Podcast appearances and mentions of Saint Peter

Apostle of Jesus Christ

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Hot Off The Wire
Fed attacks inflation with big hike; 2 claim Mega Millions prize; blind dog rescued from California hole | Top headlines for Sept. 21 & 22, 2022

Hot Off The Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 7:58


Intensifying its fight against high inflation, the Federal Reserve raised its key interest rate by a substantial three-quarters of a point for a third straight time and signaled more large rate hikes to come — an aggressive pace that will heighten the risk of an eventual recession. New York's attorney general has sued former President Donald Trump and his company, alleging business fraud involving some of their most prized assets, including properties in Manhattan, Chicago and Washington, D.C. Attorney General Letitia James' lawsuit was filed Wednesday in state court in New York. President Joe Biden has declared that Russia has “shamelessly violated the core tenets” of the United Nations charter with its “brutal, needless war” in Ukraine. Biden on Wednesday delivered a forceful condemnation of Russia's invasion to the international body, saying abuses against civilians in Ukraine “should make your blood run cold.” Robert Sarver says he has started the process of selling the Phoenix Suns and Phoenix Mercury, a move that comes only eight days after he was suspended by the NBA over workplace misconduct including racist speech and hostile behavior toward employees. Pope Francis spoke out against the cruelty suffered by the Ukrainian people in Saint Peter's Square. The Kansas City Royals have fired longtime general manager Dayton Moore, who took the club from a perennial 100-game loser to two World Series and the 2015 championship before its return to mediocrity. Lottery officials say two people who wish to remain anonymous have claimed a $1.337 billion Mega Millions jackpot after a single ticket was sold in a Chicago suburb for a late July drawing, opting to take a lump sum payment of $780.5 million. Firefighters have rescued a 13-year-old blind dog that fell into a hole at a California construction site. KABC-TV reports that the dog, named Cesar, lives next to the site in Pasadena with his owner. Cesar apparently wandered onto the site Tuesday night and fell into the hole, which was about 15 feet deep and 3 feet wide. Roger Federer says he is at peace with his choice to retire from professional tennis and plans to close his career with one doubles match at the Laver Cup perhaps with longtime rival Rafael Nadal by his side. The International Space Station is welcoming three new residents following a smooth Russian launch. The Soyuz capsule rocketed into orbit from Kazakhstan on Wednesday and, just three hours later, pulled up at the space station. Two Russians and one American are checking in for a six-month stay. —The Associated PressSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Meet the Rockadopoleis!: Sex, Love, and Power

In this episode we discuss expressions of trust in our relationship.Episode Art: The Angel Appearing to Saint Peter, Gerrit van Honthorst, c.1591.Support the show

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 16: Saint Cornelius, Pope, Martyr

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 5:35


September 16: Saint Cornelius, Pope, Martyrc. Late Second, or Early Third, Century–253Memorial; Liturgical Color: RedPatron Saint of cattle, domestic animals, and earache sufferersA Pope reigns for two years, excommunicates a schismatic, and dies in exileThe twenty-first pope of the Church, Saint Cornelius, succeeded no one. After the death of Pope Saint Fabian, martyred in January 250, persecutions prohibited the clergy of Rome from electing a successor, so the Chair of Saint Peter was vacant for over a year. Finally, when the cruel Emperor Decius departed Rome on military campaign, the clergy chose Cornelius as Bishop of Rome. Not everyone was happy with the choice, especially the former future pope Novatian, who had led the Roman clergy during the vacancy and had convinced himself that he was going to be elected. Novatian's supporters consecrated him bishop and refused to acknowledge Cornelius. Sides were taken, letters were written, and tensions heightened. After consolidating support from the esteemed Saint Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, and others, Cornelius resolved the dispute by convening a synod of bishops which excommunicated the schismatic Novatian and his followers.Pope Cornelius reigned for a little over two years, from March 251 to June 253. Even though his time in office was brief, he made some important decisions and left an interesting legacy. Decius' persecution gave rise to the greatest pastoral dilemma of the third century—how, and whether, to reintegrate Christians who had offered pagan sacrifice, regretted it, and desired to enter again into the embrace of Mother Church. The related question of whether bishops, priests, and deacons who had apostosized could perform valid sacraments would vex Cornelius's successors. There were two camps on this issue. Novatian held that lapsed Christians were idolaters, and idolatry was, in the Old Testament especially, unforgivable. The Church could not absolve such apostates. They were to be judged by God alone at death. Cornelius, Saint Cyprian, and other bishops occupied a more moderate position. They taught that the lapsi could be reintegrated into the Church through repentance and an appropriate penance. Cornelius' position won the day, forever and always, establishing an important theological precedent: There is no sin that cannot be forgiven.Pope Cornelius also left, in his letters, an important record of the size, state, and organization of the Church of Rome, hard facts so obvious to those inside of a culture that they often go unreported in historical documents. Decius' successor as Emperor was named Gallus, and he was no friend of Christians either. He banished Cornelius to a city not far from Rome where the Pope died of physical hardship. Saint Cornelius was buried near the papal crypt in the Catacombs of Saint Callixtus. One day in 1849, an amateur archeologist, a layman who worked in the Vatican library, found a small marble shard that read NELIUS MARTYR in a field on the outskirts of Rome. But there was no martyr named Nelius. He then found another shard that read COR. The inscription is still visible today in the Catacombs of Callixtus: Cornelius Martyr.The Romans unsheathed their long knives in the 250s. Pope after pope was martyred by various means. But the Church did not run and hide, it stayed and grew. The blood of Cornelius and other pope-martyrs wet the soil, and the seeds of faith moistened, grew, and sprouted into the vast garden of Catholicism that slowly, and imperceptibly, took deep root in the ground of Europe. Saint Cornelius' name is read at Mass in Eucharistic Prayer I even today, next to Saint Cyprian's. He was staunch in his defense of the Church, yet appropriately lenient to his fellow Christians who did not possess his same fortitude. In this respect, he was as wise a pastor as he was brave a martyr.Saint Cornelius, our Lord said that it profits a man nothing to gain the whole world if he would lose his own soul. You gained the papacy, not the whole world, yet gave it up rather than bend to the will of the Church's enemies. Help us to persevere like you.

Real Faith Conversations
Ep. #26 - Finding Companionship in the Church ft. Marissa Palowski

Real Faith Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 47:44


Welcome back to Real Faith Conversations, and in this show we try to talk about life, culture, and faith in the most genuine way possible. In this episode, Ryan Morris sat down with Marrissa Pawlowski, a parishioner at Saint Peter for 6 years, who serves as a Eucharistic Minister weekly at the 5pm Saturday Mass or the 11am Sunday Mass. Listen as she talks about finding companionship in the church.

Soccer Pilgrim With Jason Gisoo Kim

I'm back to recording finally! This is day 1 of my 1 month trip in Europe. This is my initial late night thoughts on London. Note: It is Saint Paul's Cathedral not Saint Peter

Without Works
Episode 51: Love and Happiness

Without Works

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 69:29


Episode Notes Episode 51: Love and Happiness Lemuel: I am Lemuel Gonzalez, repentant sinner, and along with Amity Armstrong, your heavenly host, I invite you to find a place in the pew for today's painless Sunday School lesson. Without Works. Amity: We start with a story of a man who is a shame to the cloth in a short segment of Get the Behind Me, Felicia Lemuel: I will start the conversation this way: We will have Amity read all of the negative statements Jesus made about homosexuals and homosexuality. All of the moral correction he directed as the founder of the Christian faith, the head of the Chirsitian Church, and as I believe, God made manifest on earth. Amity: (twenty seconds of silence) Lemuel: This has been a reading of the holy scriptures where the Lord Jesus Christ condemning homosexuality. In all of the accepted canon, Jesus offers not a word. Why not? There were obviously homosexual men and women in Jesus' time, and he had not a word to say against them. Of his disciples no one has anything to say. It falls again on Paul, a man who claims the authority Christ gave to Saint Peter, to nourish the new Church, to carry the baggage of Mosaic Law into the new faith. Amity: Two thousand years years later, this dynamic continues. This time continued by “Pastor” Dillon Awes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4fcQ55Urjc https://www.newsweek.com/pastor-gay-people-solution-killings-bible-1714037 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… Amity: Next up, we take a moment to consider something very familiar through a new lens in The More You Know. "Pray then like this: 'Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.'" Jesus was a very practical prophet, and he spent his time in action. He did not spend hours conceiving and embroidering elaborate prayers. When asked for a prayer from one of his disciples he produced this. There are two versions of it, in the gospels of Matthew and Luke, with slight variations. Some scholars think this reflects the shift from a mostly Jewish Christianity to a Universal Christianity. The Lord's Prayer is an interesting example of how things have been added to the actual scripture. I learned the prayer with the addition of the Doxolgy, a hymn in praise to God. the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen I always assumed, growing up in the church, that this was a part of the prayer. It was not said by Jesus, but is included in the King James translation of the scripture. This is based on those translators using what they thought was an ancient manuscript. It is actually now a part of the prayer, though it was originally a part of the call and response of the early Church. We have posted some alternative translations of this prayer. Why? Because the KIng James Translation, so well known and memorized, has errors in it. Pope Francis bright attention to this when he addressed the line, “ …And lead us not into temptation.” “It is not a good translation because it speaks of a God who induces temptation. I am the one who falls. It's not him pushing me into temptation to then see how I have fallen.” Here are some examples of other versions of the Lord's Prayer. https://www.lords-prayer-words.com/lord_contemporary_message_bible.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord%27s_Prayer#:~:text=%22Pray%20then%20like%20this%3A%20',deliver%20us%20from%20evil.'%22 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/06/led-not-into-temptation-pope-approves-change-to-lords-prayer#:~:text=Now%20Pope%20Francis%20has%20risked,Conference%20of%20Italy%20last%20month ORGAN END STINGER Amity: That brings us to the end of this week's episode. If you like it, please subscribe and leave us a review - and share it with a friend. Lemuel: We have an internet home: withoutworkspodcast.com. Our show notes and links to stories we talk about can be found there. Find us on Twitter: @WithoutWorksPod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/withoutworks Email @ withoutworkspod@gmail.com Our Internet home: www.withoutworkspodcast.com

The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ
Saint Peter Claver, Priest

The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 17:51 Very Popular


We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the week. New reflections will be added every Sunday. *Due to Covid-19, our 2020 reflections are re-purposed from earlier examen episodes.

