Podcasts about Emirates

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  • 1,256PODCASTS
  • 3,300EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Emirates

Show all podcasts related to emirates

Latest podcast episodes about Emirates

Handbrake Off - A show about Arsenal
"He's a massive tit" Rating the Sven Mislintat signings

Handbrake Off - A show about Arsenal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 44:38


Joining Ian Stone this week it's Art De Roche and Adrian Clarke to look back on the Sven Mislintat era when everything was just a little confused at the Emirates. In order to make sense of it all we have a little game of Sven Mislintit or tat where we rate the eight players that came in under Sven's eye. It's also four years since Unai Emery's first match in charge of the gooners and we compare that team to today's. Moving on to the big topic in The Athletic this week we talk about player roles and the various ways that they can be defined by focusing on Saka and Xhaka. And finally it's all about captains, and one former captain who's going to be lighting up the ballroom this winter RUNNING ORDER PART 1 - Sven Mislintit or tat - 01.00 PART 2 - Saka the wide threat - 11.00 PART 3 - Captaincy and squad leaders - 27.00 PART 4 - Strictly Tony Adams - 37.00 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast
Arsenal Leicester Preview, Tielemans Talk & Bellerin To Barcelona | #TheArsenalAgenda

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 21:47


Tom Canton is joined by Bailey Keogh to discuss the latest Arsenal talking points including, previewing tomorrow's clash against Leicester City at the Emirates. Plus, the boys recap episodes 4-6 of the All or Nothing series before touching on transfers related to Youri Tielemans and Hector Bellerin.

The Game Football Podcast
Kings of London

The Game Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 61:25


Hugh Woozencroft is joined by Gregor Robertson, Tom Clarke, Jonathan Northcroft and Tom Roddy.Antonio Conte has been praised for his work at Spurs so far - but have they actually stepped up yet? Is Sunday's game against Chelsea their opportunity to show everyone what they can do? (00:00)Arsenal have also made improvements with Gabriel Jesus the standout addition at the Emirates. What can they expect to achieve this season? Leicester have brought no players in and have seen Kaspar Schmeichel leave in this window - are they destined for a disappointing season? (22:06)It's Steven Gerrard against Frank Lampard at the weekend as Aston Villa host Everton. Which of the former England teammates will come out on top? (35:30)Jonathan spent some time with Brighton boss, Graham Potter. You can read the full conversation in The Times - but does Jonny think he's a future England manager? (42:55)Every club has made a desperate transfer deadline day signing or two - we recall our favourites (51:40)Get more of The Times and The Sunday Times for less than £1 a day. Start your free trial: thetimes.co.uk/thegame Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Radio Russian Emirates
20220809-01 - Emirates начала набор вторых пилотов & ​В Дубае бутлегера настигла полицейская погоня

Radio Russian Emirates

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 2:46


Новости на радио «Русские Эмираты» в Дубае: - Эмирейтс, крупнейший в мире оператор авиалайнеров A380 и Боинг 777, ищет помощников командира экипажа. Успешные кандидаты могут рассчитывать на новые карьерные высоты вместе с широкофюзеляжным авиапарком Эмирейтс и постоянно расширяющейся глобальной маршрутной сетью, а также наслаждаться отличным уровнем жизни в динамичном Дубае. - Нелегальный торговец алкоголем, выходец из Нигерии, арестованный в Дубае, проведет один год в тюрьме, после чего будет депортирован на родину. Такой приговор вынес Уголовный суд эмирата. Кроме того, бутлегер выплатит штраф в размере 4900 дирхамов в качестве компенсации ущерба, нанесенного патрульному автомобилю Дубайской полиции.

Nuus
Toerisme tussen SA en Verenigde Arabiese Emirate versterk

Nuus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 0:23


Die Wes-Kaapse Toerisme, Handel- en Beleggingsbevorderings-agentskap, Wesgro en Dubai Tourism het onderneem om toerisme in Suid-Afrika en die Verenigde Arabiese Emirate te versterk. Dubai Tourism beplan om 'n toer na Johannesburg, Durban en Kaapstad te onderneem. Meer as 2,7 biljoen Suid-Afrikaanse rand is tydens die pandemie in hierdie sektor verloor. Die uitvoerende hoof van Wesgro, Wrenelle Stander, sê dit is nou die regte tyd om die bedryf te laat herleef en reisigers van regoor die wêreld te lok.

Yachting Channel
S2 Ep646: Crew Travel with Lee Harris: August 8, 2022

Yachting Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 10:20


This week, Lufthansa avoids a strike by ground crew, news from BA, Emirates, Malaysia Airlines, possible strike action in Portugal and there were Crew Questions but Rhea forgot to ask. Sure Lee will follow up with you in person! All links available on the Blue Marine Travel Website at www.bluemarinetravel.com. BMT operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Contact us on blue@bluemarinetravel.com or +44 (0) 1279 661 000 For Lee Harris and daily travel updates: https://lnkd.in/dMJ28rT @bluemarinetravel #travel #yachting #yachtcrew #repatriation #travelling #crew #maritime #superyachts #yachtcharter #yachts #yachting #yachtcrew #crewtravel #yachtinginternationalradio

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 421 - Muffin Anyone?

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 130:06 Very Popular


Join Carlos, Nev and Matt for this week's Show. In this week's show Ryanair sets a new record, one passenger takes a wizz after seeing there phone bill & another passenger eats a VERY expensive McMuffin.    And in the Military this week the US Special Operations Command chooses a new armed overwatch platform and a large portion of the world's fighter fleet is grounded. Don't forget you can get in touch with us all at : WhatsApp +44 757 22 491 66 Email podcast@planetalkinguk.com or comment in our chatroom on YouTube. Here are the links to the stories we featured this week : COMMERCIAL Southampton Airport runway expansion will go ahead https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-62381000 Ryanair sets new passenger record https://www.irishtimes.com/business/2022/08/03/ryanair-sets-new-passenger-record-after-almost-17-million-flew-with-airline-in-july/ British Airways is about to pause sales of long-haul flights to destinations such as New York as the airline battles disruption at Heathrow. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2022/08/03/british-airways-cant-rule-ban-long-haul-ticket-sales-heathrow/  What Happens When an Airline Tug Jack-knifes With a Jet in Tow https://www.thedrive.com/news/watch-what-happens-when-an-airline-tug-jackknifes-with-a-jet-in-tow Emirates returns to Stansted Airport with daily long-haul service to Dubai https://www.bishopsstortfordindependent.co.uk/business/emirates-dubai-service-returns-to-stansted-airport-as-deman-9267203/ Passenger Fined Over $1,800 Over a Couple of McMuffins in His Luggage https://www.foodandwine.com/news/australian-airline-mcmuffin-fineAirline Finland set to test mobile app that will let passengers travel paper-free https://www.euronews.com/travel/2022/08/03/digital-passports-finland-set-to-test-mobile-app-that-will-let-passengers-travel-paper-fre Three taken to hospital after light aircraft crashes at Cotswold Airport https://www.itv.com/news/westcountry/2022-08-04/plane-crashes-after-overshooting-the-runway-at-cotswold-airport London City Airport to reach 3 million passenger mark as numbers soar https://www.cityam.com/london-city-airport-to-reach-3-million-passenger-mark-as-numbers-soar/ Wizz Air passengers get '£80 phone bill' after calling £1.45 a minute helpline to try and get a refund https://www.mylondon.news/lifestyle/travel/gatwick-wizz-air-passengers-80-24652154 MILITARY US Special Operations Command chooses L3Harris' Sky Warden for Armed Overwatch effort https://www.defensenews.com/air/2022/08/01/us-special-operations-command-chooses-l3harris-sky-warden-for-armed-overwatch-effort/ Rescuers on the Rio Grande: Coast Guard team saves lives at the border https://www.dvidshub.net/news/426256/rescuers-rio-grande-coast-guard-team-saves-lives-border?fbclid=IwAR1JDl5hXMe59GbC8bkEcfWlaUat9YCFcileuxDpgpioADeL64H7Lomu9fM&fs=e&s=cl The Air Force is grounding the majority of its F-35 Joint Strike Fighter fleet today, due to a faulty component inside its ejection seat that could prevent the pilot from being able to safely egress from the aircraft during an emergency, Breaking Defense has learned. https://www.unionleader.com/news/military/air-force-grounds-almost-300-training-planes-as-ejection-seat-safety-concerns-spread/article_8d2f85d8-bcae-5a65-b0e5-6089460ba56b.html https://breakingdefense.com/2022/07/air-force-grounding-f-35s-over-ejection-seat-concerns/

Podcast s Martinem Barnou
Ze života letušky Emirates

Podcast s Martinem Barnou

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 51:13


Dnes Vás čeká rozhovor s ex letuškou Emirates, vášnivou běžkyní a klavíristkou Markétou Košťálovou. Její zážitky z letů na nejluxusnější destinace světa, život letušky v Dubaji, jak si užila maraton / půl maraton a ultra maraton, jaké je to běhat ve 38 stupních v Dubaji, a taky o tom jak učí lidi hrát na klavír. IG Markéty: https://www.instagram.com/m.ark.i/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/marki14 Soundcloud Markéty: https://soundcloud.com/mark-ta-ko-lov-630072209/rana-wav?ref=facebook&p=a&c=1&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=social_sharing&fbclid=IwAR1gNGFzah8PwlLCF8wxL4Dk54forqi9aLN_DGoFXpPv9DRM2UQgxsvJu0c Be Effective Koukni na www.martinbarna.cz - koučing/videokurz, audiokniha, recepty, ebook, odkazy na můj Spotify/Apple Podcasts, Facebook, Instagram a další.

