are? Only pretend that's a polite question.Chris: “Why am I the way that I am?” Well, first of all, I love technology, right? That's the key. And I think many of us in the industry would definitely say that, right? I started off in core engineering, building—I know some people today wouldn't probably remember this, but when you had Chip and Pin where your credit card and you have to type it in and put in a pin number, that was created originally in the UK, and then went off and built e-commerce websites for retailers.Well, that then turned into—was a common theme that I kept seeing is that lot of the technology that we're using was open-source technology. And that kind of got me into the open-source movement, if you like, and I was lucky enough to then join Red Hat when they built middleware frameworks, so got into that space there. And then did a lot of innovation in the middleware space. Went to SpringSource and we did some great work there in the Java Development Framework space. But what became interesting is that—you still see it today—like, in this innovation happening in that middleware space and there's some great innovation happening, right?There's all this stuff with Lambda and serverless architecture that's out there, but they always came back to, we've got the database, this thing that is in the architecture if it goes down, you're stuffed, right? This is where the core value of your company is sitting. So, then that got me interested to see what innovation was happening in this space. And as I say, I got into this field in the early stages of NoSQL, where there was that spawn of new database technologies being created. And then from there, it was like, “Okay, let's get into what was happening in the analytic space.”Again, I'm still in the Hortonworks, and Cloudera space, that's all open-source. But it came down to this is different types of databases that were required different types of skills. And then I started talking to the team here, who was like, “How can we take as great innovation and leverage the skills I already have?” And I thought that was an interesting point.Corey: In the interest of full disclosure, I tend to take the exact inverse approach to the way that you did. When I was going through the worlds of systems administrator, than rebadged as DevOps, or SRE, or systems engineer, production engineer, whatever we're calling ourselves this week, I was always focused primarily on stateless things like web servers, or whatnot because it turns out that—this should be no surprise to longtime listeners of this show—but I'm really bad with computers. And most other things, too; I just brute force my way through it. And that's hilarious when you keep taking down web servers you can push a button and recreate. When you do that to a database or anything that's stateful, it leaves a mark.And if you do it the wrong way, just well enough, you might not have a company anymore, so your DR plan starts to look a lot more like updating your resume. So, I always tried to shy away from things that played to my specific weaknesses that would, you know, follow me around like a stink. You, on the other hand, apparently sound—how to frame it—you know, good at things, and in a way that I never was. So you're—ah, you see a problem, you're running towards it trying to help fix it; I'm trying to how do I keep myself away from making the problem worse is my first approach. It seems like you have definitely been focused on not just data themselves—I mean at some level, [if it was a 00:08:55] pure data problem, it feels like we'd be talking a lot more about storage, but rather how to wind up organizing that data, how to wind up presenting that data, and the relationship that data has to other things that are going on. I'm not speaking in the sense of a traditional relational database, necessarily, but the idea of how that data empowers businesses and enables them to do different things. Is that directionally a fair synopsis of how you see it?Chris: I think the [unintelligible 00:09:21] thing is what I would agree with. What makes it really interesting to me is what we enable people to do with that data, and being able to build, kind of, really fascinating innovation applications that are affecting their underlying businesses, right, from it could be health care, it could be airlines, financial services, some really high, interesting use cases that people are doing that are leveraging the database to be able to drive that level of innovation. Because it's very difficult; I can build some sophisticated application, but if I can't get the performance out of my database, I have a pretty poor experience to my users in today's world. Because, fortunately or unfortunately, people aren't very patient, right? If you have a website that doesn't return very quickly, a customer's gone like minutes ago. You literally got to instantly respond to someone. That's a challenging problem.Corey: It absolutely is. Something that I found as I've talked to a bunch of different companies operating in different ways is the requirements on data stores are generally very different depending upon primarily latency and performance. There's only so long people that are going to watch the spinning circle of doom on a website spin before they realize they're going to go somewhere that has its act together. Conversely, for a lot of business intelligence and analytics queries, there are an awful lot of stories where the thing that people care about is that we actually have to have the results of this query by noon on Thursday. And there are very different use cases for that, and some companies seem to be focused very much on, “We're going to solve both of those use cases extremes and everything in between with the same product offering,” and others tend to say, “Okay, this is the area of the market we're going to focus on.”You could also say that this is an expression of the larger industry question of do I want, more or less a one-size-fits-most database that's general-purpose, or do I want very specific purpose-built databases based upon the use case and the problem? Where do you find yourself on that spectrum?Chris: I find myself on that spectrum is that there's—if you want to describe it at a high level and we can break it down, there's operational-type databases, where I'd say Couchbase fits where you're talking about, I've just built an application; I'm talking to the live user, right, this is what I care about, and when I'm talking about speed and performance here, I'm talking about something that returned within milliseconds of response time. I'm playing an online game, or I'm doing online betting on a sports game. That has to be pretty much instant, right? If we're playing multiplayer games and you're doing something, then I want to be able to see what you're doing straight away, right? People don't expect it to lay there.If you're looking at streaming—people do this with Couchbase—streaming the Olympic Games or Super Bowl in the US, and you want to be able to be there, that whole profile management of that user has to be instant, have that stream to you has to be instant. People use telephone calls and use Couchbase to do, behind the scenes, profile management, right, so they know who you are who's making that call. That's an operational database problem. That's not a traditional analytical problem, right? So, there's a whole other space in the database world for analytics, right, which is bringing all the data together into one place, and I'll help you do data science, AI, machine learning, be able to crunch and compute large volumes of data. If I get back to you, rather than a week in an hour, that's great, but that's not operational. That's analytical.Corey: In data center environments, it's an argument to be made for going in a bunch of different directions; we're going to use a bunch of different data stores to store all these things. Because, generally speaking, the marginal cost of moving data from one of your data storage systems to another one of your data storage systems, one rack row over is fairly small, whereas in cloud, effectively, there are no real capacity constraints anymore until you can get the bill, but that's the entire problem where a lot of the transfer for these things is metered per gigabyte. So, there's a increased desire on a lot of architectural pressures, to wind up making sure that where the data lives, it stays. And whatever it is that you do with that data, it should be able to operate on that data in a way that fits your performance characteristic requirements in the place that it currently is. And on the one hand, I can definitely see that driving a lot of decisions people have made.The counterargument is that it feels a little weird when the cost constraints of how the cloud providers—mostly you, AWS—have decided to build these things out. And that, in turn, is shaping your entire approach to not just your architecture, but your systems design of how data winds up working its way through your lifecycle. It's frustrating, on some level, especially given that they themselves offer something like 15 distinct managed databases offerings but more announced all the time. It becomes very difficult not only to disambiguate between all of them but to afford moving data from one to the next.Chris: The affordability is an interesting discussion, right, because you can look at it from a billing perspective and go absolutely, there's a challenge associated to that. Then is a question of where is my data because it's spread across all these different services; that's another challenge. And then you have the challenge of, okay, the cost associated to having developers build applications against all these different types of services because they all require different APIs and different ways of programming. So that's, there's a cost associated everywhere.Corey: Oh, by far and away, the most expensive part of your AWS, or any cloud spend, is not the infrastructure itself; it's the payroll expense associated with the people working on it. People always cost more than infrastructure. If not, something very strange is going on.Chris: But then you look at it, and you go, okay, if that's the case, I kind of use the analogy, right, that it's like a car, where everyone is talking these days about the electric car [that's going 00:16:05] on that path, right? Now, I should be able—if I was getting an electric car—think of it now, I actually have one—that I can get in the car and I can drive it like any other car. I know what a steering wheel is, I know where my pedals work, it looks and feels like a normal car. But architecturally it's fundamentally different how it