Podcasts about Mexico

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Country in North America

  • 24,586PODCASTS
  • 69,197EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 25, 2021LATEST
Mexico

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Best podcasts about Mexico

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Latest podcast episodes about Mexico

The Dougherty Gang
Peanut & Butter Sandwiches in Mexico

The Dougherty Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 37:20


The Doughertys have just robbed a bank in Valdosta, Georgia and fled the scene with only $5000 for their efforts. As the gravity of their situation sinks in the sibling have two objectives - staying under law enforcement's radar and crossing the border to Mexico. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Enchanting Book Readings
Spook Castle

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 29:39


Spook Castle by Sir Herbert Sneakies. Copyright 2021) Check out our cool merchandise :) https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ :) Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast. :) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies :) https://www.paypal.me/anonymouscontent :) Summary: Charlie gets a substitute teacher Miss Cadaver Feng for Halloween week while his regular teacher is sick. Miss Cadaver Feng is well received when she gives cool homework like watching scary movies, carving pumpkins. She even gives them a fun writing assignment to write a scary story. Charlie and Fenny work on costumes together. Charlie is a mummy and Finny is a Pirate. The other kids in class wear neat costumes too. Charlie and his class go in a spook hearse mobile driven by a tall pale white chauffeur. He drives them to spook castle. It is lined with gravestones. Loud cackling, witches laugh are heard as they pull up a long driveway. Miss Cadaver opens the door and takes them on a scary tour. The castle is haunted and starts to moan and groan. The wood floors creak with each step the kids take. Princess Zanya and Prince Zoya are not impressed with the scar riggings as they are familiar with all the spooky techniques because they live in a castle. The students are spooked by a witch, ghosts and skeletons. They fall through a trap door in the basement and land in a water maze. The kids swim in the water maze and hungry piranha fish jump out of the water. The fish start to bite and nibble on the kids. The kids realize Miss Cadaver Feng brought them to the castle to be snacks for her pet fish. Will the kids survive this spook castle? Listen and find out if it will be a Happy Halloween with lots of treats or will Spook Castle be a trick? #1 Japan, Australia, #1 Canada, #1 UK, #1 Brazil, #1 Belgium, #1 India, #1 South Korea, #1 Bahamas, #3 Italy, #5 Mexico, #4 Germany, #1 Tawian, #4 Kenya, #4 New Zealand, #5 France, #7 Ireland, #10 Sweden, #16 Norway, #1-#26 USA! & #15 South Africa :) Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com $ Please support us & enjoy our books at Amazon :) Thank you! Skip Boots Big Safari Adventure by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Skip-Boots-Big-Safari-Adventure/dp/1729091547 * Jack the Bear and Golden Hair by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Jack-Bear-Golden-StorytellerUK2017-Adventures-ebook/dp/B010E479GE Adventures of Mooch the Pooch by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Mooch-Pooch-Adventures-ebook/dp/B01LR86FK2 Blueber Goober the Monster In My Closet! by Sir Herbert Sneakies https://www.amazon.com/Blueber-Goober-Monster-My-Closet-ebook/dp/B01LW1VMPQ/ Margaret Merlin's Journal The Battle of The Black Witch Book 1 a cool wizard seiries. https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK Please Subscribe to our YouTube:) Channel :) Storytime Fun! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCNwYcOSlx3rMRBfSuNrzPg?sub_confirmation=1 https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos Thank you!!! Public Commons music fair use.

Check Your Thread
#13: Natural Dyeing with Amy Taylor

Check Your Thread

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


I've been promising to cover natural dyeing techniques for a while now, and I've made good on that promise with this episode! I got to speak to a talented and experienced natural dye expert, Amy Taylor. A practitioner and teacher based in Chicago, Amy shares so much information in this extended episode of CYT. We go into the history and techniques, plus she busts some myths and tells us some fun stories of her experiences dyeing fabric with natural substances. If you ever had any questions about this topic, this episode is for you! Ms Amy Taylor website HERE and Instagram @msamytaylor. Amy's first natural dye teacher was Akemi Cohn who can be found HERE. The teacher Amy had in Oaxaca, Mexico is Elsa Sanchez Diaz. I couldn't find a direct contact for her, but you can find some wonderful pictures of her and her dye workshops on THIS BLOG. One is Amy's favourite natural dye substances is cochineal which makes an incredible, rich fuchsia colour (pictured below). Amy's most popular products are the tie dyed briefs undies (pictured below), found HERE. A collaboration with designer Goli June Bridal resulted in stunning silk robes using the bundle dyeing technique using onion skins (pictured below), found HERE. Gasali Adeyemo, Indigo dye expert HERE. Michel Garcia, sustainable dye practice HERE. Maiwa, natural dye supply store HERE. Botanical Colors, suppliers and educators with Feedback Friday HERE. Amy is also inspired by the following dyers, makers and organisations: @thedogwooddyer @silk&tulle @birdy_sew_obsessed @lauracastro.co @ecotone.threads @slowstitches.co @jamiebourgeois @allweremember @wearethreaded

Ask Christopher West
Grace Goes Deeper | ACW147

Ask Christopher West

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 41:11


Did the Holocaust influence St. John Paul II's writing? My parents are on the brink of divorce because of my father's pornography addiction. . . what can I do? Why did God make me this way if He knew I would hate it so much? Ask Christopher West is a weekly podcast in which Theology of the Body Institute President Christopher West and his beloved wife Wendy share their humor and wisdom, answering questions about marriage, relationships, life, and the Catholic faith, all in light of John Paul II's beautiful teachings on the Theology of the Body. Want to support the Theology of the Body Institute and have a better chance of us answering your question? Join our Patron Community (https://tobpatron.com)! Patron Question: I am a college student taking a class on the Holocaust, and I have been struck not only by the horror of the atrocities against human life but also the overall idea of personhood specifically in the forced sterilizations of the so- called "feeble minded." There was a book written in 1920 called "Allowing the Destruction of Life Unworthy of Life." Just that title breaks my heart. I can see how Theology of the Body speaks so much into this topic, and I am wondering if the events of the Jolocaust and eugenics movement had any impact on Pope John Paul II. I know he played a role in healing after WWII, but is there anything in his writings that would suggest the holocaust might have played a role in his talks on the Theology of the Body? Question 2: This is urgent. My parents have been married for 32 years and just recently my dad finally told my mom that he has had a porn addiction and has been masturbating for over 20 years. His admission has set off a huge destructive bomb in their relationship. My dad went to confession and they had the priest from our hometown come over and meet with both of them. My dad is going to be getting counseling but at this point, I still really do not know what is going to happen. I am so deeply worried and concerned that my parents are going to get a divorce. My mom says she doesn't know if she can ever recover from this damage. I know I cannot do anything about it other than pray because this is not really my issue. It is greatly impacting me, though. Despite what my dad has done, I still love him. I want to offer him mercy because he seems like he wants to get help to overcome his addiction now. I gave my dad a couple books to read. One of them was your book "Theology of the Body for Beginners" and the other one was the 33 day consecration to St. Joseph written by Fr. Calloway. I want to believe that my dad can find healing and recovery from his addictions. Is there any way that you can help me? I am 23 years old and I am so hurt by this and I have no idea what to do. Qestion 3: I have hated my body for about half of my life now. No matter how hard I try, I can't get over the idea that I need to be stick-skinny or else I'm ugly. I wish desperately I could see myself how God sees me. I just don't know why He made me like this if He knew I would hate it so much. Submit your question at AskChristopherWest.com (http://www.askchristopherwest.com). Resources mentioned this week: Join us on our Pilgrimage to Mexico (https://selectinternationaltours.com/product/tobi-pilgrimages-presents-our-lady-of-guadalupe-pilgrimage-to-mexico-city-with-christopher-west-jen-settle-and-jason-clarke-december-2-7-2021-21ja12mxtob/) December 2-7, 2021 Hope's Garden Ministry (https://hopesgarden.com) Freedom Coaching (https://freedom-coaching.net) View our COURSE SCHEDULE (https://tobinstitute.org/programs/tobi-schedule/) to register for a course, ONLINE or IN-PERSON! If you are in financial need and honestly cannot afford a book or resource recomended on this podcast, contact: michele@tobinstitute.org Find Christopher West on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/cwestofficial) and Instagram (http://www.instagram.com/cwestofficial). Discover the Theology of the Body Institute (http://www.tobinstitute.org). If you enjoy the podcast, help us out by writing a review (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ask-christopher-west/id1448699486). Thanks for listening! Christopher and Wendy hope their advice is helpful to you, but they are not licensed counseling professionals. If you are dealing with serious issues, please consult our list of trusted professionals (https://tobinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/TOBI-Recommended-Psychologists-Updated-6-8-20.pdf). Featuring music by Mike Mangione (https://www.mikemangione.com/).

The Sporkful
Pati Jinich Can Read Your Fridge Like A Tarot Card

The Sporkful

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 34:17


Pati Jinich has always had to move between worlds — as a Jew growing up in Mexico, and as a Mexican immigrant to the US, where she first worked as a policy analyst. “It wasn't until I switched to cooking,” she tells us this week, “that I was finally able to make sense of all the pieces of myself.” Since that transition she's spent a decade documenting Mexico's vast and varied food cultures in her cookbooks, and on her PBS show Pati's Mexican Table, which is watched by more than 65 million people around the world. Her new docu-series, La Frontera, is more political, examining the US-Mexico border, and the people who navigate the two worlds between it. It's also her most personal work yet. She talks with Dan about why this show is so important to her. Plus she peers into his fridge over Zoom, and tells us about a deep fried quesadilla in Jalisco that she'll never forget. // Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL). Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

Keepin It 100 with Konnan
K100Talks...Cartels worldwide

Keepin It 100 with Konnan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 29:51


On this episode of K100Talks...the crew discusses drug cartels all across the world, their involvement in pro wrestling, government corruption, drug dealing in Mexico, Konnan almost being kidnapped, and held at gunpoint, crooked prisons and guards, Narcos: Mexico, Breaking Bad, and more!Get Interactive on Twitter @Konnan5150 @TheRealDisco @MaskedRepublic @JFFeeney3rd @TheCCNetwork1 @K100Konnan Check out our Patreon site at Konnan.me and Patreon.com/Konnan for extra audio, FULL AD FREE episodes, exclusive video, listener roundtable discussion shows, weekly watch-a-longs, call in shows with Konnan and DI, plus so much more!

American Vigilante
Episode 8: Vengeance for Amanda

American Vigilante

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 50:34


KC is back in Mexico to find a woman called Amanda, and then returns for her father's revenge. Sam asks about KC's “happy place” and finds out that he's been lying to her. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 287 — Small Wars and More with Dr. Mark Folse

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021


By Walker Mills Historian Dr. Mark Folse joins the program to talk about Marine Corps history during the early 20th Century and his recent essay in Naval History Magazine, “Never Known a Day of Peace.” The discussion covers Marines in the Spanish American War, the Philippine Insurgency, interventions in Cuba, Nicaragua, Haiti, Mexico, China, the … Continue reading Sea Control 287 — Small Wars and More with Dr. Mark Folse →

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
“How to Escape One World Government?”

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 12:41


In this era of uncertainty and constant changes, it seems like there's no place to run because it's going to get bad everywhere. In this video, Andrew shares his thoughts on one government policy that will rule the world. 00:00 Start 2:35 How to protect yourself 4:25 Portugal 5:25 Georgia 6:14 Laos 6:36 Countries that allow Dual Citizenship 7:36 Digital nomad visa 8:39 Mexico 8:52 Istanbul 9:08 Australia https://nomadcapitalist.com/ Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://amzn.to/2QKQqR0 DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.