International HD
«Best of»: Katar und Vereinigte Arabische Emirate: Rivalität unter Golfprinzen

International HD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 28:12


Die Emirate haben gerade die erste Weltausstellung im Nahen Osten ausgerichtet, Katar rüstet sich für die erste Fussballweltmeisterschaft in der Region. Mitten in der globalen Krise strotzen zwei schwerreiche Scheichtümer vor Optimismus und Sendungsbewusstsein. Zugleich sind sie scharfe Rivalen. Öl gibt es auch anderswo, doch wir in den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten haben es verstanden, das Vermögen aus diesem Bodenschatz sinnvoll einzusetzen, sagt der Publizist Mohamed Al Hammadi mitten in der Hochhauskulisse von Dubai. Die Ambitionen der Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate reichen schon bis ins Weltall. Sie haben sich in den USA und in Japan die Technologie für eine eigene Marssonde eingekauft. Auch ein Museum der Zukunft gibt es in Dubai schon. Al Hammadi nimmt es als Beweis, dass die Emirate stets fünfzig Jahre voraus dächten. «Wer solche Horizonte vor Augen hat, der will sich nicht in Konflikte verstricken», sagt der Publizist. Genau das freilich wird den Emiraten vorgeworfen: Dass sie nicht nur Wolkenkratzer und Luxushotels bauen, sondern sich mit ihren Ölmilliarden in der ganzen Region einmischen, bis zum Horn von Afrika Häfen aufkaufen, in der arabischen Welt Kriegsparteien unterstützen. Wie die Emirate so pumpte auch Katar im letzten Jahrzehnt Milliarden in Konfliktzonen der Region, zugunsten der Gegenseite. Katar finanziere Terroristen, sagten die Emirate und verlangten vom widerspenstigen Nachbarn, dass er auf eine eigenständige Aussenpolitik verzichten und ganz auf den Kurs der andern Golfstaaten umschwenken solle. Katar dachte nicht daran. Und schon im Landeanflug auf die Hauptstadt Doha wird klar: so sieht kein Verlierer aus. Auch in Doha bestimmen Wolkenkratzer die Skyline, auch hier ist die Handschrift der Stararchitekten zu erkennen. Die Aussicht auf die Fussballweltmeisterschaft im nächsten Winter hat in Katar einen gewaltigen Bauboom ausgelöst. «Wir sind bereit, die Welt zu empfangen», sagt Mohammed Al Mulla vom staatlichen Organisationskomitee. Mit dem rund um den Globus beachteten Sportereignis will Katar sich selbst und der ganzen Welt die eigene Unverzichtbarkeit beweisen. (Erstausstrahlung: 30. April 2022)

International
«Best of»: Katar und Vereinigte Arabische Emirate: Rivalität unter Golfprinzen

International

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 28:12


Die Emirate haben gerade die erste Weltausstellung im Nahen Osten ausgerichtet, Katar rüstet sich für die erste Fussballweltmeisterschaft in der Region. Mitten in der globalen Krise strotzen zwei schwerreiche Scheichtümer vor Optimismus und Sendungsbewusstsein. Zugleich sind sie scharfe Rivalen. Öl gibt es auch anderswo, doch wir in den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten haben es verstanden, das Vermögen aus diesem Bodenschatz sinnvoll einzusetzen, sagt der Publizist Mohamed Al Hammadi mitten in der Hochhauskulisse von Dubai. Die Ambitionen der Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate reichen schon bis ins Weltall. Sie haben sich in den USA und in Japan die Technologie für eine eigene Marssonde eingekauft. Auch ein Museum der Zukunft gibt es in Dubai schon. Al Hammadi nimmt es als Beweis, dass die Emirate stets fünfzig Jahre voraus dächten. «Wer solche Horizonte vor Augen hat, der will sich nicht in Konflikte verstricken», sagt der Publizist. Genau das freilich wird den Emiraten vorgeworfen: Dass sie nicht nur Wolkenkratzer und Luxushotels bauen, sondern sich mit ihren Ölmilliarden in der ganzen Region einmischen, bis zum Horn von Afrika Häfen aufkaufen, in der arabischen Welt Kriegsparteien unterstützen. Wie die Emirate so pumpte auch Katar im letzten Jahrzehnt Milliarden in Konfliktzonen der Region, zugunsten der Gegenseite. Katar finanziere Terroristen, sagten die Emirate und verlangten vom widerspenstigen Nachbarn, dass er auf eine eigenständige Aussenpolitik verzichten und ganz auf den Kurs der andern Golfstaaten umschwenken solle. Katar dachte nicht daran. Und schon im Landeanflug auf die Hauptstadt Doha wird klar: so sieht kein Verlierer aus. Auch in Doha bestimmen Wolkenkratzer die Skyline, auch hier ist die Handschrift der Stararchitekten zu erkennen. Die Aussicht auf die Fussballweltmeisterschaft im nächsten Winter hat in Katar einen gewaltigen Bauboom ausgelöst. «Wir sind bereit, die Welt zu empfangen», sagt Mohammed Al Mulla vom staatlichen Organisationskomitee. Mit dem rund um den Globus beachteten Sportereignis will Katar sich selbst und der ganzen Welt die eigene Unverzichtbarkeit beweisen. (Erstausstrahlung: 30. April 2022)

The I Am Not An Arsenal Fan Podcast
Episode 12 | Now Or When?

The I Am Not An Arsenal Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 35:56


On Episode 12 of The I Am Not An Arsenal Fan Podcast: Tyrrell shares his thoughts on Arsenal's transfer activity ahead of their opening Premier League game against Crystal Palace (6:45). He dissects why this season's success will define Mikel Arteta's tenure at the Emirates, analyzes how Arsenal will tactically approach games, and shares his thoughts on whether they can finally get back into the Premier League top four.All of this and much more on this week's episode of The I Am Not An Arsenal Fan Podcast!Don't forget to subscribe and share our podcast with your friends on iTunes, Spotify, Spreaker, iHeartRadio, YouTube and your Android devices!Youtube.com/TheInnerViews

Kanu Believe It
22/23 SEASON PREDICTIONS PODCAST | KANU BELIEVE IT

Kanu Believe It

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 51:26


In this episode of Kanu Believe It. Met and Wayne live from The Emirates record their season predictions. Who will be top goalscorer, player of the season, breakout star and where will we finish in all competitions. Met also pays his bet to Wayne. 

Airlines Confidential Podcast
147 - The JetBlue/Spirit Deal - AP's David Koenig

Airlines Confidential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 46:54


This week: The JetBlue/Spirit Deal - AP's David Koenig; Southwest, Frontier, Ryan, Wizz, earnings reports; Ugly numbers from FlightAware; Operational Issues at Toronto; Listener Q: Will AA bring Envoy Piedmont into mainline? Passenger "sobbing" due to American's 6 hour CLT incident. Shout-outs to LGA and Emirates.

New Customer Offer Podcast
Arsenal vs Crystal Palace - Best Bookmaker Offers

New Customer Offer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 6:37


Episode 514 - Welcome to the Premier League 2022/23 season. Yes it's back with Arsenal hosting Crystal Palace at the Emirates on Friday. Live on Sky Sports we highlight 3 of the best bookmaker offers available right now, if you fancy a bet.  Make sure to visit our website for our bet365 new customer offer uk guide. Betfair Sportsbook - Bet £10, Get £30 in Free Bets For new customers only, 18+, Betfair Sportsbook are offering a Bet £10, Get £30 in Free Bets offer. Use promo code ZBGC01 when registering. Significant Terms: Place a min £10 bet on the Sportsbook on odds of min 1/2 (1.5), get £30 in Free Bets. Rewards valid for 30 days. SMS verification required. Only deposits via cards will qualify. T&Cs apply. Please Gamble Responsibly. #Ad Betfair Promo Details: betfair new customer Ladbrokes - Bet £5, Get £20 in Free Bets  For new customers only. 18+, Ladbrokes are offering a Bet £5, Get £20 in Free Bets. No promo code required when registering. Significant Terms: 18+ New UK+IRE customers. Paypal and certain deposit types and bet types excluded. Min £5 bet within 14 days of account reg at min odds 1/2 = 4 x £5 free bets. Free bets valid for 4 days on sports, stake not returned, restrictions apply. T&Cs apply. #Ad Full Ladbrokes promotion details: ladbrokes sign up offer Boylesports - up to £25 in Free Bets  For new customers 18+ Boylesports are offering up to £25 in Free Bets. No promo code is required when registering.  Significant Terms: 8+, T&Cs apply. Cash stakes only. Min £10 stake required for initial £5 free bet. Min odds 1/2 (1.5). Max £25 in free bets. Subsequent free bets equal 50% average of each 3 qualifying bets. 13 bets required to receive full £25 free bet. Qualifying bet must be placed within 30 days of opening account. Free bet expires after 7 days. Payment method restrictions apply. #Ad Full Boylesports Promo Details: boylesports new customer offer New Customer Offer has a huge library of promotions information. Here is our bet365 promo code uk guide and our betfred bet 10 get 60 guide. Paddy Power + Coral are partners of the NCO Network - read our paddy power new customer offer and coral free bet guides. Read our unibet new customer offer page  Top Pages 1) https://www.newcustomeroffer.co.uk/offers/william-hill-free-bet-explained/ 2) https://www.newcustomeroffer.co.uk/offers/betvictor-new-customer-offer/ 3) https://www.newcustomeroffer.co.uk/offers/888sport-new-customer-offer/ Listeners & Subscribers 18+. Please be Gambleaware, you can visit BeGambleAware.org for more information and of course please bet responsibly.

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast
Arsenal Outgoings, Maddison Dilemma, Cucurella To Chelsea & Tielemans Talk | #TheArsenalAgenda

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 17:04


Tom Canton is joined by Bailey Keogh to dissect the big Arsenal talking points, including discussion on the imminent outgoings at the Emirates stadium which includes the likes of Bernd Leno & Lucas Torreira. Plus, the boys discuss Newcastle's pursuit of Leicester City's James Maddison as well as Marc Cucurella to Chelsea before touching on Youri Tielemans with reports emerging that the Belgian star does not want his transfer uncertainty 'to drag on'. Enjoy.

