Podcasts about Amazon

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Best podcasts about Amazon

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Latest podcast episodes about Amazon

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books
Susie Petruccelli, RAISED A WARRIOR: A Memoir of Soccer, Grit, and Leveling the Playing Field

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 30:12


"We're all expecting things to be better for our daughters, but I honestly am worried that we're going to lose the rights that we already have." Zibby is joined by Susie Petruccelli, former captain of the Harvard women's soccer team and author of Raised a Warrior, to discuss her book, her career, and her love of the sport. The two talk about what it's like to be a twin, the relationship Susie had with her dad and sports, and how her identity changed when she could no longer play soccer. Susie shares when she realized how perilous it is to be a woman in the United States where we have often come to take the existence of human rights laws for granted. Purchase on Amazon or Bookshop.Amazon: https://amzn.to/3KlFqpaBookshop: https://bit.ly/3nClSTNSubscribe to Zibby's weekly newsletter here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
How Can Mikhaila Peterson Get Her Questions Answered about Christianity?

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 16:15


How's it going to go converting to Christianity while vlogging? Strange new world.  How can she get her questions answered? To learn hockey you've got to get on the ice. Tough to learn hockey watching Youtube videos.   @Mikhaila Peterson  with  @Jonathan Pageau   https://youtu.be/hycMQgz_zcI   @Mikhaila Peterson  with  @Michael Franzese  https://youtu.be/FgSXDQNy2-E  Discord link. Good for just a few days. Check with more recent videos for a fresh link. https://discord.gg/PAfngxkD Paul Vander Klay clips channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0jIcadtoxELSwehCh5QTg My Substack https://paulvanderklay.substack.com/ Estuary Hub Link https://www.estuaryhub.com/ If you want to schedule a one-on-one conversation check here. https://paulvanderklay.me/2019/08/06/converzations-with-pvk/ There is a video version of this podcast on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paulvanderklay To listen to this on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paul-vanderklays-podcast/id1394314333  If you need the RSS feed for your podcast player https://paulvanderklay.podbean.com/feed/  All Amazon links here are part of the Amazon Affiliate Program. Amazon pays me a small commission at no additional cost to you if you buy through one of the product links here. This is is one (free to you) way to support my videos.  https://paypal.me/paulvanderklay To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin (BTC): 37TSN79RXewX8Js7CDMDRzvgMrFftutbPo  To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) qr3amdmj3n2u83eqefsdft9vatnj9na0dqlzhnx80h  To support this channel/podcast with Ethereum (ETH): 0xd3F649C3403a4789466c246F32430036DADf6c62 Blockchain backup on Lbry https://odysee.com/@paulvanderklay https://www.patreon.com/paulvanderklay Paul's Church Content at Living Stones Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh7bdktIALZ9Nq41oVCvW-A To support Paul's work by supporting his church give here. https://tithe.ly/give?c=2160640  

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
BTC061: Global Macro Investing 1Q 2022 w/ Luke Gromen (Bitcoin Podcast)

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 67:46


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:Luke's overview of the Macro landscape.China's shift in monetary policy.Luke's thoughts on the dollar for the first half of 2022.How Preston and Luke are estimating how high interest rates might go.How currency exchange rates can offset interest rates (or make them twice as bad).How China's water problem could turn into a major energy crisis.How the reverse REPO system works.Luke's thoughts on Bill Miller's large Bitcoin position.What if the Saudis break the petrodollar system?BOOKS AND RESOURCESLuke Gromen's twitter Account.Luke's Website and newsletter.Luke's books on Amazon.Chinese Water Articles Luke talked about on the show.New to the show? Check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.See the all-new 2022 Lexus NX and discover everything it was designed to do for you. Welcome to the next level.Yieldstreet allows you to invest beyond the stock market with an evolving marketplace of alternative investments. Create your account today.Push your team to do their best work with Monday.com Work OS. Start your free two-week trial today.Every 28 seconds an entrepreneur makes their first sale on Shopify. Access powerful tools to help you find customers, drive sales, and manage your day-to-day. Start a FREE fourteen-day trial right now!Get the most from your bitcoin while holding your own keys with Unchained Capital. Begin the concierge onboarding process on their site. At the checkout, get $50 off with the promo code FUNDAMENTALS.Find Pros & Fair Pricing for Any Home Project for Free with Angi.Get access to some of the most sought-after real estate in the U.S. with Crowdstreet.Be part of the solution by investing in companies that are actively engaged in integrating ESG practices with Desjardins.Canada's #1 employee benefits plan for small businesses! The Chambers Plan evolves with the way you work and live while keeping the rates stable. Opt for the simple, stable, and smart choice for your business.Reclaim your health and arm your immune system with convenient, daily nutrition. Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.HELP US OUT!What do you love about our podcast? Here's our guide on how you can leave a rating and review for the show. We always enjoy reading your comments and feedback!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 1/18/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 109:42


On Tuesday's Mark Levin Show, the framers spent 5 months in Pennsylvania figuring out how to form a government since the Articles of Confederation were a failure. The new nation was in debt and states were unfairly levying taxation on one another. Enter the founding of the Constitution by well-read men who understood the fall of Rome and were informed by their predecessors and contemporaries like John Locke, Montesquieu, and Sir Edmund Burke. They had challenges over slavery, mob rule, representation in Congress, and many other issues of where they reached compromise but agreed that the federal government should not have plenary power of election, but rather that the states should. Then, the Democrat party is the party of the KKK, racism, and segregation. They were that way during the civil war, and they are that way today. Chuck Schumer and his razor-thin majority will peddle every lie they can to convince people that the Democrats' voting bill does something more than weaken a citizen's right to vote. Later, Nancy Pelosi's January 6th select committee is said to be weighing whether or not it can cook up some federal charges against former President Trump to prevent him from holding public office ever again. Such charges are purely political as there is no basis for such allegations. Afterward, Schumer's daughters work for Amazon and Facebook while Schumer is overseeing antitrust legislation that affects both tech giants, according to the New York Post. This raises substantive concerns over ethics and the appearance of improprieties as Schumer has the ability to kill this legislation before there's even a vote on it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Monetary Policy Tightens, Inflation Hits New High, Mortgage Rates Increase