operates. So, why can you apply that same thing, that same analogy to a database, right?So, why can't I have the ability from an operational perspective, [unintelligible 00:16:42] talk about operational databases, not necessarily, I don't know, full-blown analytical databases, but operationally being able to say I can store the data in an enterprise database; I can use that to leverage my SQL skills like I have before, and also use it to have a document store under operational analytics, to eventing, to full-stack search, key things that people want to do operationally, but keeping the data together in one database, like an iPhone. I want a database to have these capabilities; I don't want to have all these different types of devices that are everywhere. I want, you know, my iPhone to be able to go to have the capabilities that I'm using. Or my car, to feel like I'm driving a car; doesn't matter if the underlying architecture of the engine changed. That's great, I want the benefit, but I want to be able to drive it in the same way that I've driven any other car out there. And that's kind of trying to solve multiple problems that because you're trying to solve the issue of skills.Corey: It's one of the hard challenges out there, and I think your car analogy can even be extended a bit further because in the early days of the automobile, you were more or less taking some significant risk by driving a car if you weren't also mechanically inclined and to fix it yourself. And in time, we've sort of seen that continue to evolve where they mostly work, and now they work really reliably. And then you take it even a step beyond that, and all right now I'm just going to pay a car service so someone else has to deal with the car and a driver, and I don't have to deal with any of that aspect. And it feels like there are certain parallels, similar to that, toward the end of last year, 2021, you folks, more or less moved away from you can have it in any color you want, as long as you run it yourself—more or less—into offering a fully-managed database-as-a-service cloud option called Capella, which, on the ads for this show, I periodically sing because if you didn't want me to do that, you would not have named it Capella. Now, what was it that inspired you folks to say, “Hm, we could actually offer this as a managed service ourselves?”It's definitely a direction a lot of companies have gone in, but usually, they have to wait to be forced into it by—let's be serious for a second here—Amazon launching the Amazon Basics version of whatever it is themselves and, “Okay, well, they validated our market for us. Let's explore it.”Chris: If you look at that, you go Couchbase has been around for a good few years now selling, as you point out, high-performance databases to large-scale enterprises, on real mission-critical, people call it tier-zero type applications, high-performance applications. And these are some of the most fascinating, most innovative type of applications that I've been involved with through my career. Now, how can we take that capability, provide it to the mass market if you'd like, to be able to give it to people that don't need to have a large number of people out there managing their own infrastructure, being able to understand how to finely tune that underlying infrastructure to get the level of performance that you need from high-performance databases. Now, there are use cases for doing that, so it's not one or the other. It's not that you have to go all-in.There are particular companies out there that, for the economics reasons, for the use case reasons that are running today on-premise, and there's a rational reason for why they do that, right? But for a lot of people out there, whether they're leveraging the cloud, there's an opportunity here to take the power of the database, allow us to then manage it for people, take away that complexity of it, but being able to give them the power so they can leverage their skills, take advantage of Couchbase far easier than ever have been able to in the past. It's opened up a bigger market for us, to summarize your question.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of “Hello, World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself, all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free? This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: One way that I tend to evaluate where a given vendor sees themselves—and it's sort of an odd thing to do, but given that I do fix AWS bills for a living, it probably makes sense—I wind up pulling up the website, I ignore the baseline stuff of the, “This is what Gartner says,” and here's a giant series of scrolls. I just go for the hamburger menu and I look for, “All right, where's the pricing information?” Because pricing speaks a lot. And there are two things I generally try to find. One is, is there a free trial that I can basically click and get started working with?Because invariably, I'm trying to beat my head off of a problem at two in the morning, and if it's, “Oh, talk to a salesperson,” well as a hobbyist, or as an engineer who does not have signing authority for things, but it's talk to sales, I realize, “Oh, yeah. One, I probably can't afford it. Two, it's going to be a week or so before I can actually make progress on this, and I'm hoping to get something up by sunrise, and it's probably not for me.” Conversely, the enterprise tier should always have a, “Call for details,” because that is a signal to large enterprise procurement departments and buyers and the rest were it's, “Oh, we will never accept default terms. We always want them customized. We also don't believe in signing any contract without at least two commas in it.”Great. So, being able to speak to both ends of the market is one of those critical things that you folks absolutely nail that. What I like is the fact that if someone has a problem that they're experimenting with at two in the morning, they can get started with your database-as-a-service platform—Capella; or however you want to sing it—and they don't need to wind up talking to you folks directly, first. There's no long-term commitments, there's no [unintelligible 00:22:39] of the infrastructure themselves. There's no getting hounded for the rest of their days over making a purchase for something that didn't pan out.To me, that's always been the real innovation and breakthrough of cloud is that I can spend a few hours some evening kicking around an idea, and if it doesn't work, I can turn it off and spend 17 cents on the process, whereas if it does work, I can keep scaling up without at some point having to replace all of the Raspberry Pi's and popsicle sticks, I build things with real enterprise-grade stuff. There's a real accessibility and democratization that is entered into it. So, I'm always excited when I see companies that are embracing that model. Because, yeah, I'm a grumpy old sysadmin because it's not like there's a second kind of sysadmin, but—and I have a particular exposure and experience level with these things that I can't expect modern developers to work on. They have an idea, they want to launch something, and they just need a database to throw things against and put data into, and ideally get it back again when they query later. And that empowers them to move forward.They're not in this because they really want to run virtual machines themselves and get those set up and secured and patched and hardened, and then install the software on top of it, and, “Why is it not working? Oh, security groups, how you vex me again. I'll just open you to the entire world,” and so on. And we know where that path leads. So, it's nice to see that there is an accessible option there.Conversely, if you come at this with an approach if we are only available in our hosted cloud environment, well now those big enterprise companies that have, you know, compliance concerns are going to have some thoughts for you, none of them particularly pleasant in some cases. So, I like the fact that you're able to expand your offering to encompass different user personas without also, I don't know, turning what has historically been a database into now it's an LDAP server, and trying to eat the world, piece by piece, component by component.Chris: It's interesting that you say that because I think there's a number of things that you're touching on that were to me, if you look at us as a company in particularly this space, there's a lot of focus around the community and the open-source community. And I think there's an element of how do you make it accessible to people as a community as a whole? And then you kind of go down the path of, “Okay, let's allow people,”—as a developer, let's think of it this way, right, the ultimate thing they want to do, and you touched upon it there, is they want to build an application. They get passionate about building the application or maybe even in the weekend, and they got this funky idea that they're going to literally knock some code out.And I remember my fond memories of being an application engineer of being able to sit down for hours just been able to put my ideas into code and watch it execute. The last thing that I want to do is get to the point where I get the database and go, oh, here we go. This is going to take me a bunch of hours, now, and I'm going to set it all up and do other stuff. And I almost literally want to be able to click a few buttons—Corey: You know what I want to do tonight? Feel really dumb as I tackle a problem I don't fully understand. Gr—I'd love smacking into walls that point out my own ignorance. It's discouraging as hell. I'm right there with you.Chris: Yeah, you don't want to do that, right? So, you almost want to make like the database disappear for people, right? You want to be able to just say, like, “Here's your command. Off you go. Bring the data back. Bring it back in full. Allow it to scale.”Because you want that developer to have that experience of not breaking their flow. And what do you want them to be able to be so excited about the application and innovation that they've built, that they want to go and show that teammates? They want to say, “Look at the great thing I built over the weekend. Look at this, this is amazing.” Right?And then be able to get all the teammates pretty excited about what they built in a way in which they can try it out really easily, right? They can take this little thing that they built into the database, click some buttons, and off we go, right? And now your development team is super excited about some of the great innovation that you have. But you also have to have the reverse. You have to have the architecturally sound, so