Business Travel 360
Linking the Travel Industry - August 1, 2022

Business Travel 360

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 28:45


Linking the Travel Industry is a business travel podcast where we review the top travel industry stories that are posted on LinkedIn by LinkedIn members.  We curate the top posts and discuss with them with travel industry veterans in a live session with real audience members.  You can join the live recording session by visiting BusinessTravel360.com and registering for the next event. Your Hosts are Riaan van Schoor, Ann Cederhall and Aash Shravah.Stories covered on this session include -Airlines are getting into the farming business. Ross Fastuca from Locomote shares the story about Emirates who opened an innovative farm based on the vertical farming method, which uses 95 per cent less water than traditional farming, producing food for their flights. https://lnkd.in/duT4qk9qIf I were to tell you the Antalya - Moscow flight route is a popular one at the moment, would you have guessed how popular? Take a look at the world's busiest routes in July, according to OAG. This story brought to you by Alexandra Vukolova. https://lnkd.in/d2n9dMSySpotnana continues to receive funding to realise it's mission of delivering a "travel as a service" platform. As a result, they are on a global hiring spree, as Alexis Rochat tells us here. https://lnkd.in/dSMG69B5Huge news from Norse Atlantic Airways about an interlining partnership with several LCCs, made possible by Dohop. https://lnkd.in/dM969iqYSpirit Airlines ditches Frontier Airlines and decides JetBlue is the best buyer for them. Ann Cederhall posted about this. https://lnkd.in/dxCkggeEIn an industry first, Southwest Airlines credits will now never expire. Jennifer Belt from Executive Travel Inc. brings us this story. https://lnkd.in/dsRJqjzRHawaiian Airlines makes it content available direclty on Priceline via it's own direct connect channel. George Bryan tell us more here. https://lnkd.in/dzHFTDenTune in every week to get your weekly update.  You can subscribe to this podcast by searching BusinessTravel360 on Google Podcast, Apple Podcast, iHeart, Pandora or Spotify. Support the show

Arsenal Vision Post Match Podcast
Episode 604 - I Would Say Be Excited

Arsenal Vision Post Match Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 89:08 Very Popular


On this edition of the ArsenalVision Podcast, Elliot (@yankeegunner) is joined by Paul (@poznaninmypants) and Tim (@stillberto) to discuss a fun win over Sevilla in the Emirates cup. There's a discussion of the front 3, the new penalty taker, Odegaard as captain, Martinelli's upcoming season and the new back 4. There's also a look ahead to Palace and the season generally. All that and more on this edition of the ArsenalVision Podcast. Signup for our Patreon at patreon.com/arsenalvisionpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Good Morning Africa
How research and development can change the way we look at Africa' s food systems.

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 8:02


How research and development can change the way we look at Africa' s food systems.  Emirates cuts down on number of flights to Nigeria. 

Pitch Talk Podcast
The Straight Shootin' View Episode 117 - Arsenal Champs League Ladies & Female Premier League chair

Pitch Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 12:32


How important is it for the growth of Arsenal Ladies to play their Champions League matches & selected FA WSL games at the Emirates? On this episode of The Straight Shootin' View our co-host SSLJA talks about Arsenal Ladies being allowed to play their Champions League matches at the Emirates stadium if they qualify for the group stage and how significant this could be for the Women's team in terms of exposure. SSLJA also discusses the Premier League appointing a new female chair to their board and if this could open the doors to more diversity within the Premier League board, that is looking for a 5th person. For more information about Pitch Talk visit: Our Official Website - http://www.pitch-talk.com http://Facebook.com/pitchtalk (Become a fan & member of our Facebook group) http://Twitter.com/pitchtalk @pitchtalk https://www.instagram.com/pitchtalk/ http://Youtube.com/pitchtalk Find & Subscribe to our audio - Add us to your favourite podcast app via RSS Feed - https://anchor.fm/s/8839b7e0/podcast/rss Anchor FM - https://anchor.fm/pitchtalk Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/pitch-talk-podcast/id445883703 Google Podcasts - https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkLnBvZGJlYW4uY29tL3BpdGNodGFsay9mZWVkLnhtbA Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/0y9lR6WJaNLyAr7diAHhqh#upsell Amazon Music - https://music.amazon.co.uk/podcasts/ee0280cc-f15b-49bb-a3e2-b688e0dd49d5/Pitch-Talk-Podcast? Vurbl - https://vurbl.com/station/pitch-talk-podcast/ PlayerFM - https://player.fm/series/pitch-talk-podcast-2859976 Mixcloud Archive (Incl. Classic podcast episodes) - https://mixcloud.com/pitchtalk/ #ArsenalLadies #Championsleague #FAWSL #PremierLeagueBoard #WomensFootball #Diversity #FAWomensSuperLeague #NorthLondonDerby #weuro2022 #ManchesterCityLadies #ChelseaFCWomen #TottenhamWomen #ArsenalWomen #SkySports #tactics #arsenalwomen #mancityladies #manunitedwomen #chelseawomen #AstonVillaLadies #LeicesterCityLadies #Vlogs #PremierLeague #EFL #Podcast #Podomatic #Podbean #EPL #ApplePodcasts #GooglePodcasts #money #football #players #coaching #soccer #GrassRootsFootball #UEFA #FA #FIFA #FootballVideos #opinion #fans #facebook #twitter #igtv #instagram #YouTube

Gulf International Forum's Majlis
Allies or Partners: Deciphering U.S.-GCC Relations in Peace and Crises

Gulf International Forum's Majlis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 77:23


Featured speakers: Ambassador Patrick Theros, Ambassador Robert Gallucci, Dr. Kenneth Katzman, Anna Jacobs, and Professor David Des Roches. Synopsis: U.S.-GCC relations have become more complicated. U.S. signals of reduced interest in the Middle East and the increase in American oil and gas production to the highest record ever just as the Russian invasion of Ukraine exploded on the scene have strained the relationship more than ever before. In actions unprecedented in the U.S.-GCC relationship, both Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) and UAE Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed (MBZ) snubbed President Joe Biden's request for a telephone call. As of this writing, the response of both the Kingdom and the Emirates to Biden's request to increase oil production in order to dampen oil price rises and allow Europe to reduce its dependence on Russian energy seems to have fallen on deaf ears. Riyadh and Abu Dhabi appear reluctant to end their commitment to the OPEC+ agreement with Russia to limit oil exports despite rapidly increasing oil prices worldwide, an increase with serious political and economic ramifications in the United States. To state that these developments have provoked great speculation about the future of U.S.-GCC relations would be an understatement. U.S.-GCC relations have had their frictions in the recent past. America has expressed concerns for more than a decade about growing economic and, in some cases, security and geopolitical, ties between all the GCC states and China. The decision of the Biden Administration to find a way to restore the JCPOA, Obama's 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran from which President Trump had withdrawn the U.S. in 2019, went down badly with those GCC states which had hoped for continued U.S. confrontation with Tehran. They saw the JCPOA as a signal that Washington sought to improve relations with Iran, reversing decades of unquestioned U.S. support for the Gulf Arab states and unbending hostility towards Tehran. Combined with Obama's announced “pivot to Asia” in 2009, U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, and American support for the “Arab Spring” anti-authoritarian uprising, one can understand the concerns of some Gulf monarchies that the U.S. no longer cared about their security. Also, long-term contradictions in GCC views of the U.S. have resurfaced. On one hand, Biden rewarded Qatar, naming it a Major Non-NATO Ally, for its long-time loyalty in supporting U.S. activities in the region –not least facilitating the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. On the other hand, the U.S. continues to publicly criticize the Saudi-led war in Yemen, although it continues to provide material support to Abu Dhabi and Riyadh to defend against Yemen's Houthis attacks on both countries. What do the GCC states expect from Washington? Are they allies or partners or “is it complicated”? How do the different GCC countries see their bilateral relationships with the U.S.? Is there a collective GCC view? Most importantly, how does Washington view its interests in the region?

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast
Arsenal with @ThreeFiveWho | Correspondent Week ep 5 | Planet FPL

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 62:13


On the fifth episode of Correspondent Week Suj & James speak to Arsenal fan Adam Pritchard about The Gunners hopes for the new season and the best FPL assets from The Emirates. Does Gabriel Jesus justify being the highest owned player in the game? Adam's delighted he's signed but not convinced that the ownership numbers are justified. Could the value in Arsenal therefore lie in the midfield spots through the likes of Gabriel Martinelli, Martin Odegaard and Bukayo Saka? There's talk of Arsenal's investment in Oleksandr Zinchenko and where the 5.0 asset is likely to play during the season, injury concerns in the full-back areas persist, why William Saliba could finally be set for his Arsenal Premier League debut in Gameweek 1 and the brilliant opening set of fixtures that mean it's difficult to overlook Arsenal FPL assets as they bid to get back in the top 4. Follow Adam on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThreeFiveWho Still to come today on Planet FPL - Correspondent Week episode 6 with @FPLDummyTom on Brentford Join our Planet FPL Mini League: https://fantasy.premierleague.com/leagues/auto-join/yw6ree Patrons can find information on their mini leagues this season via this post https://www.patreon.com/posts/patreon-mini-69251447 You can also join our Sky Fantasy Football Mini League. The Pin required is 8475785 ___________________________________________ Want to become a member of our FPL and SkyFF community and support the Podcast? Our Patreon content in July features over 20 additional Podcasts from Intermediate Tier. Today's content features Tot&Ham Join us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/planetfpl Follow James on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlanetFPLPod Follow Suj on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sujanshah Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/planetfpl Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/planetfpl #CorrespondentWeek #FPL #Arsenal

Bryan Air
#105 Track Your Luggage | European Airport Chaos

Bryan Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 64:35


  ✈️Cape Town leads South Africa's tourism drive. There's an important new order for the 737 MAX at the Farnborough airshow. Clever technology to help you find your boarding gate. A recent travel experience from one of our listeners and an important tip for anyone planning on travelling through Europe in the coming months.    Audience feedback drives the show. We'd love for you to contact us and keep the conversation going! Email rosevearebryan@gmail.com, call +2783 777 8995 or leave us a message on social media! We'd love to hear from you!     ✅Quick Episode Summary:     00:00 Welcome back  02:09 Cape Town ILS Runway 01 suspended  04:13 Jet fuel crisis in South Africa 06:13 Vitality news 08:49 Both Delta and United will operate to Cape Town 17:14 Another light aircraft crash in South Africa 22:15 Farnborough airshow news  33:46 Emirates hydroponics plant  36:06 The new Gulfstream 38:44 Airport innovation 44:40 Listener travel experience  58:02 Apple Air Tags 01:01:50 Special mentions - Kendra Evans      

BICOM's Podcast
Episode 187 | Biden's visit to the Middle East: A View from the Gulf

BICOM's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 30:08


In this episode, Richard Pater speaks to Najat Al-Saied, a Professor at American University in the Emirates, Dubai, to gain a Gulf perspective of US President Biden's recent trip to the Middle East. Richard and Najat discuss the UAE's strategy vis-a-vis Iran, how the gulf views more open security and military cooperation with Israel and why the Abraham Accords are still not viewed favourably among the Arab publics. Najat is a columnist with Al Ittihad (an Arabic-language newspaper published daily in the UAE) as well as Al Hurra (an American satellite television news channel in Arabic). Beginning in January 2021, she joined Israel Hayom as contributor and columnist to the newspaper, and appears on i24 News. 