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 4:56


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending January 14th, 2022... what the Fed is saying about tighter monetary policy, the latest rise in consumer prices, and where mortgage rates are right now.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week, and confirmation hearings for Fed Chief Jerome Powell. President Biden nominated him to continue in his role as the central bank's Chairman. Powell told the Senate Banking Committee that super low interest rates are no longer needed to prop up the economy, and that short-term rates should go higher to control inflation.The Fed has penciled in three rate hikes this year, but Powell says the central bank is prepared to do more, if necessary. It's a balancing act because hiking rates too much and too fast, could lead us into a recession, and job losses. But Powell believes that rates can go higher without hurting the job market. MarketWatch described his characterization of the process as a “soft landing” for the economy, and not a recession.Powell says that “if things develop as expected, we'll be normalizing policy, meaning we're going to end our asset purchases in March, meaning we'll be raising rates over the course of the year.” (1) (2)As it stands, consumer prices rose again in December. The government says they were up .5% in December to a 40-year high of almost 7%. When you strip out food and energy, the inflation rate was up .6% in December to 5.5%. As reported by MarketWatch, that figure is a 31-year high. (3)Those high prices contributed to a drop in consumer spending, along with the spread of the Omicron variant and the supply chain disruptions that are leaving some store shelves bare. The government says that retail sales figures were down 1.9% in December. Internet retailers, like Amazon, experienced the biggest declines. Those figures were down almost 9%. Sales fell about 7% for department stores, 5.5% at furniture stores, and almost 3% at places that sell electronics, like Best Buy. (4)The unemployment report surprised economists with an increase in initial state claims. They were up 23,000 to a total of 230,000. Continuing claims dropped significantly however. Almost 200,000 people stopped collecting checks last week, leaving just 1.56 million people on the unemployment list. (5)Consumers are feeling more pessimistic about the economy because of inflation and Covid. The University of Michigan reports that its consumer sentiment index fell a few points in January, to 68.8. That's the second-lowest reading in a decade. The lowest was a few months ago when it dropped to 67.4 in November. (6)Mortgage RatesMortgage rates rose by almost a quarter point last week. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was up 23 basis points to 3.45%. The 15-year was up 19 points to 2.62%. Freddie Mac says the rate increase was “driven by the prospect of a faster than expected tightening of monetary policy” by the Federal Reserve in response to inflation, supply chain disruptions, and labor shortages. (7)In other news making headlines… Mortgage Delinquency RatesThe mortgage delinquency rate has returned to pre-pandemic levels. CoreLogic's Loan Performance Report shows that 3.8% of mortgages were delinquent by at least 30 days in October. That's only one-tenth of a percent higher than October of 2019. And the trend is expected to continue. (8)The report shows CoreLogic's chief economist, Frank Nothaft, says that loan modifications have helped lower the number of loans that are seriously delinquent. But he says they were still half a million higher in October than they were at the start of the pandemic in March.The drop in mortgage delinquencies has lowered the foreclosure inventory rate to its lowest level since 1999. CoreLogic says foreclosures are down in all 50 states, and expects them to drop further throughout the course of this year.Second-Home Demand Demand for vacation homes continues to rise. Redfin says it was 77% higher in December than it was before the pandemic due to new work flexibility and low mortgage rates. The second-home market is expected to remain strong, although higher interest rates could impact demand along with new second-home fees from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Those will take effect on April 1st. (9)That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/powell-says-fed-can-cool-inflation-without-damaging-labor-market-11641918399?mod=economy-politics2 - https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/11/powell-says-rate-hikes-tighter-policy-will-be-needed-to-control-inflation.html3 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-consumer-price-index-11641993303?mod=economy-politics4 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-u-s-retail-sales-11642166291?mod=economy-politics5 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-jump-to-highest-level-since-mid-november-11642081065?mod=economy-politics6 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/consumer-sentiment-falls-in-january-due-to-omicron-and-inflation-worries-11642172660?mod=economic-report7 - http://www.freddiemac.com/pmms/8 - https://www.housingwire.com/articles/mortgage-delinquency-rate-reaches-prepandemic-levels/9 - https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/01/07/second-home-demand-up-77-from-pre-pandemic-levels

Dense Pixels
The $70 Billion Megaton (Ep 410)

Dense Pixels

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 77:21


We spent A LOT of time on the seismic Microsoft acquisition of Activision-Blizzard: the details, what it means for these companies, and how Microsoft is going to find the value in this immense deal. As if that weren't enough, we also give you our individual top 5 games of 2021. What could be our number ones? The answer shouldn't surprise you!   Use our Amazon page to donate to the show: www.densepixels.com/amazon Subscribe to our YouTube channel: Dense Pixels We have a Discord server! - www.densepixels.com/fans You can now follow us on Twitch! Brad - DensePixelsBrad Terrence - App4RITioN410 Micah - denseblacknerd Carrie - supitscarrie

Funemployment Radio
2733: STATEN NIBLHOLE FERRY

Funemployment Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:47


Today: Greg is now obsessed with a new game online and he's not very good at it, giant frying pan on the road and McDonald's bathing suits, buying a boat and what to do with it, and have a wonderful afternoon dear friends! :)

Coach Corey Wayne
Men Lead. Women Choose.