Experience of the Soul
Bryan Schellinger: Toltecnology, the Mastery of Life | The Magnetic Voice #28

Experience of the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 32:51


Bryan E Schellinger is a Quantum Master Intuitive and Dream Embodiment Coach. He assists people in finding their infinite potential and mastering the life of their dreams. It is his desire to help people find the true nature of the universe and apply it in this lifetime on this planet.After years of unfulfilled professions; architect, mental health nurse, French-trained chef, visual artist, gallery owner, and medicinal plant cultivator; he heeded to his calling in life, to assist people in reconnecting their body, mind, and spirit, and becoming a unified whole. Helping them accept and honor their own higher wisdom and to align them with their true nature; so as to became Self-actualized and Self-empowered. Becoming the master of their Dreams.Bryan's journey to find the most efficient techniques to assist others to master their lives began with discovering what worked for him, over twenty-five years ago. He found myself participating in groups with people from Peru; Teotihuacan, Mexico, and as close to home as Atlanta, Georgia; Sante Fe, New Mexico; Ashland, Oregon; and Los Angeles, California.Bryan has had the pleasure of working with the following amazing and powerful people; Dr. Leon Lashner, John R. Stowe, Dominique Sire, Cher Rowe Bartlett, Andrew McIlrath, Don Miguel Ruiz, Don Jose Ruiz, Alberto Villoldo, Sergio Magana, Jorge Luis Delgado, and Brent Michael Phillips, to name a few. All these experiences have informed, what he refers to as his Medicine Bag and support my divine intuitive nature.Through a variety of modalities: such as Brainwave Healing, archetype identification, muscle testing, Movement Intelligence Analysis, Akashic record retrieval, lucid dream work, Indigenous ceremonies, plant medicine, and Luminous light body reprogramming, Bryan has created a program that he refers to as TOLTECNOLOGY. He is also an Advanced Awakening Dynamics Practitioner.Links:Learn More About Bryan!http://toltecnology.com/Get Your Complimentary Connection Callhttps://www.themagneticvoice.com/appointmentsThe Magnetic Voicehttp://www.themagneticvoice.comShannon Kropf Creativehttp://www.shannonkcreative.com •This channel is made possible because of listeners just like you. If you would like to support the channel with your tax-deductible contribution on an ongoing basis or through a one-time gift, head over to ExperienceOfTheSoul.com.And if you enjoy this podcast, you can help spread the word by leaving a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or the platform of your choice.The Magnetic Voice is copyright 2021, Monique McDonald. All Rights Reserved. Our theme music is composed by Dave Kropf and used with permission.The Experience of the Soul Podcast Channel is a production of 818 Studios.

Shout It Out Loudcast
Episode 146 "Freedom To Rock Tour"

Shout It Out Loudcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 105:32


This week Tom & Zeus review the 2016 KISS, "Freedom To Rock Tour." This is SIOL's 4th KISS tour reviewed. The tour was one where KISS visited the secondary markets and smaller cities. The tour began on July 4, 2016 in Tuscan, Arizona and finished in Tijuana, Mexico on November 19, 2016. Tom & Zeus attended the September 3, 2016 concert at the DCU Center in Worcester, Massachusetts and share some of their memories. As usual, they guys breakdown the costumes, stage, set list and overall tour. They then rank the costumes, stage, set list and overall tour against the previous 3 tours they have ranked so far. This episodes sees the return of many favorite SIOL characters and a new one as well. Plus the exciting organic discussion of a possible SIOL Hall of Fame... Interested in more Shout It Out Loudcast content? Care to help us out? Come join us on Patreon by clicking below: SIOL Patreon   Please go to Klick Tee Shop for all your Shout It Out Loudcast Merchandise by clicking below: SIOL Merchandise at Klick Tee Shop   Please Email us comments or suggestions by clicking below: ShoutItOutLoudcast@Gmail.com   Please subscribe to us and give us a 5 Star (Child) review on the following places below: iTunes Podchaser Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Please follow us and like our social media pages clicking below: Twitter Facebook Page Facebook Group Page Shout It Out Loudcasters Instagram YouTube   Proud Member of the Pantheon Podcast click below to see the website: Pantheon Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Truth Wanted
Truth Wanted 04.41 10-22-2021 with ObjectivelyDan and Genevieve

Truth Wanted

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 80:51


Hello Truth-Seekers and welcome to another episode of Truth Wanted. This week Objectively Dan is joined by Genevieve!Our first caller is Barrie from New Zealand, who's asking how to talk to an otherwise brilliant family member who believes in wacky conspiracy theories. Dan points out that folks on both sides of the political spectrum are susceptible to delusions that feel empowering, and suggests Street Epistemology may be an effective approach. Genevieve concurs, which is exactly what we would expect from a lizard person in disguise.Next we have Mark in Oregon, who saw a UAP and as one does, grabbed his eldest cell phone and got it on video. Sadly, our hosts can't review the evidence live on the show, and remind Mark that unidentified doesn't mean aliens.Mark's footage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCXN-WUGvrQCassius in Virginia wants our hosts to offer advice on how to combat the Old Testament/New Testament, old covenant/new covenant apologist argument. Dan makes the point that objective morality shouldn't magically change one day two thousand years ago, because “Jesus”. Genevieve thinks Christians just aren't familiar enough with the OT to really grasp how awful it is, and reiterates that their god is allegedly eternal and unchanging. You can't change the rules in the middle of the game Yahweh! The hosts wrap up by pointing out that the Christian notion of a deity seems to evolve with human culture. Seems sus…Next up is Tony in Mexico is seeing conflicting COVID information on social media, and is seeking methods to vet this content. Dan reminds Tony that the Colgate College of Fresh Breath is not a reliable medical school, and that the vast majority of medical professionals are in agreement. Genevieve points out that social media is not the best place to get accurate medical advice, and directs Tony to consult accredited sources. Both hosts agree that no drug is without side effects, and the evidence agrees that being vaccinated is far less risky to your health than the alternative.Finally we talk to Casey in Colorado, who's bringing a follow up to last week's conversation about cryonics. Casey doesn't see the harm in a small chance to be thawed out sometime in the future, and is aware that the company could conceivably go out of business. Our hosts are proponents of bodily autonomy, and put this one on ice until the science is clear.That's our show tonight folx, stay safe, and get the jab if you haven't already!

The John Batchelor Show
1784: AMLO of Mexico consolidates his power. Mary Anastasia O'Grady @MaryAnastasiaOG @WSJOpinion

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 10:50


Photo: AMLO of Mexico consolidates his power. Mary Anastasia O'Grady  @MaryAnastasiaOG  @WSJOpinion  https://www.wsj.com/articles/mexico-american-assets-obrador-amlo-energy-11634496785 Mary Anastasia O'Grady, @MaryAnastasiaOG  Wall Street Journal editorial board and “The Americas” columnist

The Book Review
One Factory and the Bigger Story It Tells

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 73:51


In “American Made,” Farah Stockman writes about the downfall of manufacturing employment in the United States by focusing on the lives of workers at one Indianapolis factory that was relocated to Mexico. Stockman, a member of The New York Times editorial board, talks about the book on this week's podcast.“I really think we've seen unions in a death spiral,” she says. “And part of the reason is globalization. You had so many people who fought for these manufacturing jobs to be good-paying jobs, and decent jobs that you could raise a family on. They didn't used to be, but they were after the labor movement had a long struggle and a long fight. And as soon as we start seeing pensions and health care and decent wages, and as soon as Blacks and women start getting that stuff, now factories can move away. They can go to other countries. And it really undercut unions' ability to demand things and to strike. And you saw a lot less appetite among workers for asking for stuff like that, because now everybody just has to beg those factories to stay.”Benjamín Labatut visits the podcast to discuss his book “When We Cease to Understand the World,” a combination of fact and fiction about some of the most ground-shifting discoveries in physics. Labatut explains why he gave himself license to imagine the lives and thoughts of some of the scientists featured — Einstein, Schrödinger and Heisenberg among them.“What I'm trying to do is for people to understand just how mad these ideas seemed at the time to the very people who discovered them,” Labatut says. “And I had to use these characters for people to get a sense of how brutal the beauty was that these men were seeing for the first time.”Also on this week's episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history as it celebrates its 125th anniversary; Elizabeth Harris has news from the publishing world; and Gal Beckerman and Lauren Christensen talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.Here are the books discussed in this week's “What We're Reading”:“Dirty Work” by Eyal Press“Invisible Child” by Andrea Elliott“Beautiful World, Where Are You” by Sally Rooney

Stories of Hope - A Project Mexico Podcast
#30 - Answering YOUR Questions! (Feat. Faeli Heise)

Stories of Hope - A Project Mexico Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 40:17


Greetings everyone! We have a very special episode for you all this week. Firstly, we are answering the question YOU all sent in! And secondly, we are joined by the past host of the podcast, Faeli Heise! It's a blast of an episode, answering questions such as what are some of the favorite foods of the boys, how to become an intern, and what our favorite shirt is! So sit back, plug in some headphones, and enjoy the show! Where to find & support Faeli: https://www.facebook.com/faelifaraway & https://bit.ly/3DUuCdE Sign up for homebuilding and internships at: www.projectmexico.org If you have a question you want to have answered on the show you can send them to: pmstoriesofhope@gmail.com If you would like to contact Project Mexico & St. Innocent Orphanage, you can call us at: (619)-426-4610 Instagram: @projectmexicosio Facebook: Project Mexico & St. Innocent Orphanage

Super Dario World Podcast
Mexico's Decalogue For Video Games

Super Dario World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:44


The President of México recently came out with a decalogue of guidelines for better video game use.

Mexico Matters
Rebalancing Relationships with Former USTR Robert Lighthizer

Mexico Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:56


In this episode, Mariana Campero speaks with former United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer about USMCA and the principles and goals that guided its creation versus the old NAFTA. They also discuss the benefits and limits of the North American market, the issues behind supply chain disruptions, the importance of protecting jobs and livelihoods, and why Mexico matters to the United States.

Super Saints Podcast
The Life of Saint John Paul II

Super Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 88:25


Saint Pope John Paul II"Our walk with our most precious Pope John Paul II began in June of 1979. We had come back to our Church four years before and once we tasted of the vine (our 2000 years of unbroken heritage), we couldn't stay away from all that was Catholic and Church. We took every opportunity to return to the roots of our Faith - the Holy Eucharist, Mother Mary, the Saints, the Angels, and the Martyrs, making Journeys of Faith to Europe, the Holy Land,Mexico, and Canada."More about the Popes CollectionJourneys of Faith Bob and Penny Lord's StoreJourneys of Faith Blog Subscribe to our Free Blog Easy PeasyBob and Penny Lord TV Channel Miracles of the Eucharist, Apparitions of Mary, and lives of the Saints videos on demand.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bobandpennylord?fan_landing=true)

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz
FDA Says It Will Use Reddit And Other Sources To Learn More About CBD And Delta-8 THC Effects

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 4:30


Today in cannabis news: The FDA announces that it will search Reddit for information on the effects of delta-8 THC, CBD and other cannabinoids; Canada logs over CAD $1 billion in nationwide cannabis flower sales in the first half of the year; and Mexico's Senate president states that legislators might soon be considering national cannabis policy reform measures yet again. It's Friday, October 22 and TRICHOMES.com is bringing you the top cannabis news from around the web. You can also listen on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, or Spotify–search TRICHOMES and subscribe!

