Podcasts about Marquette University

University in Wisconsin, United States

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Latest podcast episodes about Marquette University

JBU Chapel
Gregory Waybright (January 26, 2023)

JBU Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 38:18


Spiritual Renewal Week: Greg Waybright (Staley Guest) Rev. Dr. Greg Waybright served as president of Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois, for over twelve years. He earned a Doctor of Philosophy in New Testament Theology from Marquette University and his Master of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is currently on Wheaton College's Board of Trustees, and recently completed a two-year tenure as Wheaton's chaplain. He has pastored churches in Wisconsin, Illinois, and California, most recently at Lake Avenue Church in Pasadena. He and his wife, Chris, currently reside in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His visit is funded by an endowment from the Thomas F. Staley Foundation.

JBU Chapel
Greg Waybright (January 24, 2023)

JBU Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 41:48


Spiritual Renewal Week: Greg Waybright (Staley Guest) Rev. Dr. Greg Waybright served as president of Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois, for over twelve years. He earned a Doctor of Philosophy in New Testament Theology from Marquette University and his Master of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is currently on Wheaton College's Board of Trustees, and recently completed a two-year tenure as Wheaton's chaplain. He has pastored churches in Wisconsin, Illinois, and California, most recently at Lake Avenue Church in Pasadena. He and his wife, Chris, currently reside in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His visit is funded by an endowment from the Thomas F. Staley Foundation.

As Goes Wisconsin
Farmers’ Fields Flooding (Hour 2)

As Goes Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 45:24


Say that five times fast... (00:01:00) Interview: Bob Keefe, Executive Director of E2 Environmental Entrepreneurs Bob Keefe joins to talk about what clean jobs in Wisconsin looks like (he even brought a good wisconsin climate change joke) Bob is the executive director of E2, Environmental Entrepreneurs, a national, nonpartisan group of business leaders who advocate for policies that are good for the economy and good for the environment and author of “Climatenomics: Washington, Wall Street, and the Economic Battle to Save Our Planet." Find more info on E2 at https://e2.org/ (00:28:00) Interview: Dr. Phil Rocco on the implications of a flat tax Dr. Phil Rocco joins of for the third time (hat trick!) to talk about what this flat tax proposal would actually look like for Wisconsin. You can read his article on this topic at The Recombobulation Area. Dr. Rocco is an associate professor of political science at Marquette University and author of Obamacare Wars: Federalism, State Politics, and the Affordable Care Act. Civic Media

Persons of Interest
Dr. Liz Gross

Persons of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 27:37


Bio courtesy of CampusSonar.com Founder and CEO Liz specializes in creating entrepreneurial social media strategies in higher education and has a passion for empowering others, which she brings to colleges and universities as the founder and CEO of Campus Sonar. Liz is an award-winning speaker, author, and strategist who was named a 2018 Mover and Shaker by Social Shake-Up Show and a finalist on GreenBook's 2019 GRIT Future List. She has delivered top-rated talks at SXSW, SXSW EDU, the American Marketing Association Symposium, the Carnegie Conference, the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, and others; and is the author of two indispensable guides for higher ed: The Higher Ed Social Listening Handbook and Fundamentals of Social Media Strategy: A Guide for College Campuses. Liz has more than 15 years' experience in higher education, spanning the private and public sector (including the University of Wisconsin campuses in Milwaukee and Waukesha). Since 2013, she's focused on driving social listening forward as a source of business intelligence in higher education. She received a Ph.D. in Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service in Higher Education at Cardinal Stritch University, a master's degree in educational policy and leadership from Marquette University, and a bachelor's degree in interpersonal communication from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Follow/Connect with Liz: Twitter (@lizgross144) LinkedIn Follow Campus Sonar: Twitter (@campussonar) Facebook Instagram LinkedIn --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/personsofinterest/message

Pat McCurdy's Song of the Week

Performed by Yipes!. Recorded at Marquette University 9/80.

The Thomistic Institute
Joyful Resistance | Dr. R.J. Snell

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 60:29


This talk was given on December 4, 2022, at the Dominican House of Studies as part of "Avoiding Acedia: An Intellectual Retreat." For more information, please visit thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: R.J. Snell is Editor-in-Chief of Public Discourse and Director of Academic Programs at the Witherspoon Institute. Previously, he was for many years Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Philosophy Program at Eastern University and the Templeton Honors College, where he founded and directed the Agora Institute for Civic Virtue and the Common Good. He earned his M.A. in philosophy at Boston College, and his Ph.D. in philosophy at Marquette University. His research interests include the liberal arts, ethics, natural law theory, Thomas Aquinas, the Catholic intellectual tradition, and the work of Bernard Lonergan, SJ. Snell is the author of Through a Glass Darkly: Bernard Lonergan and Richard Rorty on Knowing without a God's-eye View (Marquette, 2006), Authentic Cosmopolitanism (with Steve Cone, Pickwick, 2013), The Perspective of Love: Natural Law in a New Mode (Pickwick, 2014), Acedia and Its Discontents (Angelico, 2015), and co-editor of Subjectivity: Ancient and Modern (Lexington, 2016) and Nature: Ancient and Modern (Lexington), as well as articles, chapters, and essays in a variety of scholarly and popular venues. He and his family reside in the Princeton area.

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights
Leadership Lens: Mary Ellen Stanek on focus, intentionality and making decisions with no regrets

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 41:01


Baird's Mary Ellen Stanek joins Marquette University president Michael Lovell and BizTimes Media managing editor Arthur Thomas on the latest episode of Leadership Lens. Stanek discusses how she tries to use laser-like focus while holding many titles and roles, how being intentional helps her find work-life balance, and how she tries to make decisions with an eye towards having no regrets. 

Classroom to Boardroom
Success Story: Olivia Louwagie

Classroom to Boardroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 31:17


Olivia went from Kindergarten teacher to Sales at Scholastic. Hear her story and how Classroom to Boardroom helped her land her first position at an education company.   Learn more about Classroom to Boardroom at www.carrieconover.com. Transcript: Introduction (00:00): Welcome to the Classroom to Boardroom podcast. If you are a teacher or administrator looking to change careers, you are in the right place. There can be many reasons an educator is ready to leave the classroom, boredom, burnout, pressure from parents and administrators. The list goes on and on. If you are ready to move on from teaching, there are many roles in which you can use your teacher skillset to have a positive social impact and set yourself up for a fulfilling and rewarding career. Now, let's meet your host, Carrie Conover. Carrie is a veteran educator and ed tech, corporate leader, turn founder, and c. So grab your notepad because your new journey outside the classroom starts right now. Carrie Conover (00:47): Hey there, friends. Welcome back to the Classroom to Boardroom podcast. Today I have a success story that you are going to love. The best way I can summarize it is the person I'm about to interview now works in sales for an education company. You definitely know, and when this person came to Classroom to Boardroom, I never would've guessed sales for them, and they would've never kept, guessed sales for themselves. But guess what? Sales was a match made in heaven with my guest, Olivia, today. We'll get to that in one second, but I just wanna let you know that if you have not listened to the first episode of this new season of the Classroom to Boardroom podcast, our third season, I'm gonna ask you to pause this podcast and go back and start there. This year I am focusing classroom to boardroom everything we do around these seven stages that I believe a teacher or educator goes through when they are transitioning out of the classroom quickly. Carrie Conover (01:52): I'll just share those with you. They are contemplation, decision making, exploration, fear, action, belief and results. And I am basing everything we do on classroom to wardroom this year around those kind of seven pillars. So if you haven't listened to the episode that came out on January 10th, please go listen to that episode now and then come back to this success story within these pillars. The, the first stage that I think most teachers go through is a stage I call contemplation. And when it's when an educator realizes, Hey, I'm not totally satisfied or totally happy or totally fulfilled in the role that I'm currently in, and they first recognize that unsettling feeling, that unhappiness, and then they start wondering about other options that are out there for them and are dreaming of what that change could look like. And so I want you to really pay attention in this Success story interview with Olivia about at the beginning of her journey, this contemplation stage where she recognizes she wasn't totally unhappy, but she knew it was time to think about more in her career. Carrie Conover (03:05): So today in this interview, I not only want you to hear the success story, I want you to really hone in on that first stage that I think teachers go through, which is what I call the conation stage. Today I have a very, very special guest, one of my first classroom boardroom students, Olivia Luwak. She is a former teacher that now works as an education specialist at a company. You all know Scholastic Learning? She is a passionate educator. She's passionate about reading, she loves talking about education, and now she has gone from teacher to working at an education company. Thank you so much, Olivia, for being here today. Olivia L. (03:54): Carrie, thank you so much for having me. It's so great to connect with you. I feel like it's been a little while since we've had a chance to speak. So it is so, so great to be able to to catch up with you tonight and to be able to talk about Classroom to Boardroom. Carrie Conover (04:08): Well, you know, you hold a special place in my heart because you were one of my first classroom to boardroom students , and I knew Classroom to Boardroom was gonna work, and I knew it was good, but there's kind of a trio of you. You, Marjorie and Jessica were like the first three that got jobs outta costume border, and I'm like, this works, this works. But before we start talking about all of that, could you just give our listeners a general story of your career and your background? Olivia L. (04:35): Sure. So I graduated from Marquette University and while at Marquette I studied both education and communication studies. And during my time in college, I always thought that it would be so neat to one day tie both of my degrees together. I had no idea what that would look like, but as I was going through my classes, I really had a passion for both, a passion for education and a passion for communication studies where I had the opportunity, you know, to work with clients and to share knowledge about a particular, you know, topic with a larger audience. And so I kept that idea in the back of my pocket. A student taught in first grade my last year of my senior year at college. I loved first grade, and so I knew when I started to apply for teaching roles that I wanted to stay somewhere in the primary grade level. Olivia L. (05:44): I never thought that I would teach kindergarten, but an opportunity came up and as soon as I went through the interview process and got to meet with some of my some of the teachers that were going to to be on my team, I became super excited about kindergarten. And I have to say teaching kindergarten was a very, very special time for me. I was in the classroom for five years. I truly loved getting to know the families that I worked with and my colleagues, but I have to say that two things stuck out to me during my time as a teacher. I found myself loving teaching, phonics and reading. And I also had a deep love for going to professional development sessions, which I know not every teacher enjoys getting to do that or, you know, it can, they can be long days. Olivia L. (06:40): But I always loved going and learning about new curriculum, new technology. So about after my third year of teaching, I, you know, I kind of kept thinking about these thoughts that were coming through my mind of man, I, you know, I really love you know, the time that I have in the classroom where I'm watching students learned how to identify single sounds and eventually blend them together and make words. And I also really love sitting down with my team every Thursday and going over lesson plans and explaining and sharing ideas about how we can best implement the curriculum that we've been given, you know, to teach our students. So I started thinking about a little bit and year four, same thing, that those same thoughts kind of kept coming up on my heart. And by year five I remember telling my husband, I was like, I think I'm gonna start to look at what other opportunities are out there within the education field. Olivia L. (07:42): I have no idea, you know, if there is anything or how I would even get there, but I just wanna start looking. And so it was the spring of my fifth year of teaching. I started Googling, you know, jobs outside of the classroom. And the more and more that I searched, I just found my heart filled with excitement for some of these, some of these roles. And so I, I was so excited to explore, but I felt kind of stuck at the same time. You know, every time I would read a read a job description, I would be like, yes, this is what I wanna do. Like this is exactly what's in my heart. But I didn't exactly know how to express that to others and exactly know like what to do with those thoughts. So it was an evening in May and I was on the phone with one of my very dear friends, also now a classroom to boardroom graduate, and she calls me up and she said, Olivia, she's like, I know someone who who has a program called Classroom to Boardroom, and the program is designed to help teachers find a job outside of the classroom. Olivia L. (08:57): And I remember turning to my friend and being like, are you reading my mind? Because like, this is exactly like what I have been thinking about and I just don't know how to get from here to there. So she quickly shared your information with me, Carrie and I immediately like Googled her name and like found classroom to boardroom, and within 24 hours I was signed up . That Carrie Conover (09:21): Is awesome. I I actually have forgotten about because that was Lexi, right? Olivia L. (09:28): Yes, yes. That Carrie Conover (09:29): Is crazy because okay, we just kind of have to tell this story. So Olivia L. (09:33): Yes, Carrie Conover (09:34): Of, you know, that I am an avid tennis player, and when I started my own business, I started playing competitive tennis again. Like I, I am on a traveled tennis team, like every week we travel to different clubs and play, and that's a whole other thing. But on my, in my tennis program is a woman who, her daughter's name is Lexi, and she was a teacher. And so Lexi's the one that told you about me because she knew through her mom, right? Like, that's so funny. And then Lexi just recently came back around and also took classroom to boardroom and also just got a job working with you, which is just, yes, so crazy. I mean, I, I had forgotten that's how the intro was and how all the dots were connected. So what a crazy, crazy timeline there. So I wanna pause you for a second because this is a question I always ask every guest. Did you feel guilty about leaving? Olivia L. (10:36): I did. Carrie, at first I felt a sense of guilt because I felt, you know, for the longest time I felt teaching was my calling. And, you know, everyone knew me as a teacher. I, it was something that I wanted to do. Ever since I was a little girl. I, you know, I remember playing school in the basement. My mom was a teacher. And so for the longest time, you know, teaching had been my dream. So I did feel guilty in the sense that I was leaving my calling. However as soon as I started researching jobs outside of the classroom and, you know, reading the, the job descriptions, I found that so much of what these jobs entailed were areas of focus that I did every day in the classroom. Meaning that the skills that were needed and the, you know, the job duties, so much of that was what I was already doing in the classroom. So that made me feel 10 times better. And I was like, you know, the, the, the outlines here that I'm seeing are exactly what I wanna do. And so being able to do that in a new way, in a new light, in a new environment made me really excited. So I think seeing that information helped me feel less guilty and made me really excited to take the next step forward. Carrie Conover (11:57): Well, and I also, I, I felt guilty at the beginning, but like looking back, I don't feel guilty at all. Like, I gave 10 years of my life. You gave five years of your life to teaching. And I do remember, I, I was chuckling, like I played school in my basement, I think all the way through middle school . And the funny thing is that I didn't even get my undergrad in teaching. I went back and got my master's so I could teach. But my point is, is that I think that, you know, especially with the teacher shortage right now, everyone's so scared about the teacher shortage, but it's okay. Like you can do something for five or 10 years or 15 years and then be like, okay, I'm done doing that thing. It doesn't mean it bothers me a little bit that society thinks, like I call them the Apple handcuffs, that like, once you're a teacher, you're never allowed to leave . Carrie Conover (12:43): And that's just, you know, you know, that's a whole other complex , this is a subject. But I do think that a lot of times when you're a really successful and talented teacher, a lot of the things that make you a successful and talented teacher are what would make you a really good salesperson or customer success person and all the various roles. So tell us a little bit about so you talked about joining Classroom to Boardroom and you know, that process. Can you talk a little bit about maybe how you grew in Classroom to Boardroom and then what you think, like, looking back on your new career so far, how do you think you've grown and changed the most? Olivia L. (13:24): Sure. so as I began, I remember like with, you know, within 24 hours I had signed up for Classroom to Boardroom. And that following weekend, like I was so excited to dive right into like module one . And so I, I have to say Carrie, that the modules within classroom to, to Boardroom provided me with so much knowledge about different opportunities and the different areas that you could go into. Again, you know, I was researching these jobs on my own, but I didn't exactly know what area they all fell into. And so the modules really helped me to see all the different fields that I could go into. And I have to say that the vocabulary that you provided for us in the modules was so, so helpful. It was so helpful When it came time for interviews I would use my little notebook and reference the vocabulary that I learned, you know, when the person interviewing me with rollout an acronym and I would be able to understand, you know, what they were talking about. Olivia L. (14:28): So the vocabulary that I learned was just amazing. And actually, I still use my little notebook from classroom to boardroom today because I still use the vocabulary that's in there. Even in my, my new job now I referenced that vocabulary and so I grew in my knowledge of the ed tech field, the ed tech world and I was able to take that knowledge that I gained and apply it to, you know, to where I am now. Like I said you know, before joining Classroom to Boardroom, I had no idea what C R M meant. And now, you know, I use Salesforce, our, that's our customer relationship management tool that we use. And, you know, I'm able to reference the concepts and the terminology that I used in classroom to boardroom. So classroom to boardroom, I refer to it as like my stepping stone to where I, to where I am today. Olivia L. (15:25): The knowledge that I learned the interview help and just growing with the classroom to boardroom community, you know, when we met and did our group sessions, we shared, you know, tips and tricks on resumes and interview help and all of that helped form who I am today. And I still use the same skills, you know, that I, that I learned from classroom to boardroom in my day-to-day job. Now I remember Carrie calling you for the first time I had an interview and I was like, Carrie, I have an interview. Like what do I do? Can you like walk me through? And I still remember the advice that you gave me and I still have my pearls and red lipstick by the way. . Carrie Conover (16:08): Okay, we're gonna get to that, but I have to pause you for a second because I remember when you said you were prepping for the interview and I think you showed me or told me that you had like a binder, a notebook with all the vocab and I was like, oh my gosh, I need to make a workbook. So you inspired me. I made a hundred page digital workbook that goes with the course now. Cause I'm like, everybody needs this in their back pocket. But you were also one of the people that listened to the modules over and over again so that you knew it. And it, it's interesting, I have a new leader board in classroom to boardroom. We didn't do this when you were part of the cohort, but every month for our monthly get together and coaching call, I say who the leader boards are, like who's completed the most of the course. Carrie Conover (16:49): And when I pull the data and I can pull it and sort it from, you know, who's completed all of it down to who's completed, like none of the coursework. What's interesting is that the people at the top are the people with jobs. So like you pull all the historical data of everyone that's ever taken it and the people that have gotten jobs are the people at the top. And so I always tell the members like the magic is in, you know, building a strong relationship with me, but it's in the coursework, like I spent Yes. Blood, sweat, and tears giving that knowledge. So I'm glad that helped you so much. Let's shift and talk a little bit about those pearls and red lipsticks, . So you purchased a one-on-one coaching call with me when you were going into your interview with Scholastic. And I'll never forget it was it was like kind of a gray day. We were talking later in the day and one of the first things we talked about is how are you gonna present yourself to the camera? How are we, so I remember we broke down your job descript the job description. Yes. And really started thinking through like, you know, your answers for interview questions based on your history, but we did talk about pearls and red lipsticks. So can you talk about that a little bit? Olivia L. (18:00): ? Yes, I do remember we'd gone through all like the logistics of the job and then you're, and then you're like, I also have some advice on, you know, you know, we wanna make you, cuz again, I only taught for five years in the classroom and so I am still, you know, rather new in my, in my career. Yeah. And so you're like, I think I know the perfect like finishing touches to add to your outfit pearls and red lipstick . Yes. Those are like my confidence boosters. So ever since that conversation I would always wear my pearls and red lipstick for any interview that I did . Carrie Conover (18:33): Well, and I remember saying because the one job that we were looking at in that session repeated over and over again that they needed someone to be like super poised and seem experienced. I can't remember what the vocabulary was, but yes, really professional. So I wanted you to really look kind of buttoned up and pulled together cuz you're so articulate. I knew you would nail that part, but I didn't want them to look and be like, oh, you only taught kindergarten for five years, you're so young. I wanted you to seem experienced so that they would like, you know, not, they would look past that and and say like, wow, this woman has a lot of knowledge. So whether it's pros or red lipstick, I just think it's like putting your best foot forward in these interviews in the way you look, in the way you talk in your energy. So I'm glad that worked out. . Let's talk a little bit about, okay, so you've had two different roles at Scholastic. So can you tell us those two different roles and then talk to us a little bit about like your day-to-day responsibilities? Olivia L. (19:36): Sure. So when I, I had applied to Scholastic you know, last year and it was, I applied for a full-time position actually. And when I received the email back from them, it was actually regarding a temporary role. And I remember reaching out to you Kiri, I think you may have been in Florida at the time, and it was like, I don't wanna bother her, but I have to share this news. They emailed me back about an interview for a temporary role on the classroom magazine team and Kiri, I remember you took time outta your day to write me back and you said, Olivia, like, you know, I would go for it. Give it your all work hard, you know, and just put your best foot forward because you never know what could come out of an opportunity like this. Yeah. And so I took your advice, Carrie and I was on the magazine team for the fir for, it was a three month position and at the end of the my third month there were some additional job postings in the company for full-time positions. Olivia L. (20:41): And I remember reaching out to the HR manager asking if I would be able to, to, or if I would be eligible to apply to one of the full-time positions. And she had gotten back to me and said yes. And so I applied for a position on the education team and that is where I'm currently at. So I went from working on the magazine team where we focused on renewing classroom magazines for schools in addition to, you know, trying to get new business as well. And then I transitioned over to the education team where our focus is more so on classroom instructional materials. So I have the opportunity each day to work with principals and superintendents to have conversations with them about their pain points what's working for them, what's not working from them, for them. And ultimately my job is to help find a solution to help support their teachers and students in whatever initiative or goal they may have. Olivia L. (21:51): So I work really closely with principals and superintendents having conversations with them about, you know, what are their goals, what are their, what are their initiatives, what are they currently using and where do they see gaps where I can come in and provide a resource, whether it would be you know, a classroom library collection, professional learning for their teachers small group instructional material or even books to send home with students to help students build their at-home library. So I have the, the privilege and the opportunity to work with school districts on reaching their, you know, their literacy, literacy initiatives and their literacy goals. Carrie Conover (22:36): That's amazing. Wow. And I, can we just talk about the fact that, how many times have you heard me say this, and I say it all the time, teachers in trans transition, your first job may or may not be your ideal job, but you've got to get that first job and get that on your resume, right? Yes. And whether Olivia had taken that magazine job and then that ended and she didn't have the opportunity to continue full-time, she would've had a leg up in so many ways looking for a full-time position outside of Scholastic. So I say it all the time, I mean, don't get desperate, but if you can get that first job and stay there a year, 18 months, even a few months, if it's temporary, I love contract positions, go for it. Be brave and take the job. Olivia L. (23:28): Yes, I remember, that's exactly what you told me, Carrie, and like as soon as I got the email back from you, I was like, okay, I'm doing this. I'm in . Carrie Conover (23:36): Well, and you mentioned a little bit too about the group meetings. This is where you hear me say a lot of the same things over and over again, , but those group coaching calls, we really are, we become friends, we become a community. And I am still close with a lot of the people who started Classroom boardroom and are all and are outworking and many of you are gonna hear those talented individuals on the podcast this season. When we talk, think about your role, can you talk to us a little bit of some of the soft skills required in your role, and then maybe tell us about some of the different hard skills required in your role. Olivia L. (24:15): Okay. So regarding soft skills, I would say that it's definitely important to be a good listener to have good communication good communication skills, and also to be time oriented. So when I call a customer, again, whether it be a principal or a superintendent or a curriculum specialist I have to be able to listen closely and carefully to their needs their pain points, you know, what they're looking at so that I can then provide a solution that will actually be able to meet their needs and, you know, and that they can have success. So it's really important that I, that I listen closely and carefully to my customers. And then the second part of that is having good communication where I can share the products that I sell. I need to be able to share what the product is and how it will benefit them. Olivia L. (25:09): Oftentimes, if, you know, a principal doesn't know about the value of the product it can be easy for them to, to turn away and, you know, not have as much interest in what I am selling. So it's important for me to be able to convey the value of the product that I am selling to them. And then with that in mind it's very important that I am time oriented. Most times a principal won't, you know, purchase a product on the first phone call that we have, so I will set a callback with them and, and sometimes it can be many callbacks. So I need to keep track of my call log who I talk to when the next phone call conversation will be. And then also whether sometimes, you know, the customer will, will request a Google meet or a Zoom session. So I need to make sure that I stay on top of my appointments and my calls because that's ultimately how I get, you know, my sales and how we get business. So it is important for me to be time oriented you know, without throughout my day, but with answering emails, answering phone calls, and then being proactive and reaching out on my own to customers and setting up those appointments. Carrie Conover (26:28): Wow. Just listening to you, I I'm just, it's, it is amazing how far you've come in a year, . And, and, and whoever thought like, I think, so you're technically in sales, correct? Under the sales under, yes. And like I think a lot of people, especially teachers are like, oh, there's no way I could ever do sales. And I bet you probably thought that you weren't a sales person, but like that's the difference between selling, there's a difference between selling, you know, used cars and selling education tools that are gonna make classrooms better. Olivia L. (27:10): Exactly. No, I never would've pictured myself in sales, but Carrie, I absolutely love it . I, I find it so fun to engage with customers. You know, in a way it's like consulting where I'm listening, you know, to their needs and being able to provide a solution. And ultimately these solutions are helping students and that was one of the main reasons why I became a teacher in the first place. So I still feel like I'm getting to help students and teachers every single day, which really is my passion and my dream. So I feel like I'm living, I feel like I'm living my, my best dream . Carrie Conover (27:45): Well, what advice do you have for teachers who are looking to transition into a role at an education company? Olivia L. (27:53): Very, very similar to your advice, Carrie. I I just say go for it. So many education companies need teachers input and need teachers knowledge in order to successfully run, you know, run their business. You know, I use my teaching experience, my teaching background on a day-to-day basis. And I even tell my customers, you know, I was a former teacher, so I totally understand where you're coming from. And just sharing with them my understanding, it's that is such a great relationship builder for me with my customers because I can relate to what they're going through. I've been there, I understand what it's like to be, you know, in their shoes. And so my advice would be to keep moving forward, keep applying. And I used to think of it as this, every application, every interview that I did every afternoon that I would spend time researching different jobs and different roles is a stepping stone to your final destination. And so even though the journey may seem long keep your head up high because there are so many education companies out there that need you. Carrie Conover (29:03): Oh, that's amazing advice. Thank you so much for sharing that. And I just ask you if you have any final thoughts or advice before we sign off here on today's episode. Olivia L. (29:16): I just wanna say carried. You and the classroom to boardroom community will forever hold a special place in my heart. You and the community have formed who I am today, and I just encourage anyone who is thinking about leaving the classroom to give classroom to boardroom a chance because I feel all the tools and the knowledge that I now carry in my pocket were gained from attending the classroom to boardroom group sessions and by going through the modules. And so I definitely 100% hands down would say Join Classroom to Boardroom because you truly will receive the tools that you need to make the transition forward. Carrie Conover (30:00): It's like, I wanna sing that song, you've Got a Friend In Me, . I think that's story, story, right? . But the truth is you do have a friend in me and through going through this process, I get to know everyone. And I'm here for you, Olivia, no matter where your career journey takes you. I hope you stay at Scholastic for a long, long time, , but I'll be here for you through the rest of your career. It's not just a short-term partnership. So thank you for those kind words and thank you so much for taking your time to be here with us. If you are interested in taking Classroom to Boardroom, you can learn more about the course and all the courses that I teach@carrieconover.com. Olivia, thank you so much for being here Olivia L. (30:45): Today. Introduction (30:47): Thanks so much for tuning in to this episode of The Classroom to Boardroom podcast. If you are enjoying the show, please feel free to rate, subscribe, and leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts. That helps others find the show and we greatly appreciate it. Once again, thanks for listening and we'll catch you in the next episode of The Classroom to Boardroom podcast.  