Glimpses of the Gospel
September 9th, 2022 - XXIII Friday in Ordinary Time - Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priest

Glimpses of the Gospel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 8:39


+ Holy Gospel according to Saint Luke 6: 39 – 42 Jesus told them a parable, "Can a blind person guide a blind person? Will not both fall into a pit? No disciple is superior to the teacher; but when fully trained, every disciple will be like his teacher. Why do you notice the splinter in your brother's eye, but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own? How can you say to your brother, 'Brother, let me remove that splinter in your eye,' when you do not even notice the wooden beam in your own eye? You hypocrite! Remove the wooden beam from your eye first; then you will see clearly to remove the splinter in your brother's eye. The Gospel of the Lord

Daily Gospel Reading and Reflection
Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Luke 6:39-42

Daily Gospel Reading and Reflection

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 3:14


Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, PriestLK 6:39-42"Why do you notice the splinter in your brother's eye,but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own?How can you say to your brother,‘Brother, let me remove that splinter in your eye,'when you do not even notice the wooden beam in your own eye?”

Daily Reflections with Fr. John
MEMORIAL OF SAINT PETER CLAVER, PRIEST

Daily Reflections with Fr. John

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 6:30


Get the wooden beam out of your own eye! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/john6345/message

Saint of the Day
September 9 Memorial Of Saint Peter Claver

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 1:58


Saint Of The Day With Mike Roberts!

Podcast for the Holy Church
Episode 202: Fr. Humberto’s homily - Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priest on: “Let’s say yes to our call to be missionaries and by doing it, to make salvation (the Savior) close to more souls till they reach hotlines and heaven”

Podcast for the Holy Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 8:46


GospelLUKE 6:39-4239He also told them a parable: "Can a blind man lead a blind man? Will they not both fall into a pit? 40A disciple is not above his teacher, but every one when he is fully taught will be like his teacher. 41Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? 42Or how can you say to your brother, `Brother, let me take out the speck that is in your eye,' when you yourself do not see the log that is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take out the speck that is in your brother's eye.

The Catholic Word Podcast
Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priest

The Catholic Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 22:28


SORROWFUL MYSTERIES today.  Your word, O Lord, is truth; consecrate us in the truth. (Jn 17:17b, 17a)

The Good Word
Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priests, Kevin O'Neil, C.Ss.R.

The Good Word

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 3:45


Lectio Divina Daily Reflections
Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priest

Lectio Divina Daily Reflections

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 1:46


Can a blind person guide a blind person? Will not both fall into a pit? No disciple is superior to the teacher; but when fully trained, every disciple will be like his teacher. This episode is also available as a blog post: https://lectiodiv.wordpress.com/2022/09/09/memorial-of-saint-peter-claver-priest/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lectio-divina-daily/support

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 9: Saint Peter Claver, Priest (U.S.A.)

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:51


September 9: Saint Peter Claver, Priest (U.S.A.)1580–1654Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of slaves, Colombia, seafarers, and missionaries to AfricaA builder of the Spanish Bridge, he personified respect for human rightsIt is commonly taught that human rights were born in the Anglo-Saxon Enlightenment of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This thesis holds that non-Catholic, nominally Christian intellectuals, including the founders of the United States, were the first generation of thinkers to philosophically articulate, and legally protect, man's inherent, universal human rights. And, this train of thought concludes, these steps forward were possible only after the heavy chains of traditional Christianity fell to the ground. In other words, human rights were the obverse of Catholicism. As the shadow of the Church and its archaic teachings receded, the theory goes, the inherent dignity of individual man moved into the light. The problem with this thesis is twofold: first, it ignores one thousand seven hundred years of history; second, most Enlightenment thinkers owned other human beings just like they owned cows, or at least depended on the services of slaves or took advantage of slave women.Today's saint was among numerous Spanish priests, nuns, and lay men and women who built the Spanish Bridge from the Old World to the New. They knew what Jesus taught. They internalized the content of the papal encyclicals condemning the indignity and immorality of slavery. They battled over human rights in royal courts, they risked life and limb confronting their own unscrupulous countrymen in the fields and ports of New Spain, and they sacrificed their personal health to care for slaves. Their intellectual advocacy for, and practical living out of, human rights is the true source of the Western world's embrace of human rights, not those few Anglo-Saxon intellectuals whose culture raised them to despise a broader tradition of which they were ignorant. A converted former slave owner and fellow Spanish priest named Bartolomé de las Casas laid the intellectual groundwork for people like Peter Claver, today's saint. Claver practiced, in flesh and blood, what Las Casas had taught a few generations before him. Peter Claver lived human rights. He cared for actual persons at great cost to his own health. He did not write books like Las Casas or just give lip service to human dignity like many colonists. He implemented Catholic social teaching for over forty years, universalizing the concept of neighbor to include everyone, because everyone is made in God's image and likeness. He epitomized the sweet and sacrificial love of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.Saint Peter Claver was from the region around Barcelona, Spain. He joined the Jesuits and requested to serve in the American missions. Like so many saints, when he left for God, he left for good. He never returned to friends and family in Spain. He was ordained a priest in the port city of Cartagena, Colombia, in 1615, and immediately and from then on dedicated himself to the physical and spiritual care of African slaves. But he didn't just care for them in the fields or plantations of Colombia. He met every slave ship he possibly could as soon as it dropped anchor in port. Using interpreters, he greeted the traumatized chained men and women with fresh water, ripe fruit, bandages, perfumes, food, medicine, lemons, a broad smile and charitable caresses. When weather prohibited seafaring and he didn't have to be in port, Peter instructed and baptized whatever slaves were open to it. He baptized more than forty thousand souls.It is said that Saint Peter Claver lost his senses of taste and smell due to his long years of breathing obnoxious odors. He called himself the slave of the slaves. He also labored among the Spanish slave traders, attempting to convert them from their evil ways. When visiting his fellow Spaniards, he did not stay with them but in their often rancid slave quarters. This apostle of Cartagena died forgotten, alone, and poor. He was canonized in 1888.Saint Peter Claver, you worked among the most traumatized and destitute populations of your time, caring for slaves, because they were made in the image and likeness of God. Help us to understand, protect, and exalt the inherent dignity of every human person, just like you did.

Lectio Divina
Cycle II - Memorial of Saint Peter Claver, Priest

Lectio Divina

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 29:43


Catholic Reading of the Day
9 September 2022 - Saint Peter Claver

Catholic Reading of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 3:31


Leviticus 19:1-2, 17-18 (You must love your neighbour as yourself) 1 Corinthians 9:16-19, 22-27 (We go into strict training like fighters at the games)

RC Top 3
Episode Eighty-Eight

RC Top 3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 13:54


Hearing His Heartbeat Video Series Consecrated Woman Jacquie Lustig created the Hearing His Heartbeat discernment series, six videos designed to help people become aware of the voice of God in their own hearts and respond to him fully in their everyday lives, for all people who might be seeking more freedom and connection in their relationship with God. 5:25 Pope Francis Creates First Legionary Cardinal On the afternoon of Saturday, August 27, in Saint Peter's Basilica, Pope Francis presided over the Ordinary Public Consistory for the creation of 20 new cardinals. Among the list of new cardinals was Msgr. Fernando Vérgez Alzaga, the first Legionary of Christ created Cardinal, and Msgr. Gianfranco Ghirlanda, SJ, who accompanied the process of revision and renewal of Regnum Christi. 11:28 Consecrated Women Hire New Pastoral Care Advocate The Consecrated Women of Regnum Christi recently hired lay woman, Griselda Cervantez, as their first Pastoral Care Advocate in North America. Her primary responsibilities include assisting those who report an allegation of abuse, accompanying victims through the investigation process, advocating for victims' voices to be heard, and providing ongoing pastoral care to victims and their families.