Youse Guys and that Podcast
Episode 96: Mexican black market w/Brandon from Agorist Nexus

Youse Guys and that Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:02


Brandon from Agorist Nexus came back to the show to cover his experience with the black market down in Mexico, the libertarian nature of small towns in Mexico & more. We were not able to cover all of this on episode 89 when Brandon first told us about his big move, so this episode is an addendum to 89. Enjoy! Image source: pri.org  Check out the growing blog section, contributions by Bryan, Paul B from B-town & Jay. Youse Guys are (support us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram & spread the word!): @youseguyspod @angel_soundgirl @thebloodletting @jaycoleau @bryanp789 Sponsors: www.agoristnexus.com/ Rae Faba - fine art from the Great Lakes Team Mandalore - keep cycling weird i paint akron -Local artists bringing art instruction to the masses. Art for the people, forever!! https://www.etsy.com/shop/AkronApothecary   Check out our sponsor! BUY TODD'S GAY SOAP! DEFEAT SWAMP ASS!! 

Lucha Central Podcast Network
Lucha Central Weekly - Ep 75 - FTR Wins AAA Gold, Zelina Vega Takes The Crown, MLW, Gino Medina and more!

Lucha Central Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 119:18


It's another jam packed edition of Lucha Central Weekly! Join hosts Miranda Morales, Brendan Barr, and Dusty Murphy as they take you on your weekly journey around the world of lucha libre. This week the trio discusses FTR winning AAA gold in AEW (under masks?!?!), Zelina Vega going all the way to the throne in the WWE Queen's Crown Tournament, MLW, and highlights of the crew's Gino Medina interview. All this plus a look around each promotion, This Week In Lucha, and so much more!For the best in lucha libre coverage, keep it tuned to Lucha Central:http://luchacentral.com 

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https://twitter.com/LuchaCentralCom 

https://www.instagram.com/luchacentral/ 

https://www.youtube.com/c/luchacentral/videos

New Books in History
Viviana B. MacManus, "Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:41


Today I talked to Viviana MacManus, author of Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars published by the University of Illinois Press in 2020. It has just received Honorable Mention for the 2021 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize. The National Women's Studies Association awards the prize for groundbreaking scholarship in women's studies that makes significant multicultural feminist contributions to women of color/transnational scholarship. Viviana McManus is at the department of Spanish and French Studies, Occidental College in Los Angeles. Her current research focuses “on feminist uses of horror in contending with gender state and racialized violence in Latin American film and literature”. In Disruptive Archives, Macmanus throws light on the many women activists who survived the years of repression in Argentina and Mexico and who have been relegated to the category of the unseen or are portrayed as underlings to the men who they fought alongside with. She also discusses how human rights texts and masculinist Left accounts of dictatorships have made women's struggles invisible as they have remained silent and consequently helped post dictatorship regimes who have a vested interest in brushing uncomfortable truths under the carpet. Minni Sawhney is a professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Viviana B. MacManus, "Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:41


Today I talked to Viviana MacManus, author of Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars published by the University of Illinois Press in 2020. It has just received Honorable Mention for the 2021 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize. The National Women's Studies Association awards the prize for groundbreaking scholarship in women's studies that makes significant multicultural feminist contributions to women of color/transnational scholarship. Viviana McManus is at the department of Spanish and French Studies, Occidental College in Los Angeles. Her current research focuses “on feminist uses of horror in contending with gender state and racialized violence in Latin American film and literature”. In Disruptive Archives, Macmanus throws light on the many women activists who survived the years of repression in Argentina and Mexico and who have been relegated to the category of the unseen or are portrayed as underlings to the men who they fought alongside with. She also discusses how human rights texts and masculinist Left accounts of dictatorships have made women's struggles invisible as they have remained silent and consequently helped post dictatorship regimes who have a vested interest in brushing uncomfortable truths under the carpet. Minni Sawhney is a professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Caribbean Studies
Viviana B. MacManus, "Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:41


Today I talked to Viviana MacManus, author of Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars published by the University of Illinois Press in 2020. It has just received Honorable Mention for the 2021 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize. The National Women's Studies Association awards the prize for groundbreaking scholarship in women's studies that makes significant multicultural feminist contributions to women of color/transnational scholarship. Viviana McManus is at the department of Spanish and French Studies, Occidental College in Los Angeles. Her current research focuses “on feminist uses of horror in contending with gender state and racialized violence in Latin American film and literature”. In Disruptive Archives, Macmanus throws light on the many women activists who survived the years of repression in Argentina and Mexico and who have been relegated to the category of the unseen or are portrayed as underlings to the men who they fought alongside with. She also discusses how human rights texts and masculinist Left accounts of dictatorships have made women's struggles invisible as they have remained silent and consequently helped post dictatorship regimes who have a vested interest in brushing uncomfortable truths under the carpet. Minni Sawhney is a professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Viviana B. MacManus, "Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:41


Today I talked to Viviana MacManus, author of Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars published by the University of Illinois Press in 2020. It has just received Honorable Mention for the 2021 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize. The National Women's Studies Association awards the prize for groundbreaking scholarship in women's studies that makes significant multicultural feminist contributions to women of color/transnational scholarship. Viviana McManus is at the department of Spanish and French Studies, Occidental College in Los Angeles. Her current research focuses “on feminist uses of horror in contending with gender state and racialized violence in Latin American film and literature”. In Disruptive Archives, Macmanus throws light on the many women activists who survived the years of repression in Argentina and Mexico and who have been relegated to the category of the unseen or are portrayed as underlings to the men who they fought alongside with. She also discusses how human rights texts and masculinist Left accounts of dictatorships have made women's struggles invisible as they have remained silent and consequently helped post dictatorship regimes who have a vested interest in brushing uncomfortable truths under the carpet. Minni Sawhney is a professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Latin American Studies
Viviana B. MacManus, "Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:41


Today I talked to Viviana MacManus, author of Disruptive Archives: Feminist Memories of Resistance in Latin America's Dirty Wars published by the University of Illinois Press in 2020. It has just received Honorable Mention for the 2021 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize. The National Women's Studies Association awards the prize for groundbreaking scholarship in women's studies that makes significant multicultural feminist contributions to women of color/transnational scholarship. Viviana McManus is at the department of Spanish and French Studies, Occidental College in Los Angeles. Her current research focuses “on feminist uses of horror in contending with gender state and racialized violence in Latin American film and literature”. In Disruptive Archives, Macmanus throws light on the many women activists who survived the years of repression in Argentina and Mexico and who have been relegated to the category of the unseen or are portrayed as underlings to the men who they fought alongside with. She also discusses how human rights texts and masculinist Left accounts of dictatorships have made women's struggles invisible as they have remained silent and consequently helped post dictatorship regimes who have a vested interest in brushing uncomfortable truths under the carpet. Minni Sawhney is a professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Delhi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

Return To Tradition
There May Be Hope For The FSSP In Mexico

Return To Tradition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 13:42


Yes, some dialogue may be happening after all. RtT's official Sponsor: https://gloryandshine.com/ https://praylatin.com https://www.charitymobile.com/rtt.php https://www.devoutdecals.com/ Sources: https://www.returntotradition.org Contact Me: Email: return2catholictradition@gmail.com Support My Work: Patreon https://www.patreon.com/AnthonyStine SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.net/return-to-tradition Physical Mail: Anthony Stine PO Box 3048 Shawnee, OK 74802 Follow me on the following social media: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbgdypwXSo0GzWSVTaiMPJg https://www.facebook.com/ReturnToCatholicTradition/ https://twitter.com/pontificatormax https://www.minds.com/PiusXIII https://gloria.tv/Return%20To%20Tradition mewe.com/i/anthonystine Back Up https://www.bitchute.com/channel/9wK5iFcen7Wt/ anchonr.fm/anthony-stine +JMJ+ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anthony-stine/support

The NewsWorthy
Alec Baldwin's Prop Gun Kills, Trump's Social App & Winter Weather Predictions - Friday, October 22nd, 2021

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 13:02


The news to know for Friday, October 22nd, 2021! We'll tell you what's known so far about movie star Alec Baldwin firing a prop gun on set that killed a cinematographer and hurt a director. Also, the number of migrants arrested at the U.S.-Mexico border hit a new record high. And what weather to expect where you live this winter. Plus, former President Trump revealed plans for his new social media app, the U.S. government turned the tables on a Russian hacking group, and Netflix is bringing movies beyond your living room. Those stories and more in around 10 minutes! Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by kiwico.com (Listen for the discount code) and Policygenius.com Become a NewsWorthy INSIDER! Learn more at www.TheNewsWorthy.com/insider            

EVERYNIGHTNIGHTS PODCAST
SECOND TO NUN | EVERYNIGHTNIGHTS PODCAST #132

EVERYNIGHTNIGHTS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 125:52


Snow and Juju are back on the podcast dressed as nuns this time, talking about Snow going to Mexico solo, other countries vs the USA, blowing up an airplane pillow on the plane with someone famous next to her, Brian Laundrie, Alec Baldwin, movie set accidents, the death penalty, Trumps new social media, and much more

First Class Fatherhood
#547 Brandon Leake

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 20:44


Episode 547 Brandon Leake is a First Class Father and Winner of America's Got Talent season 15. He was the first ever spoken word poet on the popular competition show. He received the Golden Buzzer in the first round from Howie Mandel, who was a guest on Episode 467 of First Class Fatherhood. Brandon performed pieces about his sister who died and his father who abandoned him. He was named the champion of the 15th season in September 2020, took home the $1 million dollar cash prize, a brand new car and the opportunity to star in Luxor Las Vegas. He will begin performances at the Luxor on November 4th. He has performed in 36 US states, New Zealand, Mexico and Canada and has released a poignant new album titled “Level”. In this Episode, Brandon shares his Fatherhood journey which includes two children under two years old. He discusses the impact of growing up without a father and the need to have more positive male role models in society. He describes the power of creativity and gives advice for parents of kids interested in poetry. He talks about his upcoming performances at the Luxor in Las Vegas. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! BRANDON LEAKE - https://linktr.ee/calledtomovectm Subscribe to First Class Fatherhood and watch on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 SPONSORS: DML CBD - https://dmlcbd.com Promo Code: Father SeatGeek - https://seatgeek.com Promo Code: FirstClass Save: $20 off tickets MY PILLOW - https://www.mypillow.com Promo Code: Fatherhood Save Up To 66% Off 1-800-875-0219 More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace First Class Fatherhood Merch - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/first-class-fatherhood-/we+are+not+babysitters-A5d09ea872051763ad613ec8e?productType=812&sellable=3017x1aBoNI8jJe83pw5-812-7&appearance=1 Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

Cold Water Podcast
NUESTRAS VACACIONES EN PUERTO RICO

Cold Water Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 29:33


Episodio especial del Tres Bajo Zero con un invitado especial John Nazario.  En este episodio John nos habla de su mision metiendose en un concierto y conociendo al artista urbano Eladio Carrion.  Luego le contamos de nuestras vacaciones en la isla del encanto Puerto Rico y todas nuestras experiencias.Instagram:@tresbajozeropodcastFacebook:Tres Bajo Zero PodcastHosted by:Raul LopezJoshua QueroGabriel Del ValleJohn Nazario