then when you get to the architect, if you like, who is looking at the bigger picture of what's the future going to look like? Is it the right technology? Is this something that we can bring into the organization? And you know, this is a cool bit of application you just built me, but you know, is this realistic that I can deploy this thing?And this is where you start going back into it still has to have high performance, the security has to be there, the scalability has to be there so that I can potentially—I can start small and grow this thing horizontally as I see the requirements coming. There are different set of requirements architecturally, so we're looking at—you know, as a company, our key focus is how do you drive that developer community so that you give the people the freedom to build the next generation of applications in the simplest way [unintelligible 00:27:35], say with free trials, click some buttons, have the database up in minutes, but also then being able to have that capability in the underlying database to take it to the architect. That's what our core focus is every day.Corey: I agree with everything that you're saying. You're making an awful lot of great points, but for me, the proof in the pudding is the second thing that I tend to look at on your website after the pricing page, and that is your list of customers. Because it's always interesting when someone talks about how they're revolutionizing everything, and this is the way to go, and everyone who's anyone is doing these things. And then you look at their customer page and either they don't have one, which is telling, or the customers on that page are terrifying in that, “Wow, that sounds like a whole bunch of fly-by-night startups whose primary industry is scamming people.”You have a bunch of household blue-chip names as well as a bunch of newer companies that are very clearly not what people think of as legacy—you know, that condescending engineering term that means it makes money. It's across the board, it is broad-spectrum, and it is companies that absolutely know exactly what it is that they're doing when it comes to these things. That to me is far more convincing than almost anything else that can be said because it's—look, you can come on and talk to me about anything you want about your product, and I can dismiss it and, “Yeah, whatever. Great.” But when I start talking to customers, as I did prior to recording this episode, and seeing how they talk about you folks, that to me is what reaffirms that, okay, this is actually something that has legs and is solving real customer problems.Because early stage, it's, “We have this idea for this company we're going to build that it's going to be great.” “Awesome. Go talk to more customers.” That is a default, safe piece of advice generically you can give to anyone. And it's easy to give and hard to take.I've been saying this for years, and I still screwed it up and we started trying to launch a SaaS product here called DuckTools. Yeah, it turns out that we didn't talk to enough customers first about what they're actually trying to achieve, and we assumed we knew the answers. It's an easy mistake to make. What I really appreciate is—about a Couchbase in particular—is not just the fact that you have all of these customer references, but the fact that each one talks about what the value to the business is not just in terms of, “Oh yes, now we can query data and there was no way for us to do that before.” Of course, people have found ways to do that since business started.Instead, it's much more about this is how it made it more efficient, more optimal, how it unlocked possibilities and capabilities for us. That alone tells me that there definitely is significant value that you're delivering to customers. In my own business, whenever I think I've seen it all, I have to do is talk to one more customer and learn something new. What have you seen in recent memory, from a customer, that surprised you about how they're using Couchbase?Chris: You look at that, and you can see—I could probably talk for hours on different types of customers, but it's the ones that you can literally see in your life and you can reflect to, right? So, if you taken one of the biggest airlines that are out there today, they're completely changing, kind of, the whole experience. And our whole experience of and how do I get feedback? Because Couchbase's customers, [unintelligible 00:31:01] customer, right, is what they're thinking about, right? They're an airline.So, these passengers; fine. But how many times have you got on a plane, and you see all these people, literally, there's obviously the passengers, and then there's the cabin crew, and then there's the people on the ground, and then there's the pilot, and for the sake of the discussion, the staff that are there are literally passing paper back and forth to each other. And surely there a better way to do this. And for someone who likes to solve complex technical problems, you go, “Wow, this is going to be a bit of a challenge.” Because if you want to collect feedback from an aeroplane in the air, [laugh] right, and you want to connect that to the ground data that people are having in terms of maintenance data, you want to do that across the world, in multiple different time zones, that's pretty tricky problem to try to go solve, right?So therefore, how do you get a database that is able to work remotely and on what people would call the edge; let's just call it in this case in a device that's literally a cabin crew member is carrying around with them that's not connected because there is no connection because I'm in the middle of the air. But I want to pair it with the other cabin crew members that are around, right, in flight, and then when I land, I want to sync that data backup to the maintenance people. So, you need a database that's able to operate on a device with no connection, and then being able to synchronize backup to a cloud database that is then collecting data from all the other flights around the world.Corey: Synchronization sounds super easy until you actually try and do it, and then, “Oh, wow.” It's like, you could cut to pieces by the edge cases.Chris: And then people go, “Well, there's no problem. There's internet everywhere these days.” Yeah, sure there is. [laugh]. You get disconnected all of the time.Corey: Not to name names. This is very evocative, an earlier episode of this show I had with Tyler Slove, who's a senior manager over at United Airlines, about specifically how they're approaching a lot of their own reimagining and the rest. It's a fascinating use case, and as someone who's a bit of a travel geek himself—you know, in the before times—that's always an area of intense interest because it's… I'm sorry, I'm still a little boy at heart; it's magic to me. You get on a plane, you go somewhere else, close the doors, it opens it up, and you're on the other side of the world. And now there's internet on it? Oh, my God, who would have imagined such a thing?Chris: Uh-huh. But that's changing the experience for people. It's just really fascinating.Corey: Completely. And it's empowering and unlocking that experience you're talking about of being able to sync between the crews, about handling all this stuff behind the scenes. Everyone loves to complain about airlines because no one knows really how to run the massive logistical part of an airline. But the WiFi was a little bit slow or the food was cold; well, that's something I know how to complain about Twitter.Chris: [laugh].Corey: It becomes this idea of almost a bikeshed problem expression, where it's, “Oh, yeah. I'm just going to complain about things I can wrap my head around.” Yeah.Chris: I was talking to somebody recently, and they were—swapping topics a little bit—and they were like, so—they were talking about innovation on some new web application that they built. And I literally have to explain them, and I said, “Well, if you think of it, the underlying whole technology stack that's behind this for high-scale e-commerce, it's sophisticated, right, because people will literally walk away from a page, an application, a mobile app, if they don't get an instant response time. And that request has to literally travel, physically, quite a fair amount of distance, talk to multiple different types of technology, answer to that question, then come back to you instantly.” The sheer amount of technology that's involved here of moving that data around is a complicated architectural problem to fix. A database only plays a small part of that. You can't be the slowest player in the party.Corey: No. And that is always the challenge is that when you're looking at different use cases, there's always a constraint, and how that constraint winds up manifesting in different ways, if it's not the thing that's slowing things down, it's also not where the attention goes. If you have a single thing like, the database for example, slowing things down, everyone cares about improving databases, people focusing on, “Well, we're going to improve the JavaScript load time on the website,” that's not the problem. Find the bottleneck and focus on it. And although I'm generally a fan of picking a database and using that as a general-purpose thing until it makes sense not too—much like I am cloud providers—[audio break 00:35:54]Corey: —journey personally, where's the best place to find you?Chris: Clearly, if you want to find more about Couchbase, you can obviously go to couchbase.com. You kindly pointed out you can go and look at the trial for Capella and try out the tech. You're more than welcome to do that as a free trial.If you want to contact me particularly, you find me on LinkedIn; I'm Chris Harris at Couchbase. You'll find me [unintelligible 00:36:26] with Chris Harris in general and probably find lots of them. In the UK, Chris Harris is a famous racing driver. That's not me; it's someone else. So, find me on LinkedIn, I'm sure it won't be that difficult to find what you find. Or you can find me on Twitter.Corey: And we will of course, but links to all of that into the [show notes 00:36:43]. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time today. It's always appreciated to talk to people who actually know what they're doing.Chris: You're more than welcome. It's been great to be on the show. Thanks, Corey.Corey: Chris Harris, Vice President of Global Field Engineering at Couchbase. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment. I'm going to wind up using all of those angry comments, at one point, as a database.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
The pilot shortage and other issues facing the airline industry