Catholic News
September 6, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 4:52


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Pope Francis beatified John Paul I, who reigned as pope for only 33 days, amid a thunderstorm in Saint Peter's Square on Sunday. In his homily for the rainy beatification Mass on September 4, Pope Francis said that John Paul I “embodied the poverty of a disciple” through his “victory over the temptation to put oneself at the center, to seek one's own glory.” Often called “the smiling pope,” John Paul I died unexpectedly on September 28, 1978, a month after the conclave that elected him. In one of the shortest pontificates in papal history, John Paul I gained a reputation for his humility and his dedication to teaching the faith in an understandable manner. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252206/pope-francis-beatifies-john-paul-i-pope-for-33-days With the next World Youth Day less than a year away, Pope Francis has promised that a pope will be in attendance, but joked that it may be “Pope John the 24th.” https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252209/pope-francis-jokes-that-either-he-or-john-xxiv-will-attend-world-youth-day-next-year In their message for Labor Day, the US bishops have urged the passage of the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act as a means of building a just economy for women and families. “There is currently no federal law requiring employers to provide short-term, reasonable accommodations to pregnant women in the workplace and the PWFA would do so,” https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252194/us-bishops-urge-senate-to-pass-protections-for-working-moms-in-labor-day-message Today, the Church celebrates Saint Teresa of Calcutta, also known as Mother Teresa. She was born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu August 26, 1910, in Skopje, Macedonia. The youngest of three children, she attended a youth group run by a Jesuit priest called Sodality, which eventually opened her to the call of service as a missionary nun. She joined the Sisters of Loretto at age 17 and was sent to Calcutta, where she taught at a high school. After contracting tuberculosis, she was sent to rest in Darjeeling, and it was on the way that she felt what she called "an order" from God to leave the convent and live among the poor. The Vatican granted her permission to leave the Sisters of Loretto and to live her new call under the guidance of the Archbishop of Calcutta.After she left her convent, Mother Teresa began working in the slums, teaching poor children, and treating the sick in their homes. A year later, some of her former students joined her, and together they took in men, women and children who were dying in the gutters along the streets. In 1950, the Missionaries of Charity were born as a congregation of the Diocese of Calcutta. In 1952, the government granted them a house from which to continue their mission of serving Calcutta's poor and forgotten. The congregation quickly grew from a single house for the dying and unwanted to nearly 500 houses around the world. Mother Teresa set up homes for prostitutes, battered women, orphanages for poor children and houses for those suffering from AIDS. She was a fierce defender of the unborn, and is known to have said, "If you hear of some woman who does not want to keep her child and wants to have an abortion, try to persuade her to bring him to me. I will love that child, seeing in him the sign of God's love." She died on September 5, 1997, and was beatified just six years later by Saint John Paul II October 19, 2003. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-teresa-of-kolkata-585

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 3: Saint Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctor

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 5:44


September 3: Saint Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctorc. 540–604Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of musicians, singers, students, and teachersA gifted nobleman serves Rome, becomes a monk, and then a consequential popeWhen your salad is awesome, your car amazing, and your internet connection is great, there's a problem. Overused superlatives diminish their own meaning and crowd the linguistic space reserved for things which are truly awesome, amazing, and great. Today's saint sent the large missionary party that trekked across Europe and converted Saxon England to Catholicism, establishing a culture that endured for almost a millennium. That's awesome! He wrote a theological work that was used for centuries by thousands of bishops to help them become more fatherly pastors. That's amazing! Gregorian chant is named after him; he is one of the four Latin Fathers of the Church; he was the first pope to use “Servant of the Servants of God” as a papal title; he alone preserved the memory of Saint Benedict with a biography; he made revisions to the content and structure of the Mass which are part of the liturgy until today; and he was the most impactful pope of the long span of centuries from the 500s to the 1000s. That's great! These accomplishments thus truly merit the title Great with which Saint Gregory has been justly crowned by history.Pope Saint Gregory the Great was born into a noble Roman family with a history of service to Church and empire. The family home was perched on one of Rome's seven ancient hills, the Caelian, which Via San Gregorio still cuts through today. His father was a Roman senator, although at a time when Italy was in decline and the imperial government was based in Constantinople. Gregory received an education in keeping with his class and became the Prefect of Rome, its highest civil position, in his early thirties. In 579 he was chosen by the pope as his emissary to the emperor's court in Constantinople, primarily to seek the emperor's assistance in protecting Italy from the Lombard tribes that had long ago overrun her.Gregory was elected the bishop of his home city in 590 and was thus obligated to abandon the quiet life of a monk, which he had been living with some friends for a few years in a small monastery near his family home. In numerous letters which have fortunately been preserved, Pope Gregory, soon after his election, bemoans the loss of his monastic solitude, peaceful recollection, and life of prayer. But he had only been a monk for a few short years. Gregory's skills as an administrator, honed in his long years of prior civil and church leadership, proved valuable when he sat on the Chair of Saint Peter. He drew into the orbit of papal authority the bishops of France and Spain who had, until then, been operating somewhat autonomously. He secured the allegiance of Italy's northern tribes to orthodox Catholicism, compelling them to abandon the counterfeit Arian Christianity they had held for centuries. And Gregory made the fateful decision to personally organize and promote the great, and highly successful, missionary journey of Saint Augustine of Canterbury to the Kingdom of Kent in England.Pope Saint Gregory the Great's legacy in liturgy, pastoral doctrine, and miracles left a deep mark on medieval Europe and beyond. The Council of Trent in 1562 mandated the suppression of votive Mass cycles for the dead or for any other need. But the Council Fathers made one exception: The Mass of Saint Gregory, a cycle of thirty Masses on thirty consecutive days for the release of a soul from purgatory, was not suppressed. Almost a thousand years after his death, Gregory's memory was too venerable to suppress. Gregory was an encourager of the encouragers, a bishop who modeled, strengthened, and explained how and why his fellow bishops should be fathers first and lords second.Pope Saint Gregory the Great, your example of holy leadership, of scholarly practicality, of balance between universal and local concerns, helps all Christians to weigh their many duties in a proper balance and to choose correctly what matters most to God and their own salvation.

Catholic News
August 29, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 2:36


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Pope Francis created 20 new cardinals for the Catholic Church during a liturgy in Saint Peter's Basilica on Saturday. “Jesus calls us by name; he looks us in the eye and he asks: Can I count on you?” Pope Francis said in a homily addressed to the College of Cardinals and its new members on August 27. “The Lord,” he said, “wants to bestow on us his own apostolic courage, his zeal for the salvation of every human being, without exception. He wants to share with us his magnanimity, his boundless and unconditional love, for his heart is afire with the mercy of the Father.” During the ceremony, the new cardinals made a profession of faith by reciting the Creed. They then pronounced an oath of fidelity and obedience to the pope and his successors. Each cardinal then approached Pope Francis, kneeling before him to receive the red birretta, the cardinal's ring, and a document naming the titular church he has been assigned. Pope Francis embraced each new cardinal, saying to him: “Pax Domini sit semper tecum,” which is Latin for “the peace of the Lord be with you always.” Each cardinal responded: “Amen.” catholicnewsagency.com/news/252141/jesus-asks-us-can-i-count-on-you-pope-francis-creates-20-cardinals-for-the-catholic-church Pope Francis became the first pope in 728 years to open the Holy Door of a 13th-century basilica in L'Aquila, Italy, on Sunday. During a visit to the Italian city located about 70 miles northeast of Rome on Aug. 28, the pope participated in a centuries-old tradition, the Celestinian Forgiveness, known in Italian as the Perdonanza Celestiniana. The opening of the Holy Door marked a key moment in the annual celebration established by Pope Celestine V in 1294. In his brief Angelus message, the pope offered a prayer for the people of Pakistan, where flash floods have killed more than 1,000 people and displaced thousands more. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252145/pope-francis-becomes-first-pope-in-more-than-700-years-to-open-the-holy-door-in-l-aquila Today, the Church commemorates the beheading of John the Baptist, who prepared the way for Jesus. As an adult, he lived as a hermit in the wilderness. After the Spirit inspired him, he went about preaching that the people should repent of their sins and be baptized in order to prepare for the Messiah. Herod imprisoned John because he had condemned Herod for committing adultery by living with his brother's wife, Herodias. At he celebration for Herod on his birthday, the daughter of Herodias danced for him, and Herod was so impressed that he said he would offer her anything she liked. She consulted with Herodias who told her to ask for the head of John the Baptist on a platter. Herod did not want to kill John for fear or what his follwers might do, but because of his promise to the girl he could not refuse, and so John was beheaded. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/the-beheading-of-john-the-baptist-578

Catholic News
August 25, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 3:30