Straight-Talk Solar Cast
Solar + Industry Updates

Straight-Talk Solar Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 13:47


In this week's podcast we discuss the recent updates with the solar installer license, Net Energy Metering changes and solar in Mexico. Great to be back! About Jamie Duran & Solar Harmonics Brought to you by Solar Harmonics in Northern California, who invite their customers to “Own Their Energy” by purchasing a solar panel system for their home, business, or farm.  You can check out the website for the top solar energy equipment installer, Solar Harmonics, here. In each episode we discuss questions facing people making the decision to go solar. The solutions to your questions are given to you – straight  – by one of the leading experts in the solar industry, Jamie Duran, president of Solar Harmonics. Feel free to search our library for answers to questions that you're facing when considering solar. About Adam Duran & Magnified Media Solarcast is produced and co-hosted by Adam Duran, director of Magnified Media. Based in San Francisco & Walnut Creek, California, Magnified Media is an internet marketing agency focused on online marketing, local and national SEO, website design and customer generation for companies of all sizes. Magnified Media helping company leaders master their marketing by: • getting their website seen at the top of Google rankings, and • getting them more online reviews, • creating media content that engages with their audience. In his spare time, Adam enjoys volunteering on the board of several community-based non-profits and hosting his podcast Local SEO in 10.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Thursday 10/21 - Hour 2

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 37:21


More on the discover of the remains confirmed to be those of Brian Laundrie in Florida. Listeners comment. A salmonella outbreak in onions from Mexico has sicked over 600 people in 37 states. Rudy Salas, the latest candidate to enter the Congressional race for D-21 in CA is in hot water over federal campaign finance rules after political signs used in his state campaign were recently repurposed. The trial of Paul and Ruben Flores in the death of Cal Poly student Kristin Smart in May 1996 is set for 4/25/2022 in San Luis Obispo County.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Back Door Cover
NFL Week 7 w/ ALGO & Can't Miss Mitch

Back Door Cover

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 36:41


Mitch calls in from Mexico to preview week 7 ALGO picks with Brad. Special thanks to Early Bird CBD, a great partner to Back Door Cover and the reason we're able to keep the show rollin. Show Early Bird your thanks by visiting www.earlybirdcbd.com/bdc and you'll get for 20% off your first order. Thanks for listening,

PRI's The World
Controversial TV pundit shakes up French politics

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:03


So far, many have considered France's presidential election next April a close race between President Emmanuel Macron and far-right candidate Marine Le Pen. But recently, far-right columnist and TV commentator Eric Zemmour has been soaring in opinion polls, throwing the race wide open. And, court battles are keeping the Biden administration from completely undoing the Trump-era "Remain in Mexico" policy. It's kept thousands of asylum-seekers waiting in Mexican border towns while their asylum petitions move through US courts. Plus, blues-rock musician Pascal Danaë and his trio, "Delgrès," has a new album called “4 a.m.” Danaë tells us about how his ancestors in Guadeloupe, and seeing his great-great-grandmother's affidavit of her freedom from slavery in 1841, influenced the trio's new album. 

Radical Personal Finance
Is it Cheaper to Live in Mexico or the USA?

Radical Personal Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 57:20


The Richie Allen Show
Episode 1352: The Richie Allen Show Thursday October 21st 2021

The Richie Allen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 109:29


Richie is joined by Max Igan.Max is a broadcaster, writer and researcher. He has just left his home in Brisbane Australia and moved to Mexico. Max believed that if he didn't get out of Australia he would forever be banned from travelling unless he accepted a covid-19 jab. He now believes that he may never see his homeland again.Max shares his extraordinary story with Richie. Do not miss this show. For more on Max Igan visit www.thecrowhouse.com 

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC182 - Dr. Judith Grisel Author of Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:26