Coach Corey Wayne

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 13:50


Why men lead the romantic interactions, but it is women who do the choosing. If you have not read my book, “How To Be A 3% Man” yet, that would be a good starting place for you. It is available in Kindle, iBook, Paperback, Hardcover or Audio Book format. If you don't have a Kindle device, you can download a free eReader app from Amazon so you can read my book on any laptop, desktop, smartphone or tablet device. Kindle $9.99, iBook $9.99, Paperback $29.99 or Hardcover 49.99. Audio Book is Free $0.00 with an Audible membership trial or buy it for $19.95. Here is the link to Audible to get the audiobook version: http://bit.ly/CCW3Man Here is the link to Amazon to purchase Kindle, Paperback or Hardcover version: http://amzn.to/1XKRtxd Here is the link to the iBookstore to purchase iBook version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/how-to-be-3-man-winning-heart/id948035350?mt=11&uo=6&at=1l3vuUo Here is the link to the iTunes store to purchase the iTunes audio book version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/audiobook/how-to-be-a-3-man-unabridged/id1106013146?at=1l3vuUo&mt=3 You can get my second book, “Mastering Yourself, How To Align Your Life With Your True Calling & Reach Your Full Potential” which is also available in Kindle $9,99, iBook $9.99, Paperback $49.99, Hardcover $99.99 and Audio Book format $24.95. Audio Book is Free $0.00 with an Audible membership trial. Here is the link to Audible to get the audiobook version: http://bit.ly/CCWMY Here is the link to Amazon to purchase Kindle, Paperback or Hardcover version: https://amzn.to/2TQV2Xo Here is the link to the iBookstore to purchase iBook version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/book/mastering-yourself-how-to-align-your-life-your-true/id1353139487?mt=11&at=1l3vuUo Here is the link to the iTunes store to purchase the iTunes audio book version: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/audiobook/mastering-yourself-how-to-align-your-life-your-true/id1353594955?mt=3&at=1l3vuUo You can get my third book, “Quotes, Ruminations & Contemplations” which is also available in Kindle $9,99, iBook $9.99, Paperback $49.99, Hardcover $99.99 and Audio Book format $24.95. Audio Book is Free $0.00 with an Audible membership trial. Here is the link to Audible to get the audiobook version: https://www.audible.com/pd/B0941XDDCJ/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-256995&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_256995_rh_us Here is the link to Amazon to purchase Kindle, Paperback or Hardcover version: https://amzn.to/33K8VwF Here is the link to the iBookstore to purchase iBook version: https://books.apple.com/us/book/quotes-ruminations-contemplations/id1563102111?itsct=books_box_link&itscg=30200&ct=books_quotes%2C_ruminations_%26_contemplatio&ls=1 Here is the link to the iTunes store to purchase the iTunes audio book version: https://books.apple.com/us/audiobook/quotes-ruminations-contemplations-volume-i-unabridged/id1567242372?itsct=books_box_link&itscg=30200&ct=audio-books_quotes%2C_ruminations_%26_contem&ls=1 Here is the link to purchase Official Coach Corey Wayne branded merchandise (T-Shirts, Mugs, etc.): https://teespring.com/stores/coach-corey-wayne Click the link below to book phone/Skype (audio only) coaching with me personally: http://www.understandingrelationships.com/products Click the link below to make a donation via PayPal to support my work: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=LKGTSSLYJ93J6

Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide
ERP 303: How To Create Safe Conversations — An Interview With Drs Harville Hendrix & Helen Hunt

Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 50:49


In this episode, we'll discuss an often overlooked skill that is so simple yet has a significant impact on how we negotiate relationships. We'll also talk about some tools and practices that can help us turn our disagreements into meaningful connections with our partners. Dr. Harville Hendricks and Dr. Helen Hunt are co-creators of Imago Relationship Therapy, and a social movement called Safe Conversations. Internationally respected as couple's therapist, educators, speakers, activist, and New York Times bestselling authors. Their 10 books, including the timeless classic Getting the Love You Want: A Guide for Couples, have sold more than 4 million copies. Harville appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show 17 times! Helen has been installed in the Women's Hall of Fame and the Smithsonian Institute. The list goes on and on. Check out the transcript of this episode on Dr. Jessica Higgin's website. In this episode 3:56 What safe conversation is and why it's important in building a healthy relationship. 12:58 How these safe conversations in the Imago Dialogue process help the relational culture. 28:19 Simple practices to remind us to value our partners, that they matter, and that we adore them. 39:13 The structure of the Imago Dialogue process: mirroring, validating, and empathizing. 42:54 What the on-duty, off-duty days are and how Helen and Harville use this method to make sure that they are connected when they go to bed. Mentioned Imago Relationship Therapy Getting the Love You Want: A Guide for Couples Helen LaKelly Hunt - National Women's Hall of Fame Meet a Philanthropist - A Conversation With Helen LaKelly Hunt | National Museum of American History The Polyvagal Theory: Neurophysiological Foundations of Emotions, Attachment, Communication, and Self-regulation (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology) Still Face Experiment: Dr. Edward Tronick Doing Imago Relationship Therapy in the Space-Between: A Clinician's Guide Connect with Harville and Helen Websites: Harville and Helen and Safe Conversations Facebook: facebook.com/harvilleandhelen Twitter: twitter.com/HarvilleHelen YouTube: Harville Hendrix & Helen LaKelly Hunt Instagram: instagram.com/harvilleandhelen/ Connect with Dr. Jessica Higgins Facebook: facebook.com/EmpoweredRelationship  Instagram: instagram.com/drjessicahiggins  Podcast: drjessicahiggins.com/podcasts/ Pinterest: pinterest.com/EmpowerRelation  LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/drjessicahiggins  Twitter: @DrJessHiggins  Website: drjessicahiggins.com   Email: jessica@drjessicahiggins.com If you have a topic you would like me to discuss, please contact me by clicking on the “Ask Dr. Jessica Higgins” button here.  Thank you so much for your interest in improving your relationship.  Also, I would so appreciate your honest rating and review. Please leave a review by clicking here.  Thank you!   *With Amazon Affiliate Links, I may earn a few cents from Amazon, if you purchase the book from this link.