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - A team of archaeologists uncovered new evidence this month about location of the house of Saint Peter. While excavating a fifth-sixth century Byzantine basilica at the el Araj archaeological site located on the shores of the Sea of Galilee in Israel, the team discovered a large Greek mosaic that seems to bolster the theory that the church was built over the home of Saints Peter and Andrew. The mosaic is inscribed with a petition that asks for the intercession of Saint Peter, who is referred to as “the chief and commander of the heavenly apostles.” The next excavation will take place in October. The team will complete the cleaning of the church, and hopes to uncover more inscriptions. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252110/st-peter-s-house-believed-found-shore-sea-of-galilee Patriarch Kirill of Moscow will not attend an interreligious summit in Kazakhstan in September, where it was hoped he would meet with Pope Francis to discuss a peaceful resolution to the six-month-long war in Ukraine. Pope Francis will travel to Kazakhstan for the VII Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions in the city of Nur-Sultan on September 13th to 15th. There had been speculation that the two religious leaders — who met in Havana, Cuba, in 2016 — might meet in person, possibly in Jerusalem, to discuss Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which Kirill has publicly supported. The Vatican has said it stands ready to mediate peace talks between the two countries. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252118/patriarch-kirill-will-not-meet-pope-francis-in-kazakhstan Less than a week after abducting the bishop of Matagalpa and apostolic administrator of Estelí, Rolando Álvarez, the dictatorship of Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua has silenced another Catholic radio station. Radio Stereo Fe of the Diocese of Estelí lamented August 24 on Facebook that “almost 28 years of radio evangelization on FM have ended today.” The reason used by the telecommunications regulatory agency of the Ortega dictatorship “is that the radio station is functioning with the license in the name of Father Francisco Valdivia,” a deceased priest, “and that the new director doesn't have any permission.” The closure of the radio station took place just one day after the priests of the Diocese of Estelí released a statement calling on the authorities of the dictatorial regime of Ortega to convert, to allow them to work in peace, and to release Álvarez. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252114/daniel-ortega-regime-shuts-down-another-catholic-radio-station-in-nicaragua Shortly after Governor Kevin Stitt of Oklahoma denied clemency to death row inmate James Coddington on Wednesday, the Archbishop of Oklahoma City encouraged the state not to resort to the death penalty. Archbishop Paul Coakley urged prayer for an end to the death penalty and “that our leaders may have the wisdom and compassion to recognize the humanity in every person, regardless of their state in life.” The Diocese of Tulsa plans to hold a prayer vigil outside the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252113/oklahoma-city-archbishop-disappointed-by-denial-of-clemency-to-death-row-inmate Today, the Church celebrates Saint Louis. As the king of France, his biographers have written of the long hours he spent in prayer, fasting, and penance, without the knowledge of his people. King Louis was renowned for his charity. Beggars were fed from his table, he washed their feet, ministered to the wants of the lepers, and daily fed over one hundred poor. Saint Louis was also a patron of architecture. He died of the plague near Tunis during the Second Crusade. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-louis-ix-of-france-570

The Return to Order Moment
Why Does Pope Francis Deny Our Precious Catholic Heritage

The Return to Order Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 32:40


Pope Francis called his recent trip to Canada a “Penitential Pilgrimage.” In so doing, he called into question the sacrifices of innumerable priests, brothers, nuns, and laypeople who gave their efforts, and in some cases their lives, to bring Christianity to all corners of the world. In doing so, he sacrifices our Catholic Heritage to the spirit of the age. He has done this before, most notably in his attempts to restrict the use of the Traditional Latin Mass and his Amazonian Synod in 2017. Who can forget his desecration of Saint Peter's Basilica with the infamous Pachamama idol? This podcast contrasts the effects of Pope Francis's Canadian trip with true Catholic Heritage, as represented by the heroic Christopher Columbus. To read these essays in their published format, please use the following links - https://www.returntoorder.org/2022/07/how-pope-franciss-canadian-trip-undermines-the-traditional-catholic-concept-of-the-missions/?PKG=rtoe1631 and https://www.tfp.org/the-catholic-spirit-of-christopher-columbus/. Thank you for listening.

Daily Joke
Saint Peter Fridge

Daily Joke

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 1:53


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

BIBLE IN TEN
Acts 9:36

BIBLE IN TEN

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 7:48


Saturday, 20 August 2022   At Joppa there was a certain disciple named Tabitha, which is translated Dorcas. This woman was full of good works and charitable deeds which she did. Acts 9:36   While Peter was still in Lydda, Luke now brings a new development into the narrative at a new location, beginning with, “At Joppa.”   Joppa (Hebrew: Yafo) is a port city found four times in the Old Testament and ten in the new. The name comes from yaphah, to be fair or beautiful, and so it means Beautiful. It is the city from which Jonah went in order to obtain a ship going to Tarshish. For the city today, Wikipedia says of this location –   “Jaffa, in Hebrew Yafo (Hebrew: יָפוֹ, Yāfō (help·info)) and in Arabic Yafa (Arabic: يَافَا) and also called Japho or Joppa, the southern and oldest part of Tel Aviv-Yafo, is an ancient port city in Israel. Jaffa is known for its association with the biblical stories of Jonah, Solomon and Saint Peter as well as the mythological story of Andromeda and Perseus, and later for its oranges. Today, Jaffa is one of Israel's mixed cities, with approximately 37% of the city being Arab.”   Today, the population of Joppa is about 46,000. It is in this location that Luke continues, saying, “there was a certain disciple named Tabitha.” This is an Aramaic name coming from a word meaning “gazelle.” Hence, her name means “Gazelle.” Of her, Luke next says, “which is translated Dorcas.”   Dorcas (Greek Dorkas) means the same thing, Gazelle. That comes from a Greek word meaning “to see clearly,” because the gazelle is an animal with bright, large eyes. Having two names is not uncommon in the Bible. In her case, being in Joppa which was a port town, there would be many Greek-speaking people. Therefore, to accommodate both, she was probably known by either her Aramaic name (the language of Israel at the time) or by her Greek name (the standard language of trade and commerce in the Roman Empire at the time). Of her, Luke next says, “This woman was full of good works.”   The meaning is obvious, but Charles Ellicott gives insight into Luke's writing style by saying this of her –   “The form of the expression may be noticed as characteristic of St. Luke, and his favourite formula for conveying the thought of a quality being possessed in the highest degree possible. So we have ‘full of leprosy' in Luke 5:12, ‘full of grace' and ‘full of faith' in Acts 6:5; Acts 6:8. (Comp. also Acts 13:10; Acts 19:28.)”   In the case of Tabitha, Luke uses the word agathos to describe her works. It is a common word signifying that which is intrinsically good. It is what finds its origin in what is provided by God, and it finds its empowerment from Him. For example, Jesus speaks of a tree that bears “good fruit.” One can see the root of the modern name Agatha in it.   Along with this, Luke continues, saying of her, “and charitable deeds which she did.” The verb is imperfect showing that her good deeds were ongoing – “which she was doing.” It wasn't that she was known for something good that she had done, but she was known for her constant doing of good things. The Greek word used to describe these good deeds signifies beneficence or alms. They were deeds of charity that defined her as a person who was doing what she did without any strings attached.   Life application: Luke is careful to refer to Tabitha in two ways: full of good works and charitable deeds. One can be full of good works that are self-serving, and one can be full of charitable deeds that are sloppy or not well thought out. However, when one does good things and is charitable as well, it shows a person who is careful, methodical, and who is generous simply because it is his or her nature.   The Bible's inclusion of this description of Tabitha tells us that her conduct was right in the eyes of Luke, but it also tells us that it is right in the eyes of God who inspired Luke to write these things. She was being evaluated and the record of her life has been documented.   Likewise, we are also being evaluated, and the attitude and conduct we put forth are being remembered. Someday, we will have our life and actions judged –   “Now if anyone builds on this foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw, 13 each one's work will become clear; for the Day will declare it, because it will be revealed by fire; and the fire will test each one's work, of what sort it is. 14 If anyone's work which he has built on it endures, he will receive a reward. 15 If anyone's work is burned, he will suffer loss; but he himself will be saved, yet so as through fire.” 1 Corinthians 3:12-15   “Therefore we make it our aim, whether present or absent, to be well pleasing to Him. 10 For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive the things done in the body, according to what he has done, whether good or bad.” 2 Corinthians 5:9, 10   If our purpose for doing things is amiss, our rewards will be diminished. And if the quality of our works is shoddy, the same will be true. Let us strive with our hearts set on the Lord in order to perform well and to produce that which is exemplary. In this, the Lord will be pleased and will return to each of us a full reward.   Heavenly Father, help us to be faithful and careful stewards of the time and talents You have given to us. And Lord, we are flesh and bone. Give us strength to meet our desire to perform and give us the inner drive to meet the strength You have provided. May there be a full display of careful attention to our deeds and actions before You. Amen.

Karraker & Smallmon
The Sporting New's Mike DeCourcy

Karraker & Smallmon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 10:29


Mike joins Randy & Michelle to talk about the potential problem on the CBB horizon: an expanded tournament and a change to the auto-big process for smaller teams. How does SEC commissioner Greg Sankey's power-hold on college sports affect the equations? Did the threat to the Saint Peter's of the world survive the initial shock? What does an 80-team tournament look like? And how about adding a 5th team in football before you worry about the 69th team in basketball?