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!  Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Link to Judy's Book:  https://amzn.to/3DTeXet     Hello Loves, Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and that just goes to show, if I can do it, you can too.   Today I'm talking with Judith Grisel. She holds a PhD in Neuroscience, she's a professor at Bucknell University and author of the highly impactful book “Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction”   What is so interesting about her is that once she got sober, like a lot of us, she wanted to help others suffering from addiction, but she took it to a whole other level! She got her Phd in neuroscience to try to cure addiction! I'm so in awe of her.    This book is full of the mechanics and mechanisms of addiction which really takes the shame out of having mental illness because it demonstrates that anyone could fall prey to addiction. I listened to the audio version of the book, which, btw, I loved  because her voice is so soothing, but I also got the paperback because I wanted to really study some of the concepts she goes into. Plus there's a few pictures in it so there's that.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! With that, please enjoy this episode with Judy.   Transcript: Arlina Allen  0:08   Let's see. Judy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. I'm really happy to be here. Arlina is it okay to call you, Judy? Oh, yes. Dr. Chris. No, please. Thank you. Well, listen, I am so excited to talk to you. I have your book. I posted on social media, I was like, I have a big announcement. And I'm talking to the author of never enough the neuroscience and experience of addiction. those that know me know that I'm completely obsessed with the mind the brain. I know sometimes people think of those as two different things, but we can kind of get into it. But what I thought was so good about this book, right? And what I love about science in general, is that it has a way when we you understand sort of the mechanics of it, it kind of depersonalized us and helps us to answer or resolve the things like guilt and shame which she which seemed to me to be a block or a barrier to healing. So I thought maybe we could start first with your a little bit of your story. Like what is I know you've been sober for 35 years? Congratulations.   Unknown Speaker  1:29   It is long time. Yeah. really grateful. Yeah, I it's funny that you mentioned guilt and shame, because I, I could see in my own life, how initially, drugs end up including alcohol were sort of the self or guilt and shame that was just it is still sort of deep in my bones. I'm not sure if it's genetic, or environmental or what, but I am, well acquainted with self criticism, and just, I guess, feelings of unworthiness. And I almost didn't realize that until I had my first drink, which was right about the time of my 13th birthday. And I was a good drink. I mean, I had little sips here and there, but I got loaded for the first time at that age. And more than anything else, it was this great relief, because I suddenly either didn't care or was made, you know, kind of transiently whole in a way that was so profound, so people talk about it all the time. But it did literally feel as if that absence was running over and you know, with fullness, I guess and so, I because I was off to the races pretty pretty dramatically. I grew up in a I guess there's no such thing as a typical home, but I was certainly fairly advantaged and you know, had no big traumas. I guess that's also kind of a funny thing to say. But you know, in light of how hard it is to grow up, I think I was fairly on the easy half anyway. And, but I got this alcohol, I spent 10 years taking as much of every single mind altering drug I could find. I remember one time I found some pills and I just, you know, took them, I was kind of, and I still am, I guess a little bit all or none so I, I was definitely I went from none to all. And as a result, I was kicked out of my first school in 10th grade. It was a, you know, girls Catholic school, so they didn't go for the kind of thing I was up to. And then to colleges I was expelled from and I was homeless intermittently, often, I contracted hepatitis C sharing dirty needles. And I hated myself really, I did hate myself that was probably my bottom was as kind of self loathing, so that I was just a teeny bit unwilling even though at the time, right around the time my 23rd birthday, I thought, drugs and alcohol were the solution to my problems of the cause. I was sort of willing to go to what I thought was going to be like a spa, an educational spa, which they was treatment. This was in the 80s so I had no idea about drug treatment at all. I just heard the word treatment and it seemed to be something I deserved. So anyhow, I ended up in what was more like a hospital for crazy adolescence and, and there without drugs in my body for a few weeks, I got kind of scared at the disaster of my life. And, and I guess I wasn't you know, it's an interesting thing as we talk about how we have to sort of see it and be willing to change. I was barely willing, I feel like I was kind of plucked out of my situation. And I had just enough grace or openness. I am sort of an experimentalist at heart. And I, I think I figured they were all saying to me from going on too much, by the way. Arlina But anyway, I was saying, you know, if you want to live, you're gonna have to quit using and I thought, No way. There's got to be another way work around. Yeah, work around, there's a backdoor somewhere. So I figured I would cure my addiction was going to take me seven years, I was going to stay clean for that seven years. Well, I solved the disease of addiction, which is what everybody was saying. And then I would use and so I was open minded and totally, you know, arrogant ignorance, naive, I don't know. But I, I was willing to do seven years, I guess,   Arlina Allen  6:26   what was the seven years to get your degree? You know,   Unknown Speaker  6:28   no, I think I wasn't thinking that clearly. I figured that I started when I was 13, I was 23, I decided I wasn't really in terrible shape, you know. So it was like seven years of intense addiction. Somehow it seemed balanced to me, if I could clear it up in seven years, and then there was just no way you were gonna tell me, I was going to spend the rest of my life without drugs, which is what my life is completely about by that time. So yeah, I was scared enough to be willing enough to be open enough to try a different way temporarily. And I remember when seven years came, by the way, and went and I looked around my life was a zillion times better. It wasn't, you know, easy, by any means. But it was definitely better. And my curiosity had kind of come back. And so I, you know, kind of a data time is, you know, stuck it out. And so here I am, 35 years clean and sober, still have not cured addiction, still very interested in the role of science in understanding and treating and preventing addiction, but also recognize that there's a lot that science doesn't know. And so, yeah, I think, yeah, it's been a it's been a fun, rich trip.   Arlina Allen  8:07   It's fun. That's, that's awesome. I mean, we were people who insist on having a time that's for sure. I think that's so amazing that so so you became abstinent at 23. From then on, he became abstinent.   Unknown Speaker  8:22   I mean, I smoked a few cigarettes and I'm completely addicted to coffee, but I don't think that his account had other than nicotine, any mind altering chemicals, and I've been tempted many times, so it's not like I just said, you know, that's it for me, I guess. Yeah, just a long, long time.   Arlina Allen  8:46   You know, I knew that you and I were going to be friends when you talked in your book about like, the your love of weed. Oh, my gosh, if I there was a period of time that if I was awake, I was high. Right? I grew up in the church and the preacher's daughter. The pastor's daughter once told me she's like, I'm high. So often that not being high was as my altered reality. And I was like, Oh, my God, you're my hero. I want to be just like you. And I was. But in your book, you talk about how I see after I got sober. It took me a little over a year to go a single day without wishing for a drink. That is rough. But it was more than nine years before my craving to get high abated during that, and I think I'm so glad that you've mentioned that because I think a lot of people especially those who are 12, step oriented, are you know, they hear stories about like, the obsession to use is lifted, or they're on this pink cloud. And I think for people who don't have that experience, they feel They're doing something wrong. Right. But   Unknown Speaker  10:02   I think for Bill Wilson, right, it was just an overnight thing. And for many of us, it's sometimes slowly and for I was definitely have a slow variety. I, I really, and when I say, you know, for the craving to abate, I really seriously wish to get high for most days, those nine years. Yeah. And I, you know, the more time that went by the more, I could see what was at risk. So when I first got clean, you know, there's nothing to lose, because you're at rock bottom. But, you know, as a result of putting one foot in front of the other things got much better. So, you know, then I could kind of see that, and then I remember so well, I can almost taste it the experience of not wanting to smoke, and I can remember how all the sudden, I was okay to be in concerts that were indoors with good weed around me. Or, you know, I was sort of indifferent. Like I was like, I had been to alcohol. You know, I'm, I have served alcohol to friends. And I was kind of in that position, like, I don't care if you smoke or not. And then it got I had the craving come back. I was, I was joke about this, but right around menopause. I just knew that, for me, an antidote to the anxiety and just sort of the brittle angst of hormonal changes, I guess was going, you know, could be smoking. And, you know, anxiety is so epidemic, and I hadn't really had a ton of it until, and there was other things going on in the world, we can just say at that. But, anyhow, oh my gosh, and I think I say this in the book, too. But I, I, at the time, I was thinking maybe I'll get cancer and my doctors make me smoke. And then little I do you know, I mean, I was wishing for, you know, some kind of serious illness. So   Arlina Allen  12:23   our minds play funny tricks on us, it doesn't matter how long you're sober. It's just weird layer. If that was ever a solution in your mind. I've heard that dopamine is like the Save button. Right? I don't know if you've ever heard of Dr. Andrew Haberman, he talks about how in nature like a deer that will find water, they get like dopamine is released. And that's how they remember where the water is. And it's almost similar for us. Like when we do something that makes us feel good. Dopamine is then released. And it helps us to remember what made us feel good. And I feel like it's burned in my psyche that if I take a bomb hat that I'm going to feel good. And I have other solutions, but it's all it's I don't think that idea is ever gonna leave me, you know, 27 years sober. I was telling you earlier that my younger son went to rehab. And this all was predicated because we found a Bag of Weed in his room and duty, I had not held a bag of marijuana for almost 30 years. And when it was in my hand, this plastic baggie, it was like I was a teenager again. And my inner drug addict was like, well, maybe we should, maybe we could maybe maybe. And I was like, I was actually a little alarmed almost a little bit of shame. Like seriously, after all this time, after all the work I've done. It's still there. I mean, it's just so engrained in my brain, I guess.   Unknown Speaker  14:00   Absolutely. And I think the one of the interesting things about the story, you just told us that the ability of a drug to make to release dopamine is different across the population. So for some people, that marijuana let's say, or alcohol doesn't do much to that for me, and for other people. It's really a potent signal. And I think that is part of the reason some of us are more at risk than others and and also the reason why it's not a really reasonable argument to say, you know, why don't they just put it down because it is like a thirsty person finding water as opposed to somebody who's completely satisfied finding water, you know, you can take it or leave it. So I think that's true. And also the brain. You know, learning is absolutely persistent. So Pretty sure we will both be I guess subject to those kinds of, you know, triggers through our until we die.   Arlina Allen  15:11   Yeah, maybe, maybe this is a good time to ask you, you know, what is what's different in that? So you're you have your PhD in neuroscience. And you know, he got sober and went on this quest to cure addiction. What have you found that's different about the brain of people who get addicted so quickly?   Unknown Speaker  15:34   Mm hmm. Well, I guess the, what I want to say first is that it's not simple, I thought I was gonna be a little switch that we were going to discover, and I wasn't alone in this, I think this was scientific understanding in the 80s, we'll find that, you know, broken switch or molecule or circuit and fix it. It's definitely not that way. So the causes of addiction are very complex and intersectional. They involve differences in dopamine and other genetic liabilities, or protective factors that make the the initial sensitivity to a drug, different across different people. So some try a drug for the first time and absolutely love it. About a third of people, for instance, try opiates and don't like them at all. And they usually try them in the doctor's office, but they find them aversive. So obviously, that's a good protective,   Arlina Allen  16:40   meaning, meaning they don't like the way they feel. Yeah, so weird to me,   Unknown Speaker  16:45   largely genetic. I know. Right? So very big individual differences. And then there are sex differences. So women tend to appreciate drugs that provide relief. And then justice is overgeneralizing a little bit Sure, overall, tend to appreciate drugs that make them feel good. And so women don't want to feel bad, and drugs help with that, certainly, especially and men like to feel good. Another big factor, and probably the largest factor more than genetic liability is adolescent exposure. So kids, like your son and my daughter are tuned into Well, they have, they have a particular kind of brain that is the adolescent brain that is really prone to trying new things, really prone to not worrying is certainly abstractly worrying about consequences. So they're less cautious. And they, they want to buck against whatever they're told, they shouldn't do. And those three traits like novelty seeking, and risk taking, and not really caring about consequences are ones that help them to become adults, if they just listened to their parents until they were 35. No one would really like that. So they they're designed to kind of say, not this, you know, I'm making my own way, which would be good if there wasn't so many high potency, dangerous ways of escaping at their fingertips. So I think through most of our evolutionary history, these you know, kids having that tendency is is no problem. The other thing that kids have in their brains are different about is that, and we all know this, they are terrific at learning. I'm teacher, and it's crazy, because and you probably noticed this with your own children, but they don't seem to even be paying attention. yet. They are like sponges information really goes in. And if they were learning French, or if they're learning addiction, both ways, their brain is really quick to take the experience and build it into the structures so that it's lasting, and I can learn French, or addiction, but your chances are so much lower. So if you start using any addictive drug, before you're 18 you have about a 25% chance of developing a substance use disorder. And the earlier you start using, the higher the chance, I started 13 so you know it was basically more likely than not. And that's because 13 year olds are great at picking up new information, much better than 33 year olds. So they if you if you Wait, on the other hand till you're 21, your chances are one in 25.   Arlina Allen  20:06   Wow, I told   Unknown Speaker  20:07   my kids that and I tell my students that and they all ignore me. Why? Because they're high novelty seeking high risk taking, and they don't really want to listen to the, you know, concerns or worries. I mean, that's not how they're designed. So we're in a kind of a perfect storm for them. And that, that is the best predictor of developing a problem starting early is starting or like,   Arlina Allen  20:30   you know what terrifies me nowadays I have a nephew who's 26 years old. And he's had four friends died from accidental fentanyl overdose, because for whatever reason, drug dealers are putting fentanyl and everything. And you know, these are pretty well adjusted kids. I don't think it's I know that there's a certain percentage of the population who indulge a little bit who don't have a disorder. Or maybe that's Yeah, is that is that true?   Unknown Speaker  21:02   Well, it's, it's more true if you start at 26. And if you start at 16, as I just said, but I think the reason that nose and everything is because it is so is it a traffic, it's so so potent, that a tiny bit can get the whole town high. So it's really advantageous to traffickers. And also, because people are having access to more and more chemicals. And when they start early, especially their reward pathway, the dopamine pathway we've been talking about is kind of desensitized, so they can't, you know, have a cup of wine coolers that doesn't do the trick at all anymore, they need something a little more, because they're sort of immune to the that dopamine, squirt? So yeah, unfortunately, I think that's another reason it's not gonna. We, I think focus, we've also noticed lately that there's more and more overdoses from methamphetamine, and then from somebody who's been looking at the trends for a long time, it's always be something and there's always going to be more potent, whatever. So it's not the drug itself, as much as this very narrow ledge that more and more of us are on trying to, I guess, medicate reality. And and so, you know, I think, I don't know how that is for your nephew. But it's a terrible lesson to have to learn for all of us.   Arlina Allen  22:51   It's just, it just makes me sick. I mean, I think there was a report that was released, I think it was at the end of March, there was a 12 year period that they were measuring overdoses that ended in March, and I think they track like 80,000 deaths. And, and I just think about all the families like all the mothers, all the all the fathers and siblings, and just everybody that's affected by so many deaths, and   Unknown Speaker  23:19   and I think a 40% increase in those deaths over the last year with COVID. So the isolation as Alicia is, has made, and also the the higher, you know, the more likely you are to find fentanyl, and whatever it is you're taking at, which is just hard to prepare for I think, biologically. Yeah. Yeah, I think it's, it's tragic. It's so tragic.   Arlina Allen  23:50   And then and then so my mind naturally goes, Well, what can we do about it? You know, it's like, we can understand, I love how, you know, science will sort of break down the mechanics. And once we understand, you know, alcohol is addictive drugs are addictive. I mean, there's a reason why they're illegal, right? It's because they're so harmful. But, you know, and then we can get into the causes, right? Like you mentioned, it's a very complex issue, you know, we you mentioned, do you that you didn't have any big trauma growing up, but I feel like, you know, we were sort of in that generation where we were not like things like ADHD and anxiety and depression weren't really talked about a whole lot. And we really didn't know how to treat those. And so our parents handled us with a lot of tough love. I got a lot of tough love and you know, from reading your book and listening to your interviews, it sounds like you were raised with that as well. And then your Can we just talk a little bit about your dad, like I wonder what it was. We talk a lot about science and it sort of leaves God out a little bit. But in my experience, it feels like there are things that are sort of serendipitous or magical about the unusual things that happen that lead us to a life of recovery. Like, what was your dad's role and your recovery?   Unknown Speaker  25:23   Um, yeah. So, so much in that question, especially, I guess I want to start by saying that I agree that we did not recognize trauma, and anxiety and all mental illnesses, wait, their response was, was so different, I think. And in my house, it was to push through both my father's parents were immigrants. And he dealt with life by controlling everything he could. And that worked great until he, you know, met 13 year old me. And I was absolutely out of control, by definition, and   Arlina Allen  26:11   he would have been terrifying to me.   Unknown Speaker  26:13   I was terrified. And I was I was, like, determinately, out of control. I mean, that was my goal to be absolutely out of control. And the more both my parents tried to kind of constrain me, the less manageable I was, and I guess I, I don't think I'm unique in this. I mean, I've raised three children. And so it's something built into the teenage neurobiology. And I had it probably in spades. So his way of life because   Arlina Allen  26:45   you're smart, smart kids are harder to race.   Unknown Speaker  26:48   I don't know. I'm also, one thing I like about myself more than if I have any smartness is, is that I'm, I guess, strong willed. And so I don't know if that actually goes with intelligence or not, but I'm not the one who's following so much. And so I wasn't named, I wasn't influenced really by too much of what people, you know, just like you said, you know, you try to get the information out. Drugs are dangerous, but it doesn't really have an impact my kids have grown up with man, they've been sort of forced to look at graphs and things. And, you know, they'll say to me, my daughter said to me the other day, you know, I know all this. But and that is sort of how I was, and I didn't know that much. My mother was giving me a reader's digest reprints you know, of how lead would damage your ovaries and stuff. But anyway, you're like,   Arlina Allen  27:49   Oh, good, I will get pregnant.   Unknown Speaker  27:51   No, I didn't. Yeah, wasn't on my radar at all. But anyhow, my father, because I think it was so painful to be around me. And to watch me his strategy, which is kind of in our family, I guess, was just denial that he even had a daughter. So during a period, after they kicked me out of the house, right about my 10th birthday. He, he would, and he would say that he had two sons. It was just too much for him. And this is kind of the way he is. So it's, and I think it's fragile. That's what he was. And he was raised to be fragile, because it was a lot to worry about, because they were poor immigrants and you know, a million ways to not make it and I think that's common for a lot of people today. So my father was just able to block it out. And we have a family friend who I dedicated the book to father, Marty Devereaux, who is this kind of an unbelievable, interesting person. He's in his 80s. Now, we're still good friends, but he is a psychologist, and has a lot of experience with addiction and also a Catholic priest. And he told my father, and don't my father's not really Catholic. I mean, he was raised Catholic, but that doesn't mean too much these days. So anyway, he   Arlina Allen  29:19   Where was he from? Marty Devereaux?   