Locked On Hornets - Daily Podcast On The Charlotte Hornets
LaMelo Ball's weird illness DNP, Miles Bridges career night at the garden and Kelly Oubre update

Locked On Hornets - Daily Podcast On The Charlotte Hornets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 39:38


Walker and Doug discuss the Hornets' win over the Knicks coming off the heels of the Magic loss. Miles Bridges goes bananas at The Garden, where will he rank in Hornets history when his career is over? 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. MEGAPHONE:  Follow & Subscribe to the Locked On Hornets Podcast on these platforms

Relationship Advice -
#360 - Why Won't My Partner Commit, They left Me for Their Ex, We Haven't Had Sex in Months

Relationship Advice -

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:12


This podcast answers listeners' questions: 1. Why doesn't my partner know what they want anymore? 2. He left me and came back. What do I do? 3. My Ex says she misses me. Is this a trap? 4. We haven't had sex since July and they sit on their phone. Listen for dating and relationship advice. To ask a question and get a personalized video back: https://www.wisio.com/The_GameEXPOSED. Read my books free with amazon kindle free trial: “Regain Your Power” on Amazon

Taste Radio
How A ‘Goat' Of Beverage And Food Investment Picks Winners

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 53:54


Carlton Fowler is back for another round. The co-founder and managing partner of Goat Rodeo Capital, a venture capital firm that holds stakes in several fast-growing beverage alcohol, non-alcoholic drink and premium snack brands first joined us for an interview in October 2020. Fowler's return to Taste Radio this week follows the recent launch of Goat Rodeo's second fund, from which the firm has made investments in hop-centric beverage company HopLark and premium canister snack brand The Good Crisp. Those companies joined a portfolio that includes ready-to drink cocktail brand DRNXSMYTH, canned wine company Archer Roose and Lemon Perfect, a brand of cold-pressed lemon water drinks. As part of our discussion, Fowler reflected upon the data and business criteria that influenced Goat Rodeo's initial investments and how that information is being utilized to make new funding decisions. He also spoke about how the firm evaluates non-portfolio DTC brands and their potential for omnichannel success, weighed in the continued blurring of lines within the non-alcoholic beverage and beverage alcohol industries and explained why Goat Rodeo's second fund will not include investments in cannabis beverages, despite Carlton being bullish about the future of the space. Show notes: 0:44: Carlton Fowler, Managing Partner, Goat Rodeo Capital – Fowler and Taste Radio editor Ray Latif riffed on the investor's role as a judge for BevNET's Cocktail Showdown 2 competition and a tweet about two of his two passions appearing in a limited-edition product. Fowler also spoke about how Goat Rodeo has and continues to deploy capital for its second fund, his perspective on brands that attempt to create a new category versus seeking an addressable market for their products and how he evaluates brand success on Amazon. Later, he explained why he celebrates greater crossover among non-alcoholic, spirit and beer brands, the reason he sees a big runway for zero-proof drinks and why cannabis drinks are on his mind, even if not part of Goat Rodeo's second fund. Brands in this episode: Golden Rule Spirits, Social Hour Cocktails, Arby's, Lay's, Guinness, HopLark, The Good Crisp, Lemon Perfect, Liquid Death, Tito's, Mountain Dew, Twisted Tea, Mike's Hard Lemonade, Monster Energy, Topo Chico, Seedlip, Heineken, Budweiser, CANN, Levia

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1627 Scott Adams: Why Does the Good News and the Bad News All Look the Same Today?

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 58:00


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Biden, on MLK day, says Floyd had more impact Ivermectin and automobile deaths Supply chain issues worsen Chamath Palihapitiya's offensive honesty COVID observational reports Feb 1 strategy ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Irenicast - A Progressive Christian Podcast
A Conversation with Carolyn Baker, Author of Confronting Christofascism - 194

Irenicast - A Progressive Christian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:36