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022


United Airlines spokesman Charles Hobart joins Lisa Dent on Chicago’s Afternoon News to explain how the pilot shortage is impacting the airline industry, primarily at smaller regional carriers, and also discusses passengers who had been banned for unruly behavior during the mask mandate now being allowed to fly again. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News […]

City Cast Chicago
Ald. Nicole Lee Aims to Chart New Course for 11th Ward

City Cast Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 20:08


A month ago, Nicole Lee was appointed by Mayor Lori Lightfoot to finish the term of former 11th Ward Ald. Patrick Daley Thompson, following his conviction for tax fraud. An alderperson's responsibilities include voting on legislation, constituent services, allocating resources to the ward, and more. Lee is a third-generation Chinatown resident, Whitney Young alumna, and she most recently led community engagement at United Airlines. Lee is Chicago's first Chinese American alderperson, in a city where Asian Americans are the fastest growing ethnic group. Her appointment comes at a critical time as the ward remapping process continues. The two proposed maps each redraw the 11th ward as the city's first Asian American–majority ward. We visited Ald. Lee at her Bridgeport office ahead of her first full City Council meeting Wednesday.  Some Good News: ChiTeen Lit Fest 2022 Follow us on Twitter: @CityCastChicago Sign up for our newsletter: chicago.citycast.fm Call or Text Us: (773) 780-0246 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mark Levin Podcast
The Best Of Mark Levin - 4/23/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 67:15


It was revealed that several terrorists from the watchlist have entered the United States undetected through our southern border. President Biden and the left don't care about human life, they just want to control it. While they claim to care about human life their policies on abortion, national security, and science prove the contrary. Will Americans actually vote for someone that doesn't care about what happens outside of the United States? Imagine taking that approach with Germany in WWII. After two years Americans can now fly without wearing a mask. No more getting arrested or thrown off airplanes because your 3-year-old won't keep their mask on. Yet our federal government resisted letting go of this power until a judge struck it down. Then, the same Administration that is still holding January 6th prisoners, and used the DOJ against concerned parents, and attacks capitalism through the degrowth climate change movement is now enacting a self-imposed ban on defending ourselves against satellite weapons in space. United Airlines claims to be committed to a "carbon-free future" however such a future would kill us. Plants process carbon dioxide to create the air we breathe. It's simply not the job of an airline CEO to be woke.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 4/21/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 114:13


On Thursday's Mark Levin Show, United Airlines claims to be committed to a "carbon-free future" however such a future would kill us. Plants process carbon dioxide to create the air we breathe. It's simply not the job of an airline CEO to be woke. Then, a former McDonald's CEO has spoken out against teaching wokeness to employees. In the same way, the Florida legislature has decided to stop subsidizing Disney's unique special self-governance arrangement. Disney decided it would go against what parents expected would be taught and the government decided to rescind their special status. Later, American Marxism, Critical Race theory, is about dehumanizing individuals. Will we now say that Mother's Day is bigoted because we can't define a woman? Will there be a transition day? Afterward, NY Congressman Lee Zeldin calls in to discuss his campaign for Governor. Zeldin added that crime is so rampant that New Yorkers are fleeing to southern states. Zeldin also remarked that constituents are tired of the failed leftwing leadership that puts politicians first and families last.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Street Daily Snapshot
Stocks Power Higher On Earnings Boost; Tesla Surges On Bullish Musk Outlook: Stock Market Today

Street Daily Snapshot

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 4:24


Bullish outlooks for Tesla and United Airlines, as well as a modest pullback in Treasury bond yields, are giving U.S. stocks an early boost Thursday.

Wintrust Business Lunch
Wintrust Business Lunch 4/21/22: Netflix loses subscribers, United Airlines forecasts a return to profitability, and student loans delay wealth-building for some borrowers

Wintrust Business Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022


Segment 1: Áine Cain, Senior Reporter for Business Insider, joins Anna to talk about a variety of stories including the price of groceries at Trader Joe’s, Delta Airlines backtracking after calling COVID an ‘ordinary seasonal virus,’ and Netflix losing subscribers for the first time in a decade. Segment 2: Greg McBride, Senior Vice President and Chief […]

Becker Group Business Strategy Women’s Leadership 15 Minute Podcast

In this episode Scott Becker discusses: Markets update Netflix lost $54.3 billion in market value in one day. US median home prices reached a record price of $375,000. Tesla posts record profits in Q1. United Airlines lost $1.38 billion the 1st quarter. Carvana saw sales fall in the first quarter. The price of a barrel […]

Alles auf Aktien
Rekord für Tesla und Zeitenwende bei den Streaming-Wars

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 17:26


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Philipp Vetter über den Absturz der Tech-Aktien und ein großes Versprechen bei United Airlines. Außerdem geht es um Tesla, Spotify, Warner Bros Discovery, Paramount Global, Meta, Amazon,  Alphabet,  United Airlines, Infineon, Siltronic, ASML, Siemens Energy, Daimler Truck, Bayer, HelloFresh,  Netflix, Apple, Disney, ishares S&P500 Consumer Staples Sector (WKN: A142NW), Lyxor Stoxx Europe 600 ETF (WKN: LYX02J), Nestlé, Diageo, Anheuser, Pernod-Ricard und Danone, Anheuser Busch InBev, Heineken, United Breweries, Molson Coors und Ambev.

Nightly Business Report
What's next for Netflix?, oil spillover and cars, planes & metal 4/20/22

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 44:03


If you thought the action in Netflix looked bad last night, it's even worse today – now down 37%, and dropping below $100B market cap. Is it too late for the streaming pioneer to turn things around? We'll talk to the analyst who called this one right -- Needham's Laura Martin. Plus, is what's bad for Netflix good for other parts of the market? We'll speak with an expert who says this makes him even more bullish on energy now. And, we'll give you the story, the action and the trade in Tesla, United Airlines and Alcoa ahead of results after the closing bell today.

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast
US Market Open: Continued pickup in broad equity performance as yields recede & DXY slips; NFLX -26%

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 3:18


European bourses and US futures were choppy at the commencement of the European session, but, have since derived impetus in relatively quiet newsflow amid multiple earnings and as yields continue to ease; ES Unch.NFLX lower by 26% in the pre-market as subscriber numbers fall; TSLA due after the closeDXY continues to slip amid receding yields and a recovery in the JPY as the BoJ ramps up intervention to anchor 10yr yieldsCore debt is experiencing a resurgence from recent sessions of pressure with Bunds eclipsing yesterday's peak, aided further by well-received issuanceWTI and Brent reside at the top-end of USD 2/bbl parameters; focus very much on China-COVID, Iran, Libyan supply and Ukraine-Russia developmentsRussia has lost its confidence in the Ukrainian negotiators, according to the Russian Foreign Ministry while Ukraine announces a Mariupol corridor has been agreedLooking ahead, highlights include Canadian CPI, US Existing Home Sales, French Election TV Debate, Speeches from Fed's Daly & Evans and ECB's Nagel & Rehn Supply from the US, Earnings from Tesla, Abbott, Procter & Gamble and United Airlines.Read the full report covering Equities, Forex, Fixed Income, Commodites and more on Newsquawk

RNZ: Morning Report
US airlines drop mask mandates after Florida court ruling

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 2:06


Many passengers on flights in the US have breathed a deep sigh of relief - without a mask - after mandates on public transport were dropped. The dismissal comes after a federal judge in Florida struck down the 14-month-old directive from the Biden administration. Major airlines, including American Airlines, United Airlines and Delta Air Lines, relaxed restrictions soon after the ruling. New York correspondent Sarah Walton spoke to Susie Ferguson.