No, I'm sorry. Your said Your father was an immigrant. Oh,   Unknown Speaker  29:24   he was born in Atlantic City. But his mother was from Slovenia, and his father from Switzerland. And they met in Central Park. They were both, you know, one was a baker one was a housecleaner. And they sent two sons to college and wow. Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it's a pretty typical American story. Yeah, yeah. But um, anyway, Marty said take her out to dinner and bring her flowers like on a date. Well, I have No idea what how my father did this because he's, he's just not the type to waste any money on flowers, or two. And I was when I say I think I tried to convey this in the book. But when I imagined myself now at that moment, I was pretty deplorable. I was probably quite smelly and dirty. I was, at this point, sort of living in a one bedroom apartment with many people. And I was pretty gross. So anyway, this is when you were 23. I was not quite 23. So his takeaway? Yeah, so we he picked me up and you know, so not only was I gross, I was completely belligerent. I, I thought that my parents were terrible. And I didn't want any part of their fascist, you know, existence. And yet, I deserved a nice dinner, of course. So my big dilemma, I will not I really can still almost feel this was how we were going for early bird dinner, because it's my dad. And I'm very frugal. Yeah, he is wealthy and frugal. And   Arlina Allen  31:27   that's how I get wealthy.   Unknown Speaker  31:28   Yeah, I mean, this is sort of the first thing I guess. But anyway,   Arlina Allen  31:32   and that was a dad begged my dad, maybe it is a dead   Unknown Speaker  31:35   thing. He was also an airline pilot, so just not extremely cautious. He still is. And he's, he's in his 80s today, and we have a great relationship. But anyway, I was so stuck, because when he was picking me up, maybe quarter to five, but I had to figure out between 11 when I woke up and six hours later, how to be not too high when he came, you know, high enough, but not too high. And of course, this is harder and harder to achieve at this point in my life, because I could either be passed out or getting ready to be I mean, it was just hard to find that place. So anyway, he picks me up, he takes me out. And he said, and we talked about this still. Dude, I just wanting you to be happy. And I guess I should say, he doesn't remember saying that. But I know he said it. Because it was the most unlikely words that could ever come. And this is sort of what you were getting at, I guess where did those words come from? They're not my dad. My dad was worried about my teeth and the way you know, a lot of things but not my happiness ever. No, probably it's hard for him. And I had of course, no. No adequate response to that because I was absolutely miserable. And it went right into my heart. I fell apart. Yeah, it was a funny like tears   Arlina Allen  33:10   in my eyes. Just to think that the hard ass dad was so sweet, right? When you needed it the most. I know,   Unknown Speaker  33:17   you know what he tells me now it's funny. He, I was so out of it. I guess I don't remember the flowers. But he took me in his very clean car and my friends I guess to the beach to go for a swim that same day, that same after dinner. And we got to fill the sand. And that's what he remembers as his biggest stretch. And what I remember as his biggest stretch is him reaching across the table with his heart and saying, I want you to live basically. I mean, he sent me how I think he he met a lot by that. And my mother was not invited to the dinner. I hadn't spoken with her in a long time either. But she had been researching treatment centers for years she had had a court order actually in Florida, there's an act where you can commit somebody because of their addictions. And they thought over that a lot. But anyway, next thing I knew they flew me to a treatment center, which of course I had no idea what I was getting into and saved my life really. That place did. So I feel really fortunate that I had that opportunity to wake up a little bit as I think for the chances are that my father wouldn't have said that my mother wouldn't have had the resources to know what to do and I would have died on the streets probably not too much longer.   Arlina Allen  34:52   I feel like that really speaks to you know, people just didn't have solutions, right and they get so far straighted that their only choice is to disown right. Like I had that same experience with my mom, she disowned me on a regular basis, like she was an immigrant from Mexico. And although my father was, you know, his, his people have been here a long time. Like, they didn't know what to do with me either. And, you know, my dad was always the sweet and nurturing one, but he was, you know, he's former Marine, he was a government guy, he was kind of a hard ass, and in a lot of respects, but, you know, our parents, you know, just, it's just speaks to the love of a parent, you know, you want to save your kids. You know, you see your kids are suffering and like, my mother just didn't know how she was so frustrated that she would disown me on a regular basis. But I think when I think it's the contrast between like, a little bit of sweetness goes a long way, because it's not what we're used to. It's so shocking. Like, shocking to the system,   Unknown Speaker  36:00   let's thought about it a lot, because I do think there's a, I had a boyfriend at the time who died. Oh, overdose. And his parents were extremely sweet. So it's hard. And you could say they sweeted him into his last big use, but um, I don't know that there's a recipe I think if if there was one thing that, that I tried to do with is to show up and be honest, and I think it was so painful for my parents, both of my parents to just grapple with what happened to their little girl, that their tendency was to not show up. And I don't blame them. I mean, it's it's tough. It's tough raising teenagers sometimes because they're not that it's almost unrecognizable, you know, from the sweet nine year olds, or the 99 might become, but I think what we're called to do for each other is to tell the truth, not their truth. You know, I don't you know, you're speaking from him first himself. He said, Yeah, I was. I mean, I think this was true for him, I think, really at the core, and somehow he had the grace to find it. What all he really wants and all, probably any parent wants their kid to be well, and whatever well looks like for us. And I think the fact that he could say that was kind of miraculous.   Arlina Allen  37:42   Very, yeah, that was absolutely. sneak up for Marty, right?   Unknown Speaker  37:47   Yeah, yeah. Exactly. No, I   Arlina Allen  37:50   think yeah, it's, it's just, yeah, my mom was, she was really tough. And I remember growing up, she's going through her second divorce. And all my hair started falling out, like a lot I was under, and nobody knew what was going on. And you know, when it ended is one day, she let me curl up in her lap and cry. I had a good cry. And then my hair stopped falling out after that. Wow. Yeah. And I think it was like, there needs to be this balance. Like I feel like as a parent I attend like we tell our kids that we love them all the time. And I almost feel like maybe we maybe it's a little too much sweetness. You know, I have I have the the hard ass edge me because I think I inherited that from my mom. But you know it when you get something different from your parent, it is kind of jolting. It is kind of healing, it can be life changing, if it's different. So if you're sweet all the time, when you show up with boundaries that can be jolting. When you're a hard ass your whole life and you show up with a little bit of sweetness. It can be start, it's like a pattern interrupt, you know that. It's just kind of interesting. And I wanted to ask you a little bit   Unknown Speaker  39:09   of a story, by the way. But your mother obviously was disappointed, you know, and her own struggles, but that she was able to be with you. And warning I think that is really a bridge.   Arlina Allen  39:28   That was it made me feel you know, like the talk about original wounds, like I don't matter, or I'm unlovable because I'm either too much or not good enough. Right. Or maybe that I'm alone, you know, those original wounds, and I feel like I had all those but my mom, you know, in that moment, it's like those, like that moment that your dad had like they were willing to do something different. Like they had a glimmer of hope, like somebody gave them hope and they decided to do something different. And that's kind of what But you said your dad reached across the table with his heart, you know, and it was like, there is something that's transmitted, like when people are really vulnerable and honest and coming from their heart. That's so healing. Right? And I feel like that's a lot of what recovery has been about for me is that just that willing to be vulnerable and have a degree of humility, it's a lot of times kind of, like forced humility. It's like, like, I have to get honest about what what's really going on, so that I can get the solution. But you know, as a parent, you know, we're talking about our kids, and how do we reach our kids, because I think that's, you know, in this day and age, a lot of us that have had addiction issues, you know, we're worried about passing it down to our kids. And we thought we were talking earlier about leading by example, right, we need to lead by example for our kids, and it's so hard to know, I felt like we're walking this fine line. Because, you know, kids commit suicide all the time, like, you know, and the, there's all these ideas, like kids are like, a very aware of anxiety and depression, and being socially awkward, and there seems to be, you know, and as a parent, it's like, you want to encourage them to get help and take responsibility for their feelings at the same time, you don't want to push them too hard, because that is the ultimate threat is that they will commit suicide. Right. And it's, and I know that they're taking drugs to medicate, I took drugs to medicate. And I used to say that, you know, drugs, drugs, were my savior for a long time. If, if I had to feel, you know, especially those young years 1415 if I had to feel all the feelings, because I didn't have any coping skills, I don't know that I would have survived. So, you know, I know you've been trying to cure addiction, and what are some of the things that, you know, besides leading by example, for our kids, how can we, how do we, how do we fix this duty? How do we,   Unknown Speaker  42:08   I think we show up for each other is to start I don't know. But I, I do feel, and everybody says this, I guess every generation notices this, but I do think it is an inordinately challenging time to be growing up. I was saying to a student in my office, not too long ago, you know, if you're not anxious, you're crazy. Because and crazy is probably not the right word for Psychology at it. You know, and here I am a psychologist, I'm not all that correct times. But I think that you at least if you're not anxious, and you're growing up right now, you're somehow blind and deaf, or in denial, yeah, or in a massive denial, which I don't even know, I think that I think what's different, and what shifted for my dad, and what continues to be something that I work on, is to respond to all this pain, the natural response is to sort of curl up and close in, and to hide, and to take ourselves away. And as addicts you know, I still have a great capacity for denial that I have to check all the time. But I also found many tools to use. And that's why drugs are so compelling, because it was like, boom, you know, you've got a 10 foot wall now, between you and any realities, are safe and cozy, and delightful. And I think kids find drugs, you know, to do the same thing, but they also are stuck in a way because face it, that it's a tear, it's a hard time for any of us to be on the planet. And there's not a lot of great models of going through that awake and an honest and I guess, you know, I just try to put myself in the position of a nine year old, knowing, you know, probably on Instagram and every other thing, you know, how much suffering there is or is about to be. And then seeing the many ways, drugs and other ways that adults around are medicating and escaping. And even though you and I have been able to put down drugs, I think, at least for me, I guess I can still do want I naturally want to distance myself. And I don't I think that is a way to kind of abandon the nine year olds. I don't know how old you were when you're here was five out but I think as about maybe than nine or 10 Yeah, the metaphor is put our heads on each other's laps and, and just cry, you know, cry or or whimper or hope or try or touch each other I think in touch each other in the in the true spot where there is anxiety and depression and fear because if we can't do that and there's so many opportunities to escape I you know we're in a kind of a vortex going down the drain here because the more we escaped the worst things grow around us because we don't have to deal with them. And then the young people see oh my gosh, it's, you know, this is a crazy house. This being Earth. So I, I think or your family, I suppose but I, I guess we're both your mother and my father were able to do was recognize, you know, the truest piece of themselves and their children and respond honestly. Yeah. And that sometimes that might be kindness, sometimes that might not be kindness. But I think it's honesty, that's the, the, the thing we're really lacking or, or, you know, maybe the, the lifesaver would be Yeah,   Arlina Allen  46:44   I think in that moment, there was, you know, a high degree of empathy. Bernie Brown is a shame researcher, she talks about empathy is the antidote to shame. Right? I've heard people say that, you know, this is a disease of isolation and connection is the cure. And you know, I really feel like connection is one of those one of those solutions to all this, like, we need to connect with each other. We're, you know, as human beings, we actually really need each other.   Unknown Speaker  47:15   Oh, my goodness, yeah.   Arlina Allen  47:17   Yeah, I need to be around easily cope with stress   Unknown Speaker  47:20   is by social support. And there's tons of evidence that social support, not only mitigates, but also reverses the effects of stress. And it is, you know, surely a big part of, of getting better as individuals and also as communities and families, I think, recognizing that and it's tough because my parents kicked me out your your mother disowned you. And partly for me that facing the consequences of my decisions was helpful. But I do think that's harder because fentanyl wasn't around. You know, you you don't want to face them in the ultimate, you know, right, way too early. So I guess as parents we, we try to block a very tough line these weird. Yeah, it is hard.   Arlina Allen  48:23   Yeah. But I'm glad to hear that there's evidence that shows that social support mitigates and reverses stress, that's amazing. It kind of confirms everything that we knew, right? Like, we got sober we got social support, we, you know, had lots of people who had done it before us so learning by example, I hear that hope I've heard hope is hearing other people's experiences, which is why I do the podcast right? You know, people that listen, go Okay, you know, we can talk about the mechanics how, how the brain works, and all that and how it's affected by alcohol. And you know why it's a bad idea. But then hearing about like the turning point, like when your dad reached out to you, and you were at that place where I'm sure you had you were sick and tired of being sick and tired. Ready, just ready enough, you talk about just having just a tiny bit of willingness. It's a little chink in the armor. How long were you in that? That rehab in the 80s   Unknown Speaker  49:29   I was in for 20 days, which seemed like nine years and then I was in a halfway house for three months, which I calculated at the time so I know this is true was 1/27 of my life or something. I forget how I did that or something like that. I had some kind of crazy mula totally a rip off. I was so furious. But I, I was, like I say at the turning point, and there's been so many times, you know, I know where things are. Lena, we're talking about openness. And I think one way I could be honest, is to say, even after setting addiction for 35 years, and having all this personal and scientific experience, I still need to be open to all I don't know. And certainty is a lie, you know, certainty is the biggest illusion. And so here we are kind of trying to get through. And I think that is what I first had in my I was very certain until I'm in the treatment center. And I'm asked to try a different way. And I was troubled, because on one way I went, and I could see my way was not going great. Like it was really not going well. And I could see that without the drugs, you know, for a few weeks. But to do an another way that was extremely vague and chancy, and, you know, just seemed really crazy. To me. I was just stuck. And that, like you say this, just a tiny bit willing to say, I don't know. And, okay, you know, and this is a still, I think where I am I one of the things I love about recovery the most is that it is always different. And, you know, I thought that drugs were gonna give me this great, you know, every day is a big surprise, you know, who knows if it's the cops or that whatever. It just turned out to be adrenaline, but it was a grind, it was not really novel or interesting. And in fact, 35 years later, I'm I'm just astounded by how much mystery there is, in any day. It's just breathtaking. So I guess that I have to show up for that, you know, I have to not buy into the lie that I know exactly what I'm doing. Right?   Arlina Allen  52:20   I think the more we learn, the more we realize we don't know, a lot. You know, yeah, that is a I do love that about recovery is that every day is kind of new again, you know, and that we don't have to, and there's so much interesting research going on. Now I know that, you know, and I didn't I feel like we're running out of time, but that there is so much research now on helping people with chronic addiction through things like psychedelics. It's just like, you know, I I practice abstinence. So that's, let's face it, my life is fine. Like I don't, you know, need that. But for the chronic alcoholic who meets some criteria of like, you know, post traumatic stress disorder, and things like that. I know, Johns Hopkins is doing some interesting studies about that. That Yeah, there's still so much to learn about, about the brain and addiction and how to help people. Where do you see the focus of your work in the next, I don't know, five to 10 years?   Unknown Speaker  53:28   Well, can I just respond to this thing about the psychedelic so   Arlina Allen  53:33   Oh, sure. Yeah, cuz Yeah, you wrote a lot about it, and you're But well, I read some about   Unknown Speaker  53:36   And I think it's congruent with what other people are writing to that it may be those drugs may be a useful tool. But it reminds me that they go back to what you were saying earlier, the the benefit of those drugs is in their ability to help us connect with something bigger than ourselves, you know, which could be the love of other people. And I think that it reminds me that every drug is only doing nothing new, it's a total we have the capacity to do ourselves. So the way the pharmacology goes is that drugs work by exploiting pathways we already have. So in a way, this opportunity for transcending ourselves to connection with others, maybe helped by psychedelics, but those are not the answer. The answer is transcending ourselves by connecting with ourselves in something bigger than ourselves. So I would say that what I'm working on now Well, I there's so much that I am excited to do I wish I could stay up later, but I've got my research lab going. I'm studying sex differences in addiction. I'm also studying initial responses. to drugs and I'm interested in the genetic difference, individual differences that are mediated by an interaction of genes and say stress or other kinds of environmental influences. But I'm also hoping to write another book and I have this is funny because I'm, I don't really consider myself the book writing type, I'm kind of like the short, quick, get it done thing. And the first book took 10 years. So I don't have that a 10 years. I know so sad. Because I was busy, I was raising children and I was trying to get grants and we're, you know, grade papers and all that. So I can't do that, again, I don't, I have three books, so I'm probably not going to live long enough. So three books I want to write and I have a sabbatical coming up. And I'm hoping that I will have an opportunity to spend the year getting at least one of those out either on the adolescent vulnerability to addiction or on sex differences in the causes and consequences of addictive drugs, or just a kind of more philosophical take on. Because so a response to the opportunity that everybody alive on the planet has today to take substances and just as you were saying, sometimes for some people, those and some substances might be beneficial, and sometimes not. And I think that understanding and sort of finding your way to a personal ethic of how, what drugs in my life requires and appreciation of science, but also of you know, our honest assessment of who and where we are our development and what drugs are doing for instance, I this is just a little thing, but I read the other day that the marijuana industry is really exacerbating the droughts on the west coast. And that is a sort of a dilemma for this idea. And I mean, I I think there may be benefits also, but you know, it's not that our choices, if we know anything in October of 2021, we realize that our individual choices have impact on others, and so and on ourselves. So I guess I want to just consider that and not in a you know, there's a lot that can be said about it. So anyway, I'm excited about all those things. Who knows what tomorrow will bring, but I'm hoping to take a break from teaching it's been a tough year and a half with COVID Yeah, routines and yeah, yeah, I think we're all kind of hobbling through   Arlina Allen  58:03   Yeah, my heart goes out to all the teachers I know it's just been it's we're living in through unprecedented time so I really so grateful to all the teachers who've been able to hack it out and help our kids right it's it's really important work. You know, they I think they need as many people in their corner as they can get. So thank you for hanging it out and being available to all these kids. But I am so excited about your your book projects. I will personally be rooting for the one about adolescence.   Unknown Speaker  58:38   Me too, that one almost could write itself the data, you know, in the last 1520 years are overwhelming. And so it's really a good time to get that out. And, and adolescents are like sitting ducks today. And that is not their problem. That's all of our problem.   Arlina Allen  59:00   Oh yeah, they're our future. Right? I remember people saying that about us. Listen, thank you so much for your time today. When you get done with that book. You come on back and we'll talk about that one too.   Unknown Speaker  59:13   Okay. Arlina Thank you for having me. It's been really nice. Yeah, such   Arlina Allen  59:16   a pleasure. We'll talk soon thanks. Bye bye.