In this episode Bonnie sits down and has a compelling conversation with Carolyn Baker PhD mostly about her newest book, Confronting Christofascism: Healing the Evangelical Wound.  It is no secret that since 2016 the United States has felt as though it is on its last legs as a democracy.  Carolyn shares with us many of her perspectives on why that is the case from her book. This conversation includes many of the things we are not supposed to talk about at the dinner table: religion and politics.  Specifically the marrying of fascism and a large portion of American Christianity.  Carolyn's revolutionary mindset is on full display when she expands on a terms like religious terrorism and her books namesake, Christofascism. ANNOUNCEMENTS Sign Up for our Email list HERE and stay up to date on all things Irenicast! Intersections is a group of un-fundies and exvangelicals meeting to support each other and process our evolving faith journeys. Facilitated by Bonnie, Casey, Rajeev and Jeff.  Our next session will be Thursdays, February 3rd through March 10th at 7pm PT.  Register today. RELEVANT LINKS From Our Conversation with Carolyn Baker Carolyn Baker (Website) Carolyn Baker (Author Page) Confronting Christofascism: Healing the Evangelical Wound (Kindle Edition) by Carolyn Baker (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) Healing the Evangelical Wound: The End of Religious Authoritarianism by Carolyn Baker (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) Billy Graham (American Evangelist) Josh Hawley (American Politician) Thomas Cotton (American Politician) Christopher Hedges (American journalist, Presbyterian minister, author and television host) American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21st Century by Kevin Phillips (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) Leaving the Fold: A Guide for Former Fundamentalists and Others Leaving Their Religion by Marlene Winell (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) Texas Senate Bill 8 (Texas Abortion Law) George Walker Bush (43rd President of the United States) Jimmy Lee Swaggart (American Pentecostal Televangelist) Comfortable with Uncertainty: 108 Teachings on Cultivating Fearlessness and Compassion by Pema Chodron (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) The Cloud of Unknowing (an anonymous work of Christian mysticism written in Middle English in the latter half of the 14th century) New Age Jungian Therapy The Hope: A Guide to Sacred Activism by Andrew Harvey (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) Dietrich Bonhoeffer (German Lutheran pastor, theologian) James Finley (Clinical Psychologist and Author) The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe by Richard Rohr (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) MORE ON OUR GUEST CAROLYN BAKER Carolyn Baker's mission is to create islands of sanity in a sea of global chaos. This mission necessitates the development of a variety of emotional tools alongside a commitment to spiritual transformation. Through her multifaceted outreach via webinars, podcasts, live workshops, books, and articles, as well as one-on-one life coaching, Carolyn is touching the lives of thousands to assist them in deeply adapting and becoming resilient in the face of the unprecedented changes confronting humanity. Hundreds of people have worked with Carolyn in recent years to receive guidance around living and loving in turbulent times. Carolyn also offers spiritual counseling to provide meaning and purpose in a time of personal and collective suffering. Carolyn believes that one of the key tools we need for navigating the global crisis is solid information. For nearly a decade, Carolyn has published a comprehensive Daily News Digest, seven days per week unless she is traveling. This amazing, subscription-based newsletter contains key stories on economics, the environment, world news, civil liberties, civil unrest, and cultural trends—and contains a unique Inspiration section that offers options for responding to our planetary predicament. Carolyn graduated from Michigan State University, the University of Colorado, and Columbia Pacific University. She was a psychotherapist in private practice for eleven years and a college professor of psychology and history for ten years. Carolyn is the author of numerous books, and she lives and writes in Boulder, Colorado. For more on Carolyn Baker go to CarolynBaker.net SUPPORT THE SHOW You can always count on Irenicast providing a free podcast on the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of every month.  However, that does not mean that we do not have expense related to the show.  If we have provided value to you and you would like to support the show, here are a few options. PAYPAL - You can make a one-time, or recurring, tax-deductible donation to the show through PayPal. Just go to Irenicast.com/PayPal to make your donation. We are a 501(c)(3). MERCH - Irenicast has a merch store at Irenicast.com/Store.  We are always developing more items so check out our current offerings. AMAZON - Next time you go to make a purchase on Amazon consider using our Amazon affiliate link.  This will give us a small portion on everything you purchase.  No additional cost will be passed on to you. IRENCAST HOSTS Rev. Bonnie Rambob, MDiv | co-host | bonnie@irenicast.comYou can connect with Bonnie on Facebook and at Parkside Community Church-UCC and haystackspodcast.com. Pastor Casey Martinez-Tinnin, MTS | co-host | casey@irenicast.comYou can follow Casey on Twitter and Facebook, or you can check out his blog The Queerly Faithful Pastor or loomisucc.org Jeff Manildi | co-founder, producer & co-host | jeff@irenicast.comFollow Jeff (@JeffManildi) on facebook, instagram & twitter.  You can also listen to Jeff's other podcast Divine Cinema. Rev. Rajeev Rambob, MCL | co-host | rajeev@irenicast.comYou can connect with Rajeev at Parkside Community Church,  Facebook, Twitter, Medium, LinkedIn, and Haystacks Podcast.   ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CONVERSATION Join our progressive Christian conversations on faith and culture by interacting with us through the following links: Email Us at podcast@irenicast.comFollow Us on Twitter Like Us on Facebook Listen & Subscribe to Us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart Radio, Spreaker, Pandora and SoundCloud Speak to Us on our Feedback Page and the Post Evangelical Facebook Group See Us on Instagram Support Us on PayPal, Amazon or at our Store Love Us? CREDITS Intro and Outro music created by Mike Golin. This post may contain affiliate links.  An Irenicon is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Gup's Corner Podcast Network
THE SMASH FACTOR: DAILY FANTASY GOLF & PGA BETTING SHOW – The American Express

Gup's Corner Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Gup goes through his thoughts on this weeks PGA TOUR event, The American Express. He Brings you all his picks, bets, fades, sleepers & Gut Feel Plays for the week! Your #1 spot for Daily Fantasy Sports and betting content! Amex LL - https://www.draftkings.com/draft/contest/122761564?wpsrc=Organic%20Social&wpaffn=Twitter&wpkw=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.draftkings.com%2Fdraft%2Fcontest%2F122761564&wpcn=draft&wpscn=contest%2F122761564 Monkey Knife FIght & Underdog Promos - https://gupscorner.com/affiliates Prediction Strike - CODE gup, Link to app store: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/predictionstrike/id1532763870 Link to website: https://predictionstrike.com Google – https://goo.gl/JgkDZL Spotify – https://goo.gl/afhcFh Stitcher – https://goo.gl/KnQwUc TuneIn – http://tun.in/piScm PodBean – https://goo.gl/F1EvXv YouTube – https://goo.gl/j6nirG Itunes – https://goo.gl/GjVWNu Deezer – https://www.deezer.com/show/507322 Amazon – https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/4f8380e2-c560-4579-9390-22781174d6b3/Gups-Corner-Podcast-Netwo

Life In The Stocks
#248 Marko DeSantis (Sugarcult/Bad Astronaut)