The Thomistic Institute
Acedia and the Bleaching of Being | Dr. R.J. Snell

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 61:43


This talk was given on December 2, 2022, at the Dominican House of Studies as part of "Avoiding Acedia: An Intellectual Retreat." For more information, please visit thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: R.J. Snell is Editor-in-Chief of Public Discourse and Director of Academic Programs at the Witherspoon Institute. Previously, he was for many years Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Philosophy Program at Eastern University and the Templeton Honors College, where he founded and directed the Agora Institute for Civic Virtue and the Common Good. He earned his M.A. in philosophy at Boston College, and his Ph.D. in philosophy at Marquette University. His research interests include the liberal arts, ethics, natural law theory, Thomas Aquinas, the Catholic intellectual tradition, and the work of Bernard Lonergan, SJ. Snell is the author of Through a Glass Darkly: Bernard Lonergan and Richard Rorty on Knowing without a God's-eye View (Marquette, 2006), Authentic Cosmopolitanism (with Steve Cone, Pickwick, 2013), The Perspective of Love: Natural Law in a New Mode (Pickwick, 2014), Acedia and Its Discontents (Angelico, 2015), and co-editor of Subjectivity: Ancient and Modern (Lexington, 2016) and Nature: Ancient and Modern (Lexington), as well as articles, chapters, and essays in a variety of scholarly and popular venues. He and his family reside in the Princeton area.

What Is Truth?
34: A Christian Critique of Gender Theory w/ Dr. John Grabowski

What Is Truth?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 68:25


What are the philosophical foundations of modern gender theory? Can modern gender theory form a coherent worldview? What all is wrong with modern gender theory? Today I am joined by Dr. John Grabowski, author of the book "Unraveling Gender" to answer all of these questions and more.Buy Dr. Grabowski's book from TAN and get 15% Off using code TRUTH.Purchase here: https://bit.ly/3CHNu1gDr. Grabowski's Bio:A native of Wisconsin, Dr. Grabowski earned his B.A. in theology at the University of Steubenville and his Ph.D. at Marquette University.  For the last thirty years he has been on the faculty of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. where he is currently Ordinary Professor of Moral Theology/ Ethics.  He and his wife were appointed to the Pontifical Council for the Family by Pope Benedict XVI in the fall of 2009 where they served as a member couple.  He has served two terms as a theological advisor to the U.S.C.C.B. Committee on Laity, Marriage, Family, and Youth and one term as an advisor to the subcommittee which produced the Pastoral Letter Marriage: Love and Life in the Divine Plan (2009).  In 2015 he was appointed by Pope Francis to serve as an expert (adiutor) at the Synod of Bishops on the Family.Dr. Grabowski has published widely in the areas of moral theology, marriage, sexuality, and bioethics.  His articles have appeared in scholarly journals as Nova et Vetera, The Thomist, The Heythrop Journal, and the National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly as well as more popular publications such as America, Commonweal, The Living Light, and Our Sunday Visitor.  His books include Sex and Virtue: An Introduction to Sexual Ethics (CUA Press, 2003), Transformed in Christ: Essays on the Renewal of Moral Theology (Sapientia Press, 2017), One Body:  A Program of Marriage Formation for the New Evangelization with Claire Grabowski (Emmaus Road Press, 2018), A Catechism for Family Life with Sarah Bartel (CUA Press, 2018), and Raising Catholic Kids for Their Vocations with Claire Grabowski (TAN, 2019).Dr. Grabowski's Work: https://marriage4life.net/Get 15% Off TAN Books using code "TRUTH" at checkout: https://tanbooks.com/?rfsn=7031065.cf6efa1 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkz9M06qR_vjVS8k9oEkiSQInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/whatistruthpod/

IndoctriNation
Currency & Coercive Control w/ Tracy Coenen

IndoctriNation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 71:50


Tracy Coenen has been investigating fraud for more than 25 years, but she didn't always want to be a forensic accountant. She went to Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI to get a criminology degree. A class on financial crime investigations reminded her how much she loved Encyclopedia Brown books as a kid. She continued her criminology degree but added accounting and economics courses so she could sit for the CPA exam. Today, Tracy is finding money in cases of corporate fraud, high-net-worth divorce, and other financial shenanigans. She's the founder of pinktruth.com which provides information-sharing about the truth of multi-level marketing companies that prey upon women. The focus is mostly on Mary Kay Cosmetics but also covers other pyramid schemes and MLMs. Tracy is also the creator of The Divorce Money Guide, which has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The Business Journal, and many more major media outlets. In this unique and important conversation, Tracy explains how her personal experience as a Mary Kay consultant led her to uncover the fraudulent practices of multi-level marketing groups and brought her to a career in forensic accounting. Rachel discusses with Tracy the similarities inherent in survivors of high-control groups and personal relationships with regard to lack of transparency and manipulative financial practices, Together Rachel and Tracy offer ways for people to protect themselves from financial abuse in both relationships and business ventures. Before You Go: Rachel addresses the misleading financial terminology and framing that manipulative groups and even partners may use to obscure malicious intent regarding financial control. Find out more about Tracy's work here: https://www.fraudcoach.com/divorcemoneyguide Find out more about Mary Kay here: https://www.pinktruth.com You can purchase Rachel's webinar series LIVING IN FREEDOM here: rachelbernsteintherapy.com/webinar.html To help support the show monthly and get bonus episodes, shirts, and tote bags, please visit: www.patreon.com/indoctrination Prefer to support the IndoctriNation show with a one-time donation? Use this link: www.paypal.me/indoctrination Connect with us on Social Media: Twitter: twitter.com/_indoctrination Facebook: www.facebook.com/indoctrinationpodcast Tik Tok: www.tiktok.com/@indoctrinationpodcast Instagram: www.instagram.com/indoctrinationpodcast/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/rachelbernsteinlmft You can always help the show for free by leaving a rating on Spotify or a review on Apple/ iTunes. It really helps the visibility of the show!

PositiveImpact® Global
Podcast: Interview with Dr. Jane Wright

PositiveImpact® Global

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 18:23


Episode 122 An interview with Jane Wright, DDS, MS, a board certified orthodontist and an a adjunct faculty member in the dental school in Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dr. Wright has written a new children's book entitled, “The Capture of Clementine” about the Tooth Fairy and children practicing good dental health. We discuss why it is important to for children… The post Podcast: Interview with Dr. Jane Wright appeared first on Positive Impact Life.