The Mark Milton Show with The Smash
Ep. 72, Seg. 1: Mexico and Mandates

The Mark Milton Show with The Smash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:02


Mr. “Mealtone” returns from his trip to Cancun and lives to tell about being bitten by a fish; the guys discuss the merits of vaccine and mask mandates and whether people should have a right to choose over losing their jobs.

The Takeaway
Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment 2021-10-21

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:27


Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment On October 1, a ruptured pipeline resulted in 25,000 gallons of crude spilling into the Pacific Ocean near Orange County, California. While the spill wasn't as bad as initially feared, it reignited a debate over offshore drilling. California has an aging pipeline infrastructure with questionable federal oversight. And this wasn't the only large oil spill this year. Less than a month ago, after Hurricane Ida, a federal satellite detected the most oil spills from space in the Gulf of Mexico after a weather event. The federal government started using satellites to track spills and leaks starting a decade ago. The Takeaway spoke with Catherine Kilduff, Senior Attorney at The Center for Biological Diversity, and Wilma Subra, who deals with environmental human health issues, on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network. Biden Administration Plans to Rein In "Forever Chemicals" On Monday, the Biden administration unveiled its plans to rein in so-called “forever chemicals,” or PFAS. PFAS refers to a group of more than 4,000 toxic chemicals that don't break down in the environment. PFAS are found in everything from our drinking water to our cookware. Even some rain jackets and cosmetics contain PFAS. But PFAS are also hazardous for our health. In fact, they've been linked with certain cancers, thyroid disease, and other health impacts, too. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Pat Rizzuto, chemicals reporter with Bloomberg Law.  Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Are Now Running 24/7 Last week, President Biden announced that the Port of Los Angeles will move towards operating 24/7 to address the shipping delays that have led to nationwide supply chain disruptions this year. The Port of Long Beach has also expanded its operations towards a 24/7 schedule in an attempt to solve the supply chain issue. The Takeaway hears from Dr. Afif El-Hasan, Physician-in-Charge at Kaiser Permanente San Juan Capistrano Medical Offices and spokesperson for the American Lung Association, as well as Mario Cordero, the executive director of the Port of Long Beach. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The Steve Gruber Show
Scot Bertram, President Biden was in Pennsylvania to talk about his Build Back Better agenda.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:00


Live—from the campus of Hillsdale College in beautiful Hillsdale Michigan— this is Scot Bertram in for Steve on the Steve Gruber Show for –Thursday October 21st 2021—   —Here are 3 big things you need to know—   Three— Fresh whole onions imported from Mexico are being linked to a salmonella outbreak in the U.S.  The CDC issued a food safety alert saying more than 650 people have been infected with the strain in 37 states as of October 18th.  It includes red, white and yellow onions that were distributed by ProSource Inc. and last imported on August 27th.         Two—The latest Ending Homelessness in Michigan annual report finds homelessness fell 19-percent in 2020 compared to 2019.  Eviction moratoriums enacted due to COVID-19 are credited with helping the numbers fall along with a state Eviction Diversion Program to give renters relief as they were hurt by the pandemic.     And number one— President Biden was in Pennsylvania to talk about his Build Back Better agenda.  Biden called his infrastructure package and the larger social spending bill bipartisan.  He insisted the measures won't increase the deficit and are fully paid for.  He told other jokes as well. Democrats are trying to complete a framework on the bill sometime this week.  

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field
Clemencia Caporale: NOLS Wilderness Medicine - Saving the Life of a Stranger and Spending the Day with Paul Petzold

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:50


Clemencia Caporale belongs to East Coast but currently lives in her Kimbo Camper and instructs for NOLS Wilderness Medicine and Prescott College. She graduated from the University of New Hampshire's Outdoor Education Program, attended the Audubon Expedition Institute's travelling master's program, and earned a Master in Environmental Education from Leslie University. Clemencia completed a NOLS semester in Baja, Mexico, where she learned backpacking, kayaking, and sailing skills. She has worked in many universities in outdoor education programs over the past 20 years. Long-distance hiking is one of her passion and has hiked more than 10,000 miles. She can ruin her shoes in three weeks!In this episode:   [3:51] Clemencia talks about her meeting with Paul Petzoldt, also known as the founder of NOLS and one of the first Outward Bound Instructors in the USA. She was a freshman in collage when a woman told her about having a job where she had to sleep out in the open, so after the class, she talk to the woman where she gave her some number and told her to call Paul. After going back to her dorm, she called him, and he later told her to come to his house to talk about the job further. After drinking a couple of hot beverages and sharing some stories and advice, they went to get lunch together. After a few more hours had gone by, he autographed two of his book and gave them to her without answering any sort of job-related questions. A few days later, in her outdoor class, Dan Garvey asked a question about everyone's weekend, and she told him that she met Paul Petzoldt when he immediately asked her that had she read his books and recommended her to read them.   [17:34] Caporale tells about the thru-hiking course where she took eight students on Appalachian Trail, about 100 miles. They had Privy not far away from where they were camping, but it was a rainy day and was very foggy. They were going to camp for eight days, and on the 6th day, one of the students named Kate went missing. The story gets more interesting when she finally finds the missing girl.     [30:32] Clemencia shares the story when they were heading to Wyoming and got stuck in Jack's Canyon. So they were on their way to Wyoming, and they spotted a great spot to camp, but to get to the location, they had to go through and muddy road. They thought the road was frozen and could drive over it, but it was not frozen. Both of the van's front wheels got stuck in the mud. Later on, there was no choice but to get everyone out and head over to the camping spot on foot. After spending the night, she, alongside two more people head over to the van where the mud got frozen overnight, and they pulled out the van easily and parked at a better spot.    [34:31] Clemencia Caporale narrates a tale but still to this day warms her heart. She was in Edinburgh, and some of her friends knew that she was a hiker and convinced her to do a very short hike known as Arthur's Seat. After spending a couple of hours there, she saw a man lying across the trail. She recently completed her medical training, so she rushed to him and checked to see if he had a pulse. To know how Caporale saves the day, head over to the podcast now.