I AM BIO
Green Fuels Have Taken Off

I AM BIO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 20:00


Last December, a United Airlines' flight from Chicago to Washington DC was the first ever passenger flight powered with 100% sustainable aviation fuel. The achievement demonstrated the potential for the aviation sector to reduce its carbon footprint. Our guests in this episode each played a key role in in helping the airline reach this exciting milestone.

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders
Take-Two Interactive's CEO Strauss Zelnick Hits His Stride

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 25:36


In a conversation recorded in March, Managing Director of LionTree and co-founder of Griffin Gaming Partners Nick Tuosto and Take-Two Interactive Chairman and CEO Strauss Zelnick catch up on a multitude of topics, from Strauss's personal inspiration and management philosophy to the current state of the gaming industry.Find and rate KindredCast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. For more content, follow KindredCast on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. You can hear our radio show on SiriusXM Business Radio, channel 132 and on United Airlines. And you can find all of Kindred Media's podcasts and subscribe to our daily newsletter, “Take a Break with Kindred Media,” here (https://linktr.ee/KindredMediaHQ).Please read before listening: http://www.liontree.com/podcast-notices.htmlSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

ON THE CALL
ON THE CALL - DONNA GROSSMAN

ON THE CALL

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 27:52


DONNA GROSSMAN: Donna grew up with a loving father who was a professional singer, whom she loved deeply and emulated as a singer. She became an actor and performer as a very good ventriloquist in her youth. Later she gained her Fine Arts and Teaching Degree for grades K-12, fell back to her entertaining roots taking Opera classes, and performing theatrically Off-Broadway when she auditioned for the role of “Rizzo” in ‘Grease' on Broadway. Donna then began working with the worldwide marketing and communications network, DDB, where some of her account were: IBM, Volkswagen, Hershey, Clairol and after 2 years was invited to work with film and television Director, Bob Giraldi -one of the very few directors to be inducted into the Art Directors Hall of Fame -in his company Giraldi Productions. From there Donna moved to be the primary head Casting Director of Griner/Cuesta & Schrom, for 6 Television Directors, with clients such as: Xerox, United Airlines, Arthritis Foundation PSAs, March of Dimes, Coke and more. Then in 1991, Donna opened Donna Grossman Casting with her Aqua Studios in the Flatiron District - with the staunch support of her loving husband and partner, Paul Bernstein. Aqua Studios is a warm, calm comfortable setting, casting for bicoastal clients, which then expanded to Spain, Germany, Ireland, England, South America and Iceland, for some of her favorite clients such as: Campari Red Passion for Director Joel Schumacher, Public Service projects for Farber Center for Oncology, Look Good, Feel Better Foundation and United federation of Teachers. Donna participates yearly in the 39 mile Avon Walk for Breast Cancer in New York City and has also been sought out for her portrait and headshot photography. Though a recipient of several CLIO awards for her commercials, Donna has maintained her level of care, warmth, joy, kindness, openness and listening that shines through when you are in her presence, in or out of the ‘room' which allows for the trust to do the work in a relaxed atmosphere. Admired, liked and respected by both clients and talent, she always intuitively seems to know the right questions to ask, that opens one's heart. Check out her Casting Agency at: https:www.donnagrossmancasting.com https:www.facebook.com/dgcasting/ and follow her on IG: @donna_grossman_casting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ozzie-stewart/support

The Daily Sun-Up
Business at Denver International Airport returning to pre-pandemic levels; William B. "Bat" Masterson

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 17:14


Business out at Denver International Airport was, of course, hard hit by the global pandemic. But traffic at DIA has been rebounding, and, depending on how exactly you crunch the numbers, the airport appears to be headed toward achieving 2019 passenger levels sometime this year. Colorado Sun reporters Chris Outcalt and Tamara Chaung talk about the latest DIA stats, how those numbers connect to a United Airlines hiring spree and why even though employers are hiring there's still some hesitation among business leaders about the direction the economy is headed. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Highwire with Del Bigtree
IS MANDATE MAYHEM OVER?

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 5:09


From the legislative arena to big business, Covid restrictions seem to be in their final day. Businesses have begun re-hiring unvaccinated workers, airline CEOs are calling for an end to Biden's federal mask mandate, and legislators are working to prevent mandates from ever happening again.#UnitedAirlines #KyrieIrving #MaskOff

Police Off The Cuff
POC After Hours with guest Joe Murray

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 66:25


Frequent POC guest Joe Murray. Is a former NYC Police Officer turned Attorney. He has a very successful practice in New York. Mark and Joe have a ton of laughs this episode. Joe starts the discussion talking about the NYPD's appeal process for unvaccinated Police Officers with "exception" . A ruling will come down shortly. Mark and Joe talk about Mayor Eric Adams lifting restriction for unvaccinated athletes and entertainers to perform in NYC. United Airlines welcomes back unvaccinated employees. Yet NYC is still looking to fire unvaccinated first responders. Recent attacks on Hasidic Jewish residents of Williamsburg Brooklyn are uncomfortable walking the streets of their neighborhoods because of unprovoked attacks. The most recent a group of teens attacking a 21 year old Orthodox Jewish man for no reason. A sixteen year old male has been apprehended and charged with a hate crime. Body Cam footage saves a Tallahassee Fl Police Officer from excessive force charges. Long Island man shoots himself in the hands making Ghost Guns. The most beautiful Police Pup ever and a DUI excuse that makes too much sense. An informative, interesting and hilarious episode. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/otcpod1/support

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders
GetYourGuide's Johannes Reck on the Travel Industry's Resurgence

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 35:44


Join Howard Han, LionTree's Head of Principal Investments & Merchant Banking, as he gets the lowdown on the travel industry's post-Covid mojo from Johannes Reck, the co-Founder and CEO of GetYourGuide. In a world in which 50% of travel is still booked offline, GetYourGuide is driving the transformation to help globetrotters book one-of-a-kind experiences at the most sought-after destinations. Johannes' journey leading the Berlin-based startup to a position of strength provides a bevy of lessons for entrepreneurs of all stripes.Find and rate KindredCast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. For more content, follow KindredCast on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. You can hear our radio show on SiriusXM Business Radio, channel 132 and on United Airlines. And you can find all of Kindred Media's podcasts and subscribe to our daily newsletter, “Take a Break with Kindred Media,” here (https://linktr.ee/KindredMediaHQ).Please read before listening: http://www.liontree.com/podcast-notices.htmlSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
You Have The Whole World to Look Through With Andrea Breanna