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast
Zinchenko Due For Arsenal Medical, Paquetá Or Tielemans & Back Three Experiment | #TheArsenalAgenda

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 27:02


Tom Canton is joined by Chris Davison to dissect the big Arsenal talking points including reaction to Oleksandr Zinchenko's imminent arrival to the Emirates from Manchester City. Plus, the boys assess what's next for the Gunners in the transfer market amid links to Lucas Paquetá & Youri Tielemans before discussion on whether Mikel Arteta should experiment with a back three for the forthcoming season. Enjoy.

The Football Ramble
FRP Showcase: At The Match - Arsenal 0-2 Liverpool, March 2022

The Football Ramble

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 37:43 Very Popular


For today's Football Ramble Presents showcase, we're back with an episode of At The Match, the series that takes you right to the heart of football matches across the world.Andy is joined by the Ramble's own Jim Campbell as they revel in a cracking atmosphere under the lights at the Emirates back in March! They talk about Jim's relationship with his beloved Arsenal after moving to the area and how the team's recent resurgence under Mikel Arteta is grounds for renewed optimism.Tweet us @FootballRamble and email us here: show@footballramble.com.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Business Travel 360
What's Up in Business Travel - July 18, 2022

Business Travel 360

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 15:04


Welcome to the BT360 Podcast: What's Up in Business Travel for Week 28 of 2022.  This is a weekly podcast where we update you on what's up this week in the world of business travel.  This podcast is great for those who need to know what's happening all in less than 15 minutes.Topics covered during this podcast -Alaska Airlines surprises employees with 90,000 milesHeathrow Airport caps departing passengers at 100,000Airlines post Q2 profits despite travel chaosTransatlantic airfares hit record high in JuneNew York City is recommending face masksBahamas to eliminate Covid testsCanada to restart random COVID-19 testsRegional Express to purchase National Jet ExpressSWVL acquires SurbvanTravel Edge joins EnsembleAir Canada & Emirates agree strategic partnershipTrainline & Agiito agree extended partnershipSaudi Arabia to open airspace to all air carriersCayman Airways will fly to the West CoastSAS pilots strike reaches 11th dayUS passport wait time is now 8 - 11 weeksSouthwest Airlines returns to pre-pandemic employee levelsSabre & Amadeus to distribute Finnair NDC content this yearLufthansa Group to change Distribution Cost chargesFinnair portal enables GDS bypass_____________________________________Tune in every Monday morning to get your weekly update.  We hope you will make this a regular part of your week and listen in while you on the move or sitting back and sipping your coffee.  You can subscribe to this podcast by searching BusinessTravel360 on Google Podcast, Apple Podcast, iHeart, Pandora or Spotify.Be sure to sign up for regular updates at BusinessTravel360.com - Enjoy!Support the show

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast
Emirates has accused Heathrow of causing an 'airmageddon' situation.

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 33:33


The airline has said it's just going to keep operating its Heathrow flights regardless. We ask aviation lawyer Nick Humphrey - can they do that? Plus, US President Joe Biden will arrive in Saudi Arabia today. Rawan Radwan of Arab News explains what this visit means for the Kingdom. And, where should you invest your money in these volatile markets? The Chief Investment Officer of Emirates NBD Maurice Gravier has the details.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Update
UAE sights in world top 20, Emirates rejects Heathrow move and Ivana Trump dies – Trending

The Daily Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 2:01


Trending Middle East brings you the latest social media and search trends from the region and around the world. In today's episode, two of the UAE's most famous landmarks have been ranked among the top 20 of the 'world's most beautiful sights'. Emirates airline has rejected London Heathrow airport's request to cancel flights due to a new cap on passenger numbers and Ivana Trump, ex-wife of former US president Donald Trump, has died at 73.

Bryan Air
#104 Emirates vs Heathrow, Baggage Repatriations And Sold Out Local Carriers!

Bryan Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 16:19


✅In this episode:   There's a battle looming between the decision makers at the world's busiest airport and Emirates. Simon Newton-Smith resigns from Spoories Version 2.0 as FlySafair, Airlink, Lift, and Cemair sells out tickets for the Johannesburg - Cape Town route. Baggage repatriations to fix the bottleneck in Europe and pilot jobs are plentiful.    Audience feedback drives the show. We'd love for you to contact us and keep the conversation going! Email rosevearebryan@gmail.com, call +2783 777 8995 or leave us a message on social media! We'd love to hear from you!   Listen to the podcast:     Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/bryan-air/id1482906139 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1Hb2Fpe5OsLwXf0F8xdx5Q?si=oloCHIqzSBGw0BBTQTheRQ&dl_branch=1 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BryanRoseveare       ❤️Support:     If you would like to support the podcast by pledging a small monthly fee, you can do so through Patreon; your support in this regard will be greatly appreciated; alternatively, a once-off donation can also be made through PayPal, available on my YouTube channel. https://www.patreon.com/bryanair     ➕Also, follow me at these places below and don't hesitate to say hi.     Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryanroseveare/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryanroseveare/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bryan.roseveare.988 Twitter:https://twitter.com/bryanroseveare     

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
What does Heathrow passenger cap mean for summer travel?

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 14:57


Emirates has today rejected Heathrow's order to stop selling some plane tickets, to comply with its to 100,000-a-day cap on passenger numbers.The airline issued a statement accusing Heathrow of showing “blatant disregard for consumers” by attempting to force carriers to “deny seats to tens of thousands of travellers”.In response Heathrow said it had asked airlines to “help come up with a plan to solve their resourcing challenges”, but no clear plans were put forward, and the airport had “no choice” but to impose a capacity cap.Travel Journalist Simon Calder explains what it all means for air travel out of Heathrow, and what might happen next.And Travel Expert Rob Staines discusses the wider problems facing passengers, and when things might get back to normal.Follow us on Twitter for more news @EveningStandard See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

An Inside View Podcast
Series 3 // Ep. 10 - Sharon O'Keeffe - Founder of The Design House| Irish Businesswoman | Interior Design

An Inside View Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 78:18


On episode 10 of #AnInsideViewPodcast we are delighted to be joined by Irish Businesswoman and Founder of The Design House - Sharon O'Keeffe.   Some points we discuss:  

Business Extra
How Emirates and Etihad averted the worst of 'airmageddon'

Business Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 14:25


Delays, cancellations, lost luggage and labour shortages. These are but some of the issues facing airlines in Europe and the US as the summer travel season picks up pace.   Aviation correspondent Deena Kamel joins co-hosts Mustafa Alrawi and Kelsey Warner this week. They discuss how Gulf carriers like Etihad and Emirates managed to avert the travel chaos burdening the industry, what effect surging demand is having on airfares and balance sheets, and the outlook for aviation through to the end of the year.   Read more: Abu Dhabi airport well-staffed to meet summer travel rush despite global labour crunch BA to 'cancel 800 flights for more than 100,000 holidaymakers' Paris airport staff call off strikes but travellers face more cancelled flights chaos Emirates proceeding with summer schedule despite travel disruption in some markets   Subscribe to Business Extra for free to receive new episodes every week Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Podbean

Two Dry Guys
Episode 37: Summer of Whiskey #2

Two Dry Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 59:39


The Two Dry Guys give Hudson Whiskey a shot and have differing opinions. Nate discusses getting ready for a 5k, being too fat to ride a jetski with his lady, and trying to determine what drugs do to poo. Justin talks about officiating a wedding, AirBnb's, and constipation at home. Thank your bullies. For This Week in Furniture Nate talks about airplane seats on Emirates. 

Airplane News Update
Airplane News: Russia VS ICAO, Emirates A380 continues with hole, Jet Truck Explodes, New FAA Admin

Airplane News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 4:31


This week in airplane news: ICAO has told Russia to stop registering foreign-owned Airliners, Emirates A380 Completes flight with hole in the plane, Jet truck explodes killing one, and the nomination for the new FAA admin is in! To combat sanctions, Russia has been registering foreign owned aircraft. ICAO records show 450 aircraft owned by foreign lessors that have been put on the Russian register. Most are registered in Bermuda Russia demanded that Bermuda de-register these aircraft. Bermuda refused stating “Our response is consistent in that we will deregister aircraft on request from the owner, in accordance with the relevant Bermuda legislation and procedures,” Bermuda said in a statement. https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/icao-tells-russia-to-stop-registering-foreign-owned-airliners An Emirates A380 landed in Australia after making a 13 hour flight from Dubai with a hole in the wing root fairing It is unsure what caused the hole, however there was additional damage to a main gear tire A passenger said the heard a loud “Bang” during the flight, and the A380's sensors told the crew they'd be landing with a blown tire. https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/emirates-a380-completes-flight-with-hole-in-wing-root-fairing/ One person was killed this week when the Jet-truck exploded at the Field of Flight Airshow. “Shockwave” was a semi truck with 3 Pratt & Whitney J-34-38 jet engines capable of producing 21,000lbs of trust and capable of 350 mph. News sources are saying that during the accident the truck was traveling at ~300 mph. The airshow was suspended after the accident. https://www.avweb.com/air-shows-events/driver-killed-in-shockwave-jet-truck-explosion As expected, the President has nominated Phillip A Washington as his new FAA Administrator. Washington's only aviation job is his current position as the CEO of Denver International Airport. Kevin M. Burke, CEO of Airports Council International, said in a statement that Washington is a “real innovator and problem solver” and that “his knowledge and experience are exactly what we need in an FAA administrator.” https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/biden-nominates-phillip-washington-for-faa-administrato