Life In The Stocks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 119:14


It's been a while since I've had anyone this chatty on the show. Marko is one hell of a talker. He's got stories for days. He's also a complete music geek, and his knowledge of early Californian punk rock is second to none. There's all kinds of fun stuff in this episode - if you like NOFX, Lagwagon, No Use For A Name, and that whole Fat Wreck Chords scene, you'll going to love it! We also talk about Sugarcult and the twentieth anniversary of their debut album, Start Static. Enjoy the show!Follow me on Facebook / Twitter / Instagram: @mattstocksdjCheck out the Life In The Stocks Patreon page, support this podcast, and get all kinds of extras in return, from bonus podcasts & DJ mixes to archive print interviews & radio shows. www.patreon.com/lifeinthestocksMy first book, 'Life In The Stocks: Veracious Conversations with Musicians & Creatives (Vol. 01)' is also out NOW and is available via Amazon, Waterstones, Blackwell's & Rare Bird Publishing. https://rarebirdlit.com/life-in-the-stocks-veracious-conversations-with-musicians-creatives/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rover's Morning Glory
Rover has a fungus growing on his penis and balls, Does B2 have body dysmorphia, & more

Rover's Morning Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 183:13


NYC has a safe space where people can legally do drugs. Landlord sparks fury by selling Banksy mural for 2 million. Dallas Cowboys' fans throw trash at the refs. Rover holds his cat while he craps. Rover has a fungus growing on his penis and balls. People are looting trains for Amazon packages. Hunter records a deer running into him and gouging his eye. Woman is upset after boyfriend asks her to put makeup on to meet his friends. Mom says daughter brought home letter from school offering shapewear to girls struggling with body image. Does B2 have body dysmorphia?

Gay Erotica by Liam Williams
Review - Cole Got Cucked Hard by Jack Hornwood

Gay Erotica by Liam Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 4:28


Jack Hornwood's first novella, Cole Got Cucked Hard is an action-packed erotic story that opened my eyes to the cuck kink. You can purchase the novella from Jack's https://www.jackhornwood.com/cole (website). If you're in a purchasing mood, my first novella https://www.amazon.com.au/Batter-Up-First-Time-Story-ebook/dp/B09J2YQCJF/ref=sr_1_1?crid=T1GGPU1RDK1N&dchild=1&keywords=batter+up%21+liam+williams&qid=1635928404&sprefix=batter+up+liam+willia%2Caps%2C272&sr=8-1 (Batter Up! )is now available for purchase on Amazon. Thanks for joining me for another episode of Gay Erotica. If you enjoy the podcast make sure you hit subscribe and leave a rating and review. You can join the conversation by connecting with me onhttp://facebook.com/liamwilliamsauthor ( Facebook),https://twitter.com/liamwilliams85 ( Twitter) andhttps://instagram.com/liam.williams.author ( Instagram). If you'd like to support me further, check out my http://patreon.com/liamwilliams (Patreon). There's plenty of options and bonuses. To keep up to date you can sign up for my regular newsletter http://eepurl.com/hC8r-L (here). For more of my writing, click here. Support this podcast

History Extra podcast
Women of the Rothschild dynasty

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:37


Historian Natalie Livingstone chronicles the unexplored lives of the women who shaped the famous Rothschild banking dynasty. She speaks to Elinor Evans about how – though often excluded in a patriarchal society – they forged their own paths, from influential hostesses to pioneering scientists. (Ad) Natalie Livingstone is the author of The Women of Rothschild: The Untold Story of the World's Most Famous Dynasty (John Murray, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Women-Rothschild-Untold-Worlds-Dynasty/dp/1529366712#:~:text=From%20the%20East%20End%20of,dawn%20of%20the%20nineteenth%20century/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Smartest Amazon Seller
Episode 136: Amp up your product pages with Ampd.io

The Smartest Amazon Seller

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 25:11


Join Scott this week as he talks about how you can amp up your product pages with Ampd.io.

Serious Sellers Podcast: Learn How To Sell On Amazon
#314 - Amazon, Walmart, and Helium 10 Updates To Help Your Business

Serious Sellers Podcast: Learn How To Sell On Amazon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 51:22


Lem Turner joins us today to talk about the latest updates on Amazon, Walmart, and Helium that can help you crush it this 2022.

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
Mudhut Revisited: Processing The Bible Through Art

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:42


Emilee's been on the channel a few years ago. Time to see how she's been.  Our first conversation. https://youtu.be/A0_gM9PBMaA  https://mudhutillustration.com/  https://www.instagram.com/mudhut_illustration/  https://t.me/mudhutstudio  Recent chat with Chris  https://youtu.be/MKWH9XsgLtE  GR meet ups  https://www.meetup.com/hudsonville-conversation-meetup-group/  https://www.meetup.com/J-B-Peterson-Discussion-Meetup/   Discord link. Good for just a few days. Check with more recent videos for a fresh link. https://discord.gg/PAfngxkD Paul Vander Klay clips channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0jIcadtoxELSwehCh5QTg My Substack https://paulvanderklay.substack.com/ Estuary Hub Link https://www.estuaryhub.com/ If you want to schedule a one-on-one conversation check here. https://paulvanderklay.me/2019/08/06/converzations-with-pvk/ There is a video version of this podcast on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paulvanderklay To listen to this on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paul-vanderklays-podcast/id1394314333  If you need the RSS feed for your podcast player https://paulvanderklay.podbean.com/feed/  All Amazon links here are part of the Amazon Affiliate Program. Amazon pays me a small commission at no additional cost to you if you buy through one of the product links here. This is is one (free to you) way to support my videos.  https://paypal.me/paulvanderklay To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin (BTC): 37TSN79RXewX8Js7CDMDRzvgMrFftutbPo  To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) qr3amdmj3n2u83eqefsdft9vatnj9na0dqlzhnx80h  To support this channel/podcast with Ethereum (ETH): 0xd3F649C3403a4789466c246F32430036DADf6c62 Blockchain backup on Lbry https://odysee.com/@paulvanderklay https://www.patreon.com/paulvanderklay Paul's Church Content at Living Stones Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh7bdktIALZ9Nq41oVCvW-A To support Paul's work by supporting his church give here. https://tithe.ly/give?c=2160640  