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 36:39


Andrea Breanna's life's work has been on building high traffic websites and is the straight talking founder of RebelMouse that has built two of the most important new media companies of this decade. It also powers content hubs and media properties for brands, like United Airlines, BlackRock, Flonase and many more.  Before that, she was CTO of HuffingtonPost, where she led product, design and engineering. In today's interview with Ryan she discusses both of these and much, much more.   KEY TAKEAWAYS Due to the rise and reliability of remote technologies, the physical office has less importance. Face to face still plays a key part, especially in sales, but for the day today running, you have the whole world to recruit from. As far as the customer experience goes, for a high percentage of companies the website will be the first point of contact and so many companies still fail to see the potential even now. Creating an ever evolving and positive user experience can guarantee return visits.  There's always the temptation to continue to burn money in VC funded companies because of the nature of the model. Moving away from that and switching to a more sustainable model may seem painful, but in the long run it can enhance your business. For a company, your sales team is the most important part of the company and as such can also be the most expensive if they're not completely on brand and aligned with your mission.    BEST MOMENTS ‘We're globally distributed. There are eighty-seven of us actually and we're in thirty-one countries. '  ‘Consumers don't have empathy for a bad website.”  ‘Now, a year and a half after announcing core web vitals, very few sites are getting a good grade. Most of them are getting absolute failures and that type of thing is what we keep all of our clients monitored on so it's not like each client has to worry about that, the platform worries about those things.' ‘What you're told is to learn to burn money.'     Do You Want The Closing Secrets That Helped Close Over $125 Million in New Business for Free?"  Grab them HERE: https://www.whalesellingsystem.com/closingsecrets   Ryan Staley Founder and CEO Whale Boss 312-848-7443 ryan@whalesellingsystem.com www.ryanstaley.io Andrea Breanna - https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreabreanna   ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire? How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak), Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Micro Acquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to LinkedIn) and many more. This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less.   ABOUT THE HOST Ryan is a Founder, Podcast Host, Speaker, Loving Father, Husband and Dog Dad. He is an 18x award winner and grew a business unit from 0-$30M in Annual Recurring Revenue while adding $30M in capital revenue in less than 6 years.  He did this all with only 4 salespeople and without demand generation.   Whether you are a new founder, VP or CEO who is already generating 6, 7 or even multiple 8 figures annually, you are going to gain knowledge about sales you didn't know existed. Support the show: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Crain's Daily Gist
03/31/22: The hottest housing market in decades

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 38:06


Crain's residential real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin talks with host Amy Guth about local housing news including how the Chicago market is the hottest since the late 1980s. Plus: Nielsen to go private in $16 billion deal, loan trouble looms for another local mall, Goldman buys robo-adviser NextCapital and United Airlines invests in a startup to study greener jet fuel.

Your Brain on Facts
Fell on Black Days: Sunday (ep. 189)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 34:46