OUT THERE ON THE EDGE OF EVERYTHING®
Podcast: Interview with Dr. Jane Wright

OUT THERE ON THE EDGE OF EVERYTHING®

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 18:23


Episode 122 An interview with Jane Wright, DDS, MS, a board certified orthodontist and an a adjunct faculty member in the dental school in Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dr. Wright has written a new children's book entitled, "The Capture of Clementine" about the Tooth Fairy and children practicing good dental health. We discuss why it is important to for children who still have their baby teeth and older children to brush and floss their teeth every night. We also discuss the importance of good nutrition and why it is important to avoid food and beverages with a high sugar content. What does the Tooth Fairy have to say about children brushing and flossing their teeth every night? Practicing good dental health with your children creates a positive impact in your life. Out There on the Edge of Everything® … Stephen Lesavich, PhD Copyright © 2023, by Stephen Lesavich, PhD.  All rights reserved. Certified solution-focused life coach and experienced business coach.

Musical Theatre Radio presents
Be Our Guest with Paul Salsini

Musical Theatre Radio presents "Be Our Guest"

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 27:54


Paul Salsini was a reporter, editor, and staff development director for The Milwaukee Journal for 37 years and a correspondent for The New York Times for 15 years. He also taught journalism courses and a musical theater history course at Marquette University. In 1994, he founded The Sondheim Review, a magazine devoted to the works of the composer/lyricist, and was its editor for ten years. Recently he wrote the book Sondheim & Me: revealing a Musical Genius where he describes his unlikely long-distance relationship with the fabled composer/lyricist. The memoir includes the dozens of notes that Sondheim sent Salsini about articles in the magazine In recent years, he has been writing fiction, with ten books set in Tuscany.

Hoop Heads
John Willkom - Author of the New Book: No Fear In The Arena: Travis Diener's Unrivaled Leadership and Competitive Drive - Episode 737

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 47:55


John Willkom is the author of the new book, No Fear in the Arena: Travis Diener's Unrivaled Leadership and Competitive Drive. The book is an inside look at Travis Diener's rise to basketball stardom from Marquette University to the NBA to the Italian League.John is a former Division 1 basketball player and teammate of Travis Diener's at Marquette University. John later earned his MBA from Loyola University Chicago. The co-founder of Playmakers Basketball, John implemented collegiate-level workouts into a basketball camp circuit and AAU program aimed to provide better opportunities for kids in the Midwest. John also worked with high school and collegiate athletic programs on the importance of proper nutrition and the development of fueling stations to enhance athletic performance. If you're looking to improve your coaching please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program. We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach. By matching you up with one of our experienced mentors you'll develop a one on one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset. The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced Head Coaches. Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly mike@hoopheadspod.comFollow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram and be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content.Take some notes as you listen to this episode with John Willkom, the author of No Fear in the Arena: Travis Diener's Unrivaled Leadership and Competitive Drive.Website - https://www.amazon.com/Fear-Arena-Unrivaled-Leadership-Competitive-ebook/dp/B0BPTDHDLLEmail - john.willkom@gmail.comTwitter - @johnwillkomVisit our Sponsors!Dr. Dish BasketballMention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! Fast Model SportsFastModel Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there! In addition to a great product, they also provide basketball coaching content and resources through their blog and playbank, which features over 8,000 free plays and drills from their online coaching community. For access to these plays and more information, visit fastmodelsports.com or follow them on Twitter @FastModel. Use Promo code HHP15 to save 15%United Basketball PlusUnited Basketball Plus has over 3,000 plays, 45 Deep Dive Courses with some of the best minds in the game including Tyler Coston, Paul Kelleher, Tobin Anderson, Dave Love and more. You can also view United Basketball Clinics, and receive 50% off in-person clinics. United Basketball Plus partnered with Jordan and Joe Stasyzyn from Unleashed Potential to create their Skill Development Curriculum. United Basketball Plus is a one stop shop to help you grow as a coach, leader and culture builder. Use the code 'clinic' and receive an annual...

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1429 - The Foundation of Scalability with Great Lakes Advisory's Chris Gwinn

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 21:08


In this episode of The Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks with Chris Gwinn, founder and CEO of Great Lakes Advisory.Chris shares his passion for helping small and medium sized businesses standardize all of their processes and ensure everyone follows them.. He added that they also document core processes and measure them, develop and customize training, and teach all leaders how to hold each other accountable. Chris shares some of the benefits of establishing standardized processes - reducing reliance on some of the key employees, creating an environment where there is more responsibility, autonomy and accountability among all leaders, and allowing leaders to focus on the real growth and management of their teams. He also shares the impact of technology on operations. He explains that technology, along with the integration of apps and automation, could help lower operational costs. Chris also provides practical advice on how to assess business processes and performance. He encourages all business leaders to proactively address all issues related to their SOPs if they were to move towards growth and scalability.Key Points from the Episode:How Important is Technology to Operations?Best Practices for Onboarding a New HireRecommendation for Evaluating Your Company's SOPs About Chris GwinnChris is the founder and CEO of Great Lakes Advisory. He began his career at Northern Trust working on an investment team within Northern Trust Wealth Management. During Chris' tenure at Northern Trust, he managed over $85 million of client assets and provided holistic wealth management solutions for high net worth individuals and families.Prior to launching Great Lakes Advisory, Chris was the Director of Finance and Operations at Harmony Center for Surgery of the Ears, Nose, and Throat. As the Director of Finance and Operations, Chris' responsibilities included consulting on daily business operations, building process playbooks, streamlining workflows, strategic planning, improving patient satisfaction, growing practice visibility within the metro Detroit area, and assisting in human resources.Chris shares a passion for operations, processes, finance, investments, and working with people. Chris holds a bachelor's degree in accounting and finance from Marquette University. He has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst® (CFA®) designation.Outside of work, Chris loves spending time with his wonderful wife, Courtney, Australian Shepherd, Igor, and their families and friends. He is an avid golfer and enjoys running, cycling, and CrossFit.About Great Lakes AdvisoryGreat Lakes Advisory is an operations and financial advisory firm located in Chicago, IL. The company was founded on the principle that great companies testify about their people and their processes. They help entrepreneurs realize their vision by improving their processes, standardizing their operations, and developing engaging training to get everyone aligned, so their business runs faster. Their goal is to help companies train new hires faster, serve more customers, and scale their business.Links Mentioned in this Episode:Want to learn more? Check out Great Lakes Advisory's website at

ABOUT THAT WALLET
S3E34: [Tracy Coenen] Divorce Money Guide - Get The Money You Deserve In Your Divorce

ABOUT THAT WALLET

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 46:17


Divorce is something that all married people hope to not do, but it happens. Even if you are not going through a divorce, you need to know what is available to you in your marriage and look for the red flags within your relationship. Tracy Coenen has been investigating fraud for more than 25 years, but she didn't always want to be a forensic accountant. With a dream of one day being a prison warden, Tracy went to Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI to get a criminology degree. A class on financial crime investigations reminded her how much she loved Encyclopedia Brown books as a kid. She continued her criminology degree, but added accounting and economics courses so she could sit for the CPA exam… and here Tracy is, finding money in cases of corporate fraud, high net worth divorce, and other financial shenanigans. More of Tracy: divorcemoneyguide.com https://www.fraudcoach.com/ instagram.com/divorcemoneyguide Be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. =|| Books Mentioned ||= All Lawyer Books by John Grisham - https://amzn.to/3WI0ImA youtube video: https://youtu.be/wWS7dpPsyJc THANK YOU FOR LISTENING! #TracyCoenen #DivorceMoneyGuide #aboutthatwallet #personalfinance #divorce #divorcesupport DISCLAIMER: these are sponsored links in which I get paid and you can benefit for being a listener to the podcast. Get Eco Friendly Stocking stuffers with Earth Breeze Laundry Sheets: aboutthatwallet.com/earthbreeze Survey Junkie - Make some shmoney for your opinions! aboutthatwallet.com/surveyjunkie Gain access to over 5,000 training videos to increase your skillset: https://shopakanundrum.com/?ref=atw Get Amazon Prime: https://amzn.to/3ORzaHl Read books on Kindle Unlimited: https://amzn.to/3OBcOdu Wedding registry: https://amzn.to/3A8z89F Baby registry: https://amzn.to/3NtkxIY Listen to the show on Audible: Try Audible and get 2 free books - https://amzn.to/3tWuDdJ _____ Follow Me: Main page: https://www.aboutthatwallet.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aboutthatwallet Listen to the podcast on your favorite listening platforms such as Apple, Google, Spotify, Amazon and more!! -- DISCLAIMER: I am not a CPA, attorney, insurance, contractor, lender, or financial advisor. The content in this audio are for educational purposes only. You must do your own research and make the best choice for you. Investing of any kind involves risk. While it is possible to minimize risk, your investments are solely your responsibility. It is imperative that you conduct your own research. I am merely sharing my opinion with no guarantee of gains or losses on investments. If you need advice, please contact a qualified CPA, CFP, an attorney, insurance agent, financial advisor, or the appropriate professional for the subject you would like help with. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/aboutthatwallet/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/aboutthatwallet/support

Podcast – Evidence In Motion
Practice Leadership - Movers & Shakers Deep Dive | Kevin Wilk

Podcast – Evidence In Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 41:33


Welcome to the Practice Leadership Podcast. This season we're digging ever deeper into the PT industry's biggest movers and shakers. Join us, your co-hosts, Tim Reynolds and Bryan Guzski, the authors of Movers & Mentors, as we deep-dive with the big guns – answering the big questions every future and current PT wants to know. From Confluent Health and Evidence In Motion, The Practice Leadership Podcast's Movers & Shakers Season will go straight to the source, asking our industry heavyweights for their wisdom, deconstructing influential quotes and learning a thing or two along the way. This week we are connected with Dr. Kevin Wilk, a leading authority in the rehabilitation of sports and orthopedic conditions for the past 37 years. He is currently the associate clinical director for Champion Sports Medicine in Birmingham, AL. He is the Vice President of Clinical Research and Education for Select Medical, director of Rehabilitative Research at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, and adjunct assistant professor in the PT program at Marquette University. He has published over 190 journal articles, 130 book chapters, 10 textbooks, and lectured at over 1200 professional and scientific meetings throughout the world. He has received countless awards including the Ron Peyton Award for career achievement from the sports physical therapy section of the APTA, the James Andrews Award for achievement in the area of baseball science, inducted in the Sports Section Blackburn Hall of Fame, and received a tremendous honor when the Sports Physical Therapy Section of the APTA named the Traveling Fellowship after him. Instagram: @wilk_kevin 

The Slavic Connexion
Compounding Conflicts: Russia in Ukraine, the Middle East, and Africa with Robert Freedman

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 45:02


On this episode, venerated political scientist Dr. Robert Freedman joins us to expound on the various wars and conflicts that Russia has gotten into, not only in Ukraine, but also in Syria, Libya, Mali, and more. Dr. Freedman articulates Putin's current goals as he sees them, touches on the liberal use of the Wagner Group by Russia, and prognosticates on the future of the war in Ukraine and Ukraine's prospects in joining Western security organizations. Thanks for listening (and happy holidays to all)! ABOUT THE GUEST Professor Robert Freedman received his B.A. in Diplomatic History from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in International Relations from Columbia University. He was an Assistant Professor of Russian History at the United States Military Academy (West Point) and Associate Professor of Political Science and Russian at Marquette University, before his extended career in Baltimore as Professor of Political Science and later the President of the Baltimore Hebrew University. Now, he is visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University and continues to hold an appointment at the Baltimore Hebrew University. He is the author or co-author of five books on Soviet foreign policy and fifteen on Israel and the Middle East. He has consulted with U.S. and Israeli government agencies, served on significant government delegations, and been a commentator innumerable times on major news outlets. He is a highly respected authority in the U.S. foreign policy community. PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on November 13th, 2022 at Palmer House Hilton in Chicago, Illinois at the 2022 ASEEES convention. If you have questions, comments, or would like to be a guest on the show, please email slavxradio@utexas.edu and we will be in touch! CREDITS Host/Associate Producer: Taylor Ham Host/Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy (@MSimanovskyy) Associate Producer: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Associate Producer: Cullan Bendig (@cullanwithana) Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Social Media Manager: Eliza Fisher Supervising Producer: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (@charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Holizna, Jazzafari, Kai Engel,Makaih Beats) Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (@MSDaniel) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Robert O. Freedman.

Press Box Access
Mary Schmitt Boyer: “Just Come in With Everybody Else.”

Press Box Access

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 57:28


Mary Schmitt Boyer helped pave the way for other women in sports journalism with her excellence and professionalism. Hear about her experiences as a scribe, and why her own career plans changed after a year in Al McGuire's circus atmosphere at Marquette in the mid-1970s. She recalls his showmanship, his welcoming personality, and how the Hall of Fame basketball coach set her on a path that took her around the world. Mary explains why Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic torch is the top sports moment she covered, and why Kyrie Irving is the most difficult athlete she dealt with. We talk a lot about the NBA, which Mary covered for more than two decades, including 18 years in Cleveland. She offers a front-row perspective on LeBron James after documenting his rise from phenom to immortality. Mary specialized in the NBA and Olympics at The Plain Dealer in Cleveland from 1996 until she retired from the newspaper business in 2014. She previously worked at the St. Paul Pioneer Press (1989-1995), the Milwaukee Journal (1978-1988), and the Minneapolis Tribune (1977-78). She was also an intern reporter at the Washington Post, the Kansas City Star, and the Eugene (Oregon) Register-Guard. In 2008, the Association for Women in Sport's Media presented Schmitt Boyer with the Mary Garber Pioneer Award. The honor has been given annually since 1999 to those who have distinguished themselves in the field while reflecting and advancing the values and mission of AWSM. Mary served as AWSM president in 1993-94. She was president of the Professional Basketball Writers Association in 2013-14. Mary has written or co-authored seven sports books: · “Inside Game: Race, Power, and Politics in the NBA” – written with Wayne Embry and Spike Lee · “The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly: Cleveland Indians – Heart-Pounding, Jaw-Dropping, and Gut-Wrenching Moments from Cleveland Indians History” – written with Terry Pluto · “The Complete Encyclopedia of Basketball” – written with Ron Smith · “Indians Essential: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Real Fan!” – written with Thomas Hamilton · “Welcome to the Jungle” · “Browns Essential: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Real Fan!” – written with Doug Dieken · “Kobe Bryant” Mary graduated from Marquette University in 1977 with a degree in journalism after serving as sports editor of the student newspaper, the Marquette Tribune. She's a recipient of the Diederich College of Communications Award: the Journalism By-Line Award. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lake Effect: Full Show
Tuesday 12/20/22: plea deals, Capitol Notes, classes for incarcerated, Boswell Books to Gift

Lake Effect: Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 51:20


We learn about plea deals and how often they're used in Milwaukee County. Capitol Notes looks at possible items that may placed in the state budget. We learn about a program at Marquette University that's helping educate currently and formerly incarcerated people. Plus, we go through a list of books to gift this holiday season with Boswell Book Company.

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights
Leadership Lens: Reflecting on key lessons with Marquette president Michael Lovell

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 44:08


Marquette University president Michael Lovell joins BizTimes Media managing editor Arthur Thomas to reflect on lessons learned during interviews with southeastern Wisconsin business leaders over the past six months. The lessons they touch on include:Frank Cumberbatch, Bader Philanthropies: Leaders have to show upPeggy Troy, Children's Wisconsin: Stay curiousBernie Sherry, Ascension Wisconsin: Mission matters and supporting teamsTim Sheehy, MMAC: Building consensus is importantJonas Prising, ManpowerGroup: Taking leadership lessons from sports

ScholarChip$
On a Mission Ft. Lupita Avalos

ScholarChip$

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 64:36


Lupita Avalos is on a mission to help Black and Brown families achieve financial security. Tone and Larry sit down with Lupita to discuss her journey and all things related to financial planning and wealth building. More about Lupita:Milwaukee born and raised on the Southside by Mexican parents from Nayarit. Lupita was the first in her immediate family to earn a degree graduating from Marquette University. She is passionate about helping her community by volunteering her time and through her career. As a Financial Advisor, Lupita helps educate individuals and families on life insurance, saving, budgeting, and planning for retirement to build generational wealth. She also guides her clients with creating living wills/trust and overall estate planning. She's currently a volunteer with the Sixteenth Street Clinic. She also volunteers with Special Spaces, a non-profit that gives children with cancer their dream room. Lastly, she is a board member for Operation Dream, an org that provides young males in Milwaukee with mentoring. Outside of work, Lupita loves traveling, working out, hiking, and hanging out with her Bulldog ‘Pavo'!Welcome to the ScholarChip$ podcast hosted by Larry Alexander and Tone Gaines. Larry is a transactional attorney at a Fortune 100 Company. Tone is a Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions attorney at a large law firm in Chicago. But more importantly, both Larry and Tone are Black Men from the inner city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The duo started ScholarChip$ to (1) create a platform to have candid conversations with scholars and (2) normalize academics as a viable way to achieve upward mobility in Black and Brown communities.Discussions in this podcast are for general information and entertainment purposes only. Nothing contained in this podcast constitutes financial, legal, tax or any other professional advice. Always consult a professional regarding your individual circumstance. NOR DOES IT CONSTITUTE AN ENDORSEMENT OF ANY INDIVIDUAL GUEST. ALWAYS DO YOUR DILIGENCE.  If you have a moment, we'd love to hear from you: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/25G8JGD. You can also email us at scholarchipspodcast@gmail.com!