Crossing Borders with Nathan Lustig
Caterine Castillo, Neivor: Streamlining real estate administration in Latin America, Ep 153

Crossing Borders with Nathan Lustig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:17


Caterine Castillo, Neivor: Streamlining real estate administration in Latin America, Ep 153   In Latin America, a building manager typically has to handle thousands of apartment units and tenants. This means simultaneously dealing with building maintenance, reconciling payments, and meeting tenant and landlord requests. Currently, this is done manually with pen and paper, maybe an Excel spreadsheet or through WhatsApp which leads to inefficiencies and unhappy residents.    Caterine Castillo, Neivor's co-founder and CEO, is trying to make living in Latin America's apartment buildings and condos better. Neivor is a vertical SaaS platform that simplifies condo fee collections and streamlines management and communication between residents, property owners, and building managers. Neivor processes tens of millions of payments per month and help manage 3000+ apartment buildings in Mexico, Colombia, and Ecuador.   I sat down with Caterine to talk about the pain points of property management in Latin America and the differences in Neivor's reception between the Colombian and Mexican markets. We also talk about her experience in finance before becoming a founder and what it was like fundraising for the first time. Growing Neivor's team   One of the biggest lessons Caterine learned from working at corporations was managing large teams. These skills are extremely critical in Neivor's roadmap with a team that is currently growing from 18 employees to 75 in under a year. Caterine also explained that hiring won't solve a company's problems immediately. It's important to understand that people are managing a big learning curve when they join a new team.    Listen to this episode of Crossing Borders to learn more about Caterine's main takeaways from her experience working in corporations.  The importance of connections in VC Caterine's first fundraising experience was with Neivor. She explains that having a great solution and an underserved market with low-hanging fruit sometimes isn't enough. Having the right connections is key. She had connections in the corporate world, but not in the VC world. Besides funding, Caterine considers that those first warm introductions are game-changers for any entrepreneur that is new to the space.   Learn more about Caterine's fundraising journey with Neivor and the connections that were key to their growth in this episode of Crossing Borders. Property management: Colombia versus Mexico Expanding to a new market in another country involves a lot of risks. Consulting with others who have done it before can be really helpful. However, there's so much more insight that can be gained from being on the ground and talking to clients before making a decision to expand. During her time in Mexico, Caterine discovered that their target market was much more receptive to Neivor's product, requiring a different marketing approach than in Colombia.   Check out this episode of Crossing Borders to learn more about the differences between the Colombian and Mexican property management markets.    Caterine Castillo brings her expertise in business development, sales, marketing to propel Neivor's solution forward in Latin America. Her innate passion for team building and creating solutions that disrupt the market will be key to Neivor's success.    Outline of this episode: [2:34] - About Neivor [5:20] - Dealing with fraud [6:35] - Where Neivor operates [7:02] - Becoming an entrepreneur [8:20] - From fintech to founder [9:14] - Biggest lessons learned in fintech [10:24] - Growing Neivor's team  [13:40] - Fundraising process [15:30] - Jumping to Mexico [18:00] - How to sell in Mexico [20:27] - Books, blogs, and podcast recommendations [21:20] - Caterine's advice to her younger self [22:09] - What's next for Neivor?    Resources & people mentioned: Caterine Castillo Neivor Books: The Hard Thing About Hard Things, Lean In  

Reaching Out with Michael Constable
Chosen Family and Overcoming Machismo Culture (w/ Gustavo Padron)

Reaching Out with Michael Constable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 62:53


In this week's episode, I chat with one of my favorite people of all time: my friend and former go-to yoga / SoulCycle instructor, Gustavo Padron!  Gustavo is one of the most positive and motivational people I know, so it is a dream to have him on the show to share his coming out story with us. Gustavo talks about how he decided to NOT come out when he went to college and instead just live authentically, the impact that the culture of machismo had on him growing up in Mexico, how important chosen family can be while coming out, and more! I used to say that while I am most definitely not a religious person, I would get all the spiritual fulfillment I needed from Gustavo's inspirational talks at the end of a yoga class while in Shavasana.  This week's episode is basically an hour of that.  Namaste, girlies!Want to reach out to Gustavo?Instagram @gustavopadronFlow with Gustavo online glo.comWebsite www.gustavopadron.comFollow along with Reaching Out!Instagram @reachingoutpodTwitter @reachingoutpodHost @michaelwingsit

Ash Said It® Daily
Woven By Guardian Angels: Maria Victoria

Ash Said It® Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:27


Authentically beautiful and created with fair trade opportunities, feel good supporting the outstanding work of these artists. Maria Victoria is the stunning NEW brand of handwoven bags and accessories made out of recyclable PVC plastic. The collection epitomizes the beauty and culture of Mexican art! All bags are named after famous Mexican painters and muralists and take anywhere from two to six hours each to make depending on the style. The bags are super versatile, great for the beach, travel, gym, school, or everyday use. Super easy to clean, the bags are lightweight, foldable, long-lasting, and extremely durable. From The Founders: We are a couple of friends, an architect and an industrial designer, and we've shared a profound passion for art and design since the moment we met.We are proud to be Mexican and we felt the need to show the world why Mexico's art is considered to be one of the most interesting, as can be seen by admiring art-lovers worldwide.Every corner of Mexico is rich in traditional artistic handcrafts that go from wood and plastic to textiles and jewelry. We offer a unique selection of Mexican handcrafts, each individually made by hand by dedicated Mexican artisans. Our commitment is to show how artistic and beautiful our culture is. Web: https://www.mymariavictoria.com Follow: @MyMariaVictoria About the show: ► Website: http://www.ashsaidit.com ► Got Goli Gummies? https://go.goli.com/1loveash5 ► For $5 in ride credit, download the Lyft app using my referral link: https://www.lyft.com/ici/ASH584216 ► Want the ‘coldest' water? https://thecoldestwater.com/?ref=ashleybrown12 ► Become A Podcast Legend: http://ashsaidit.podcastersmastery.zaxaa.com/s/6543767021305 ► Review Us: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ash-said-it/id1144197789 ► SUBSCRIBE HERE: http://www.youtube.com/c/AshSaidItSuwanee ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/1loveash ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ashsaidit ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/1loveAsh ► Blog: http://www.ashsaidit.com/blog ► Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/1LoveAsh/ #atlanta #ashsaidit #ashsaidthat #ashblogsit #ashsaidit® Ash Brown is a gifted American producer, blogger, speaker, media personality and event emcee. The blog on AshSaidit.com showcases exclusive event invites, product reviews and so much more. Her motivational podcast "Ash Said It Daily" is available on major media platforms such as iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio & Google Podcasts. This program has over half a million streams worldwide. She uses these mediums to motivate & encourage her audience in the most powerful way. She keeps it real!

New Books in African American Studies
Alice L Baumgartner, "South to Freedom: Runaway Slaves to Mexico and the Road to the Civil War" (Basic Books, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 72:17


For some enslaved Americans, the path to freedom led not north, but south, argues Dr. Alice Baumgardner, an assistant professor of history at the University of Southern California. In South to Freedom: Runaway Slaves to Mexico and the Road to the Civil War (Basic Books, 2020), Baumgartner reveals an untold story of enslaved African Americans finding redemption from slavery in Mexico, which had abolished slavery in many of its territories decades before the American Civil War. Indeed, it was concern by Texas slaveholders that their human property may have been threatened that led them to revolt against Mexico and eventually join the United States and, in time, the Confederate States of America. For those who escaped, Mexico could be far from an anti-slavery paradise, but Mexican officials were loathe to return runaway former slaves back to the United States, a fact which was one of the many reasons why the United States went to war with Mexico in the 1840s. South to Freedom is a fresh look at America's slavery crisis and Civil War, and one which places enslaved people themselves and their own quest for freedom at the heart of the story. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Take to the Sky: the Air Disaster Podcast
Take to the Sky Episode 080: Aeroméxico Connect Flight 2431

Take to the Sky: the Air Disaster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 71:40


Taking off during bad weather is rarely enjoyable, but it can certainly be a dangerous decision. In this week's episode of Take to the Sky: the Air Disaster Podcast, Stephanie takes us through the events that led to the crash of Aeroméxico Connect Flight 2431 on July 31, 2018. Was it the weather, bad decision making, or something even more surprising that led to the accident? This story has a few twists and turns that with surprise you as well as a legacy that is sure to stay with you. Don't miss a single legacy: join our Patreon for exclusive air disaster stories, layover episodes, and surprises!   Visit our website at taketotheskypodcast.com for show notes and our merch store!

Reality Witch
SPECIAL GUEST!! Jon Bauer Recaps RHOBH Reunion Pt 1 !!!

Reality Witch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 140:12


Sup Witches! Your favorite guest is back! Jessie Nails' friend, Jon Bauer made his triumphant return to recap The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Reunion Pt 1. If you remember Jon's last appearance, he was an Erika Jayne stan and consumed enough wine to keep Jesus away. This time it is a little bit more hinged but he has some new controversial opinions. For real though, this is hilarious. If you want a good laugh and want to be our bestie, tune in. This is the most honest recap you'll get, and we also chat about some pop culture news before the recap. Jon is MVP and we love him.  He is 100% witch energy. Thank you for joining this pop culture coven! Please rate, review and subscribe on Apple Podcasts!Social:Instagram: Realitywitch_TikTok: Jessie_NailsTwitter: Jessie__Nailsrealitywitchpod@gmail.comFollow Jon and his Mexico adventures! https://www.instagram.com/heyjb__/

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Oct 20 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:15


Invasion: U.S. authorities detained more than 1.7 million illegal immigrants along the Mexico border. We are living in the era of mass media and mass hysteria, the results are not good. Remember NY Gov. Hochul's "vaxed" necklace wearing; Buck joked she should have doubled it, right? New York Governor Hochul: Colin Powell's death "cannot be hijacked" by anti-vaxxers. Nation's worst mayor announces covid vaccine mandate for all New York City workers. FDA going to announce booster mandate? CDC boss Walensky says schools should keep mask mandates even if kids are vaccinated. Let's Go Brandon rap song rockets up the charts: C&B play it for you. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Holly Randall Unfiltered
214: Sexy Vanessa: The First MILF

Holly Randall Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:48


Vanessa is 68 and proud of her age! Her claim to fame is being the first MILF back before this craze ever became a thing in the adult industry. But there's so much more to this fascinating woman-- kicked out of Mexico for having an affair with a high-ranking politician, Vanessa found then herself married to one of the biggest drug smugglers in Latin America. Once he was caught and went to prison, this vivacious woman had to reinvent herself-- and she did. Now she's one of the oldest working women in porn, and even though she looks amazing, says she's never had any kind of plastic surgery to keep her youthful appearance. Get to know this captivating figure in this exclusive, in-depth interview!   Support my show by supporting my sponsors! Arosur lets you text, call, and video chat with real kink-friendly women excited to explore your fantasies. Get 100 credits for free when you go to arousr.com/holly.  Support my show by supporting my sponsors! Manscaped is offering 20% off plus free shipping for their NEW revolutionary electric body trimmer the Lawnmower 4.0, just use code HOLLY at Manscaped.com. I'm thrilled to have my favorite (and longest!) client Twistys sponsoring the show! I've shot some of my best work for this website, so make sure you go and check out all the beautiful girl/girl scenes I've produced for them! Want more from this podcast? Get access to tons of perks by joining my Patreon! We have exclusive bonus content-- and just added, access to my fine art photos and videos! Get early access to an uncut version of the show and get cool gifts like coffee mugs, stickers, and hoodies. Join our community now at Patreon.com/hollyrandallunfiltered Don't forget you can always email us at hollyrandallunfiltered@gmail.com