(Get Surfshark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/MOXIE - Enter promo code MOXIE for 83% off and 3 extra months free!) T-shirt for Ukraine, all proceeds and matching donation to Ukraine Red Cross at yourbrainonfacts.com/merch There are four Sundays a month, but more than a dozen days we call "Black Sunday."  Here are three -- two forces of nature and one parade of schadenfreude. 02:42 Black Blizzard 12:45 Bondi Beach 24:42 Disneyland Quote reader: Vlado from It's Not Rocket Surgery Promo: Remnant Stew Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Dan Lebowitz,  Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Every year, tens of millions people or so go through Denver International Airport, the fifth busiest in the country and in the top 20 busiest in the world.  That's a lot of bodies to get from hither to yon, so the airport relies heavily on Automated Guideway Transit System, a people-mover that connects all of the midfield concourses with the south terminal, providing the only passenger access to concourses B and C.  And in 1995, a day that will live in infamy for staff and passengers alike, the system failed.  They refer to that day as Black Sunday.  My name's…   So I said to myself the other day, you know what would make a good topic, days with colorful sobriquets, surely there are enough of those to write about.  In what they call a good problem to have, there are in fact, too many!  Most of the “black.”  So I'm starting with a few Black Sundays and if you thinks it's a fruitful area of discussion, I'll make it a series, maybe one a month.  I'd space them out because you don't hear about the planes that land and you don't call a day Black whatever if everything was chill.  As such, today's episode is two heavy topics and one packed with schadenfreude, so gauge how you're feeling today.,  I don't mind waiting – it's not how long you wait, it's who you're waiting for.  We're going to go heavy, heavy, light, as decided by folks in our Facebook group, the Brainiac Breakroom, where anyone can share clever or funny things they find; same goes to the ybof sud-reddit.   Speaking of social media, folks are starting to post pictures of themselves wearing their Russian Warship go F yourself shirts to raise money for the Ukraine red cross (url).  Thanks to them specifically and I want to send a sweeping cloud of thanks to people in other countries for taking in the refugees.  Speaking of refugees, there was a time when hundreds of thousands of Americans were refugees in their own country.  During WWI, wheat prices rose and farming in the open prairies of the great plains was an attractive proposition.  Homesteaders and farmers set up shop, ripping up or tilling under the native grasses that had evolved as part of that ecosystem, with long roots that both held onto lots of soil, but reached down far enough to reach water waaay below the topsoil, allowing it to better survive drought conditions.  But we don't like to eat those grasses, so they replaced it with shallow-rooted wheat.  The rain stopped falling in 1931, leaving instead a severe widespread drought that lasted the rest of the decade, eventually killed thousands of square miles of wheat fields.  No other crops, either, and nothing to feed livestock.  Without live plants to hold onto the topsoil, it blew away.  The prairie wind became a sandstorm and people's livelihoods blew away.  It got so bad, the dust clouds eventually reached the east coast and beyond.  At the same time, they had this Great Depression on, a real nuisance, you've seen the movies, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, the other versions of Of Mice and Men, O Brother Where Art Thou (only time I enjoyed George Clooney), and dozens more.  The price of wheat [sfx raspberry] and people lost their jobs left right and center.  Many families were left with no choice but to pile whatever they still had left onto the family car and follow rumors of work, sometimes migrating all the way to California, where, even though they were regular ol' ‘Mericans, they were treated like foreign invaders.   Black Blizzard, American Dust Bowl, 1938   That's a broad-stroke quickie overview – and boy do I want to rewatch Carnivale for the fourth time (love me some Clancy Brown, rawr, I still would) – but we're here to talk about one day, a black Sunday, brought on by a black blizzard.  It's a blizzard but made up of dirt so thick, it blocks out the sun.  14 hit black blizzards hit in 1932, 38 in 1933, up to 70 by 1937 and so on.  The worst of it hit Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.  The storms became so frequent that people could discern the origin of the storm by the color of its dirt – brown dust storms were from Kansas or Nebraska, gray from Texas, and red dust storms were from Oklahoma.    People tried to protect themselves from breathing the dust and cloth masks were the least of it.  They'd hang wet sheets over doorways and seal up windows, sometimes with a paste ironically made of wheat flour because that's what they could get. They'd rub petroleum jelly into their nostrils, anything to try to prevent the “brown plague,” dust pneumonia.  Constant inhalation of dust particles killed hundreds of people, babies and young children particularly, and sickened thousands of others.   1934 was the single worst drought year of the last millennium in North America, temperatures soared, exceeding 100 degrees everyday for weeks on much of the Southern Plains, absolutely *baking the soil.  When spring of 1935 rolled around, there was a whole lot more dry dirt ready to be thrown into the air.  After months of brutal conditions, the winds finally died down on the morning of April 14, 1935, and people jumped on the chance to escape their homes.  Hope springs eternal and people thought maybe it was finally over.   It was, of course, not over.  The worst was standing in the wings in full costume, waiting for its cue.  A cold front down from Canada crashed into warm air over the Dakotas.  In a few hours, the temperature fell more than 30 degrees and the wind returned in force, creating a dust cloud that grew to hundreds of miles wide and thousands of feet high as it headed south.  Reaching its full fury in southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, it turned a sunny day totally dark.  Birds, mice and jackrabbits fled for their lives.  Have you ever heard the sound *one terrified rabbit makes?  I would not want to be on the ground while this was happening.  Domestic animals like cattle that couldn't get to shelter were blinded and even suffocated by the dust.   Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down anywhere they could, from fire stations to tornado shelters to under beds if a bed was the closest you could find to safety.  Folksinger Woody Guthrie, then 22, who sat out the storm at his Pampa, Texas, home, recalled that “you couldn't see your hand before your face.” Inspired by proclamations from some of his companions that the end of the world was at hand, he composed a song titled “So Long, It's Been Good to Know Yuh.”  [sfx song] Guthrie would also write other tunes about Black Sunday, including “Dust Storm Disaster.”   The storm dragged on for hours and peoples' wits began to fray.  One woman reportedly thought the merciless howling wind blocking out the sky was the start of the Biblical end of the world – can't imagine how she arrived there-- contemplated killing her child to spare them being collateral damage in a war between heaven and hell.  By all accounts it was the worst black blizzard of the Dust Bowl, displacing 300,000 tons of topsoil.  That would be enough to cover a square area of .4mi/750 m on each side a foot deep.  “Everybody remembered where they were on Black Sunday,” said Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, a history professor at Iowa State University and the author of “Rooted in Dust: Surviving Drought and Depression in Southwestern Kansas.”  “For people on the Southern Plains, it was one of those defining experiences, like Pearl Harbor or Kennedy's assassination.”   The Black Sunday storm blew its dust all the way to the east coast, causing street lights to be needed during the day in Washington DC and even coating the decks of ships in the Atlantic ocean.  The next day, as the remnants of the storm blew out into the Gulf of Mexico, an Associated Press reporter filed a story in which he referred to “life in the dust bowl of the continent,” coining the phrase that would encapsulate a phenomenon, a place, and a time.  Inspired by the myriad tales of suffering that proliferated in Black Sunday's wake, the federal government began paying farmers to take marginal lands out of production. It also incentivized improved agricultural practices, such as contour plowing and crop rotation, which reduced soil loss roughly 65 percent. By then, however, many families had given up hope and ¼-⅓ of the most affected people fled the Southern Plains, never to return.  But in the win column, thanks to better agricultural management practices, the massive black blizzards never returned either. Bondi Beach, Australia, 1938   The phrase Black Sunday isn't exclusive to the US, of course.  My one sister's adoptive country of Australia has had their fair share as well.  Like Black Sunday from 1926, an especially bad day during an already disastrous bushfire season.  60 people were killed and 700 injured.  Or the Black Sunday bushfires across South Australia in 1955.  60 fire brigades and 1,000 volunteers were needed to get the fires under control.  Thankfully this time only 2 people died that time.     On the far side of the element wheel is the story of Bondi Beach, minutes east of Sydney, on a February Sunday in 1938.  Sydney had recently celebrated its 150th birthday, or sesqui-centenary, with a big old parade and events planned to last until April.  The city was a-bustle with visitors, many of whom joined the locals spending the hot, sunny day at Bondi Beach.     The sky was clear, but the sea was already acting a fool. A large swell was hitting the coast and lifeguards at Bondi were busy all day Saturday pulling people from the heavy surf, as many as 74 rescues in one hour.  Despite the heavy seas, beach inspectors gave a mayor of Amity-approved thumbs-up to opening the beach on Sunday, February 6.  Beachgoers started coming and coming and coming.  The morning started out relatively quiet for the lifeguards, but business got brisk, even as they tried to wave swimmers toward safer parts of the beach.  As the tide moved out, more and more people ventured out to a sandbar that ran parallel to the beach.  The crowd had grown to 35,000, enjoying the surf and sand.  Extra surf reels were brought out to the beach as they tried to keep pace with the ballooning battery of bathers.  A lifesaving reel is an Australian invention that was brilliant in its simplicity.  It was a giant reel of rope, with a belt or harness at the end, in a portable stand.  The life saver would attach the harness to his or her self then swim out to the struggling swimmer or surfer.  The lifeguard –and I am going to persist in saying the American lifeguard rather than the Australian lifesaver– then puts the rescuee in the harness and a lifeguard on the beach would reel them in.  The lifeguard in the water either accompanies that person back or goes on to rescue someone else.      Boat crews were out in the water dropping buoys to mark out a race course for weekly races held by and for the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club.  This would turn out to be as fortuitous as when a woman had a heart attack on a trans-atlantic flight, but there were 15 cardiologists on board, going to a conference.  At about 3.00 p.m. two duty patrols were changing shifts at the Bondi surf club and some 60 club members were mingling around waiting for the competition.    Suddenly, five tremendous waves crashed high onto the beach, one right after the other, in such quick succession that the water could not recede.  Even though most bathers were only standing in water up to their waists, they were thrown onto the beach, and pummeled by the following waves.  Then the water receded.  What goes up must come down and what comes in must go back out.  The backwash, which is the term for water on the beach finding its level and returning to the ocean, swept people who'd been nowhere near the water, including non-swimmers who never planned to get in the water, into the water.  