Spinal Cast
Bryon Riesch

Spinal Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 37:58


In this episode we sit down with the inspiring, Bryon Riesch!In 1998, as a college freshman, Bryon Riesch suffered a severe spinal cord injury which left him paralyzed from the chest down with very limited use of his arms. Despite his injury, he graduated from Marquette University in 2002. He currently is part owner of R&R Insurance, where his responsibilities include investigating and implementing new ideas and technologies.He is also one of the founders and serves as President of the Bryon Riesch Paralysis Foundation (BRPF). Dedicated to finding a cure for paralysis, the BRPF provides funding for the latest in medical research and provides assistance to those that suffer from neurological disorders.In addition to the BRPF, Bryon serves or has served on the Presidential Advisory Board for Carroll University, the Marquette College of Health Sciences Leadership Council, the Neurological Advisory Board at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Advisory Board for the Waukesha Community Foundation. He has also been involved in Goodwill Industries where he received the Goodwill International Graduate of the Year Award. He has been recognized by Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin with their Hope & Spirit Award and given an honorary doctorate in 2011. Finally, Marquette University honored him with the Spirit of Marquette Award in 2018.Learn more about the amazing work being done by BRPF here: https://brpf.org/Thank you again to Bryon Riesch for joining us on Spinal Cast! This production is a collaborative effort of volunteers working to create a quality audio experience around the subject of spinal cord injury. A special shout out of appreciation to Clientek for providing studio space and top-notch recording equipment. Most importantly, thank YOU for being part of the Spinal Cast audience!Interested in watching these episodes?! Check out our YouTube playlist! https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL40rLlxGS4VzgAjW8P6Pz1mVWiN0Jou3vIf you'd like to learn more about the MCPF you can visit our website at - https://mcpf.org/Donations are always welcomed - https://mcpf.org/you-can-help/

Coach Me Up with Jimmy Dykes & Chris Burke
Tom Crean: Don't Miss the Details | Coach Me Up with Jimmy Dykes & Chris Burke

Coach Me Up with Jimmy Dykes & Chris Burke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 55:08


Former college basketball coach and current ESPN analyst Tom Crean is the guest this weeks episode of the Coach Me Up Podcast. Coach Crean has been at the highest level of college basketball having been the head coach at Marquette University, Indiana University, and most recently at the University of Georgia. He has lead his teams to multiple NCAA tournaments and placed several players into the NBA. Jimmy and Chris talk about common qualities of great coaches and players and what Coach Crean has learned from studying the best. Three key areas of selflessness, being a problem solver, and being the spiritual leader of your home are broken down in detail by Coach Crean. And a great lesson on how we are to respond when it does not go our way is of great impact in this weeks episode. Be challenged by Jimmy and Chris as they wrap up this episode discussing the key takeaways from their conversation with Tom Crean. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• As always we thank our title sponsor OneCountry.com for making this podcast possible, and to Blue Delta Jeans and Konexial.com for their continued support of our podcast. COACH ME UP TEAM OneCountry.com. Blue Delta Jeans Konexial.com Follow us on Twitter: @CoachJimmyDykes @ChrisBurke02 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Hosted by Jimmy Dykes and Chris Burke Produced by Jared Mark Fincher All audio is subject to copyright 2022 Jimmy Dykes Inc. Contact us at coachmeuppodcast@gmail.com

Hoop Dreams The Podcast
Ep.59 - Jim Chones Part 2 - Hoop Dreams The Podcast

Hoop Dreams The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 84:47


EP.59 Wisconsin native and former NBA great, Jim Chones, joins Will Gates and Arthur Agee on the Hoop Dreams Podcast. Jim was an All-American ball player at Marquette University where he wore number 22 (one of the reasons Will Gates chose to wear number 22 at the same school). Jim was only the second player ever to leave college early to go pro when he joined the New York Nets of the ABA, in 1972, where he went on to be a member of the ABA All-Rookie Team. In 1975 he joined the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA where he played 5 seasons before winning a championship with the LA Lakers in 1980. Jim is portrayed by actor Newton Mayenge in Adam McKay's Winning Time on HBO. Jim takes us back to his childhood where he grew up in a tough neighbourhood with a volatile home life and discusses the lessons he learned through the good and bad experiences of dealing with his father. After retiring from the NBA Jim has spent many years as part of the Cleveland Cavaliers broadcast team. Jim has raised 5 children who were all NCAA athletes and his kids are still involved in basketball to this day. His daughter Kaayla played for the Washington Mystics of the WNBA and his daughter Kareeda works for the Milwaukee Bucks. Sit back and listen to a piece of basketball history on this weeks episode. Listen & Subscribe on Apple, Spotify, YouTube and all your podcast platforms.An Unlearning Network ProductionHosted by Will Gates and Arthur AgeeProduced by Matt HoffarWritten by Matt Hoffar, Will Gates and Arthur AgeeEditing by: Matt Savagewww.unlearningnetwork.com

Hustling Sideways
Episode 47: Stu Roche of MyMomentum

Hustling Sideways

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 39:23


Today on Hustling Sideways, Jim Love and Allen Halas talk to Stu Roche, a strength and performance coach at Marquette University athletics. In addition to his job coaching collegiate athletes, Stu also helped to develop MyMomentum, a program that connects newer coaches with opportunities nationwide. Stu talks about his experience growing up in England before discovering collegiate sports while studying abroad in America, how that eventually led him to Marquette, and the development of the program. He also talks about organizing a seminar in the metaverse, and growing the MyMomentum program to be a resource for coaches from all over. Follow us: Allen Halas AllenHalas.com BreakingAndEntering.net Twitter: @AllenHalas Instagram: @AllenHalas Jim Love GoAuthenticYou.com Twitter: @jim_m_love Instagram: @jimmlove23

The Morning Show
Security and extremism on social media

The Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022


The Department of Homeland Security says the U.S. is in a “heightened threat environment” of violent extremist behavior both on and offline. A Marquette University digital ethics expert breaks down the risks and strategies of navigating social media.

Athrabeth
Episode 53: Interview with Dr. Sarah Schaefer and Dr. William Fliss, co-curators of J. R. R. Tolkien: The Art of the Manuscript

Athrabeth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 71:39


Thanks to our guests, Dr. Sarah C. Schaefer and Dr. William M. Fliss, the co-curator's of “J.R.R. Tolkien: The Art of the Manuscript” at the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University. Exhibition dates: August 19 – December 23, 2022Exhibition website: https://www.marquette.edu/haggerty-museum/tolkien.phpDr. Sarah C. SchaeferAssistant Professor, Modern Art, Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin, MilwaukeeFind Sarah on Twitter: @sarahcschaeferWebsite: https://www.sarahcschaefer.com/Check out her book!: “Gustave Doré and the Modern Biblical Imagination” published by Oxford University Press: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/gustave-dor-and-the-modern-biblical-imagination-9780190075811?cc=us&lang=en&Dr. William M. FlissArchivist, Special Collections and University Archives, Raynor Memorial Libraries, Marquette University, Milwaukee Curator of the J. R. R. Tolkien collection at Marquette's Raynor Memorial Library: https://www.marquette.edu/library/archives/tolkien.php  Connect with Bill on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/TolkienMarquetteCheck out The J.R.R. Tolkien Fandom Oral History Collection and schedule your interview with Bill!: https://www.marquette.edu/library/archives/Mss/JRRT/fandomoh.phpExhibition catalog: “J.R.R. Tolkien: The Art of the Manuscript” https://shophaggerty.com/product/j-r-r-tolkien-the-art-of-the-manuscript-catalog-softcover-second-edition/

On The Edge Of Equity
Extraordinary Leadership with Thelma Sias

On The Edge Of Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 18:32


Thelma A. Sias, retired executive and the founder and president of the Sias Group, shares how her childhood and personal story influenced her capacity to lead and why she believes great leadership involves the ability to listen and follow other people. Sias discusses the importance of leading through critical conversations, as well as enabling others to grow as leaders themselves. Importantly, Sias reflects on the remarks she gave when receiving an honorary doctorate from Marquette University in May 2022, during which she charged the audience to create access and opportunity for others, which she believes is how individuals should define their success. Episode Highlights:03:56 - The challenge we are having in today's world, in my opinion, is the fact that we are still struggling with women being in powerful leadership roles. With all of the experience we've had of the success of how women lead, we still struggle with that. And we're still struggling with the issue of younger leaders, leaders that have a different lifestyle. And I think we all need to get over it and understand this message about the table having everyone there, the tent being big enough to include everyone, is significant. We're living in a world that has changed and it continues to change. And if we don't get ourselves ready forward versus constantly going backwards, we're going to delay the enormous progress in this community, in the state, in this world that we need to have.07:42 - My parents were probably the most significant leaders I've ever met in that they led. They took action. They made change happen. They raised 11 kids and sent us all off to college with a combination of athletic and academic scholarships. And they built a principle for us all to work from.17:00 - The resilience to be able to stand up when so many people are pushing you down and the resilience to still believe in yourself when so many people are saying it should not be. Connect with Becky Dubin JenkinsLinkedIn Connect with Thelma SiasLinkedInGuest Bio:Thelma A. Sias is one of Milwaukee's most powerful women because of her leadership and commitment to serve her community. She is proud to be the fifth of 11 children of the late Roosevelt and Pauline Sias, raised on the family farm in Mayersville, Mississippi. Thelma joined Wisconsin Gas (now We Energies) in 1986. In 2003, she was appointed vice president. In 2015, she was named to the Milwaukee Business Journal's 40 Under 40 Hall of Fame; in 2016 to Savoy Magazine's list of Top Influential Women in Corporate America; and in 2017 to the History Makers' Collection at the Library of Congress with the Doug Jansson Leadership Award from the Greater Milwaukee Foundation. In 2018, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Milwaukee Business Journal. In 2022, she received an honorary doctorate from Marquette University. Sias is a board member of the United Way of Greater Milwaukee and Waukesha County, the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Milwaukee, the Sojourner Family Peace Center, and Cardinal Stritch University. Sias is a retired executive and the founder and CEO of the Sias Group LLC.

Empowerography
Finding the Money Through Forensic Accounting with Tracy Coenen S01 EPS402

Empowerography

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 42:03


In the latest episode of the Empowerography Podcast, my guest is Tracy Coenen. Tracy Coenen, CPA, CFF of Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting has spent more than 25 years investigating fraud. Her educational background includes an Honors Bachelor of Arts in Criminology and Law Studies and a Master of Business Administration, both from Marquette University. Tracy is a Certified Public Accountant and holds the designations Certified in Financial Forensics and Master Analyst in Financial Forensics. She has personally completed more than 500 forensic accounting engagements in a wide variety of industries, including cases of embezzlement, financial statement fraud, investment fraud, divorce, and insurance fraud. Tracy has also been named an expert witness in numerous cases involving damage calculations, commercial contract disputes, shareholder disputes and criminal defense, and has testified more than 80 times. Tracy has been an adjunct instructor at Marquette University, adjunct professor at Concordia University, adjunct faculty member for the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), and faculty member for the National Association of Certified Valuators and Analysts (NACVA). She is the author of three books, Expert Fraud Investigation: A Step-by-Step Guide, Essentials of Corporate Fraud, and Lifestyle Analysis in Divorce Cases: Investigating Spending and Finding Hidden Income and Assets. In this episode we discuss accounting, fraud investigation, forensic accounting, fixed fees accounting and divorce. Website - https://www.sequenceinc.com/                 https://www.fraudcoach.com/divorcemoneyguide IG - http://www.instagram.com/divorcemoneyguide FB - https://www.facebook.com/divorcemoneyguide LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracycoenen "In my criminology program in college my sophomore year I took a class called financial crime" - 00:03:08 "Even as far as we've come in our society with equal rights and such" - 00:18:04 "Integrity is what matters most and caring for others and helping others is what matters most" - 00:40:03 Empowerography would like to offer you a discount code to one of our exclusive partners, Quartz & Canary Jewelry & Wellness Co. Please use CODE EMPOWER15 to receive 15% off upon check out at www.quartzandcanary.com. Quartz & Canary is truly the place, where spirituality meets style.

The Commute with Carlson
December 5, 2022 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 107:58


6am hour -- Democrats and Pres. Biden "throwing shade" at Iowa regarding the presidential primary voting, Oregon's Constitutionally shaky M114 running in to trouble even before the court challenge occurs, the story of the weekend is the Twitter documents that disclose the corporate censorship on content that hurt or negatively portrayed Democrats--including Joe Biden--during the 2020 Presidential election, GUEST: attorney Anne Bremner, defense attorney for Pierce Co. Sheriff, Ed Troyer, describes the contention in the criminal trial about what was threatened when Troyer approached what he deemed was a suspicious car in his north Tacoma neighborhood, why there may be one more proverbial shoe to drop in the trial, Oregon's AG wants a delay in voter approved gun-control law M114 that would require a permit to exercise a Constitutional right. 7am hour -- weekend version of the National Anthem by singer Ashanti has the music world buzzing, UW Husky football team will face former head coach--Steve Sarkisian--in Alamo Bowl game versus U. of Texas, Donald Trump's wild suggestions after Twitter documents show that Twitter censored content to benefit Democrats in 2020 and protect candidate Joe Biden from negative publicity, Democrats and Pres. Biden want to remove Iowa as the first vote in 2024 Presidential primary, the irony that Iowa--which is 84% white population--launched the Presidential campaign of Barack Obama isn't Black enough in 2024 for Democrats, new polling by Marquette University asks Republicans and GOP leaning voters who they prefer for President in 2024, the looooong pause before Dr. Anthony Fauci answers a news media question if he'd re-do anything as Director of NAID. 8am hour -- apparently Ye (Kanye West) is still very popular in Seattle after the updated listing of five most streamed music artists on Spotify, and then Bad Bunny makes a KVI debut, how Ye is able to manipulate social media and news outlets for attention to his anti-Semitic, abhorrent behavior; the WA Attorney General's office is under the microscope as the trial against Pierce County Sheriff Ed Troyer begins, the alleged threat in the Troyer encounter with newspaper delivery driver, "Cheap virtue signalling by Gov. and attorney general" doing favors for social justice activists.