Bryan Air
#102 Full Service vs Low Cost Airlines | Airlink Review

Bryan Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 62:33


  Bryan returns to Johannesburg after a successful AviaDev in the Mother City. A special thanks to everyone at Airlink for making my travel experience exceptional. Travel chaos in Europe as staff shortages take a toll on airports and airlines. Would you accept a 10,000USD payday to take a later flight?   Audience feedback drives the show. We'd love for you to contact us and keep the conversation going! Email rosevearebryan@gmail.com, call +2783 777 8995 or leave us a message on social media! We'd love to hear from you!     ✅Quick Episode Summary:     00:00 On today's show 02:13 New tech Rodecaster Pro 2 05:17 Travelling mask free 08:30 Airlink review 17:28 Full service vs low cost 19:02 What are the airports like? 23:26 More EASA exams in South Africa 25:13 SAA deal 28:39 Emirates tyre burst 30:00 SAS files for chapter 11 30:16 Travel chaos in Europe 38:45 Delayed flight incentives in the USA 43:04 Airbus A380s are back 45:01 Story of the week, AviaDev 2022 55:36 Roger Foster 01:00:43 Special mentions   ✈️Podcasting Articles and Links mentioned by Bryan and Ryan:   AviaDev Panel Discussion    

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
#9 'Pouyehali' - Immigration from Russia to Emirates - #9 Поуехали. Подкаст об эмиграции и эвакуации. Эмираты

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 13:37


"Pouyehali" is a SBS Russian podcast about the waves of immigration from Russia. The first season is about the modern wave - people who left Russia after February 24, 2022. This is a Russian language content. - "Поуехали" - это подкаст SBS Russian, в котором мы рассказываем о волнах русской эмиграции. В первом сезоне говорим о современной волне - людях, которые покинули Россию после 24 февраля 2022 года.

Pain in the Arsenal Podcast on Arsenal FC
What should Arsenal prioritise this summer? Plus, Jesus spotted in his Arsenal kit!

Pain in the Arsenal Podcast on Arsenal FC

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 46:09


On this edition of TCOAG podcast, Harry Symeou discusses what positions Arsenal should be targeting this summer and ranks them in terms of importance amid links to Lisandro Martinez, Raphinha, Youri Tielemans & more. Plus, we're still waiting for an announcement regarding Gabriel Jesus who was spotted walking pitchside at Emirates stadium wearing the number nine shirt! Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit www.athleticgreens.com/90MIN. Take ownership over your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance! Sign up to our Fantasy Football League for the coming season by clicking the link below:  https://fantasy.premierleague.com/leagues/auto-join/t9wizh Code to join the league: t9wizh Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbDo0kye_J-N0TkQoBTPSjA/join Part of the   @90min Football  network!  Twitter: https://twitter.com/chronicles_afc​​​...​ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Chroniclesof...​... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chronicles_...​... SUBSCRIBE | COMMENT | LIKE | SHARE #AFC #Arsenal #PremierLeague Support the show: http://www.chroniclesafc.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast
"ONE OF THE BEST" | Where Does Lisandro Martínez Fit In At Arsenal? | Talking Transfers ft Roy Nemer

The Arsenal Way: Arsenal FC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 22:24


Bailey Keogh & Umar Choudhry are joined by Argentinian football expert and national team reporter, Roy Nemer to take a closer look at Arsenal transfer target Lisandro Martínez. With the Gunners extremely keen on bringing the Ajax defender to the Emirates stadium this summer, we bring you a lowdown on the 24-year-old and how he may fit into Mikel Arteta's set-up. Enjoy!

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
My White Coat Doesn't Fit

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


“My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget

Screaming in the Cloud
TikTok and Short Form Content for Developers with Linda Vivah