Our Gifted Kids Podcast
#059 College level science for kids?! w/ Dr Daniel Fried

Our Gifted Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 31:23


In this episode, we're talking to Dr Daniel Fried about his Biochemistry Literacy for Kids online classes. As soon as I saw this, I knew my gifted kids would love it and I'm excited to share something made for kids that is high-level science – that is so hard to find! I  hope you love it too! Enjoyed the podcast? then subscribe or get your show notes, free eBook or course at ourgiftedkids.com If this episode inspired you in some way, I'd love to hear about it in our Facebook group or Instagram or feel connected & supported in our community, the Our Gifted Kids Hub. Please leave a review on your podcast player and help parents find us! Memorable Quote “Dr. Daniel Fried has been my son's mentor for more than two years. When my then 5-year-old wanted to learn more about "real science", Dr. Fried was the only one who believed and allowed a young child like my son to enter his classroom. Dr. Fried has a Ph.D. from Yale University and his life-long mission is to make college-level science accessible to younger students. He has taught many elementary students college-level biochemistry and organic chemistry.” – Hui, an Our Gifted Kids podcast listener Resources biochemistryliteracyforkids.com Biochemistry Literacy for Kids Facebook Page Biochemistry Literacy for Kids Instagram Biochemistry Literacy for Kids Twitter Upcoming entry-level Zoom classes begin the week of September 12th 2022. See the website for details. Classes are Sundays, Mondays, or Tuesdays, depending on your location. Class 1: 7PM Sundays California / 12PM Mondays Sydney Class 2: 6:30PM Mondays New York / 8:30AM Tuesdays Sydney Bio Dr. Daniel Fried is the creator of Biochemistry Literacy for Kids, a unique digital learning system that brings college-level science to kids in K-12. Dr. Fried grew up in Upstate New York, and earned a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Yale University. After a post doctoral fellowship at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Dr. Fried became an assistant professor of chemistry, first at Kean University, then at Saint Peter's University. After receiving tenure, he took a job as an upper school science teacher at The Pingry School. He currently lives in New Jersey with his wife, five-year-old son, and new baby daughter. Hit play and let's get started!

Catching Foxes
Husband, Dad, Priest, Oklahoman: an interview with Fr. Justin Fletcher

Catching Foxes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 171:07


Fr. Justin Fletcher is a priest of the Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter. He was an Episcopal priest, married with kids, and converted to Roman Catholicism. He is also a student and lover of the Catholic liturgy and explains things so incredibly well. I interviewed him about two months ago in my house at 9pm with my buddy, Brian Jones, and we ended around 2am, which was awesome. This was my first recording using my new soundboard and I screwed up MY microphone. So I apologize. Topics Include: the Readings (Lessons) and why they are doxological and not didactic what lay people are expected to do during Mass how the novus ordo tends to cater to those wanting didacticism how Catholicism is different in kind, not degree, from all forms of Protestantism Oklahoma living Irishman joining the ... Anglican-use Ordinariate? shedding culture and reclaiming culture rootedness and being settled in one's surroundings and people Funeral liturgies and my desire to die funerals are not a 'celebration of life' CS Lewis' book That Hiddeous Strength Finally, what's it like being a married Catholic priest?

Catholic Forum
Catholic Forum, Aug. 6, 2022 - Fr. Joseph McQuaide discusses the Cathedral of St. Peter

Catholic Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 29:43


On this eposode of Catholic Forum, we will get a news update from Dialog editor, Joe Owens, then learn about the beautiful and historic Cathedral of Saint Peter in Wiilmington, Delware, when we are joined by the Very Reverend Joseph W. McQuaide, IV, the cathedral's Rector.  Father McQuaide will tell us about the cathedral's history, the parish community, and ways we can help the ministry of the cathedral during the upcoming special collection. 

Catholic Saints & Feasts
August 7: Saint Sixtus II, Pope; and Companions, Martyrs

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 6:52


August 7: Saint Sixtus II, Pope; and Companions, MartyrsEarly Third Century–258Optional Memorial; Liturgical Color: RedPatron Saint of Bellegra, ItalyThe Pope is murdered in cold bloodThe sixth pope was named the “Sixth” or, in Latin, “Sixtus.” He reigned from 115–125 A.D. The next Sixtus was today's martyr, who reigned from one August to the next in 257–258. Sixtus II (or Sixth, the Second) is listed in the Roman Canon's select roll call of sainted popes: “Linus, Cletus, Clement, Sixtus, Cornelius, Cyprian…” The preservation of his name in the liturgy is compelling proof of the lasting impact of his bloody witness. After the legalization of Christianity in 313, perhaps two popes were martyred, although various others died unnatural deaths. But throughout the 200s, solid historical evidence proves that more than a dozen popes were assassinated by Roman authorities just for being Christian leaders. Many of their remains were interred in an ornate burial chamber in the catacombs of Saint Callixtus, which was excavated in the 1850s.Sixtus II succeeded to the Chair of Saint Peter at a difficult time. The on-again, off-again persecutions of the early Church were on-again in the 250s. The Roman Emperors Decius and Valerian sought the blood of Christians not only to try to decapitate the surging Church but also to confiscate the wealth and property of Christians. The tensions in Church-State relations were no less serious than internal Church tensions tearing at its unity. The persecution of Decius from 250–251 was wicked. Decius' edict required everyone in the empire to sacrifice to a Roman god in the presence of a state official, with a signed libellus, or certificate, being issued afterward as proof that the sacrifice had been offered. Many Christians were weak and afraid and so sacrificed to gods they knew didn't exist. Some Christians purchased a libellus, some fled to the safety of the countryside, and some refused to sacrifice and were cruelly martyred.Christians' divergent responses to the persecution—some heroic, some weak, some uncertain—were traumatic for the Church. Many in the African and Asiatic Church said that those who sacrificed (the lapsi) must be re-baptized. Pope Stephen I, Sixtus II's predecessor, said that the lapsi must only repent to be reconciled with the Church. The theological positions of the two camps were each sincere and hardened over time. There was no easy answer. After Pope Stephen died, it seems that Pope Sixtus II was more diplomatic in seeking reconciliation with the African and Asiatic churches over this controversy, although it would not be theologically resolved until Saint Augustine wrote one hundred and fifty years later.Sixtus II had to be consecrated as Pope in secret because of the times. In 257, the formerly peaceable Emperor Valerian issued an anti-Christian edict which forbade Christians from assembling in cemeteries. Sixtus avoided persecution for many months. But in early August 258, Valerian got serious. A new edict focused on essential targets. Bishops, priests, and deacons could be put to death without a trial. On August 6, 258, Pope Sixtus II was with his flock, seated and preaching the word of God, probably at Mass, in the catacombs. A small troop of soldiers was on the hunt. The Pope must die. With torches lighting the way, the soldiers scurried through the warren of dark and narrow passageways toward the underground chapel. Perhaps they heard some singing. They acquired their prize soon enough, and the deed was done.Saint Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, North Africa, received the news shortly afterward and, before being martyred himself, wrote a letter to his flock: “Valerian has issued an edict to the Senate to the effect that bishops, presbyters, and deacons shall suffer the death penalty without delay…I must also inform you that Sixtus was put to death in a catacomb on the sixth of August, and four deacons with him...Let all our people fix their minds not on death but rather on immortality...knowing that in this contest the soldiers of God and Christ are not slain but rather win their crowns.” An inscription placed on Sixtus II's tomb over a hundred years after his death by Pope Saint Damasus, rediscovered in the 1800s, verifies the drama of Sixtus II's last moments. It notes that the shepherd gave his life for his flock. The faithful with Sixtus that fateful day walked up the steps of the catacomb into the daylight totally unharmed, while their pastor lay dead. The companions martyred with Sixtus were the deacons Januarius, Vincentius, Magnus, and Stephanus. The deacons Felicissimus and Agapitus were martyred on the same day, but not with Pope Sixtus.Pope Saint Sixtus II, you were a servant and a leader; a confident shepherd to a frightened flock; a central actor, not a bystander; a witness to truth, not an outside observer; a light generating others' shadows. You are known because you were courageous. Make us faithful like you.

Jim Bohannon
Jim Bohannon Show 08-03-22

Jim Bohannon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 116:50


Guests: Alain Sanders, Constitutional Law Professor at Saint Peter's College, On to discuss Tuesday's primaries. James Gilmore III, Former Ambassador to the Organization for Security and Cooperation, On to discuss what happens with NATO and Ukraine if the GOP win big in Novermber. Frank Buckley, Professor at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University, On to discuss his book "Progressive Conservatism." And ... Your thoughts on the latest in the news.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Luke21 Radio - Biblical Prophecy with Steve Wood
Episode 289 – St. Peter's Prophetic Teaching

Luke21 Radio - Biblical Prophecy with Steve Wood

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 14:31


2 PETER SERIES Steve introduces the second epistle of Saint Peter, calling it one of the most relevant books of the bible for Christians today.