As Goes Wisconsin
“Free the nipple on Instagram”

As Goes Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 133:52


Les Miserables. Badgers Volleyball. Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. Things you shouldn't say to people with long covid. (0:28:00) - Les Miserables Associate professor of Romantic literature at Marquette University and a lifelong Les Mis fan, Ben Pladek tells us about the legacy of Les Miserables. You can connect with Ben on Twitter. (0:48:32) - Badgers Volleyball 3X All American Badger Volleyball Alum, Molly Haggerty talks about Badger's volleyball. You can connect with Molly on Twitter and Instagram. (1:11:00) - Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin Bilingual Director of Community Relations at Planned Parenthood in Wisconsin, Alyson Chavez talks about the new community centric model. Connect with PPWI on Twittter, Instagram, and Facebook. (1:33:00) - Things you shouldn't say to people with long Covid Comedian Laura Lyons tells us things you should never say to people with long Covid. You can connect with Laura on Tiktok and Instagram. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Music from today's show can be found on As Goes Wisconsin's Spotify playlist. We love hearing from you! Got a topic you think we should cover? Have an idea for a guest we should have on? Want to leave us feedback? Let us know! Civic Media

As Goes Wisconsin
Interview: Ben Pladek

As Goes Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 23:36


Associate professor of Romantic literature at Marquette University and a lifelong Les Mis fan, Ben Pladek tells us about the legacy of Les Miserables.Civic Media

Canada Hoops
Ep 38: Katherine Plouffe

Canada Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 60:58


Katherine Plouffe, former SWNT player, Olympian and now 3X3 player for Canada Basketball, pulls up on Canada Hoops! Katherine sits down with your boy Matty to share her incredible basketball career and story thus far. Katherine talks about growing up playing the game in Edmonton, alongside her twin sister Michelle, playing at NEDA and her twist of fate when it came time to commit to Marquette University. Katherine tells us about her memories at Marquette, playing professionally in France and of course Katherine talks about what it means to represent Canada Basketball. Katherine became an Olympian in 2016 when she represented Canada at the Rio Olympics; but it was a grind to make that team and Katherine shares her story of hard work and perseverance. And you know Katherine drops a great Top 5 of all time for Canada basketball on us. Much love to Katherine Plouffe for joining us on Canada Hoops!Canada Hoops Podcast is presented by and partnered with betstamp. betstamp: Bet. Like a Pro.betstamp.appHit us up on Twitter: @canadahoopspod @TheMattyIrelandHit us up on Instagram: @canadahoopspodcastEmail: canadahoopspodcast@gmail.comhttps://canadahoopspodcast.buzzsprout.com/

On The Edge Of Equity
Unbought and Unbothered with Dr. Howard Fuller

On The Edge Of Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 29:14


Civil rights activist and education reform advocate Dr. Howard Fuller shares his powerful thoughts about what being unbought and unbothered mean to him – and what does bother him. Dr. Fuller also shares his approach to having conversations with people with whom you fundamentally disagree and why words have such power, including importantly with the students who attend the charter school he founded, Dr. Howard Fuller Collegiate Academy. Tune in to this remarkable conversation with a once-in-a-generation leader.Episode Highlights: 02:20 - I've always tried to make sure that I represented what I believed in, no matter what the consequences are. And I've always tried to be both honest with myself and with the people that I represent and the people that I'm talking to. And so in that sense, I've never seen myself as someone who could be bought off, someone who you could tell me what to say, versus I'm going to say what I believe, and then everybody has to deal with it. I have to deal with it. The people who are listening to me have to deal with it. But I always wanted people to know that whatever it is I said, it's what I believe. 13:49 -The reality is no one wants to feel unimportant. I mean, in fact, sometimes when a kid is going off in a classroom or in a building, sometimes it's because they're trying to say, "Look at me." They're trying to figure out a way for who they are to become relevant. 16:22 - Never be afraid to make mistakes, the only way you cannot make mistakes is not to do anything. And so, in my view of the world, none of us are perfect. So, no matter what it is we do, there's the potential of mistakes. I've made a zillion mistakes in my life, but I'm never going to let the possibility of being an error stop you from pushing forward. 31:44 - What I'm trying to say to young people is success is not leaving the place that you came from. Success is leaving the place that you came from, and then coming back to that place and making a significant difference.Connect with Becky Dubin JenkinsLinkedIn Connect with Dr. Howard FullerWebsite Guest Bio:Dr. Howard Fuller is a legendary activist and reformer. Born in Louisiana, he was raised in Milwaukee and has centered his life's work in education reform and the school choice movement. Dr. Fuller's career includes many years in both public service positions and the field of education. He is the founder of the Institute for the Transformation of Learning at Marquette University, whose mission is to support exemplary education options that transform learning for children, while empowering families, particularly low-income families, to choose the best options for their children.Immediately before his appointment at Marquette University, Dr. Fuller served as the superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools from 1991-95. His prior positions included: director of the Milwaukee County Department of Health and Human Services 1988 -1991; dean of general education at the Milwaukee Area Technical College 1986 – 1988; secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Employment Relations 1983 – 1986; and associate director of the Educational Opportunity Program at Marquette University 1979 – 1983. He was also a senior fellow with the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University 1995 – 1997.He has received numerous awards and recognition over the years, including four Honorary Doctorate Degrees: a Doctorate of Humane Letters from

On The Edge Of Equity
Leading with a Belief Mindset with Nick Dillon

On The Edge Of Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 24:29


Speaker, trainer and professional coach Nick Dillon – the Believe Coach – shares how critically important a belief mindset is in our professional and personal journeys, importantly the need to disrupt patterns and thoughts that don't serve you. Dillon shares his daily mantras, the importance of expressing gratitude and the need for leaders to leverage their emotional intelligence. He places a strong emphasis on showing empathy and compassion and accepting the fact that humans are imperfect. Listen in to hear Dillon's wise counsel about the importance of belief. Episode Highlights: 01:33 - Life is all about beliefs and beliefs are what I call accepted truths. And so, when we are leading our lives very intentionally versus just living, then we're leading with a very intentional belief mindset. 09:24 - One of the things that I have is I have my mantras. And so, my mantra each morning is waking up, because I get on the treadmill, because I still got some health challenges. So, I try to get on the treadmill and I exercise. And I take those moments and in those moments, and I would encourage us to do this – those are moments of mindfulness. Those are moments of shining the flashlight in the corners of your mental mindset in search of things that you don't want in there. 18:16 - One of the big things that I often say is that if someone tells me they're stuck, if someone tells me, "I'm having challenges getting a promotion. I'm having challenges to get a job. I'm having challenges with my team. I'm having challenges in the relationship," any type of scenario I just gave you, and I can go on and on and on, it's always going to tie you back to some sort of belief and mindset that they're bringing to that situation. Connect with Becky Dubin JenkinsLinkedIn Connect with Nick DillonWebsite Guest Bio:Inspirational, innovative and empowering are only a few words that define the character of Nicholas Dillon. An entrepreneur, Dillon is on a mission to pursue his passion and build a legacy of influence.Thousands of individuals from the community to corporate America have learned from Dillon's insights on leadership and professional development, entrepreneurship, and personal empowerment.“My dad always had an entrepreneurial spirit, and my mom encouraged me to be the best I can be in life because average will never get noticed or recognized,” says Dillon, who later in life took the leap of faith to pursue his education and the world of self-improvement to become a Certified Life Coach and counselor.A Milwaukee native, Dillon holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communication and a Master in Adult Education from Marquette University and the University of Phoenix, respectively. He also completed an additional Master's degree in Counseling from the University of Wisconsin–Platteville and is enrolled in post-graduate doctoral studies in Behavioral Psychology.Dillon initially launched his professional career in the field of insurance and risk management. His career has placed him in front of business executives, which served as a launching pad for the multifaceted professional he has become.

The Investigation Game
76. Criminal Defense Casework | Tracy Coenen & Mary Breslin

The Investigation Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 35:13


This summer while at the ACFE Global Fraud Conference several speakers and friends of the podcast got together to play an escape room. Before and after the escape room adventure, Leah found herself engrossed in stories from investigators around the US and didn't want the conversation to end. It was these valuable conversations that inspired the format for the next 6 episodes of the podcast. For the remainder of 2022, Leah is joined by investigators to share case stories from investigations worked in a variety of areas. In this episode, Leah is joined by Tracy Coenen CPA, CFF, MAFF and Mary Breslin, CFE, CIA who discuss cases involving criminal defense.Data Sleuth: Using Data in Forensic Accounting Engagements and Fraud Investigations by Leah Wietholter, CFE, PI, CPAWhen Leah joined the financial investigation industry over 15 years ago, her goal was to work as many cases as possible, but getting those first few cases felt extremely challenging with questions like, “How do I get the casework without the experience? And how do I get the experience without the casework? And when I get the casework, will I know what to do?”Based on her experience of working over 200 cases in her career, she wrote Data Sleuth® to help others facing this very problem. It is the book she needed so many years ago. In this book, she explains how to start a financial investigation from case planning, to finding best evidence, to incorporating non-financial evidence – like interviews and open source intelligence, and ultimately, how to put it all together for clients or even law enforcement with step by step details and case examples. If you want to gain confidence in financial investigations to build your case experience, you need to read Leah's book. Data Sleuth® is available on Amazon, Goodreads, or wherever you like to buy books!Tracy Coenen CPA, CFF, MAFFTracy has been investigating fraud for more than 25 years, but she didn't always want to be a forensic accountant. With a dream of one day being a prison warden, Tracy went to Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI to get a criminology degree. A class on financial crime investigations reminded her how much she loved Encyclopedia Brown books as a kid. She continued her criminology degree, but added accounting and economics courses so she could sit for the CPA exam. Tracy is a Certified Public Accountant and holds the designations Certified in Financial Forensics and Master Analyst in Financial Forensics.Now, Tracy is finding money in cases of corporate fraud, high net worth divorce, and other financial shenanigans.Connect with Tracy: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracycoenen/ Website: http://sequenceinc.com/Mary Breslin, CFE, CIAMary Breslin is the Founder of Verracy and an internationally recognized speaker and training facilitator for Internal Audit, Risk and Fraud. When she is not speaking publicly or facilitating trainings, Ms. Breslin conducts fraud investigations and provides management consulting for internal audit and fraud.Ms. Breslin has over 25 years of experience in Internal Audit, Fraud, Accounting and Management, including working for global companies like Costco, Barclay's Capital, ConocoPhillips, and Boart Longyear. She has implemented and managed audit programs in more than 50 countries. Additionally, she has led fraud investigations in numerous countries spanning six continents.Ms. Breslin attended Rutgers University and University of Phoenix. She is a Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) and a Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE).Connect with Mary: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marybreslin/ Website: http://www.verracy.com/Connect with Workman Forensics Youtube: @WorkmanForensics LinkedIn: @workmanforensics Subscribe and listen to this and more episodes of The Investigation Game on Apple Podcasts, Android, or anywhere you listen.

Leading Equity
LE 272: A Literacy Action Plan from Birth to Six with Maya Payne Smart

Leading Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 22:55


Order the Leading Equity Book Today! Maya Payne Smart Maya Payne Smart is a writer, parent educator, and literacy advocate who has served on the boards of numerous library and literacy organizations. She and her family live in Milwaukee, where she serves as affiliated faculty in educational policy and leadership in the College of Education at Marquette University. Her website, MayaSmart.com, provides tips and tools for parents to nurture, teach, and advocate for kids on the road to reading. Show Highlights What Maya wishes teachers would have told her as parent to a young child Questions guardians can ask Progress monitoring for teachers and communication with guardians Top 6 Levers Parent/Guardian advocacy strategies The importance of partnerships between the school and the home Connect with Maya Website Twitter Facebook Book: Reading for Our Lives: A Literacy Action Plan from Birth to Six Additional Resources Book Dr. Eakins Amplifying Student Voices Program Watch The Art of Advocacy Show Learn more about our Student Affinity Groups Free Course on Implicit Bias 20 Diversity Equity and Inclusion Activities FREE AUDIO COURSE: Race, Advocacy, and Social Justice Studies

Pat McCurdy's Song of the Week

Performed by Yipes!. Recorded at Marquette University 12/78.

The Sports Mecca Podcast
Ep. 93: Jared Humphrey Interview

The Sports Mecca Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 24:15


Marquette University track & field athlete Jared Humphrey joins the show. Jared talks about how he's felt mentally and physically during a 2-year break of competing. In addition, he speaks on his decision to transfer plus his excitement to finally compete again in 2023. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Education Suspended
Lessons From Oma

Education Suspended

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 22:58


In today's episode we connect with my favorite guest, ever. My mom. (Yes, I'm biased). Oma, began teaching in 1958 and she sits down with us and shares some of her biggest lessons learned as an educator. She talks about the importance of having a holistic lens and reflects on how she leaned into her teaching community for creativity and inspiration. Joanne Pfeiffer, also known as Oma, is a retired college professor. Joanne has her Masters in Education, from Marquette University, and taught at Grandview College, in Des Moines, Iowa, for over 40 years. She is currently a Healing Touch Practitioner, working in Hospice facilities. Besides all this, her greatest accomplishment is raising Pfeiffer, and not messing her up too bad, kidding...but seriously. Intro song: Poet's Row, Young Bones

As Goes Wisconsin
Dan Shafer takes over

As Goes Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 133:54


Dan Shafer of The Recombobulation Area takes over. The Bucks. The midterms & misinformation. 1,000 Friends of Wisconsin. Anthony Chergosky joins. (00:28:32) - The Bucks The Milwaukee Bucks beat writer at The Athletic, Eric Nehm joins to talk about the impressive start to The Bucks season. You can connect with Eric on Twitter and Instagram. (00:49:20) - The midterms & misinformation Professor in the Department of Political Science at Marquette University, Amanda Heideman talks about the midterm elections and the role of misinformation. You can connect with Amanda on Twitter. (1:11:12)- 1,000 Friends of Wisconsin Transportation Policy Director at 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Gregg May tells us about expansion of I-94. You can stay connect with 1000 Friends of Wisconsin on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. (1:33:26) - Anthony Chergosky joins Assistant Professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Anthony Chergosky talks about the midterms and Western Wisconsin. You can connect with Anthony on Twitter. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Music from today's show can be found on As Goes Wisconsin's Spotify playlist. We love hearing from you! Got a topic you think we should cover? Have an idea for a guest we should have on? Want to leave us feedback? Let us know! Civic Media

As Goes Wisconsin
Interview: Amanda Heideman

As Goes Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 20:36


Professor in the Department of Political Science at Marquette University, Amanda Heideman talks about the midterm elections and the role of misinformation.Civic Media

Sports Rush with Brett Rump
Hour 1: Mike Carmin

Sports Rush with Brett Rump

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 43:06


Mike Carmin from The Lafayette Journal & Courier joins The Sports Rush to discuss Purdue Basketball's win last night over Marquette University -- as well as a few of the standout players from the game including freshman Braden Smith. He also discusses Purdue Football with Brett as the Boilermakers can potentially win the Big 10 West. We also talk about a few of the most exciting college basketball games from last night including Michigan State against Kentucky and Kansas and Duke. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights
Leadership Lens: ManpowerGroup CEO Jonas Prising on learning from team sports and COVID's lasting impact on work

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 44:16


Jonas Prising, chairman and CEO of Milwaukee-based ManpowerGroup joins Marquette University president Michael Lovell and BizTimes managing editor Arthur Thomas to talk about leading a global organization and where labor markets are headed on the latest episode of Leadership Lens. Their conversation touches on lessons Jonas takes from playing hockey, how the COVID-19 pandemic will shape the world of work, and the importance of empowering decision makers throughout an organization. 