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

The Homeowners Show
AI Smarter Home Security System with David Selinger

The Homeowners Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 99:55


In this episode, Craig and Kevin interview David Selinger, CEO of Deep Sentinel. Deep Sentinel is a new, artificial intelligence home security system that is changing the face of home security. David has an impressive history of working for Amazon, co-founding Redfish, among other accomplishments – but this system is his pride and joy. Imagine having a security system that actually prevents home invasions, at a staggering rate. Imagine a system that a guard is actually monitoring with cameras instead of just an alert being sent to a call station. Listen in as David walks us through why Deep Sentinel is changing the game regarding home security.   Deep Sentinel Website David Selinger LinkedIn David Selinger Facebook Deep Sentinel LinkedIn Deep Sentinel Facebook   Sustained Growth Solutions Email – Design a lead generation system specifically for your business so that you never have to search for leads again!   Termisave Email – Warranty your home against the threat of termites.    Buy a Homeowners Show T-Shirt!   Subscribe to our YouTube Channel   The Homeowners Show Website The Homeowners Show Facebook Page Instagram @homeownersshow Twitter @HomeownersThe   Info@homeownersshow.com 

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)
Winter Olympics ticket sales close, Amazon to accept UK Visa cards

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


In today's top stories, China will no longer sell tickets to the Beijing Winter Olympics, Amazon will continue to accept UK-issued Visa cards and airlines seek more 5G protections to avoid disruptions.

The Think Marketing Podcast
113: 3 Surprising Insights for Growing Your YouTube Channel in 2022

The Think Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 36:06


In this episode, Sean talks about 3 surprising insights for growing your YouTube channel in 2022! *** Join our FREE 5-Day YouTube 1K Challenge to discover how to start or grow a YouTube Channel to 1000 Subscribers and your first $1000  ➡️ http://Tube1KChallenge.comThis video is NOT sponsored. Some product links are affiliate links which means if you buy something we'll receive a small commission.

Screaming in the Cloud
The re:Invent Wheel in the Sky Keeps on Turning with Pete Cheslock