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
DC14 St. Peter Chrysologus – The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunson

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 31:16


Born: 406 AD, Imola, Italy Died: July 31, 450 AD For more on St. Peter Chrysologus and his teachings From Wikipedia: Peter was born in Imola, where Cornelius, bishop of Roman Catholic Diocese of Imola, baptized him, educated him, and ordained him a deacon. He was made an archdeacon through the influence of Emperor Valentinian III. Pope Sixtus III appointed Peter as Bishop of Ravenna (or perhaps archbishop) circa 433, apparently rejecting the candidate whom the people of the city ofRavenna elected. The traditional account, as recorded in the Roman Breviary, is that Sixtus had a vision of Pope Saint Peter the Apostle and Saint Apollinaris of Ravenna, the first bishop of that see, who showed Sixtus a young man, the next Bishop of Ravenna. When a group from Ravenna arrived, including Cornelius and his archdeacon Peter from Imola, Sixtus recognized Peter as the young man in his vision and consecrated him as a bishop. St.-Peter-ChPeople knew Saint Peter Chrysologus, the Doctor of Homilies, for his short but inspired talks; he supposedly feared boring his audience. His piety and zeal won universal admiration. After hearing oratory of his first homily as bishop, Roman Empress Galla Placidia supposedly gave him the surname Chrysologus, meaning "golden-worded." Empress Galla Placidia patronized many of projects of Bishop Saint Peter. In his extant homilies, bishop Peter explained Biblical texts briefly and concisely. He also condemned Arianism and Monophysitism as heresies and explained beautifully the Apostles' Creed, the mystery of the Incarnation, and other topics in simple and clear language. He dedicated a series of homilies to Saint John the Baptist and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Peter advocated daily reception of Eucharist. He urged his listeners to confide in the forgiveness offered through Christ. He shared the confidence of Saint Pope Leo I the Great (440-461), another doctor of the Church. A synod held in Constantinople in 448 condemned Eutyches for Monophysitism; Eutyches then appealed to Saint Peter Chrysologus but failed in his endeavour to win the support of the Bishop. The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon(451) preserves the text of letter of Saint Peter Chrysologus in response to Eutyches; Peter admonishes Eutyches to accept the ruling of the synod and to give obedience to the Bishop of Rome as the successor of Saint Peter. The post DC14 St. Peter Chrysologus – The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunson appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
News Minute: Local Church Offers Food for Those In Need

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 2:07


The Episcopal Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, 1795 Johnson Ferry Road in Marietta, is partnering with There's Hope For The Hungry to provide free food for those in need. #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline            Register Here for your essential digital news.          Email bgdoughnut22@gmailcom for your chance to win a $15 gift card from Dough in the Box https://www.chattahoocheetech.edu/ https://cuofga.org/ https://www.esogrepair.com/ https://www.drakerealty.com/ https://doughinthebox.com/         Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.             This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group   For more information be sure to visit https://www.bgpodcastnetwork.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
August 2: Saint Peter Julian Eymard, Priest

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 6:31


August 2: Saint Peter Julian Eymard, Priest1811–1868Optional Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhiteApostle of the Holy EucharistThe Eucharist was the pearl that shone in his eyesThe great artist Auguste Rodin, who sculpted “The Thinker” and other world-famous pieces, met today's saint in 1862 and joined his Congregation as a lay brother. Rodin was despondent over the death of his sister and wanted to abandon art and dedicate his life to God. Saint Peter Julian Eymard burned like a bonfire for God, but this was one vocation his flames would not consume. Father Eymard could see Rodin's prodigious talent in an evocative bust Rodin sculpted of the future saint while Rodin was a religious brother. Eymard told Rodin to return to the world to pursue his artistic calling. So while Father Eymard was as apostolic and demanding as any saint, he was also just as wise as any saint. Not every man who felt a vocation truly had one. It was for the superior to discern the validity of the calling. Father Eymard knew this well from personal experience. He had lived at least three priesthoods inside of his one priesthood: as a diocesan priest in a parish, as a religious priest in the Marist Order, and as the founder of the Congregation of the Most Blessed Sacrament.There was never a time when Peter Julian Eymard did not love Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. At the age of five, he disappeared from home one day. His siblings went in search and found him standing right next to the tabernacle in their local church. When they asked him what he was doing there, little Peter responded, “I am here listening to Jesus.” His father did not want Peter to be a priest but a blacksmith. He relented a bit over time and then died prematurely, removing all opposition. Peter was ordained a diocesan priest in 1834 and served in a parish. But he felt a slightly different call within his call and began to seek admission to the Society of Mary, or Marists. His diocesan bishop was reluctant to let Father Peter go. The bishop relented in 1839, writing to the Marist superior that “I have given sufficient proof of my high esteem for the Society of Mary in giving it such a priest.” Father Peter's personal energy, apostolic zeal, and prayerfulness led to his being named a Marist Provincial. He traveled throughout France and became acquainted with nocturnal and perpetual adoration societies. He became expert at preaching about the Eucharist and at directing lay Eucharistic societies. During a Corpus Christi procession in 1845, he had a mystical experience while carrying the Blessed Sacrament. His attraction to the Eucharist became so personal and so intense that he resolved “to preach nothing but Jesus Christ, and Jesus Christ Eucharistic” from then on. Discussions with his superiors about orienting the Marist's more toward a Eucharistic identity were frustrated. It was not their primary charism. On January 21, 1851, at the Shrine of Our Lady of Fourviere overlooking Lyon, Father Eymard received the inspiration to found a new Order dedicated exclusively to the Blessed Sacrament. This third call within his one priestly call would consume the rest of his life.In 1857 the Society of the Blessed Sacrament was formally established in Paris. One year later, the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament for nuns would be founded. Father Peter and his few companions did not limit their Eucharistic dedication to piety and prayer. They prepared children to receive First Holy Communion, reached out to lapsed Catholics, and promoted frequent reception of Holy Communion for all Catholics. The normal struggles of every young Congregation bedeviled Father Eymard: extreme poverty, atrocious lodgings, lack of vocations, and problems of growth.Rodin's bust captures the essence of Father Eymard better than any photo. Eymard's mass of hair is out of control, communicating his passionate eccentricity. His gaze is penetrating. He knows the mysteries of God and other secrets of the soul. His thin face, straight nose, and protruding cheekbones say he is a mortified ascetic. And buried in his vest, just over his heart, is a scroll. Only a few words of it can be read. It is a fragment of Emyard's prayer: “O Sacrament Most Holy, O Sacrament Divine, all praise and all thanksgiving be every moment thine.” His love of the Eucharist pulsated in sync with his heart, every moment of every day of his fifty-seven years. Our saint is buried in his Congregation's chapel in Paris. He was canonized in 1962 and in 1995 his Optional Memorial was finally included in the Church's universal sanctoral calendar. Saint Peter Julian Eymard, your ardent love of the Blessed Sacrament consumed your thoughts, words, preaching, and life. May such a healthy devotion mark all of our lives. May we satisfy Christ's thirst for our presence by not making Him wait too long between our visits.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
July 30: Saint Peter Chrysologus, Bishop and Doctor

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 6:16


July 30: Saint Peter Chrysologus, Bishop and Doctorc. 380–c. 450Optional Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of Imola, Italy, invoked against fever and mad dogsA golden tongued bishop preaches to a golden cityIn 330 A.D., the Emperor Constantine transferred his capital from Rome to a newly constructed city he named after himself in present day Turkey. The Roman Empire and its ancient traditions continued but under a new guise. The Empire slowly oriented itself toward Greek, not Western, art and culture; adopted Orthodoxy, not Catholicism, as its religion; and communicated in the Greek, not the Latin, language. Contantinople's walls were finally breached in 1453 by the Ottoman Turks, bringing a definitive end to Byzantium, or the Eastern Roman Empire, after more than a millennium. Due to the capital's transfer in the fourth century, Italy was in disarray at the time of today's saint in the fifth century. Weeds pushed through the cracked marble of Rome's ruined temples. The Western emperors, more warlords than kings, migrated back and forth throughout the 400s between disintegrating Rome and a newly fortified city on the Adriatic Sea. It was imperial Ravenna, Byzantium's sole toehold in Italy. It was a jewel box of a city sparkling with mosaics. Ravenna throughout the 400s and 500s was a mini-Constantinople, Byzantine to its fingertips, basking in the glow of imperial splendor, and abuzz with the construction of palaces, churches, and mausoleums. And it was of vibrant fifth-century Ravenna that Saint Peter Chrysologus was appointed archbishop in about 425 A.D. He served the city well for the next twenty-five years.Saint Peter preached his first episcopal homily to the empress and is depicted alongside her and the emperor in a contemporary mosaic, proving Peter mingled with the elites and enjoyed their support. Peter developed a reputation as a skilled preacher. One-hundred-and-seventy-six of his sermons still survive. In later centuries Peter would be given the moniker Chrysologus, the “Golden Worded,” in recognition of his oratorical skills. The name may also have been given by Western theologians to purposefully rival the Eastern world's famous Saint John Chrysostom, the “Golden Mouthed.”Apart from his homilies, the only surviving document of Peter's is a letter he wrote to Eutyches, a central figure in the complex, and sometimes vicious, Christological and Marian debates of the fifth century. Peter vigorously supported Pope Saint Leo the Great's teachings on the Incarnation, while Eutyches and others in the East had drifted into monophysitism or versions of it. Monophysitism held that Christ possessed one mixed nature which mingled both human and divine elements. The Council of Chalcedon in 451 would formally adopt Leo's teaching, condemn monophysitism, and teach forever and always that a fully divine nature and a fully human nature dwelled inside the one person of Jesus Christ without confusion, co-mingling, or alteration. This complex reality, called the hypostatic union, is precisely what gives such meaning, color, and richness to all that Christ said and did.During the burning theological controversies preceding the Council of Chalcedon, just after Pope Saint Leo clarified orthodox teaching on Christ's one person and two natures, Chrysologus wrote his letter to the very confused Eutyches. Concisely and charitably, Chrysologus encouraged the heretic to submit to the Bishop of Rome: “Obediently heed these matters of which the most blessed Pope of the city of Rome has written, because Blessed Peter, who lives and presides in his own See, proffers the truth of faith to those who seek it…we cannot decide upon cases of faith without the harmonious agreement of the Bishop of Rome.” Peter's letter proves just how widespread early Christianity knew that the Bishop of Rome was the one hub where all of Christianity's many spokes were joined.Although much is known of Peter's time and place, both theologically and culturally, few details remain of his life or ministry apart from his sermons. These sermons show rhetorical flair in expounding on the Incarnation, Mary's role in mankind's redemption, and in the need for penance and conversion. Saint Peter's golden words impressed the populace of a golden city for decades. We can assume that our saint lived as elegantly as he preached. Saint Peter Chrysologus was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church in 1729.May all priests and deacons be graced with your passion, clarity, and eloquence, Saint Peter. Help the faithful who seek the fullness of the Word of God to find Him and aid those who are distracted and apathetic to pay heed to God's interventions in their lives.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
July 22: Saint Mary Magdalene