The people on the sandbar were then swept further out.  The club recorded 180 people, but news reports at the time put the figure as high as 250 – 250 people now in need of rescue, panicking and thrashing in the surf.     All hands from the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club lept into action.  Beltmen took every available line out, many went in without belts and held up struggling bathers.  Lifesaver Carl Jeppesen is said to have simply dived into the surf to rescue six people without the aid of a surf reel.  One of the main problems was not lack of assistance but too much unskilled help from the huge crowd on the beach.  One beltman, George Pinkerton, was dragged under water by members of the public trying to haul him in. He ended up in need of medical attention. Once the lines had been cleared and a certain amount of order restored, the lifeguards could get on with the job.  Thankfully there were people who *could help.  “I was co-opted into the situation because I was a strong swimmer and they put me on a line,'' said Ted Lever, just 16 at the time, a member of the Bondi Amateur Swimming Club who would soon be invited to join the renowned Bondi lifesaving club.    Even when the well-meaning public had been cleared from the lines to leave them in trained hands, there were still problems. The beltmen often found themselves swamped by swimmers seeking assistance. Some of them had to punch their way through a wall of distressed bathers to get to others in more danger.  One beltman spoke of being seized by five men who refused to let go.  “I was trying to take the belt to a youngster who was right out the back but I didn't get the chance.  As I went by, dozens yelled for help and tried to grab me.  I told them to hang on to the rope as soon as I got it out.  I didn't think I had a chance when they all came at me.  One grabbed me around the neck, two others caught me by one arm, another around the waist and another one seized my leg.  I hit the man who had me around the neck, managed to get him on his chin and he let go.  I had to do it; but for that, I would have been drowned myself.”   The boat was still out after laying the buoys but the crew were waiting for the race to start, but they were completely unaware of the chaos just off the beach.  Nobody thought to signal them, but even if they had, the boat could have posed a danger to people in the water with overactive waves and rip currents.   It was difficult to tell exactly how many people had been rescued during the course of that chaotic 20 minutes.  Rescued swimmers were brought up the beach by the dozens.  About 60 needed to be resuscitated to one degree or another.  Five people died, including one man who died saving a girl.   American doctor Marshall Dyer, there on vacation, helped resuscitate swimmers.  “I have never seen, nor expect to see again, such a magnificent achievement as that of your lifesavers,'' he said. ``It is the most incredible work of love in the world.''   There were inarguably many heroes on Bondi Beach that day, but the Lifesavers' club stance afterwards was that “everyone did his job.”  “It must be realised that though perhaps less spectacular, the work on the beach and in the clubhouse was just as necessary if not more so,'' he told a newspaper.  Instead of recognising individuals for their efforts the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia recommended the entire club for a special meritorious award.   Opening day of Disneyland, 1955   even a potential COVID outbreak or the measles outbreak they had a few years ago would pale in comparison to the disaster that was opening day at Disney.  Disneyland is known as the happiest place on Earth.  But when the park opened on July 17, 1955, the now-ubiquitous nickname was downright ironic.  Disney employees who survived the day referred to it as Black Sunday.  So opening day at Disney was a bit more like the Simpsons episode where they went to itchy and scratchy world. The opening day was meant to be a relatively intimate affair, by invite only, not for every Huey, Dewey and Lewey.  If you were friends and family of the employees, members of the press, and celebrities of the day, you received a ticket in the mail.  If you were everyone else, you bought a counterfeit ticket.  The park was only expecting 15,000 guests; 28,000 showed up, nearly doubled what they prepared for.  Well, what they meant to prepare for, we'll ride the teacups back around to that in a sec.  The counterfeit tickets might have been better than the legit ones, as those were only good for half the day, morning or afternoon, to spread the workload out more evenly.  The morning tickets had an end time of 2:30 pm, when, assumably, they figured people would see that and just say, oh, bother, my time is up, guess I'll leave then.  Nobody did that.  One is stunned.  You buy a ticket for a theme park, you're there all day.  So the morning people were still milling about when the afternoon people started showing up.  And then there were the people who started just sneaking in.  One enterprising self-starter set a ladder up against the outside fence and charged people $5 to climb it.  That's about $50 adjusted for inflation, many many times over for schlepping along a ladder that I like to think he nicked from his neighbor's yard.    A lot of things were not ready on opening day, within the park and without.  The Santa Ana Freeway outside turned into a 7 mile long parking lot.  The opening of the park essentially shut the freeway down.  There were so many people waiting so long, according to some media reports, there was rampant [] relief on the side of the road and even in the Disney parking lot.  Like the video for Everybody Hurts, if folks couldn't hold their water.  If you just flashed back to your life when that video came out, be sure to stretch before you mow the lawn and don't forget your big sun hat.     Today might think of a Disney park as being meticulously manicured and maintained.  Opening day, not so much.  Walt Disney tried to have everything ready on time, hustling his people to work faster, but there's only so much you can do.  So there were bare patches of ground, some areas of bare ground that had been painted green, weeds where the lawns and flowers were meant to be.  Weeds and native flora that they couldn't get rid of in time, they instead put little signs with the Latin name of the plant in the weeds, so it kind of looks like it was meant to be there.  Turn a liability into an asset, I always say.  Returning to the topic of bathrooms, there was a plumber's strike going on during construction; Walt basically had to decide between working water fountains or working toilets.  Florida heat notwithstanding, he chose to have the toilets working, and I'd say that was probably a good call.  If you've ever played theme park tycoon or any of those games now, you know that a lack of water fountains means people *have to pay for drinks now…  Or they would… if the park's concessions had been fully stocked.  The overabundance of people meant that the food and drink sold out completely in just a couple of hours.  Did I mention it was literally 100 deg freedom/38C that day?  The asphalt had been finished so close to opening that it began sticking to people's shoes.  Some people even claimed to have gotten their shoes completely stuck to the pavement on Main Street, where lots of people spent lots of time, because the rides, kind of a big deal at a theme park, they were not ready.  A number of rides, like Peter Pan's Flight, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage, and the famous Flying Dumbo either broke down or never opened at all.   Disney's Black Sunday lasted for weeks.  A Stagecoach ride in Frontierland permanently closed when it became clear that they were as safe against rollovers as a Bronco II with a roof rack loaded with building supplies.  36 cars in Autopia crashed due to aggressive driving on the part of the patrons.  I'm starting to wonder if Disney ever met people.  Ironically, the ride was designed to help children learn to be respectful drivers on the road.  There were a number of live animals in a circus attraction, which was not great when a Tiger and a Panther escaped, which resulted in a furious death struggle on Main Street, USA.  Now that's an attraction you can't pay for, like Baghera vs Sher Khan, 8 years before The Jungle Book.  Like the park, the Mark Twain Riverboat was over capacity on opening day with over 500 people cramming onto the boat, causing it to jump its tracks and sink in the mud.  It took about half an hour to get it back onto the rail, and as soon as it pulled up to the landing, everyone rushed to one side of the boat to get off…. and tipped it over.  Thankfully, the water was shallow and there were no injuries.  There was, however, a gas leak inside Sleeping Beauty's Castle, which could have been a serious problem and prompted the closing of Adventureland, Fantasyland and Frontierland for a few hours because, whoopsie-doodles, Sleeping Beauty's Castle is on fire.  Well, trying to catch fire.  Reports vary as to how severe it actually was.  Walt was so busy handling the press that he didn't even learn about the fire until the following day.  That's how chaotic things were.     Disney was a shrewd and clever businessman, so he thought, I am opening this park. Let's make this into a big live television event.  He partnered with ABC, which had also helped provide nearly a third of the funding.  In return, Walt Disney would host a weekly TV show about what people could expect to see in Disneyland for the year before it opened.  So on opening day, Walt hosted a 90 minutes live TV special with Art Linkletter and future President Ronald Reagan.  90 million people tuned in to see the happiest place on Earth and that kind of ratings was no mean feat for the 50's.  The cameras showed all of the fun and excitement of Disneyland, completely obscuring all of the disasters and unhappiness that was actually happening.  But if you think the live broadcast would go off without a hitch, you may have pattern-recognition problems.  It was riddled with technical difficulties.  Parkgoers kept tripping over camera cables that snaked all over the park.  They were on-air flubs, mics that didn't work, people who forgot their mic *did work, and unexpected moments caught on camera, such as co host Bob Cummings caught making out with one of the dancers.  “This is not so much a show as is a special event,” Art Linkletter said during the broadcast.  “The rehearsal went about the way you'd expect a rehearsal to go if you were covering three volcanoes, all erupting at the same time and you didn't expect any of them. So from time to time, if I say we take you now by camera to the snapping crocodiles in adventure land and instead somebody pushes the wrong button and we catch Irene done adjusting her bustle on the Mark Twain. Don't be too surprised.”  And that's…. The train system is essential for the airport to function at its full capacity since it provides the only passenger access to Concourses B and C. In rare instances of the train system being out of service, shuttle buses have been used. While the system is highly reliable, one major system failure took place on April 26, 1998. A routing cable in the train tunnel was damaged by a loose wheel on one of the trains, cutting the entire system's power. The system was out of service for about seven hours. United Airlines, DIA's largest airline (who operates a large hub out of Concourse B), reported that about 30 percent of their flights and about 5,000 passengers were affected by the failure.     Sources: find sources for Disney https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/11/historical-echoes-what-color-is-my-day-of-the-week/ https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://www.history.com/news/dust-bowl-migrants-california https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnEErB6sPRY https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1925%E2%80%9326_Victorian_bushfire_season https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_bushfires https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/159183/Bondis_Black_Sunday,_1938_rev.pdf https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1000-mile-long-storm-showed-horror-life-dust-bowl-180962847/ https://alchetron.com/Denver-International-Airport-Automated-Guideway-Transit-System