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:01


Full Description / Show Notes Corey and Linda talk about Tiktok and the online developer community (1:18) Linda talks about what prompted her to want to work at AWS (5:29) Linda discusses navigating the change from just being part of the developer community to being an employee of AWS (10:37) Linda talks about moving AWS more in the direction of short form content, and Corey and Linda talk about the Tiktok algorithm (15:56) Linda talks about the potential struggle of going from short form to long form content (25:21) About LindaLinda Vivah is a Site Reliability Engineer for a major media organization in NYC, a tech content creator, an AWS community builder member, a part-time wedding singer, and the founder of a STEM jewelry shop called Coding Crystals. At the time of this recording she was about to join AWS in her current position as a Developer Advocate.Linda had an untraditional journey into tech. She was a Philosophy major in college and began her career in journalism. In 2015, she quit her tv job to attend The Flatiron School, a full stack web development immersive program in NYC. She worked as a full-stack developer building web applications for 5 years before shifting into SRE to work on the cloud end internally.Throughout the years, she's created tech content on platforms like TikTok & Instagram and believes that sometimes the best way to learn is to teach.Links Referenced:lindavivah.com: https://lindavivah.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We talk a lot about how people go about getting into this ridiculous industry of ours, and I've talked a little bit about how I go about finding interesting and varied guests to show up and help me indulge my ongoing love affair on this show with the sound of my own voice. Today, we're going to be able to address both of those because today I'm speaking to Linda Haviv, who, as of this recording, has accepted a job as a Developer Advocate at AWS, but has not started. Linda, welcome to the show.Linda: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while and there's been a lot of interesting things I learned along the way. You were one of the first people I encountered when I joined the TikToks, as all the kids do these days, and was trying to figure out is there a community of folks who use AWS. Which really boils down to, “So, where are these people that are sad all the time?” Well, it turns out, they're on TikTok, so there we go. We found my people.And that was great. And we started talking, and it turns out that we were both in the AWS community builder program. And we've developed a bit of a rapport. We talk about different things. And then, I guess, weird stuff started happening, in the context of you were—you're doing very well at building an audience for yourself on TikTok.I tried it, and it was—my sense of humor sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. I've had challenges in finding any reasonable way to monetize it because a 30-second video doesn't really give nuance for a full ad read, for example. And you've been looking at it from the perspective of a content creator looking to build the audience slash platform is step one, and then, eh, step two, you'll sort of figure out aspects of monetization later. Which, honestly, is a way easier way to do it in hindsight, but, yeah, the things that we learn. Now, that you're going to AWS, first, you planning to still be on the TikToks and whatnot?Linda: Absolutely. So, I really look at TikTok as a funnel. I don't think it's the main place, you're going to get that deep-dive content but I think it's a great way, especially for things that excite you or get you into understanding it, especially beginner-type audience, I think there's a lot of untapped market of people looking to into tech, or technologists that aren't in the cloud. I mean, even when I worked—I worked as a web developer and then kind of learned more about the cloud, and I started out as a front-end developer and shifted into, like, SRE and infrastructure, so even for people within tech, you can have a huge tech community which there is on TikTok, with a younger community—but not all of them really understand the cloud necessarily, depending on their job function. So, I think it's a great way to kind of expose people to that.For me, my exposure came from community. I met somebody at a meetup who was working in cloud, and it wasn't even on the job that I really started getting into cloud because many times in corporations, you might be working on a specific team and you're not really encountering other ends, and it seems kind of like a mystery. Although it shouldn't seem like magic, many times when you're doing certain job functions—especially the DevOps—could end up feeling like magic. So, [laugh] for the good and the bad. So sometimes, if you're not working on that end, you really sometimes take it for granted.And so, for me, I actually—meetups were the way I got exposed to that end. And then I brought it back into my work and shifted internally and did certifications and started, even, lunch-and-learns where I work to get more people in their learning journey together within the company, and you know, help us as we're migrating to the cloud, as we're building on the cloud. Which, of course, we have many more roles down the road. I did it for a few years and saw the shift. But I worked at a media company for many years and now shifting to AWS, and so I've seen that happen on different ends.Not—oh, I wasn't the one doing the migration because I was on the other end of that time, but now for the last two years, I was working on [laugh] the infrastructure end, and so it's really fascinating. And many people actually—until now I feel like—that will work on maybe the web and mobile and don't always know as much about the cloud. I think it's a great way to funnel things in a quick manner. I think also society is getting used to short videos, and our attention span is very low, and I think for—Corey: No argument here.Linda: —[crosstalk 00:04:39] spending so mu—yeah, and we're spending so much time on these platforms, we might as well, you know, learn something. And I think it depends what content. Some things work well, some things doesn't. As with anything content creation, you kind of have to do trial and error, but I do find the audience to be a bit different on TikTok versus Twitter versus Instagram versus YouTube. Which is interesting how it's going to play out on YouTube, too, which is a whole ‘nother topic conversation.Corey: Well, it's odd to me watching your path. It's almost the exact opposite of mine where I started off on the back-end, grumpy sysadmin world and, “Oh, why would I ever need to learn JavaScript?” “Well, genius, because as the world progresses, guess what? That's right. The entire world becomes JavaScript. Welcome.”And it took me a long time to come around to that. You started with the front-end world and then basically approached from the exact opposite end. Let's be clear, back in my day, mine was the common path. These days, yours is very much the common path.Linda: Yeah.Corey: I also want to highlight that all of those transitions and careers that you spoke about, you were at the same company for nine years, which in tech is closer to 30. So, I have to ask, what was it that inspired you, after nine years, to decide, “I'm going to go work somewhere else. But not just anywhere; I'm going to AWS.” Because normally people don't almost institutionalized lifers past a certain point.Linda: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Oh, you'll be there till you retire or die.” Whereas seeing significant career change after that long in one place, even if you've moved around internally and experienced a lot of different roles, is not common at all what sparked that?Linda: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's such a good question. I always think about that, too, especially as I was reflecting because I'm, you know, in the midst of this transition, and I've gotten a lot of reflecting over the last two weeks [laugh], or more. But I think the main thing for me is, I always, wherever I was—and this kind of something that—I'm very proactive when it comes to trying to transition. I think, even when I was—right, I held many roles in the same company; I used to work in TV production and actually left for three months to go to a coding boot camp and then came back on the other end, but I understood the product in a different way.So, for that time period, it was really interesting to work on the other end. But, you know, as I kind of—every time I wanted to progress further, I always made a move that was actually new and put me in an uncomfortable place, even within the same company. And I'm at the point now that I'm in my career, I felt like this next step really needs to be, you know, at AWS. It's not, like, the natural progression for me. I worked alongside—on the client end—with AWS and have seen so many projects come through and how much our own workloads have changed.And it's just been an incredible journey, also dealing with accounts team. On that end, I've worked alongside them, so for me, it was kind of a natural progression. I was very passionate about cloud computing at AWS and I kind of wanted to take it to that next place, and I felt like—also, dealing with the community as part of my job is a dream part to me because I was always doing that on the side on social media. So, it wasn't part of my day-to-day job. I was working as an SRE and an infrastructure engineer, so I didn't get to do that as part of my day-to-day.I was making videos at 2 a.m. and, you know, kind of trying to, like, do—you know, interact with the community like that. And I think—I come from a performing background, the people background, I was singing since I was four years old. I always go to—I was a wedding singer, so I go into a room and I love making people happy or giving value. And I think, like, education has a huge part of that. And in a way, like making that content and—Corey: You got to get people's attention—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —you can't teach them a damn thing.Linda: Right. Exactly. So, it's kind of a mix of everything. It's like that performance, the love of learning. You know, between you and I, like, I wanted to be a lawyer before I thought I was going to—before I went to tech.I thought I was going to be a lawyer purely because I loved the concept of going to law school. I never took time to think about the law part, like, being the lawyer part. I always thought, “Oh, school.” I'm a student at heart. I always call myself a professional student. I really think that's part of what you need to be in this world, in this tech industry, and I think for me, that's what keeps my fire going.I love to experiment, to learn, to build. And there's something very fulfilling about building products. If you take a step back, like, you're kind of—you know, for me that part, every time I look back at that, that always is what kind of keeps me going. When I was doing front-end, it felt a lot more like I was doing smaller things than when I was doing infrastructure, so I felt like that was another reason why I shifted. I love doing the front-end, but I felt like I was spending two days on an Internet Explorer bug and it just drove me—[laugh] it just made it feel unfulfilling versus spending two days on, you know, trying to understand why, you know, something doesn't run the infrastructure or, like, there's—you know, it's failing blindly, you know? Stuff like that. Like, I don't know, for me that felt more fulfilling because the problem was more macro. But I think I needed both. I have a love for both, but I definitely prefer being back-end. So. [laugh]. Well, I'm saying that now but—[laugh].Corey: This might be a weakness on my part where I'm basically projecting onto others, and this is—I might be completely wrong on this, but I tend to take a bit of a bifurcated view of community. I mean, community is part of the reason that I know the things I know and how I got to this place that I am, so use that as a cautionary tale if you want. But when I talk to someone like you at this moment, where you're in the community, I'm in the community, and I'm talking to you about a problem I'm having and we're working on ways to potentially solve that or how to think about that. I view us as basically commiserating on these things, whereas as soon as you start on day one—and yes, it's always day one—at AWS and this becomes your day job and you work there, on some level, for me, there's a bit shift that happens and a switch gets flipped in my head where, oh, you actually work at this company. That means you're the problem.And I'm not saying that in a way of being antagonistic. Please, if you're watching or listening to this, do not antagonize the developer advocates. They have a very hard job understanding all this so they can explain that to the rest of us. But how do you wind up planning to navigate, or I guess your views on, I guess, handling the shift between, “One of the customers like the rest of us,” to, as I say, “Part of the problem,” for lack of a better term.Linda: Or, like, work because you kind of get the—you know. I love this question and it's something I've been pondering a lot on because I think the messaging will need to be a little different [coming from me 00:10:44] in the sense of, there needs to be—just in anything, you have to kind of create trust. And to create trust, you have to be vulnerable and authentic. And I think I, for example, utilize a lot of things outside of just the AWS cloud topic to do that now, even, when I—you know, kind of building it without saying where I work or anything like that, going into this role and it being my job, it's going to be different kind of challenge as far as the messaging, but I think it still holds true that part, that just developing trust and authenticity, I might have to do more of that, you know? I might have to really share more of that part, share other things to really—because it's more like people come, it doesn't matter how much somet—how many times you explain it, many times, they will see your title and they will judge you for it, and they don't know what happened before. Every TikTok, for example, you have to act like it's a new person watching. There is no series, you know? Like, yes, there's a series but, like, sometimes you can make that but it's not really the way TikTok functions or a short-form video functions. So, you kind of have to think this is my first time—Corey: It works really terribly when you're trying to break it out that way on TikTok.Linda: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Right. Here's part 17 of my 80-TikTok-video saga. And it's, “Could you just turn this into a blog post or put this on YouTube or something? I don't have four hours to spend learning how all this stuff works in your world.”Linda: Yeah. And you know, I think repeating certain things, too, is really important. So, they say you have to repeat something eight times for people to see it or [laugh] something like that. I learned that in media [crosstalk 00:12:13]—Corey: In a row, or—yeah. [laugh].Linda: I mean, the truth is that when you, kind of like, do a TikTok maybe, like, there's something you could also say or clarify because I think there's going to be—and I'm going to have to—there's going to be a lot of trial and error for me; I don't know if I have answers—but my plan is going into it very much testing that kind of introduction, or, like, clarifying what that role is. Because the truth is, the role is advocating on behalf of the community and really helping that community, so making sure that—you don't have to say it as far as a definition maybe, but, like, making sure that comes across when you create a video. And I think that's going to be really important for me, and more important than the prior even creating content going forward. So, I think that's one thing that I definitely feel like is key.As well as creating more raw interaction. So, it depends on the platform, too. Instagram, for example, is much more community—how do I put this? Instagram is much more easy to navigate as far as reaching the same community because you have something, like, called Instagram Stories, right? So, on Instagram Stories, you're bringing those stories, mostly the same people that follow you. You're able to build that trust through those stories.On TikTok, they just released Stories. I haven't really tried them much and I don't play with it a lot, but I think that's something I will utilize because those are the people that are already follow you, meaning they have seen a piece of content. So, I think addressing it differently and knowing who's watching what and trying to kind of put yourself in their shoes when you're trying to, you know, teach something, it's important for you to have that trust with them. And I think—key to everything—being raw and authentic. I think people see through that. I would hope they do.And I think, uh, [laugh] that's what I'm going to be trying to do. I'm just going to be really myself and real, and try to help people and I hope that comes through because that's—I'm passionate about getting more people into the cloud and getting them educated. And I feel like it's something that could also allow you to build anything, just from anywhere on your computer, brings people together, the world is getting smaller, really. And just being able to meet people through that and there's just a way to also change your life. And people really could change their life.I changed my life, I think, going into tech and I'm in the United States and I, you know—I'm in New York, you know, but I feel like so many people in the States and outside of the States, you know, all over the world, you know, have access to this, and it's powerful to be able to build something and contribute and be a part of the future of technology, which AWS is.Corey: I feel like, in three years or whatever it is that you leave AWS in the far future, we're going to basically pull this video up and MST3k came together. It's like, “Remember how naive you were talking about these things?” And I'm mostly kidding, but let's be serious. You are presumably going to be focusing on the idea of short-form content. That is—Linda: Yeah.Corey: What your bread-and-butter of audience-building has been around, and that is something that is new for AWS.Linda: Yeah.Corey: And I'm always curious as to how companies and their cultures continue to evolve. I can only imagine there's a lot of support structure in place for that. I personally remember giving a talk at an AWS event and I had my slides reviewed by their legal team, as they always do, and I had a slide that they were looking at very closely where I was listing out the top five AWS services that are bullshit. And they don't really have a framework for that, so instead, they did their typical thing of, “Okay, we need to make sure that each of those services starts with the appropriate AWS or Amazon naming convention and are they capitalized properly?” Because they have a framework for working on those things.I'm really curious as to how the AWS culture and way of bringing messaging to where people are is going to be forced to evolve now that they, like it or not, are going to be having significantly increased presence on TikTok and other short-form platforms.Linda: I mean, it's really going to be interesting to see how this plays out. There's so much content that's put out, but sometimes it's just not reaching the right audience, so making sure that funnel exists to the right people is important and reaching those audiences. So, I think even YouTube Shorts, for example. Many people in tech use YouTube to search a question.They do not care about the intro, sometimes. It depends what kind of following, it depends if [in gaming 00:16:30], but if you're coming and you're building something, it's like a Stack Overflow sometimes. You want to know the answer to your question. Now, YouTube Shorts is a great solution to that because many times people want the shortest possible answer. Now, of course, if it's a tutorial on how to build something, and it warrants ten minutes, that's great.Even ten minutes is considered, now, Shorts because TikTok now has ten-minute videos, but I think TikTok is now searchable in the way YouTube is, and I think let's say YouTube Shorts is short-form, but very different type of short-form than TikTok is. TikTok, hooks matter. YouTube answers to your questions, especially in chat. I wouldn't say everything in YouTube is like that; depends on the niche. But I think even within short-form, there's going to be a different strategy regarding that.So, kind of like having that mix. I guess, depending on platform and audience, that's there. Again, trial and error, but we'll see how this plays out and how this will evolve. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. 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My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: I feel like there are two possible outcomes here. One is that AWS—Linda: Yeah.Corey: Nails this pivot into short-form content, and the other is that all your TikTok videos start becoming ten minutes long, which they now support, welcome to my TED Talk. It's awful, and then you wind up basically being video equivalent for all of your content, of recipes when you search them on the internet where first they circle the point to death 18 times with, “Back when I was a small child growing up in the hinterlands, we wound—my grandmother would always make the following stew after she killed the bison with here bare hands. Why did grandma kill a bison? We don't know.” And it just leads down this path so they can get, like, long enough content or they can have longer and longer articles to display more ads.And then finally at the end, it's like ingredient one: butter. Ingredient two, there is no ingredient two. Okay. That explains why it's delicious. Awesome. But I don't like having people prolong it. It's just, give me the answer I'm looking for.Linda: Yeah.Corey: Get to the point. Tell me the story. And—Linda: And this is—Corey: —I'm really hoping that is not the direction your content goes in. Which I don't think it would, but that is the horrifying thing and if for some chance I'm right, I will look like Nostradamus when we do that MST3k episode.Linda: No, no. I mean, I really am—I always personally—even when I was creating content these last few years and testing different things, I'm really a fan of the shortest way possible because I don't have the patience to watch long videos. And maybe it's because I'm a New Yorker that can't sit down from the life of me—apart from when I code of course—but, you know, I don't like wasting time, I'm always on the go, I'm with my coffee, I'm like—that's the kind of style I prefer to bring in videos in the sense of, like, people have no time. [laugh]. You know?The amount of content we're consuming is just, uh, bonkers. So, I don't think our mind is really a built for consuming [laugh] this much content every time you open your phone, or every time you look, you know, online. It's definitely something that is challenging in a whole different way. But I think where my content—if it's ten minutes, it better be because I can't shorten it. That's my thing. So, you can hold me accountable to that because—Corey: Yeah, I want ten minutes of—Linda: I'm not a—Corey: Content, not three minutes of content in a ten-minute bag.Linda: Exactly. Exactly. So, if it's a ten-minute video, it would have been in one hour that I cut down, like, meaning a tutorial, a very much technical types of content. I think things that are that long, especially in tech, would be something like, on that end—unless, of course, you know, I'm not talking about, like, longer videos on YouTube which are panels or that kind of thing. I'm talking more like if I'm doing something on TikTok specifically.TikTok also cares about your watch time, so if people aren't interested in it, it's not going to do well, it doesn't matter how many followers you have. Which is what I do like about the way TikTok functions as opposed to, let's say, Instagram. Instagram is more like it gives it to your following—and this is the current state, I don't know if it always evolves—but the current state is, Instagram Reels kind of functions in a way where it goes first to the people that follow you, but, like, in a way that's more amplified than TikTok. TikTox tests people that follows you, but if it's not a good video, it won't do well. And honestly, they're many good videos videos that don't go viral. I'm not talking about that.Sometimes it's also the topic and the niche and the sound and the title. I mean, there's so many people who take a topic and do it in three different ways and one of them goes viral. I mean, there's so many factors that play into it and it's hard to really, like, always, you know, kind of reverse engineer but I do think that with TikTok, things won't do well, more likely if it's not a good piece of content as opposed to—or, like, too long, right? Not—I shouldn't say not good a good piece of content—it's too long.Corey: The TikTok algorithm is inscrutable to me. TikTok is firmly convinced, based upon what it shows me, that I am apparently a lesbian. Which okay, fine. Awesome. Whatever. I'm also—it keeps showing me ads for ADHD stuff, and it was like, “Wow, like, how did it know that?” Followed by, “Oh, right. I'm on TikTok. Nevermind.”And I will say at one point, it recommended someone to me who, looking at the profile picture, she's my nanny. And it's, I have a strong policy of not, you know, stalking my household employees on social media. We are not Facebook friends, we are not—in a bunch of different areas. Like, how on earth would they have figured this out? I'm filling the corkboard with conspiracy and twine followed by, “Wait a minute. We probably both connect from the same WiFi network, which looks like the same IP address and it probably doesn't require a giant data science team to put two and two together on those things.” So, it was great. I was all set to do the tinfoil hat conspiracy, but no, no, that's just very basic correlation 101.Linda: And also, this is why I don't enable contacts on TikTok. You know, how it says, “Oh, connect your contacts?”Corey: Oh, I never do that. Like, “Can we look at your contacts?”Linda: Never.Corey: “No.” “Can we look at all of your photos?” “Absolutely not.” “Can we track you across apps?” “Why would anyone say yes to this? You're going to do it anyway, but I'll say no.” Yeah.Linda: Got to give the least privilege. [laugh]. Definitely not—Corey: Oh absolutely.Linda: Yeah. I think they also help [crosstalk 00:22:40]—Corey: But when I'm looking at—the monetization problem is always a challenge on things like this, too, because when I'm—my guilty TikTok scrolling pleasures hit, it's basically late at night, I just want to see—I want something to want to wind down and decompress. And I'm not about ready to watch, “Hey, would you like to migrate your enterprise database to this other thing?” It's, I… no. There's a reason that the ads that seem to be everywhere and doing well are aimed at the mass market, they're generally impulse buys, like, “Hey, do you want to set that thing over there on fire, but you're not close enough to get the job done? But this flame thrower today. Done.”And great, like, that is something everyone can enjoy, but these nuanced database products and anything else is B2B SaaS style stuff, it feels like it's a very tough sell and no one has quite cracked that nut, yet.Linda: Yeah, and I think the key there—this is, I'm guessing based on, like, what I want to try out a lot—is the hook and the way you're presenting it has to be very product-focused in the sense that it needs to be very relatable. Even if you don't know anything about tech, you need to be—like, for example, in the architecture page on AWS, there's a video about the Emirates going to Mars mission. Space is a very interesting topic, right? I think, a hook, like, “Do want to see how, like, how this is bu—” like, it's all, like, freely available to see exactly [laugh] how this was built. Like, it might—in the right wording, of course—it might be interesting to someone who's looking for fun-fact-style content.Now, is it really addressing the people that are building everyday? Not really always, depends who's on there and the mass market there. But I feel like going on the product and the things that are mass-market, and then working backwards to the tech part of it, even if they learn something and then want to learn more, that's really where I see TikTok. I don't think every platform would be, maybe, like this, but that's where I see getting people: kind of inviting them in to learn more, but making it cool and fun. It's very important, but it feels cool and fun. [laugh]. So.Because you're right, you're scrolling at 2 a.m. who wants to start seeing that. Like, it's all about how you teach. The content is there, the content has—you know, that's my thing. It's like, the content is there. You don't need to—it's yes, there's the part where things are always evolving and you need to keep track of that; that's whole ‘nother type thing which you do very well, right?And then there's a part where, like, the content that already exists, which part is evergreen? Meaning, which part is, like, something that could be re—also is not timely as far as update, for example, well-architected framework. Yes, it evolves all the time, you always have new pillars, but the guide, the story, that is an evergreen in some sense because that guide doesn't, you know, that whole concept isn't going anywhere. So, you know, why should someone care about that?Corey: Right. How to turn on two-factor authentication for your AWS account.Linda: Right.Corey: That's evergreen. That's the sort of thing that—and this is the problem, I think, AWS has had for a long time where they're talking about new features, new enhancements, new releases. But you look what people are actually doing and so much of it is just the same stuff again and again because yeah, that is how most of the cloud works. It turns out that three-quarters of company's production infrastructures tends to run on EC2 more frequently than it tends to run on IoT Greengrass. Imagine that.So, there's this idea of continuing to focus on these things. Now, one of my predictions is that you're going to have a lot of fun with this and on some level, it's going to really work for you. In others, it's going to be hilariously—well, its shortcomings might be predictable. I can just picture now you're at re:Invent; you have a breakout talk and terrific. And you've successfully gotten your talk down to one minute and then you're sitting there with—Linda: [laugh].Corey: —the remainder of maybe 59. Like, oh, right. Yeah. Turns out not everything is short-form. Are you predicting any—Linda: Yep.Corey: Problems going from short-form to long-form in those instances?Linda: I think it needs to go hand-in-hand, to be honest. I think when you're creating any short-form content, you have—you know, maybe something short is actually sometimes in some ways, right, harder because you really have to make sure, especially in a technical standpoint, leaving things out is sometimes—leaves, like, a blind spot. And so, making sure you're kind of—whatever you're educating, you kind of, to be clear, “Here's where you learn more. Here's how I'm going to answer this next question for you: go here.” Now, in a longer-form content, you would cover all that.So, there's always that longevity. I think even when I write a script, and there's many scripts I'm still [laugh] I've had many ideas until now I've been doing this still at 2 a.m. so of course, there's many that didn't, you know, get released, but those are the things that are more time consuming to create because you're taking something that's an hour-long, and trying to make sure you're pulling out the things that are most—that are hook-style, that invite people in, that are accurate, okay, that really give you—explain to you clearly where are the blind spots that I'm not explaining on this video are. So, “XYZ here is, like, the high level, but by the way, there's, like, this and this.” And in a long-form, you kind of have to know the long-form version of it to make the short-form, in some ways, depending on what—you're doing because you're funneling them to somewhere. That's my thing. Because I don't think there should be [crosstalk 00:27:36]—Corey: This is the curse of Twitter, on some level. It's, “Well, you forgot about this corner case.” “Yeah, I had 280 characters to get into.” Like, the whole point of short-form content—which I do consider Twitter to be—is a glimpse and a hook, and get people interested enough to go somewhere and learn more.For something like AWS, this makes a lot of sense. When you highlight a capability or something interesting, it's something relevant, whereas on the other side of it, where it's this, “Oh, great. Now, here's an 8000-word blog post on how I did this thing.” Yeah, I'm going to get relatively fewer amounts of traffic through that giant thing, but the people who are they're going to be frickin' invested because that's going to be a slog.Linda: Exactly.Corey: “And now my eight-hour video on how exactly I built this thing with TypeScript.” Badly—Linda: Exactly.Corey: —as it turns out because I'm a bad programmer.Linda: [laugh]. No, you're not. I love your shit-posting. It's great.Corey: Challenge accepted.Linda: [laugh]. I love what you just mentioned because I think you're hitting the nail on the head when it comes to the quality content that's niche focus, like, there needs to be a good healthy mix. I think always doing that, like, mass-market type video, it doesn't give you, also, the credibility you need. So, doing those more niche things that might not be relevant to everybody, but here and there, are part of that is really key for your own knowledge and for, like, the com—you know, as far as, like, helping someone specific. Because it's almost like—right, when you're selling a service and you're using social media, right, not everybody's going to buy your service. It doesn't matter what business you're in right? The deep-divers are going to be the people that pay up. It's just a numbers game, right? The more people you, kind of, address from there, you'll find—Corey: It's called a funnel for a reason.Linda: Right. Exactly.Corey: Free content, paid content. Almost anyone will follow me on Twitter; fewer than will sign up for a newsletter; fewer will listen to a podcast; fewer will watch a video, and almost none of them will buy a consulting engagement. But ‘almost' and ‘actually none of them,' it turns out is a very different world.Linda: Exactly. [laugh]. So FYI, I think there's—Corey: And that's fine. That's the way it works.Linda: That's the way it works. And I think there needs to be that niche content that might not be, like, the most viral thing, but viral doesn't mean quality, you know? It doesn't. There's many things that play into what viral is, but it's important to have the quality content for the people that need that content, and finding those people, you know, it's easier when you have that kind of mass engagement. Like, who knows? I'm a student. I told you; I'm a professional student. I'm still [laugh] learning every day.Corey: Working with AWS almost makes it a requirement. I wish you luck—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —in the new gig and I also want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me about how you got to this point. And we're all very eager to see where you go from here.Linda: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me. I'm a huge fan, I love your content, I'm an avid reader of your newsletter and I am looking forward to very much being in touch and on the Twitterverse and beyond. So. [laugh].Corey: If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and other assorted nonsense, where's the best place they can go to find you?Linda: So, the best place they could go is lindavivah.com. I have all my different social handles listed on there as well a little bit about me, and I hope to connect with you. So, definitely go to lindavivah.com.Corey: And that link will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:30:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Linda: Thank you, Corey. Have a wonderful rest of the day.Corey: Linda Haviv, AWS Developer Advocate, very soon now anyway. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the like and subscribe buttons, and of course, leave an angry comment that you have broken down into 40 serialized TikTok videos.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