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 6:36


July 22: Saint Mary MagdaleneFirst CenturyFeast; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of perfumers, converts, and hairdressersAn Apostle to the Apostles first spreads the Good News“Cherchez la femme“ is a French phrase meaning “Look for the woman.” It is used as a convenient shortcut in movie or literary criticism to discover what is driving a plot, especially in a detective story. Why did the man risk his life? Cherchez la femme? Who had a motive to lie? Cherchez la femme? Where is the treasure buried? Cherchez la femme? It's a cliché, of course, but clichés often convey some truth. Look for the women in the Gospels, and you will not be disappointed. Search for one woman in particular, Mary Magdalene, and you will find yourself present at all the most important Gospel events: the passion, the crucifixion, the burial, and in a garden for the resurrection, just moments after a huge stone is rolled away from a tomb, allowing the Lord to step forth into a new world. Saint Mary Magdalene is present at key moments, says key things, and is a key witness. She opens the door to Gospel scenes that would otherwise remain hidden from view.Saint Mary Magdalene was among that troop of women who congregated on the outer edge of the twelve Apostles. These were probably women of means, who “provided for” Jesus and the Apostles “out of their resources” (Lk 8:3). When these women are named, Mary Magdalene is always named first, similar to Saint Peter's position in the listing of the Apostles. Mary Magdalene is named many more times in the Gospels than most of the Apostles themselves, signaling her importance. The Gospel of Luke relates that seven demons were driven from her (Lk. 8:2). But there is debate over whether Mary Magdalene is also the sinful woman who anoints Christ's feet and if she is also Mary of Bethany, the sister of Martha and Lazarus. Building on the presumption that the sinful woman was Mary Magdalene, medieval traditions wrongly described her as a repentant prostitute. Artistic depictions almost universally show her as sultry, forlorn, and repentant. Despite the dubious connection between Mary Magdalene and prostitution, this association continues today and will likely take centuries to purify.A “combined Mary” understanding rolls all three of the above Marys—the woman from whom demons were expelled, the repentant sinner, the sister of Lazarus—into the one person of Mary Magdalene. Mary was an extremely common Jewish name. It requires, then, careful attention to the text to sift which Mary is doing what in the New Testament. Magdala was a town on the Sea of Galilee. So when Mary from Magdala is referenced, the reader can trust that her town is adjoined to her name on purpose to distinguish her from other Marys.An old Christian tradition calls Mary Magdalene the “Apostle to the Apostles.” The resurrected Christ appeared to her first, before all others. She is the proto-witness. Mary and other women go to the tomb of Jesus to anoint His body. They see the stone rolled away and enter. The body is not there. An angel tells them to not be afraid, “But go, tell his disciples and Peter” (Mk 16:7), so Mary dutifully fulfills his angelic orders. It is a woman, then, who tells the men, who spreads the news of all news to everyone else. The men come running and verify her account. The tomb is empty. As usual, Mary respectfully remains on the fringe of the Apostles. She weeps outside the tomb while Peter and John are inside. Time passes as they try to absorb what this all means until, finally, the “disciples returned to their homes” (Jn 20:10). But Mary does not go home. And then it happens. Mary is alone again, crying. She just can't believe it. She has to take another look. So she bends her body in half to peer into the low empty tomb once again. When she straightens up, she notices a man standing just behind her. She thinks he is a gardener. A short, awkward conversation follows and then abruptly concludes: “Mary!”...“Rabbouni!” (Jn 20:16). Her name is in the mouth of God! A name is enunciated and a new life begins! At Baptism. At Confirmation. At religious vows. May we all hear the voice of the risen Christ speak our name, directly to us, just as Mary Magdalene did, when we hopefully walk for the first time in the garden of paradise: “Ashley!” ”Susan!” “Tom!” “Marty!” “Quinn!” “Juliette!”...and on and on and on until the end of time.Saint Mary Magdalene, assist all who seek your intercession to be humble followers of Christ, doing, from the margins, what is necessary to carry forward the ministry of Christ's Church, quietly accomplishing God's will without recognition except for its eternal reward.

Catholic News
July 20, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 3:17


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Following the kidnapping of two Catholic priests in central Nigeria last week, the local diocese announced July 19 that one of the two priests had escaped, while the other was “brutally” killed. Father John Mark Cheitnum and Father Denatus Cleopas were abducted at around 5:45 pm on July 15 at the rectory of Christ the King Catholic Church, in the town of Lere in Nigeria's northern Kaduna State. Cleopas escaped with his life, but Cheitnum was “brutally killed” by his abductors on the day of his kidnapping, a letter from the diocese of Kafanchan says. His burial is scheduled for July 21 at the Kafanchan's Cathedral of Saint Peter. The diocese did not say who the kidnappers were thought to be, or whether any ransom was demanded for the two priests. At least seven Catholic priests were kidnapped in Nigeria in the month of July, according to data compiled by Aid to the Church in Need, a Catholic nonprofit organization. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251827/kidnapped-priest-killed-in-nigeria-another-escapes A 76 year-old English grandmother who was fined for praying near to an abortion clinic has successfully overturned her financial penalty. Rosa Lalor, from Liverpool, was issued the fine during the country's lockdown in February 2021, after a policeman questioned why she was out doors and she replied that she was “walking and praying”. The officer involved said that this was not “a reasonable excuse” and that she was in fact protesting and so she was then arrested, detained and fined. As a result of a legal challenge, Merseyside Police have now conceded that Lalor should not have been detained due to the fact she was firmly within her rights to silently pray while out walking and that her actions were reasonable and acceptable under Covid-19 regulations. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251830/english-grandmother-arrested-for-praying-near-abortion-clinic-wins-religious-freedom-challenge Bishop Stephen D Parkes of Savannah has announced that Traditional Latin Masses in his Georgia diocese will cease in May 2023. The bishop said that he had requested permission from the Vatican Dicastery for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments for parishes in his diocese to offer Mass according to the 1962 Roman Missal and received a response from Rome that one parish can offer the Mass weekly and three parishes can offer the Mass monthly until May 20, 2023. The Georgia bishop's announcement came one day before the anniversary of Pope Francis' promulgation of Traditionis custodes, a motu proprio which placed sweeping restrictions on the celebration of Mass using the 1962 Roman Missal, also known as the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite, the Tridentine Mass, and the Traditional Latin Mass. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251822/vatican-instructs-savannah-diocese-to-end-traditional-latin-masses-in-may-2023-bishop-says Today, the Church celebrates Saint Margaret of Antioch, a virgin and martyr. Having embraced Christianity and consecrated her virginity to God, she was disowned by her father and adopted by her nurse. Threatened with death unless she renounced the Christian faith, the holy virgin refused to adore the gods of the empire. Several attempted methods of killing her failed, and she was finally beheaded. The Greek Church honors her under the name Marine on July13, and the Latin church as Margaret on July 20. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-margaret-of-antioch-307

The Myokinetix Podcast
Comparing & Contrasting Athletic Trainers & Physical Therapists with Joe Lisella

The Myokinetix Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 36:11


On today's podcast, Dr. Natty spoke with Joe Lisella. Joe is an athletic trainer working at Saint Peter's, and he also worked at Yale for a year. While on the podcast, they discussed the differences between being an athletic trainer and being a physical therapist. They both feel it is important for athletes, and everyone, to remember that, “just because you get rid of the pain, doesn't mean the problem is gone”. In terms of having an athlete's best interest at heart, athletic trainers and physical therapists go hand in hand!Get Connected:https://www.myokinetix.com/InstagramFacebookTikTok

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio
Father Kubicki - Prayer Reflections July 20, 2022