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Sometimes the little guy just doesn't cut it.Let Me Run This By You: Time's a wastin' - giddyup, beggars and choosers.Interview: We talk to star of Parks and Recreation, Easter Sunday, and Barry - Rodney To about Chicago, Marquette University, Lane Tech,  getting discovered while pursuing a Chemistry degree, The Blues Brothers, Dürrenmatt's The Physicists, playing children well into adulthood, interning at Milwaukee Rep, Lifeline Theatre, Steppenwolf, doing live industrials for Arthur Anderson, Asian American actors and their representation in the media, IAMA Theatre Company, Kate Burton, and faking a Singaporean accent.FULL TRANSCRIPT (UNEDITED):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth RAMIREZ2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand2 (15s):It. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (30s):How's your, how's your eighties decor going for your1 (35s):New house? Okay, well we closed yesterday. Well,2 (39s):Congratulations.1 (40s):Thank you. House buying is so weird. Like we close, we funded yesterday, but we can't record till today because my lender like totally dropped the ball. So like, here's the thing. Sometimes when you wanna support like a small, I mean small, I don't know, like a small bank, like I really liked the guy who is the mortgage guy and he has his own bank and all these things. I don't even, how know how this shit works. It's like, but anyway, they were so like, it was a real debacle. It was a real, real Shannon situation about how they, anyway, my money was in the bank in escrow on Friday.1 (1m 20s):Their money that they're lending us, which we're paying in fucking fuck load of interest on is they couldn't get it together. And I was like, Oh no.2 (1m 29s):They're like, We have to look through the couch cushions,1 (1m 31s):Right? That's what it felt like, Gina. It felt like these motherfuckers were like, Oh shit, we didn't actually think this was gonna happen or something. And so I talked to escrow, my friend Fran and escrow, you know, I make friends with the, with the older ladies and, and she was like, I don't wanna talk bad about your lender, but like, whoa. And I was like, Fran, Fran, I had to really lay down the law yesterday and I needed my office mate, Eileen to be witness to when I did because I didn't really wanna get too crazy, but I also needed to get a little crazy. And I was like, Listen, what you're asking for, and it was true, does not exist. They needed one. It was, it was like being in the, in the show severance mixed with the show succession, mixed with, it was like all the shows where you're just like, No, no, what you're asking for doesn't exist and you wanna document to look a certain way.1 (2m 25s):And Chase Bank doesn't do a document that way. And she's like, Well she said, I don't CH bank at Chase, so I don't know. And I said, Listen, I don't care where you bank ma'am, I don't care. But this is Chase Bank. It happens to be a very popular bank. So I'm assuming other people have checking accounts that you deal with at Chase. What I'm telling, she wanted me to get up and go to Chase Bank in person and get a printout of a certain statement period with an http on the bottom. She didn't know what she was talking about. She didn't know what she was talking about. And she was like, 18, 18. And I said, Oh ma'am, if you could get this loan funded in the next, cuz we have to do it by 11, that would be really, really dope.1 (3m 6s):I'm gonna hang up now before I say something very bad. And then I hung up.2 (3m 10s):Right, Right. Yeah. Oh my God, I know. It's the worst kind of help. And regarding like wanting to support smaller businesses, I what, that is such a horrible sadness. There's, there's no sadness. Like the sadness of really investing in the little guy and having it. That was my experience. My big experience with that was going, having a midwife, you know, with my first child. And I really, I was in that whole thing of that, that time was like, oh, birth is too medicalized. And you know, even though my husband was a doctor, like fuck the fuck the medical establishment we're just, but but didn't wanna, like, I didn't wanna go, as my daughter would say, I didn't wanna be one of those people who, what did she say?2 (3m 52s):You know, one of those people who carry rocks to make them feel better.1 (3m 57s):That's amazing. Super.2 (4m 0s):So I didn't wanna go so far as to be one of those rock carrying people to have the birth at my house, but at the same time I really wanted to have this midwife and then there was a problem and she wasn't equipped to deal with it. And it was,1 (4m 11s):I was there,2 (4m 13s):Fyi. Yes, you were1 (4m 15s):The first one, right? For your first one.2 (4m 16s):The first one.1 (4m 18s):Here's the thing you're talking about this, I don't even remember her ass. What I, she, I don't remember nothing about her. If you had told me you didn't have one, I'd be like, Yeah, you didn't have one. I remember the problem and I remember them having to get the big, the big doctor and I remember a lot of blood and I remember thinking, Oh thank God there's this doctor they got from down the hall to come or wherever the hell they were and take care of this problem because this gene is gonna bleed out right here. And none of us know what to do.2 (4m 50s):Yes. I will never forget the look on your face. You and Erin looking at each other trying to do that thing where you're like, It's fine, it's fine. But you're such a bad liar that, that I could, I just took one look at you. I'm like, Oh my God, I'm gonna fucking bleed out right here. And Aaron's going, No, no, no, it's cool, it's cool, it's cool. And then of course he was born on July 25th and all residents start their residency on July 1st. So you know, you really don't wanna have a baby or have surgery in July cuz you're getting at a teaching hospital cuz you're getting a lot of residents. And this woman comes in as I'm bleeding and everything is going crazy and I haven't even had a chance to hold my baby yet. And she comes up to me and she says, Oh cuz the, the midwife ran out of lidocaine. There was no lidocaine.2 (5m 30s):That's right. They were trying to sew me up without lidocaine. And so this nurse comes in, she puts her hand on my shoulder, she says, Hi, I'm Dr. Woo and I'm, and I said, Dr. W do you have any lidocaine? I need some lidocaine stat right up in there. Gimme some lidocaine baby. And she had to call her boss. You know who I could tell when he came in, of course he was a man and I could tell when he came in, he looks at my midwife and is like, Oh, this is what you did here. I see we have to come in and clean up. But sometimes that's the case. Sometimes it's really just true that, you know, it's that the, that the bigger kind of like more corporate option is better cuz it just works better.1 (6m 8s):Well, and they've done this before, like there is, they've done the job before in a way, and they've seen the problems. They know how to troubleshoot in a way because they just have the fucking experience. Now you could say that getting that experience is like super fucked up and patriarchal and, and all the isms, it's, and you'd be right, but when you are bleeding to death or when you know you are in a big financial negotiation that could go south at any moment and lead to not having a ho like a all feeling lost. You want someone who knows how to fucking troubleshoot, dude. Like, come on. And I, you know, and it is sad, it's heartbreaking when you like, fuck man.1 (6m 50s):I really wanted this, like Dr. Altman always said, and I have an update on Dr. Altman, my favorite psychiatrist mentor of mine. But he always said like, well when I was going through med titration, when they put this dingling at Highland Park Hospital, who tried her best but put me on lithium thinking I was bipolar and then I was and all the meds, right? All the meds. And he's like, well they could've worked2 (7m 15s):It could've worked it1 (7m 17s):All's. And I was like, you are right. So like, it could've worked, it could've gone differently, but it just didn't. So it's like, yeah, it's better to look at it like that because, or else it's just infuriating that it didn't work in the first place, Right? Like, you're like, well fucker, Well they tried.2 (7m 35s):Yeah. I use that all the time that it could have worked. Things that I got through you from Dr. Altman, you know, my husband is having like some major, you know, growth moments. Like come like those moments where all the puzzle pieces become clear and you go, Okay, my childhood isn't what I thought it was and this person has got this and this person has got that. Yes. You know? And, and whenever he's doing the thing that we all do, which is like lamenting the life, the family he wish he had had, I always say like, well, as Dr. Almond says, it could have worked. Yes, these parents could have been just fine for you if you were a different person, but you're you.2 (8m 16s):And so, and they're them and it wasn't a good match. And like that happens sometimes.1 (8m 21s):And I think it's really good with kids maybe too. Cause it's like, listen, like, like I say to my niece, like it could, this could have been whatever it is the thing or my nephew too that worked and like that you loved volleyball or that you loved this. Like you are just looking, and I think it's all about titration, right? Like it's all about figuring out where we fit in, where we belong, where we don't. And it's a fucking process, which is what he was saying and like, and that you don't, we don't get it right the first time. Even in medicine, even in it's maybe especially in medicine, maybe in especially in relationships, like, so it, it also opens the door for like, possibility, right? That like, it's an experiment and like, we don't know, even doctors don't know, Hey, run this by you, Miles did of course.1 (9m 14s):And done. What about you? What about you?2 (9m 17s):I'm gonna do it after this, after we're done recording today, I'm gonna go over and I always like to take one of my kids so they, you know, see that this is the process and you have to do it and it's everybody's responsibilities to do it. That doesn't mean that I didn't get all angry at my own party this week. You know, my mom has a great expression. I think it's her expression. She says it. In any case, all politics is local, right? Like where it really, where the really meets the road is what's happening in your backyard. And like, I have a lot of problems with my town,1 (9m 52s):So Right.2 (9m 53s):They don't wanna have, you know, they voted down this measure to put a a, like a sober living place, wanted to take up residence here. Couldn't think of a greater idea. Nobody wanted it. You know, it's a lot of nis not in my backyarders over here. And it really drives me crazy. And in the, in the paper this week, there was a big scandal because there's this particular like committee in our town, Okay. That was in charge of, there was gonna be this, what is it, like a prize maybe or an honor or not a scholarship Okay. But something where they were gonna have to name it.2 (10m 33s):Okay. And they were, you know, really looking around for names. They were trying to think up what names would be appropriate. And somebody put forward the name of this person who is already kind of a named figure in our town. Like, we had this beautiful fountain, it's named after him. He was, he was a somewhat of a big guy, you know, he was an architect, whatever. Sure. So this name gets put forward in this woman who's on this committee says, I don't think this is a great time to name something after an old white man. Now, to me couldn't be a more reasonable thing in the world to say everybody's calling for her resignation. And these, you know, the thing that I hate the most about, not just conservatives, but it seems like it's especially conservatives.2 (11m 20s):I hate this saying. And I remember, I think I've said this before on the podcast, I remember hearing some black activists saying a lot of white, you know, a lot of racism perpetrated by white people is like founded on pretending. Pretending like you don't see color pretending like, you know, saying things like, Oh, well why would you have had that experience, you know, walking down our street at night? Like, or why would you have had that difficulty getting that job? I don't understand. And pretending like they don't know that this person just got1 (11m 51s):That job because of2 (11m 52s):The color biscuit and that kind kind of a thing. So of course the way that people are coming down on this woman is to say, Well, I don't know about you, but I was taught that we have to look beyond race and we have to recognize the person before the color of their skin. And if you can't be, you know, representing the needs of white men, then I just don't really think that you, there's a place on this council. And of course, you know, somebody who I know and have in the past really respected was quoted in this article as saying, Oh, somebody who considers himself like a staunch liberal. Yeah. I mean, I just really can't think of any people of note from our town who weren't white men.2 (12m 34s):Sure. And this motherfucker let himself be quoted in our newspaper as saying this. Now maybe he feels fine about it. Maybe he doesn't think there's anything wrong with it. But I I I think it's completely, completely disgusting. Of course. So then I went and I just did this research of like all the people who have lived in our town historically, they're not just white men. We, there's other people to choose from. Needless1 (12m 58s):To say. Yeah. Well also, like, it's so interesting. I mean, it's just that that quote just is so problematic on so many levels. It like goes so deep. But like the other thing is like, maybe they miss, the only thing I can think of is that dude, did they miss the second half of your quote? Which was, and that's a problem. Like, like if, if you can't, if you can't finish that quote with, you know, I can't really think of like anyone of note in our being or anyone being recognized in our town in this way that wasn't a white dude and that's really crazy. We should really reevaluate how we're doing things here.1 (13m 39s):Period. You're so2 (13m 41s):To offer, you're so, you're so sweet to offer him this benefit of the doubt. Of course I don't offer that to him because this is a person who, you know, there's been a few people in my life who I've had the opportunity to, you know, know what they say privately and then know what they say publicly. Right? And I, and I know this, you know, I know this person personally. And no, it doesn't surprise me at all that, that that would've been the entirety of the quote. It would've been taken out of context. Now it might have been, and I don't know, and I'm not, I'm not gonna call him up to ask him, but you know, at a minimum you go on the local Facebook page and say, I was misquoting.1 (14m 20s):No, no, yeah. Chances are that this, this person just said this. And actually the true crime is not realizing if, if, if that's the case, that they, that that statement is problematic. So that's really fucked up. And also, like, think of all the native people that were on that land, on our land. Like, you're gonna tell me that just because you haven't done, they haven't done the research. They don't think that a native person from the northeast did something of greatness. Shut up, man. Excellent. Before it was rich.2 (14m 56s):Excellent point, Excellent point. Maybe when I write to my letter to the editor, maybe I'll quote you on that because Yeah, yeah. It's like, it's so, it's just, and I'm, by the way, I'm, I have been, I'm sure I'm still am guilty of the same thing too, of just being the laziness of like, well, I don't know, we'd love to, you know, hire a person of color, but none have applied. I mean, I have definitely said things like that and I just understand differently now I understand. No, no, no, they're not gonna be at the top of the pile of resumes that you're gonna get because historically these people haven't felt like there's a place for them at your table. So what you have to do is go above and beyond and say, we are specifically recruiting people of color for this position. I understand.1 (15m 35s):And how about even like, do some research online and find out who those people are and try to like, hire them away from wherever they are to and make them a great offer. You know what I mean? Like all those things. Well,2 (15m 48s):This experience did cause me to go on my little Wikipedia and look up, you know, people who have lived here and I was really like, surprised to learn how many people have known. Now it's true to say that, you know, when, when you're just looking up a list of famous people, it is gonna mostly be white men because that's who mostly, you know, sort of, she made, made history, made the news, whatever. But yeah, one of the very first things that come up, comes up when you look it up my town on Wikipedia, is that the fact that this was the Ramapo tribe that lived here. You know, this is who we took the land away from. I was also surprised to that.1 (16m 29s):I've never,2 (16m 30s):Yeah, Yeah. It was also interesting to learn, supposedly according to this, how many people of live here currently, including people like Harvey Firestein, who I have, I've never seen around town, but God I would really love to. And like some other, you know, sort of famous people. But anyway, That's1 (16m 50s):So cool.2 (16m 51s):Yeah. So, so I will be voting after this and I really, I don't have a great feeling about the election, but I'm, you know, I'm just like, what can you do? You can just sort of go forward and, you know, stick to your values. Yeah. I mean,1 (17m 7s):The thing is, stick to your values, move forward. And like my aunt, happy birthday, Tia, it's her birthday today, and she is like super depressed that, you know, she, she said, what she says is like, fascism is really, today is the day that we really something about fascism, it's like really dire and like really, Okay. So my, it's so interesting that I think boomers feel really bad because they had it so good, even though it wasn't really good, there was an illusion of goodness. Right? So I, I am depressed. But here's the thing, and I was, I was gonna bring this up to you.1 (17m 47s):It's like I, I had an experience last night where I went to this theater and saw the small theater, which I really wanna do my solo show in which is this famous theater called The Hayworth, which is, they show silent movies and all, but there's now it's like an improv sort of venue and, and it's really cute and throwbacky. But anyway, I went there and I just was thinking like, as I was watching these performers, like, oh, it is not even that, Like, it's literally that I spent 45 years thinking that I was worse than everybody else, right? And so now that I don't really think that, I actually don't have that much time left to accomplish what I would like to accomplish. So I, I spent all this time feeling like I couldn't do what she's doing.1 (18m 29s):I can't do what he's doing, can't do what theirs doing. They're, they are doing because I'm not good enough. Like literally. And now I'm like, Oh my God, I'm good enough. I have things to say. I really wanna leave a legacy. And literally the clock is ticking. Now, I'm not saying I'm running around like a nut, but what I'm saying is like, I, I, I do feel that I literally don't have the time left to participate in half-assed measures of art or whatever we're gonna do. We gotta make it purposeful because I w i, I spent all this time getting ready 45 years to not hate myself. And now the clock is ticking, I donate myself and there are things to do.1 (19m 13s):That's literally how I feel. So then when I see art or something where I'm like, Why are you using your platform this way? What are you talking about? What are you saying? Oh no, I can't, I even now I know why people leave movies early, plays early if it is, and some, for me anyway, like some people probably just assholes and like the, the person on stage doesn't look cute and they're out or whatever, but, or they're having panic attacks like I used to and I have to leave. But like, mostly I understand where it's like this is wasting my, my time, time I could be using to sort of plant seeds that may do something to be of service.1 (19m 53s):So I'm gonna jet and good luck to you. But yeah, it's the first, I just really feel like time is of the essence. And I always thought that was such a stupid thing that old people said, which was, you know, time is our most precious commodity. And I was always like, that is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. And now I'm like, oh shit. Yeah, it's really true Dude.2 (20m 15s):Yeah. Yeah. I actually had an experience some that I relate to with that, which is that, you know, I, I volunteered to be part of this festival of one act and you know, the thing we were supposed to do is read all of the submissions and then pick our top three. And then they were gonna do this rank order thing where they're attempting to put each director with one of their top three choices. Well, I read, it was like 10 plays I read them and I, I didn't have three, three ch choices. There was only one play that I felt frankly was worth my time.2 (20m 56s):And I felt really uncomfortable about having that feeling. And I was doing all of the like, who do you think you are? And you know, it's, you haven't directed something in three years and beggars can't be choosers in the whole thing. And I just thought, you know, I know what I'm gonna do if I don't