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Episode 416 - Insert Your Own Title Here

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 125:17 Very Popular


Join Carlos and Matt for this week's show. In this week's show we find out why the A350-1000 is tiny, one spanish airline goes BIG & one driver tries to escape some parking fines. In the Military this week Armando brings us all the latest news from across the globe. Don't forget you can get in touch with us all at : WhatsApp +44 757 22 491 66 Email podcast@planetalkinguk.com or comment in our chatroom on YouTube. Here are the links to the stories we featured this week : COMMERCIAL A350-1000 ‘too small' to top Airbus range: Emirates chief https://www.flightglobal.com/iata-agm-2022/a350-1000-too-small-to-top-airbus-range-emirates-chief/149067.article https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/air-transport/2022-06-21/airbus-ceo-doubts-prospects-future-very-large-aircraft https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-06-20/airbus-seeks-qatar-resolution-air-india-jet-order-iata-update#xj4y7vzkg Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary helps out at Dublin Airport security checkpoint https://www.independent.ie/news/pictured-ryanair-boss-michael-oleary-helps-out-at-dublin-airport-security-checkpoint-41770892.html https://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/ryanair-boss-michael-oleary-seen-27285879 https://inews.co.uk/news/ryanair-boss-flight-delays-cancellations-summer-airport-1697655 Landmark changes allow UK pilots and air traffic controllers living with HIV to work unrestricted https://simpleflying.com/uk-caa-reveals-landmark-updates-for-pilots-atc-staff-living-with-hiv/ https://thepointsguy.co.uk/news/caa-landmark-changes-hiv-pilots-air-traffic-controllers/ https://www.caa.co.uk/aeromedical-examiners/medical-standards/pilots/conditions/infectious-disease/infectious-diseases-guidance-material-gm/ Spanish airline reserves 10 Airlander airships from Bedford-based firm https://www.flyingmag.com/spanish-airline-group-reserves-orders-for-10-massive-airships/ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-61811535 https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2022/06/spanish-airline-reserves-airlander-10-blimps-for-2026-passenger-service/ https://airwaysmag.com/air-nostrum-airlander-airships/ Ryanair swoops in with ‘rescue flights' for passengers after cancellations by other airlines https://thepointsguy.co.uk/news/ryanair-rescue-flights-travel-chaos-2022/ https://simpleflying.com/ryanair-launches-rescue-flights-following-uk-cancellations/ https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/world-news/ryanair-strikes-planned-walkout-dates-24272227 https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/flights-cancelled-easyjet-heathrow-gatwick-b2104898.html BUILD AN AIRPLANE IN ONE WEEK AT EAA AIRVENTURE OSHKOSH https://aviationweek.com/business-aviation/aircraft-propulsion/airventure-attendees-select-final-design-build-plane-project https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2022/march/31/build-an-airplane-in-one-week-at-eaa-airventure https://www.aviationpros.com/tools-equipment/paints/paints-coatings/press-release/21270198/sherwinwilliams-aerospace-coatings-sherwinwilliams-and-scheme-designers-provide-design-expertise-and-aerospace-coatings-to-help-build-a-plane-in-seven-days-at-eaa-airventure-2022 Passenger Jet Catches Fire in Miami After Landing Gear Collapse https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-06-21/officials-plane-fire-at-miami-airport-3-minor-injuries#xj4y7vzkg https://www.flightradar24.com/data/flights/l5203#2c570c01 https://samchui.com/2022/06/22/red-air-md-82-crash-landed-at-miami-airport/#.YrMm33ZBy3A Catering and services innovations showcased at WTCE 2022 https://www.aircraftinteriorsinternational.com/news/industry-news/catering-and-services-innovations-to-be-showcased-at-wtce-2022.html https://www.worldtravelcateringexpo.com/en-gb.html https://www.topsfoods.com/inflight Near-miss at Beccles airfield left student pilots 'shaken' https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-61760969 https://www.airproxboard.org.uk/uploadedFiles/Content/Standard_content/Airprox_report_files/2021/Airprox%20Report%202021218.pdf China Updates Five-year General Aviation Plan https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/general-aviation/2022-06-22/china-updates-five-year-general-aviation-plan http://www.ecns.cn/business/2022-06-14/detail-ihaziuqy8685856.shtml http://www.gaac.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/fs1-ga.pdf Driver attempts to avoid parking charge https://www.eadt.co.uk/news/crime/stansted-airport-car-stuck-avoiding-parking-fees-9096944 MILITARY https://www.acc.af.mil/News/Article/3063524/air-force-selects-future-aircrew-helmet/ https://www.reuters.com/world/us-may-let-tajikistan-hold-fleeing-afghan-aircraft-2022-06-20/ https://defence-blog.com/russian-pilots-still-use-non-military-navigation-equipment/ https://www.airforcemag.com/house-moves-to-upgrade-not-retire-oldest-f-22s/

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast [Jun 26, '22 Business Report]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 53:20


On this episode of the Business Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guest in segment one is Kevin Craven, CEO of ADS Group; in segment two our roundtable with “Rocket Ron” Epstein, PhD, of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Richard Aboulafia of AeroDynamic Advisory and Sash Tusa of Agency Partners. Topics: — Look ahead to major themes at the upcoming Farnborough International Airshow as well as the new Aerospace Growth Forum — Inflation and supply chain impact on UK aerospace and defense sector — Defense and aerospace stock performance as market regains composure as Federal Reserve hints at more rate increases to combat inflation — Program implications of markup as lawmakers appear to achieve consensus on defense plus up of about $40 billion — Takeaways from the ILA Berlin Air Show including Spain's decision to acquire more Eurofighter Typhoon jets and the impact of the move on the Eurofighter program  — Emirates call for more big jets — Analysis of Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall's statement that the service's Next Generation Air Dominance program is in the engineering and manufacturing development phase even though the competition for the effort to develop a new teamed manned and unmanned platforms — Boeing decision to add former Collins Aerospace President and CEO Dave Gitlin to its board and whether the move foreshadows larger role for the widely well-respected executive

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast
Will tourism help revive Sri Lanka's economy?

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:49


Sri Lanka's PM has said that the country's economy has completely collapsed but Rohan Samarajiva, Chairman, LIRNEasia - a regional think tank based in Sri Lanka, says this is not the worst situation yet. Meanwhile Dubai visitors have hit 1 million a month  and are closing in on pre-pandemic levels. We asked Ed Bell of Emirates NBD what that means for the city's economy. Plus, more details on the Make it in the Emirates initiative announced by authorities here in the UAE.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast
What should you do if your landlord increases your rents?

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:03


We get legal advice from Andrew Lyons, partner at Davidson & Co. Law Firm. His twin brother John Lyons also explained if this is the right time to invest in a property. Plus a huge focus on aviation this morning, DXB is set to see 2.4 million passengers during June-July. Paul Griffiths, CEO of Dubai Airports explained how they've prepared for the huge footfall. And, the boss of FlyDubai explained what they're seeing in terms of demand this summer.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bryan Air
#101 Lift And FlySafair Race To Fill The Comair Void | Aviation And Travel News Roundup

Bryan Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 66:46


Quick Episode Summary:       Lift airline, saying and doing all the right things.  Fly Safair adds 10 new routes across sub-Saharan Africa to take advantage of the gap left by Comair. Are Mango airlines really making a comeback? Cape Town airport wins another Skytrax award. US and UK travel chaos continues during the summer holiday season. Emirates continues with excellent innovation, this time in the comfort of your home or hotel.     Links:     777 aborted take-off - https://www.flightglobal.com/safety/crew-of-777-aborted-take-off-at-high-speed-after-seeing-e190-stopping-on-runway/149063.article       PODCAST INFO:       YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BryanRoseveare Podcast website: https://bryanair.libsyn.com Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/za/podcast/bryan-air/id1482906139 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1Hb2Fpe5OsLwXf0F8xdx5Q?si=oloCHIqzSBGw0BBTQTheRQ&dl_branch=1         SUPPORT AND CONNECT:         If you would like to support the podcast by pledging a small monthly fee you can do so through Patreon, your support in this regard will be greatly appreciated (Thank You). https://www.patreon.com/bryanair         Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryanroseveare/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryanroseveare/  Twitter:https://twitter.com/bryanroseveare  Webpage: https://bryanroseveare.com