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 2:00


Today we celebrate the feast of Saint Apollinaris of Ravenna. Saint Apollinaris was a disciple of Saint Peter. As a bishop of Ravenna he was exiled from his Diocese four times and was eventually martyred  because he would not renounce his faith.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, July 20, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 397All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint ApollinarisAccording to tradition, Saint Peter sent Apollinaris to Ravenna, Italy, as its first bishop. His preaching of the Good News was so successful that the pagans there beat him and drove him from the city. He returned, however, and was exiled a second time. After preaching in the area surrounding Ravenna, he entered the city again. After being cruelly tortured, he was put on a ship heading to Greece. Pagans there caused him to be expelled to Italy, where he went to Ravenna for a fourth time. He died from wounds received during a savage beating at Classis, a suburb of Ravenna. A beautiful basilica honoring him was built there in the sixth century. Reflection Following Jesus involves risks—sometimes the supreme risk of life itself. Martyrs are people who would rather accept the risk of death than deny the cornerstone of their whole life: faith in Jesus Christ. Everyone will die eventually—the persecutors and those persecuted. The question is what kind of a conscience people will bring before the Lord for judgment. Remembering the witness of past and present martyrs can help us make the often small sacrifices that following Jesus today may require. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Saints & Feasts
July 20: Saint Apollinaris, Bishop and Martyr

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 5:40


July 20: Saint Apollinaris, Bishop and MartyrFirst or Second CenturyOptional Memorial; Liturgical Color: RedPatron Saint of Ravenna, Italy, and invoked against gout and epilepsyAn elusive early bishop's memory is preserved in artRavenna, a city on Italy's eastern Adriatic Coast, is a miniature Istanbul. It has perhaps the most impressive groupings of Byzantine churches and mosaics outside of the former Constantinople. In the centuries after the Western Roman Empire declined, Italy was ruled by various Northern tribes. The Roman Empire was thus reduced to its eastern half in today's Greece, Turkey, and Syria. Its capital was Constantinople, and its westernmost outpost, and only secure toehold on the Italian peninsula, was Ravenna. Ravenna's art and architecture, then, reflect Eastern styles rather than Western ones. And it was in Ravenna where today's saint, Apollinaris, was bishop for twenty-six years, and where two basilicas with impressive artistic and historical pedigrees still bear Apollinaris' name. These two permanent proofs of his significance date from the sixth century and, together with an almost equally ancient church in Rome dedicated to his honor, testify to Apollinaris' legacy in the early Church.The life of Apollinaris is the subject of conjecture more than analysis. Very little is known about him. Some traditions hold that he was a disciple of Saint Peter and came from Antioch, where Saint Peter was the first bishop. Other traditions, based on some historical evidence about the sequence of bishops in Ravenna, assert that he was bishop there in the late second century. Some legends speak of him as a martyr, while others say he suffered for the faith in the manner of a confessor but was not a blood martyr. Owing to these conflicting histories, and to his apparent lack of universal significance, Saint Apollinaris was removed from the sanctoral calendar in 1969 as part of the liturgical reforms after the Second Vatican Council. There was never any question, however, of removing him from the Church's official roster of saints. After a long absence, the 2002 edition of the Roman Missal restored the Optional Memorial of Saint Apollinaris.In the older of the two churches of Saint Apollinaris in Ravenna, an ancient mosaic communicates the essentials. The mosaic is not peripherally located. It is front and center in the main apse, in the direct field of vision of any and all who walk through the doors of the church. It shows a man with white hair. He is old. His skull is shaved. It is the tonsure, showing his religious dedication. A large golden halo circles his head. He is a saint. He is wearing liturgical vestments—a chasuble and stole. He is a priest or bishop. His arms are wide open in what is called the orans, or praying, position so common to early Christian frescoes and mosaics. He is saying Mass. He is wearing a pallium, a small band of white lamb's wool worn by Metropolitan Archbishops. He is the Archbishop of Ravenna. Twelve lambs, representing the faithful, look to the figure from both sides. He is an important pastor, a shepherd. His main garment is a white alb. In keeping with the mosaic's age, and with Ravenna's status as an imperial city, the alb looks more like a flowing Roman toga. The empire is alive and well. The figure is an equal to all the powerful of the city. Above the figure, tiny, dark stones spell out: +SANTUS APOLENARIS.Most of the church's mosaics were wantonly destroyed, likely by the soldiers of a neighboring city, in the fifteenth century. But not this mosaic. It was famous then and is famous now. It is the most tangible evidence imaginable of the importance of today's saint, an early bishop who suffered for a revolutionary new faith that knew about conquering death.Saint Apollinaris, we know little about you except what is most important. You were ordained to participate in the fullness of the priesthood of Christ. You gave witness to the faith that your people remembered and memorialized. May we lead lives that are equally deserving of honor and commemoration.

K Drama Chat
1.19 - Conversation with Professor Ernabel Demillo

K Drama Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 61:56


We're still on break after wrapping up with Hotel Del Luna. In this episode, Joanna and Jen have a conversation with Professor Professor Ernabel Demillo, Department Chair of the Communication and Media Culture Department at Saint Peter's University and host of the Emmy-award winning "Asian American Life" show on CUNY-TV. Ernabel talks about:Her K Drama journeyWhy she thinks K Dramas are so addictingWhether and how the popularity of K Dramas and KPop are affecting American perceptions Asian Americans and Asian cultureHow Asian culture is not monolithicHow the colorful outfits in K Dramas make her think of bouquets of flowersThe high production value in K Dramas and how filmmakers and actors in Korea take their crafts very seriouslyHow Jokoy is about to release his new movie, “Easter Sunday”The newly-designated Little Manila in QueensThe recurring theme of identity in her show Asian American Life, and so much more.We laughed nearly the entire episode; come laugh with us! After this episode with Professor Demillo, we will begin Season 2 of K Drama Chat by recapping and analyzing Episode 1 of It's Okay to Not Be Okay. If you haven't started watching, please start now!References:Asian American Life on YouTubeAsian American Life Website On Demand Korea Top 10 Korean Variety Shows 

K Drama Chat
1.18 - Conversation with Friends About K Dramas

K Drama Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 65:33


We're taking a short break between seasons after wrapping up with Hotel Del Luna. In this episode, we have a conversation with a couple of friends: Sung Hee, who was our guest in Episode 6, and cousin Linda, who we have mentioned so many times! Be prepared to laugh with us as we discuss our love of K Dramas! We cover:Our individual K Drama journeysWhat makes K Dramas so addictingHow K Dramas are so wholesomeThe invention of the Korean language, Hangeul, and our own languages journeys with HangeulOur favorite shows and actorsOur favorite K Drama OSTsAre Korean really that wonderful?What it's like to be Asian-American and Korean-American at a time when KPop, K Dramas and Korean culture are so popularWhat we thought about Hotel Del LunaWhat we think about our choice of It's Okay to Not Be Okay as the next K Drama that we will recap and analyzeListeners, next week, we will have another special guest: Professor Ernabel Demillo is Department Chair of the Communication and Media Culture Department at Saint Peter's University and host of the Emmy-award winning "Asian American Life" show on CUNY-TV.  After the episode with Professor Demillo, we will begin Season 2 of K Drama Chat by recapping and analyzing Episode 1 of It's Okay to Not Be Okay. If you haven't started watching, please start now!References:History of HangeulKorean tofu soup or Sundubu-jjigae DramaCoolKing Sejong from the Joseon Dynasty

Issues, Etc.
1811. The Saint Peter Option: Living as Exiles in a Foreign Land, Conclusion – Pr. Peter Bender, 6/30/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 57:49


Peter Bender of The Concordia Catechetical Academy Concordia Catechetical Academy 2022 Concordia Catechetical Academy Symposium

Forward Day By Day Podcast

2 Timothy 4:6-7. | Saint Peter and Saint Paul June 2022 meditations are written and recorded by Brendan O'Sullivan-Hale.   Forward Day by Day is published and produced by Forward Movement. Explore our other podcasts, books, and blogs at forwardmovement.org

Issues, Etc.
1751. The Saint Peter Option: Living as Exiles in a Foreign Land, Part 22 – Pr. Peter Bender, 6/24/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 66:50


Peter Bender of The Concordia Catechetical Academy Concordia Catechetical Academy 2022 Concordia Catechetical Academy Symposium

Issues, Etc.
1662. The Saint Peter Option: Living as Exiles in a Foreign Land, Part 21 – Pr. Peter Bender, 6/15/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 69:37


Peter Bender of The Concordia Catechetical Academy Concordia Catechetical Academy 2022 Concordia Catechetical Academy Symposium

What's Next with Eric Wood
Ep 156 - Whatever It Takes with Blaise Ffrench

What's Next with Eric Wood

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 31:33


Blaise Ffrench is an NBA agent, actor, model, and brand builder for BODYARMOR. Previously, Blaise attended Saint Peter's University, where he played on the college basketball team. He has since been featured in True Religion and Banana Republic, as well as appearances in Law And Order SVU, Blacklist, The Code, and Power among other hit shows. Today on the show, Eric and Blaise discuss his rise to fame, the details behind selling BODYARMOR to Coca-Cola for $5.6 Billion and how you can get to your next level. Other topics include: (2:20-4:40) - Growing up in Queens, NY. Playing CBB at St. Peter's (4:40-12:25) - The rise of BODYARMOR. Taking advantage of opportunities. (12:25-17:30) - Advice to aspiring entrepreneurs. (17:30-20:55) - Blaise morning routine (20:55-23:30) - Ultimate career goals (23:30-26:00) - How to grow your social media following And much more. Rate, review an subscribe to the show today! For more information about our sponsors today: https://papsjerky.com/