stand up for whatever it is I think I can do here is I'm gonna resent the thing that I get, you know, pitted with and then I'm gonna do something self-destructive or I'm gonna kind of like blow up the relationship and I don't wanna do that. So I spend a lot of time thinking about how I was gonna write this email back saying basically like, I don't have three choices. I only have one choice. And I understand if you don't want to give that to me that this, I might not be a good fit for you.2 (21m 37s):You know? But I really, I really kind of sweated over it because when you don't, you know, when you're a very, if I was an extremely established theater director, you know, I wouldn't have thought twice about it. But I'm not, I'm trying to be established here and I, you know, so my, my, my go-to has always been well having opinions and choices and stuff like that is for people who, you know, have more than you do or have more to offer than you do. And it doesn't always work out that when you kind of say, This is me and take me or leave me. It doesn't always work out. But in this case it doesn't. They gave me my first choice. And so I'm, I'm happy about that, but there's a lot.2 (22m 18s):Thank you. Thank you. Yeah, there's a lot that just goes into the, it's all just work I have to do on myself. Like, I have this, a way of thinking about things is like, I have to do this work with this other person or I have to convince them why it has nothing to do with that. It's just that I have to do this.1 (22m 34s):Well that's what I'm realizing, like Gina, Absolutely. And good for you for like, coming at it from a place of like, okay, like this might not work, but I have to do it to see and put it out there and it may not work and they may say, go fuck yourself. But the alternative one is resentment, but also is like, hmm, not doing anybody else any favors either. If you aren't saying like, I actually don't have three choices here, I'm not gonna do justice. And I also, it brings me to my other thing, which I thought was so full of shit, which is so true. It's like most things are just not, it's about not being a right fit. It's not about you're bad and I'm good, I'm good and you're bad.1 (23m 15s):It's like, this is not a good match. And I, I think it just takes what it takes to learn that it is a not, it's about a matching situation. So like you knew that like those other two wouldn't be good matches and you wouldn't do a service to them or yourself. And it's not, And also like this thing about beggars can't be choosers. I fucking think it's so dumb because like most of us are beggars all the time and, and we, we settle for garbage. And it doesn't, like, I feel like we can, like beggars should be more choosy. And I also feel like, I'm not saying not be humble, but like, fuck you if you take away our choices, like we have to have choices.1 (23m 57s):That's the thing. It's like beggars have choices, whatever you call a beggar, we still have choices. Like how we're gonna interact and how and how we're gonna send emails and shit. I'm just like,2 (24m 9s):Yeah. Plus that whole phrase is so like, in a way rooted in this kind of like terrible supremacy structure that we're trying to fight against, which is like, we wanna tell, of course we wanna tell beggars that they can't be choosers cuz we just, we don't wanna think about them as people who have the same agency in life as we do.1 (24m 25s):Sure. And now I've started saying to people when I have this conversation about like, about unhoused, people like having tent encampments and I get it, like, you're going to school, you're walking your kid to Montessori and there's a fucking tent encampment in your front yard. You did not pay for that. You did not sign up for that. You are, I get it. And also my question is, what are we gonna do when the tents outnumber the people in homes? Because then it's a real fucking problem. So like, how are we gonna do that? You think it's uncomfortable? I think it's uncomfortable to walk by a tent encampment as I'm on my way to a coffee date with someone or whatever.1 (25m 8s):That's uncomfortable. But what are we gonna do when, like in India, the, the quote slums or whatever people, you know, whatever people choose to call it, outnumber the goddamn people in the towers. Then we, then it's gonna be a different problem.2 (25m 35s):Today on the podcast, we were talking to Rodney Toe. Rodney is an actor, you know him from Parks and Recreation, Barry good girls Rosewood. He was in a film this summer called Easter Sunday. Anyway, he's a delight. He's also a professor of theater at USC and he's charming and wonderful and we know you are going to love listening to him as much as we loved talking to him. So please enjoy our conversation with Rodney Toe.3 (26m 8s):Can you hear me? Can you hear me okay?2 (26m 11s):Yes, you sound great. You sound1 (26m 13s):Happy. No echo. You have beautiful art behind you. We can't ask for a2 (26m 17s):Better Easter Sunday. We were just talking about Easter Sunday, so we're gonna have to ask you Oh sure about it, Beth. But first I have to say congratulations, Rodney tell you survive theater school.3 (26m 28s):Oh, thank you. Yes, I did. I sure did. Was2 (26m 31s):It usc? Did you go to3 (26m 32s):Usc? No, I, I'm a professor. I'm currently a professor at usc. So1 (26m 36s):We just assumed you went there, but where did you go3 (26m 38s):To No, no, no, no, no. I, that, that came about like in a roundabout way, but no, I, I totally, I went, went to Marquette University. Oh, in Milwaukee?1 (26m 46s):In Milwaukee. Oh my gosh. Yeah. So3 (26m 48s):Everybody's reaction, everybody's reactions like, well1 (26m 53s):I actually love Mil, I'm from Chicago and Evanston you do and then you are,3 (26m 58s):Yeah, born and raised north side. My family's still there. What1 (27m 1s):The hell? How did I not know this? Yeah, I'm from Evanston, but lived in Rogers Park and went to, we went to DePaul.3 (27m 7s):Well I hear the park. Yes, yes. Born and raised. My family's still there. I am a Chicago, I'm an undying Chicago and through and through. Yeah.1 (27m 15s):Wait a minute. So, so, okay, okay, okay. So you grew up on the north, you grew up in, on the north side.3 (27m 20s):Yeah, I grew up in, I, I grew up and I went to Lane Tech. Oh1 (27m 24s):My gosh, that's where my niece goes right this very minute. She goes, Yeah,3 (27m 28s):It's1 (27m 28s):Quite the school. I dunno how it was when you went, but it went through a hard time and now it's like one of these3 (27m 34s):Go, I mean when I went it was, it was still considered a magnet school. And I I, you know, I think like in like it went maybe through a period of like, sort of like shifting, but then it's like now it's an incredible school. I'm September 17th is apparently Rodney to day at Lane 10. No, Yeah, it just happened. I mean it's, it's silly. It's Easter significance. No, cause of Easter Sunday they did like a bunch of, you know, I do a lot of advocacy for the Asian American for Asian-American representation. So sort like all together1 (28m 4s):That movie had broke so many, broke so many barriers and was, I mean it was a phenomenal, and also I just feel like it's so obviously so needed. Duh. When people say like, more representation is needed, I'm like, okay, no shit Sherlock. But it's true. It bears repeat again. Cause it still is true that we need more representation. But I am fascinated. Ok, so you went to Lane Tech and were you like, I'm gonna be a famous actor, comedian? No, what,3 (28m 34s):What anything about it? Didn't I, you know, it's called Lane Tech for a reason, right? It's a technical school. Correct. So like we didn't, you know, it didn't, I mean there were arts, but I, it never really, you know, it was one of those things that were like, you know, I guess like when you were a kid, it's all like, hey, you wanna learn how to like macrame. But there were theater arts in my, in my high school, but it wasn't like,1 (28m 54s):In fact, my mother did macrame. And let me tell you something, it has come back in style. And the shit she made, we could be selling for $199 at Urban Outfitters right now. I'm just,3 (29m 4s):Oh yeah, it's trendy now. Yeah. It's like, yeah, it's in style.1 (29m 7s):Anyway, side note, side note. Okay, so you were like, I'm not doing, there was no performing at Lane Tech. There was no like out there, there,3 (29m 13s):There was, and there was, but it wasn't, again, you know, in terms of representation, there was nothing that like, I mean there was nothing that that showed me any kind of like longevity in, in, you know, it didn't even really occur to me that this was a business that people sort of like, you know, pursued for themselves. So it wasn't until I went to Marquette that I discovered theater. And so it was one of those things that like, I was like, oh, there's something here. So it wasn't like, it wasn't fostered since I was a kid.1 (29m 43s):This,2 (29m 44s):And this is my favorite type of origin story because it means, you know, like there are people who grow up in LA or their, their parents are in the industry. And then, so it's always a question like, am I gonna go into this industry? But, but people like you and like me and like Boz, who, there's no artist in our family, you know,3 (30m 4s):You2 (30m 4s):Just have to come to it on your own. So I would love to hear this story about finding it at Marquette.3 (30m 10s):So like the, this, I, I've told this story several times, but the short version of it is, so I went to college for chemistry. And so again, because I came from, you know, that that was just sort of the path that, that particularly, you know, an Asian American follows. It's a very sort of stem, regimented sort of culture. And when I went to Marquette, my first, my sort of my first like quarter there, it was overwhelming, you know, I mean, college was, was a big transition for me. I was away from home and I, I was overwhelmed with all of the STEM courses that I was taking, the GE courses. And I, I went to my advisor and at the time, you know, this is pre-internet, like he, we sat down, I sat down with him and he pulled out the catalog.3 (30m 52s):Oh yeah, the catalog, right? I1 (30m 54s):Remember the catalog. Oh yeah.3 (30m 56s):And so he was like, let's take a class that has nothing to do with your major. Oh,1 (30m 60s):I love this. I love this advisor. I love this advisor. Do you know, can he you say his name3 (31m 7s):At the, was it Daniel? Dr. Daniel t Hayworth. I mean, it's been a while I went to college with Dahmer was arrested. So that's been a1 (31m 15s):While. Okay. Yeah's, same with us. Same with me. Yeah.3 (31m 18s):Yeah. So like, I think it was Daniel Daniel Hayworth. Yeah. Cuz he was a, he was a chemistry professor as well. So he opened up, he opened up the, the thing in the, the catalog and it said acting for non-majors. And I remember thinking, that sounds easy, let's do that. And then I went to the class, I got in and he, he, he was able to squeeze me in because already it was already in the earl middle of the semester. And so I, the, the, the, the teacher for that class was a Jesuit priest. His name is Father Gerald Walling. And you know, God rest his soul. And he, his claim to fame was he had like two or three lines on Blues Brothers, the movie.1 (31m 59s):Amazing. I mean like great to fame to have Yes. Get shot in Chicago. Yeah. And if you're a Jesuit priest that's not an actor by trade, like that is like huge. Like most people would like die to have two to three lines on Blues Brothers that are working anyway. So, Okay, so you're, so he, so how was that class?3 (32m 19s):So I took the class and he, after like the first week he asked me, Hey is, and it was at 8:00 AM like typical, like one of those like classes that I was like, Oh my gosh, I'm gonna go in here miserable. Yeah. But he said to me early on, he said, Do you have any interest in doing this professionally? And I said, no. And he's like, and he, he said, and he said, I was like, You're hilarious. You know,1 (32m 43s):You're a hilarious Jesuit.3 (32m 45s):Yeah. I'm like, Good luck with God. He, he then he was directing, he was directing the university production of, and he asked me to audition for it. And I was, I don't even know what an audition was. That's amazing. So like, it was one of those things that I didn't really know how to do it. I didn't know much about it. And so he's like, Can you come in and audition for it? And I did and I got it and it was, it was Monts the physicist,1 (33m 12s):What the fuck is that?3 (33m 14s):Oh man, I love that play. It's Amont, it's the same, you know, it's the same. He's, you know, Exactly. It's really, it's one of those like sort of rarely done plays and it's about fictitious Albert Einstein, the real, lemme see if I, it's been so long since I recall this play. The real, So Isaac Newton and what was the other Mobius? A fictitious, So the real, I'm sorry, The real Albert Einstein, The real, the real Albert Einstein, the real Isaac Isaac New and a fake, a fictitious play scientist named Mobius.3 (33m 55s):And they were, they were all in, in a mental institution. And I1 (33m 60s):Think that I have this play and my shelves and I just have never read it before. Okay, so3 (34m 4s):Who did you play? It's extraordinary. Extraordinary. And so I played, I played a child like I did up until my mid thirties. I played a child who had like one line, and I remember it took, it took place in Germany, I believe. And I remember he's like, Do you have a German accent? I was like, No. You're1 (34m 20s):Like, I I literally am doing chemistry 90.3 (34m 23s):Yeah. I was all like, you're hilarious. Yeah. Only children do accents, You know what I mean? Like, it was totally, I was like, whatever's happening, I don't even know what's happening. And, and then I made up a European accent. I mean, I, I, I pulled it on my ass. I was like, sure, don't even remember it. But I was like, one of,1 (34m 39s):I love when people, like, recently Gina showed me a video of her in college with an accent. Let me tell you something, anytime anyone does an accent, I'm like, go for it. I think that it's so3 (34m 51s):Great. Yeah. I've got stories about, about, I mean, I'm Asian, right? So like, I mean it's been one of those things that all my life I've had to sort of navigate people being like, Hey, try this on for Verizon. I was like, Oh gosh. And you know, anyway, I can go on forever. But I did that, I had a line and then somebody saw me in the production with one line and said, Hey, this is at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, somebody from the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. It's huge1 (35m 18s):Theater. Fyi. Right,3 (35m 20s):Right. Again, it's, it's to this day. And so they asked if I would intern, if I would be considered interning while I was in school. And I said, I didn't even know what that was. So I met with them. And when I walked into that theater, it was one of those, it's one of the biggest, most extraordinary music theaters in the wor in the country. Right. Won the regional, Tony and I, again, I had no frame of reverence for it. So walking in, it was like this magical place. And so I started, I started interning right, right off the bat. And it was one of those like life changing experiences. I, I mean, to this day, the best acting I think I've ever seen, you know, face to face has been on that stage. It's, you know, many of those actors are still, I'm still in touch with to this day.3 (36m 3s):Some of them have passed away. However, it was the best training, right? I mean, I got thrown into the deep end. It was like working with some of the greats who never, no one ever knew. Right. So it really, it was really a wonderful experience. And that's when I sort of, you know, that's when I was like, Oh, I actually can do this for a living. So it was,1 (36m 21s):Oh yeah, Milwaukee rep. I've seen some amazing stuff there. And also what would've been great is, yeah, we like, I mean there's so many things that would've been great at DePaul at the theater school, but one of them would've been, Hey, there's all these regional theaters, like if you wanna make some dough, it was either like, you are gonna be doing storefront and Die of Hunger, or you're gonna be a star. Hilarious was no like, what about Milwaukee Rep? What about the Guthrie? Like all the things3 (36m 50s):Gut, Yeah. Never1 (36m 51s):Told at least. Or I didn't listen or I was like in a blackout drunk state. But like, I just feel like hilarious. I just feel like that is so amazing that you got to do that. So then, Wait, did you change3 (37m 2s):Your It wasn't, I did. I eventually did. Yes. So I have both. And so now it was one of those, like, it was, it was harrowing, but eventually, I mean, I did nothing with my chemistry degree. Nothing. Like literally nothing. That's,2 (37m 16s):Most people do nothing with their theater degree. So, so it all evens out. Wait, I have a question. Now. This is a question that would be difficult for me to answer. So I wouldn't fault to you if it's difficult for you. What do you think it was in you that this person saw and said, have you ever considered doing this professionally? I mean, just trying to be really objective about the, the asce the essence of you that you bring to the table. Always. How, what did that person identify, do you think, if you3 (37m 44s):Had to guess? You know, I'd like to say it was talent. I'd love to be that person and be like, you know, they recognized in me in one line that ordinary artist was going to emerge into the universe and play children into his thirties. I, I wish I could. It was that, I mean, honestly, I looked different than everybody else on that's a white school and Milwaukee rep, you know, God, forgive me for saying this, but it was a sensibly all white institution.1 (38m 12s):Super white. Super white. Yeah.3 (38m 14s):So in comes this little Asian guy who like they thought might have had potential and also is Asian. And I checked off a lot of boxes for them. And you know what I could easily say, like I, I could easily sort of, when, if you asked me like 20 years ago, I was like, Oh, I was talented, but now I'm like, no, I made my way in because of, because I, I checked boxes for people and, and1 (38m 37s):Talented,3 (38m 38s):You couldn't,1 (38m 39s):You3 (38m 39s):Couldn't have done it if you didn't have talent to thank you. And I can, I can, you know, whatever, I can own that now. But the, but the reality is like, I made it in and that's how I got in. And I'm okay with that. And I'm not saying that it's not taking anything away from talent, but the reality is it's like you gotta get in on the inside to work your way out. And if I didn't have that exposure early on, I certainly wouldn't have had the regional career that I did for a little while. You know? So like that credit, like you, like you said Jen, it's like, it's a, it's a huge credit. So like I would not have made it in any other way. Right. And I certainly,1 (39m 12s):Yeah, I just am like noticing also like my reaction to, Yeah, it's interesting too as other humans in this industry or any industry, it's like, it's like we have had to, especially those of us that are, you know, I'm 47 and like those of us who have made it in or sort of in for, in my, I'm just speaking for myself. Like I, I sort of, right, It could have been fucked up reasons or weird reasons that we got in the door or even filling someone's need or fantasy. But then it's like what we do with it once we're in the room, that really, really matters. And I think that yeah, regardless of how you ended up in Milwaukee rep, like I think it's smart and like I really like the idea of saying okay, like that's probably why I was there.1 (39m 58s):I checked, I've checked boxes, but Okay. But that's why a lot of people are a lot of places. And so like, let's, let's, let's, you could stop there and be like, that is some fucked up shit. Fuck them. Or you could say, Wait a second, I'm gonna still have a fucking career and be a dope actor. Okay, so you're there, you're, you're still, you graduate from Marquette with a double major, I'm assuming, right? Chemistry and, and was it theater, straight up theater or what was your degree?3 (40m 23s):It's, well, no, no, it's called, it's, it's, it's the, at the time it's called, they didn't have a theater degree. Right. It was called the, you graduated with a degree in Communications. Communications,1 (40m 32s):Right? Yes. Okay, okay. Yeah. My, my niece likes to say Tia, all the people in communications at UCLA are the dumbest people. I'm like, No, no, no, no, no. That would've been me. And she's like, Well, anyway, so okay, so, so you graduate and what happens? What happens to you?3 (40m 54s):So, you know, I, I went from there. I went to, I got my equity card pretty ear pretty early cuz I went for my, I think it was my final between my, the summer, my junior year and my senior year I went to, because of the Milwaukee rep, I got asked to do summer stock at, at ppa, which is the Pacific Conservatory, the performing Arts, which is kind of like an Urda contract out in the West Co on the west coast. And so I was able to get credits there, which got me my equity card very quickly after, during that time I didn't get it at the institution, but I got like enough, you know, whatever credit that I was able to get my equity card. And again, at the time I was like, eh, what are the equity? I didn't even know know what that was really.3 (41m 34s):I don't know if anybody truly knows it when they're, when they're younger. So I had it and I went, right, I had my card and I went right to Chicago because family's there. So I was in Chicago. I did a couple of shows, I did one at at Lifeline at the time. I did one at North. Yeah. So it was nice to sort of go back and, and, and, and then I, you know, right then I, it's my favorite story, one of my favorite stories. I, I got my, my my SAG card and my after card in Chicago that summer, because at the time the union was separate. That's how old I am. And I got my SAG card doing a Tenax commercial, and I got my after card doing, I'm not sure if they're still there.3 (42m 18s):I think they are actually. It is a company called Break Breakthrough Services and they did it live industrial. Oh yeah.1 (42m 24s):They, I think they still wait live. How does that work? Yeah,3 (42m 29s):Exactly. So it's a lot of like those training, you know, you see it a lot, like the people do it, like corporate training stuff. Right. So they used, at the time it was really new. So like they used a lot of actors and they paid well.1 (42m 42s):Well, I did an Arthur Anderson one that like paid my rent3 (42m 45s):Long time. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So exactly when Arthur Anderson was still a, I think I did one too. So like, they,1 (42m 53s):Rodney,3 (42m 55s):Were you in St. Charles, Illinois?1 (42m 57s):I don't know. I had to take the Amtrak. It could have been,3 (42m 59s):Yeah. In St. Charles. Right? That's where they were centered. Yes. Yeah.1 (43m 2s):Okay, go ahead. Go ahead. So you, okay, so you got your, I know our world. Do you live, Where do you live?3 (43m 8s):I'm in, I'm in LA right now. This is my home. Yeah.1 (43m 11s):Okay. Well I'm coming to your home. Okay, great. I'm in Pasadena right now. Okay. Anyway, go ahead. Oh yeah.3 (43m 17s):Okay. So we, yeah, I went to Chicago, got my cards, and then was there for, you know, a hot minute and then I moved to New York. Okay.1 (43m 25s):Wait, wait, wait. Moved. Did you have, what years were you working in Chicago? Like were we still, were Gina and I in school? What, what, what years were that were you were like, Tampa, a man Chicago.3 (43m 35s):I did God bless that commercial. Yeah, it was so good. I did, let's see here, I grad, I was there in 90, let's see, 97,1 (43m 47s):We were there. Well, Gina was graduating and I, I was, yeah. Anyway, we were there.3 (43m 52s):And then I moved to New York in 98 and then I moved to New in 98. So1 (43m 55s):You were only in Chicago a hot minute? Yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (43m 57s):Okay. Yeah. But then I came back, I came back in 2004 five to do a show at Victory Gardens. Oh. And then I did a show at Victory Gardens, and then I did a workshop at Stepin Wolf. So it was nice. Look at1 (44m 12s):Victory Gardens. Victory Gardens. That was a whole,3 (44m 15s):I'm sorry, what was that?1 (44m 16s):R i p, Victory Gardens.3 (44m 17s):Oh, yeah. I mean, well I was there pre-K. Yeah. And so, but it was, yeah, r i p I mean, r i it was truly one of the most magnificent, magnificent shows that I've been part, but I mean,1 (44m 30s):Okay, so wait, wait, wait. Okay, so why New York? Why weren't you like, I'm gonna bust out and go to LA and be a superstar on,3 (44m 38s):It's all about representation. I mean, I didn't see at the time, and you know, if you think about it, like there were people on television, but, you know, in terms of like the, the, the, it wasn't pervasive. It was like sort of every once in a while I'll turn on my TV and I'll see like Dante Bosco or I'll see like, you know what I mean? But it wasn't like I saw like, you know, I wasn't flooded with the image of an Asian American making it. However, at the time, you know, it was already Asian Americans were starting to sort of like flood the theater world, right? So I started, you know, through James c and, and Lisa Taro in Chicago, and like, people who are like, who are still friends of mine to this day, Asian American actors, they were doing theater. And so I was like, you know what, I'm gonna do theater. And so I, it was just one of those, like, I went to, and I already had these credits.3 (45m 19s):I had my equity card, I had some credits. My natural proclivity was then to go to, to, to first theater in New York. So it wasn't, I didn't even think about LA it wasn't like, oh, let me, let me like think about doing television and film. So I went1 (45m 32s):To York. I just feel like in LA it's so interesting. As an actor, writing is a little different, but as an actor, it, most of us, if we plan to go to LA as actors, we're gonna fail. I just feel like you have to end up here as an actor by accident because you do something else that you love and that people like, and then they're like, I just, it's not the most welcoming. Right. Medium film and tv. So like, it's so hard. So I think by accident is really sort of the only way, or if you're just already famous for something else, but like, anyway, So you're in New York. Did you, did you love it? Wait, can I,2 (46m 9s):Can I hang on Buzz, Can I do a timeout? Because I've been wanting to ask this just a little bit back to, you know, your undergrad experience. Did you wanna be, did you love chemistry or did you just do that because Oh, you did, Okay. So it wasn't, it wasn't like, oh, finally I found something that I, like you liked chemistry.3 (46m 29s):Yeah. To this day, to this day, I still like, it's still very much like, you know, the, the, the values of a stem field is still very much in how I teach, unfortunately. Right? Like, I'm very empirical. I, I, I need to know an, I need to have answers. Like, you know, it tends to, sometimes it tends to be a lot of it, like, you know, you know, sort of heady and I'm like, and now I need, I need, I'm pragmatic that way. I need to understand like why, Right? That2 (46m 53s):Doesn't seem unfortunate to me. That seems actually really fortunate because A, you're not the only artist who likes to think. I mean, you know, what about DaVinci? Like, a lot of people like to think about art in a, in a, I mean it's really, they're, they're, they're really kind of married art and science.3 (47m 8s):Yeah. They really are people. I, I think people would, It's so funny. Like people don't see it as such, but you're absolutely right. I agree. It's so more, Yeah. There's so much more in common.1 (47m 18s):The other thing that I'm glad Gina brought that up is cuz I'm questioning like, okay, so like, I don't know about at Marquette, but like at DePaul we had like, we had, like, we had these systems of, you got warnings if you, you weren't doing great and I bet like you probably didn't have the cut system cause that just is okay, good. But okay.3 (47m 36s):Well we were, we remember we were, we weren't a conservatory, right? So we were very much a, a liberal programming.1 (47m 42s):Yeah, I love it. Oh God, how I longed for that later, right? But anyway, so what would've helped is if someone with an empirical, like someone with more a stem mind sat down with me and said, okay, like, here are the things that aren't working in a practical way for you, and here are the things that you can do to fix it. Instead, it was literally this nebulous thing where my warning said, You're not living up to your star power now that's not actually a note. So that, that, that Rick Murphy gave me, and I don't, to this day, I'm like, that is actually, so I would love if I had someone like you, not that you'd be in that system, but like this to say like, okay, like here's the reasons why.1 (48m 25s):Like there was no why we were doing anything. It was like, you just do this in order to make it. And I said, Okay, I'll do it. But I was like, what the hell? Why are we doing this? That's,3 (48m 35s):That's like going to a doctor and a doctor being like, you're sick. You know what I mean? And you're like, but can, that's why I'm here is for you to help me get to the root of it and figure it out. Right. Being like, you're,1 (48m 46s):I think they didn't know, Here's the thing, I don't think it, it3 (48m 50s):Was because they're in.1 (48m 51s):Yeah. I I don't think it was because they were, I mean, they could have been rude in all the things. I literally, now that I'm 47, looking back on that experience, I'm like, Oh, these teachers didn't fucking know what they were, how to talk. And3 (49m 3s):This is how I came. Yeah, yeah. Which is how I came back to usc. So like that's,1 (49m 7s):Anyway, continue your New York adventure. I just wanted to know.3 (49m 11s):No, no, no. New York is was great. New York is New York was wonderful. I love it. I still love it. I I literally just got back with it. That's why, remember I was texting you, emailing you guys. I I just got back, Yes. The night before. Some amazing things. My husband would move back in a heartbeat if I, if I like texted him right now. And I was like, Hey, like let's move back. The house would be packed and we'd, he'd be ready to go. He loves, we both love it. You know, Am I in love with New York? I, that, that remains to be seen. I mean, you know, as I get older that life is, it's a hard life and I, I love it when there's no responsibilities when you can like, skip around and have tea and you know, walk around Central Park and like see shows.3 (49m 53s):But you know, that's obviously not the real, the reality of the day to day in New York. So I miss it. I love it. I've been back for work many times, but I, I I don't know that the life is there for me anymore. Right. I mean, you know, six fuller walkups. Oh no. Oh no. I just, yeah, I1 (50m 11s):Just like constantly sweating in Manhattan. Like I can't navigate, It's like a lot of rock walking really fast and3 (50m 20s):Yeah. And no one's wearing masks right now. I just, I just came back and I saw six shows when I was there. No one's wearing masks. It's like unnerving. And again, like, you know, you know, not throwing politics in it. I was like, you guys, like, how are you okay with it? I'm just like, how are you not unnerved by the fact that we're cramped in worse than an airplane? And everyone's like coughing around you and we're sitting here for three hours watching Death of a Salesman. I mean, like, how was that1 (50m 43s):Of an2 (50m 45s):Yeah know?3 (50m 46s):I mean,2 (50m 47s):So what about the, so at some point you, you pretty much, I mean, you don't do theater anymore, right? You transition to doing3 (50m 55s):Oh, I know, I do. Very much so, very much. I'm also the associate, Yeah. I'm the associate artistic director of, I am a theater company, so like I'm, I'm very much theater's. I will never let go. It's, it's just one of those things I will never as, as wonderful as television and film has been. It's, it's also like theater's, you know? It's the, it's my own, it's my first child. Yeah.2 (51m 19s):Yeah.1 (51m 20s):We have guests like Tina Parker was like that, right? Wasn't,2 (51m 23s):Yeah. Well a lot of, a lot of people. It's also Tina Wong said the same thing.3 (51m 26s):He and I are different. She's part, we're in the same theater company. So Yeah. Tina's.2 (51m 30s):That's right. That's right. That's right. Okay, now I'm remembering what that connection was. So I have a question too about like, when I love it, like I said, when people have no idea anything related to performing arts, and then they get kind of thrust into it. So was there any moment in sort of discovering all this where you were able to make sense of, or flesh out like the person that you were before you came to this? Like a lot of people have the experience of, of doing a first drama class in high school and saying, Oh my God, these are my people. And never knowing that their people existed. Right. Did you have anything like that where you felt like coming into this performing sphere validated or brought some to fullness?2 (52m 14s):Something about you that previously you hadn't been able to explore?3 (52m 18s):Yeah. I mean, coming out, you know what I mean? Like, it was the first time that people talk, you know? Of course, you know, you know, I was born to, you know, like was God, I said I was born this way. But that being said, like again, in the world in which I grew up in, in Chicago and Lane Tech, it's, and, and the, you know, the technical high school and, and just the, the, the, I grew up in a community of immigrants. It's not like it was laid out on the table for one to talk about all the time. Right. It wasn't, and even though I may have thought that in my head again, it wasn't like, it was like something that was in the universe and in the, in the air that I breathed. So I would say that like when I got to the theater, it was the first time, you know, the theater, you guys we're, we're theater kids, right?3 (53m 2s):We know like every, everything's dramatic. Everything's laid, you know, out to, you know, for everyone. Everyone's dramas laid out for everyone. A the, and you know, part of it was like sexuality and talking about it and being like, and having just like, just being like talking about somebody's like ethnic background. And so it was the first time that I learned how to talk about it. Even to even just like how you even des you know, you know how you even describe somebody, right? And how somebody like, cuz that again, it's not, it wasn't like, it wasn't language that I had for myself. So I developed the language and how to speak about people. So that's my first thing about theater that I was like, oh, thank God.3 (53m 43s):You know? And then, you know, even talking about, you know, like queer, like queer was such a crazy insult back when I was a kid. And then now all of a sudden queer is now this embraced sort of like, badge of honor, Right? And so like, it was just like that and understanding like Asian and Asian American breaking that down, right? And being Filipino very specifically breaking that down, that all came about from me being in theater. And so like, I, I'm, I owe my, my life to it if you, and, and because I've, yeah, I didn't, you know, it's so funny how the title of this is I Survived Theater School for me. It's, Yes, Yes.3 (54m 23s):And I also, it also allowed theater also gave, allowed me to survive. Yes.2 (54m 31s):Theater helped you survive. Yes. That's beautiful. So in this, in the, in this spectrum or the arc, whatever you wanna call it, of representation and adequate representation and you know, in all of our lifetimes, we're probably never gonna achieve what we think is sort of like a perfect representation in media. But like in the long arc of things, how, how do you feel Hollywood and theater are doing now in terms of representation of, of specifically maybe Filipino, but Asian American people. How, how do you think we're doing?3 (55m 3s):I think we, you know, I think that there's, there's certainly a shift. You know, obviously it, we'd like it to be quicker than faster than, than it has been. But that being said, there's certainly a shift. Look, I'm being, I'll be the first person to say there are many more opportunities that are available that weren't there when I started in this, in this business, people are starting to like diversify casts. And you know, I saw Haiti's Town, it was extraordinary, by the way. I saw six shows in New York in the span of six days out of, and this was not conscious of me. This is not something I was doing consciously. Out of the six shows, I saw every single show had 90% people of color.3 (55m 43s):And it wasn't, and I wasn't conscientious of it. I wasn't like, I'm going to go see the shows that like, it just happened that all I saw Hamilton, I saw K-pop, I saw, you know, a death of a Salesman I saw. And they all were people of color and it was beautiful. So there's definitely a shift. That said, I, for me, it's never, this may sound strange, it's not the people in front of the camera or on stage that I have a problem with. Like, that to me is a bandaid. And this is me speaking like an old person, right? I need, it needs to change from the top down. And for me, that's what where the shift needs to happen for me. Like all the people at top, the, the, the people who run the thing that needs to change. And until that changes, then I can expect to starter from1 (56m 25s):The low. It's so interesting cuz like, I, I, I feel like that is, that is, we're at a point where we'd love to like the bandaid thing. Like really people really think that's gonna work. It never holds. Like that's the thing about a bandaid. The longer the shit is on, it'll fall off eventually. And then you still have the fucking wound. So like, I, I, I, and what I'm also seeing, and I don't know if you guys are seeing it, but what I'm seeing is that like, so people got scared and they fucking started to promote execs within the company of color and othered folks and then didn't train them. And now are like, Oh, well we gave you a shot and you failed, so let's get the white kid back in that live, you know, my uncle's kid back in to, to be the assistant.1 (57m 6s):And I'm3 (57m 7s):Like, no people up for success is a huge thing. Yeah. They need to set people up for success. Yes, yes, for sure.2 (57m 12s):Yeah. So it's, it's performative right now. We're still in the performative phase of1 (57m 16s):Our, you3 (57m 17s):Know, I would say it feels, it, it can feel performative. I I'm, I'm definitely have been. I've experienced people who do get it, you know what I mean? It's just, Sunday's a perfect example of somebody who does get it. But that being said, like again, it needs to, we need more of those people who get it with a capital I like, you know, up at the top. Cause again, otherwise it's just performative, like you said. So it's,1 (57m 38s):Does it make you wanna be an exec and be at the top and making choices? Yeah,3 (57m 42s):You know, I've always, people have asked me, you know, people have asked me what is the next thing for me. I'd love to show run. I've, I just, again, this is the, this is the stem part of me, right? Like, of us, like is I'm great at putting out fires, I just have been that person. I'm good with people, I'm, I'm, you know, and I've, I, you know, it's, it's, it's just one of those things that like I, I see is a, is a natural fit. But until that happens, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm also, you know, a professor is very much a version of show learning. So I've been doing that every day.1 (58m 14s):We talk about how, cause you've mentioned it several times about playing children into your thirties. So a lot, we have never had anyone on the show that I'm aware of that has had that sort of thing or talked about that thing. They may have had it. Mostly it's the opposite of like, those of us who like, I'll speak for myself, like in college, were playing old people at age, you know, 16 because I was a plus size Latina lady. And like that's what what went down. So tell me what, what that's what that journey has been like for you. I'm just really curious mostly, cuz you mentioned it a couple times, so it must be something that is part of your psyche. Like what's that about? Like what the, I mean obviously you look quote young, but there's other stuff that goes into that.1 (58m 57s):So how has that been for you and to not be, It sounds like you're coming out of that.3 (59m 1s):Yeah, I mean, look, all my life I've always been, you know, I mean I'm, I'm 5, 5 6 on a good day and I've always just been, I've always just looked young. Like, I mean, I mean, and I don't mean that like, oh I look young. Like I don't mean that in any sort of self-aggrandizing way. I literally just am one of those and you're built, like me, my one of my dear friends Ko, God rest his soul, he was always like, Rodney, you're like a little man look, looks, you're like a man that looks like a boy. And I was like that, that's hilarious. Like, and look, I for growing up little in, in high school and, and it, it was one of those things that I was always like, you know, like I was always chummy with people, but I was never sort of like, like there's a look, let's face it.3 (59m 45s):Like we're, we're a a a body conscious society and when you're, whatever it is, you can't help. There's implicit bias, right? Implicit bias, right. Supremacy at it's most insidious. And so I am not all my life, I was like always trying to, you know, the Napoleon complex of always trying to sort of be like, prove that I was older than I was.1 (1h 0m 6s):How did you do it? How did you do, how were you, what kind of techniques did you use? For3 (1h 0m 10s):Me, it wasn't even my technique. It was about doing everything and anything I possibly could. I mean, I was like president or vice president, I a gajillion different clubs. So it1 (1h 0m 18s):Was doing, it was doing, it was not like appearance. Okay, okay. So you3 (1h 0m 23s):Was actually yeah, I couldn't do anything about this. Yeah.1 (1h 0m 25s):Right. So yeah, but like people try, you know, like people will do all kinds of things to their body to try to, But for you, it sounds like your way to combat that was to be a doer, like a super3 (1h 0m 36s):Duer. And I certainly, I certainly like worked out by the time I got to college I was like working out hardcore to try and masculinize like, or you know, this. And, and eventually I did a gig that sort of shifted that mentality for me. But that being said, I think the thing that really, that the thing that, that for me was the big sort of change in all of this was just honestly just maturity. At some point I was like, you know what? I can't do anything about my age. I can't do anything about my height, nor do I want to. And when that shifted for me, like it just ironically, that's when like the maturity set in, right? That's when people started to recognize me as an adult.3 (1h 1m 17s):It's when I got got rid of all of that, that this, this notion of what it is I need to do in order for people to give me some sort of authority or gimme some sort of like, to l