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:52


About PetePete does many startup things at Allma. Links: Last Tweet in AWS: https://lasttweetinaws.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/petecheslock LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petecheslock/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined—as is tradition, for a post re:Invent wrap up, a month or so later, once everything is time to settle—by my friend and yours, Pete Cheslock. Pete, how are you?Pete: Hi, I'm doing fantastic. New year; new me. That's what I'm going with.Corey: That's the problem. I keep hoping for that, but every time I turn around, it's still me. And you know, honestly, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.Pete: Exactly. [laugh]. I wouldn't wish you on me either. But somehow I keep coming back for this.Corey: So, in two-thousand twenty—or twenty-twenty, as the children say—re:Invent was fully virtual. And that felt weird. Then re:Invent 2021 was a hybrid event which, let's be serious here, is not really those things. They had a crappy online thing and then a differently crappy thing in person. But it didn't feel real to me because you weren't there.That is part of the re:Invent tradition. There's a midnight madness thing, there's a keynote where they announce a bunch of nonsense, and then Pete and I go and have brunch on the last day of re:Invent and decompress, and more or less talk smack about everything that crosses our minds. And you weren't there this year. I had to backfill you with Tim Banks. You know, the person that I backfield you with here at The Duckbill Group as a principal cloud economist.Pete: You know, you got a great upgrade in hot takes, I feel like, with Tim.Corey: And other ways, too, but it's rude of me to say that to you directly. So yeah, his hot takes are spectacular. He was going to be doing this with me, except you cannot mess with tradition. You really can't.Pete: Yeah. I'm trying to think how many—is this third year? It's at least three.Corey: Third or fourth.Pete: Yeah, it's at least three. Yeah, it was, I don't want to say I was sad to not be there because, with everything going on, it's still weird out there. But I am always—I'm just that weird person who actually likes re:Invent, but not for I feel like the reasons people think. Again, I'm such an extroverted-type person, that it's so great to have this, like, serendipity to re:Invent. The people that you run into and the conversations that you have, and prior—like in 2019, I think was a great example because that was the last one I had gone to—you know, having so many conversations so quickly because everyone is there, right? It's like this magnet that attracts technologists, and venture capital, and product builders, and all this other stuff. And it's all compressed into, like, you know, that five-day span, I think is the biggest part that makes so great.Corey: The fear in people's eyes when they see me. And it was fun; I had a pair of masks with me. One of them was a standard mask, and no one recognizes anyone because, masks, and the other was a printout of my ridiculous face, which was horrifyingly uncanny, but also made it very easy for people to identify me. And depending upon how social I was feeling, I would wear one or the other, and it worked flawlessly. That was worth doing. They really managed to thread the needle, as well, before Omicron hit, but after the horrors of last year. So, [unintelligible 00:03:00]—Pete: It really—Corey: —if it were going on right now, it would not be going on right now.Pete: Yeah. I talk about really—yeah—really just hitting it timing-wise. Like, not that they could have planned for any of this, but like, as things were kind of not too crazy and before they got all crazy again, it feels like wow, like, you know, they really couldn't have done the event at any other time. And it's like, purely due to luck. I mean, absolute one hundred percent.Corey: That's the amazing power of frugality. Because the reason is then is it's the week after Thanksgiving every year when everything is dirt cheap. And, you know, if there's one thing that I one-point-seve—sorry, their stock's in the toilet—a $1.6 trillion company is very concerned about, it is saving money at every opportunity.Pete: Well, the one thing that was most curious about—so I was at the first re:Invent in-what—2012 I think it was, and there was—it was quaint, right?—there was 4000 people there, I want to say. It was in the thousands of people. Now granted, still a big conference, but it was in the Sands Convention Center. It was in that giant room, the same number of people, were you know, people's booths were like tables, like, eight-by-ten tables, right? [laugh].It had almost a DevOpsDays feel to it. And I was kind of curious if this one had any of those feelings. Like, did it evoke it being more quaint and personable, or was it just as soulless as it probably has been in recent years?Corey: This was fairly soulless because they reduced the footprint of the event. They dropped from two expo halls down to one, they cut the number of venues, but they still had what felt like 20,000 people or something there. It was still crowded, it was still packed. And I've done some diligent follow-ups afterwards, and there have been very few cases of Covid that came out of it. I quarantined for a week in a hotel, so I don't come back and kill my young kids for the wrong reasons.And that went—that was sort of like the worst part of it on some level, where it's like great. Now I could sit alone at a hotel and do some catch-up and all the rest, but all right I'd kind of like to go home. I'm not used to being on the road that much.Pete: Yeah, I think we're all a little bit out of practice. You know, I haven't been on a plane in years. I mean, the travel I've done more recently has been in my car from point A to point B. Like, direct, you know, thing. Actually, a good friend of mine who's not in technology at all had to travel for business, and, you know, he also has young kids who are under five, so he when he got back, he actually hid in a room in their house and quarantine himself in the room. But they—I thought, this is kind of funny—they never told the kids he was home. Because they knew that like—Corey: So, they just thought the house was haunted?Pete: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Don't go in the west wing,” sort of level of nonsense. That is kind of amazing.Pete: Honestly, like, we were hanging out with the family because they're our neighbors. And it was like, “Oh, yeah, like, he's in the guest room right now.” Kids have no idea. [laugh]. I'm like, “Oh, my God.” I'm like, I can't even imagine. Yeah.Corey: So, let's talk a little bit about the releases of re:Invent. And I'm going to lead up with something that may seem uncharitable, but I don't think it necessarily is. There weren't the usual torrent of new releases for ridiculous nonsense in the same way that there have been previously. There was no, this service talks to satellites in space. I mean, sure, there was some IoT stuff to manage fleets of cars, and giant piles of robots, and cool, I don't have those particular problems; I'm trying to run a website over here.So okay, great. There were enhancements to a number of different services that were in many cases appreciated, in other cases, irrelevant. Werner said in his keynote, that it was about focusing on primitives this year. And, “Why do we have so many services? It's because you asked for it… as customers.”Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, you asked for it.Corey: What have you been asking for, Pete? Because I know what I've been asking for and it wasn't that. [laugh].Pete: It's amazing to see a company continually say yes to everything, and somehow, despite their best efforts, be successful at doing it. No other company could do that. Imagine any other software technology business out there that just builds everything the customers ask for. Like from a product management business standpoint, that is, like, rule 101 is, “Listen to your customers, but don't say yes to everything.” Like, you can't do everything.Corey: Most companies can't navigate the transition between offering the same software in the Cloud and on a customer facility. So, it's like, “Ooh, an on-prem version, I don't know, that almost broke the company the last time we tried it.” Whereas you have Amazon whose product strategy is, “Yes,” being able to put together a whole bunch of things. I also will challenge the assertion that it's the primitives that customers want. They don't want to build a data center out of popsicle sticks themselves. They want to get something that solves a problem.And this has been a long-term realization for me. I used to work at Media Temple as a senior systems engineer running WordPress at extremely large scale. My websites now run on WordPress, and I have the good sense to pay WP Engine to handle it for me, instead of doing it myself because it's not the most productive use of my time. I want things higher up the stack. I assure you I pay more to WP Engine than it would cost me to run these things myself from an infrastructure point of view, but not in terms of my time.What I see sometimes as the worst of all worlds is that AWS is trying to charge for that value-added pricing without adding the value that goes along with it because you still got to build a lot of this stuff yourself. It's still a very janky experience, you're reduced to googling random blog posts to figure out how this thing is supposed to work, and the best documentation comes from externally. Whereas with a company that's built around offering solutions like this, great. In the fullness of time, I really suspect that if this doesn't change, their customers are going to just be those people who build solutions out of these things. And let those companies capture the up-the-stack margin. Which I have no problem with. But they do because Amazon is a company that lies awake at night actively worrying that someone, somewhere, who isn't them might possibly be making money somehow.Pete: I think MongoDB is a perfect example of—like, look at their stock price over the last whatever, years. Like, they, I feel like everyone called for the death of MongoDB every time Amazon came out with their new things, yet, they're still a multi-billion dollar company because I can just—give me an API endpoint and you scale the database. There's is—Corey: Look at all the high-profile hires that Mongo was making out of AWS, and I can't shake the feeling they're sitting there going, “Yeah, who's losing important things out of production now?” It's, everyone is exodus-ing there. I did one of those ridiculous graphics of the naming all the people that went over there, and in—with the hurricane evacuation traffic picture, and there's one car going the other way that I just labeled with, “Re:Invent sponsorship check,” because yeah, they have a top tier sponsorship and it was great. I've got to say I've been pretty down on MongoDB for a while, for a variety of excellent reasons based upon, more or less, how they treated customers who were in pain. And I'd mostly written it off.I don't do that anymore. Not because I inherently believe the technology has changed, though I'm told it has, but by the number of people who I deeply respect who are going over there and telling me, no, no, this is good. Congratulations. I have often said you cannot buy authenticity, and I don't think that they are, but the people who are working there, I do not believe that these people are, “Yeah, well, you bought my opinion. You can buy their attention, not their opinion.” If someone changes their opinion, based upon where they work, I kind of question everything they're telling me is, like, “Oh, you're just here to sell something you don't believe in? Welcome aboard.”Pete: Right. Yeah, there's an interview question I like to ask, which is, “What's something that you used to believe in very strongly that you've more recently changed your mind on?” And out of politeness because usually throws people back a little bit, and they're like, “Oh, wow. Like, let me think about that.” And I'm like, “Okay, while you think about that I want to give you mine.”Which is in the past, my strongly held belief was we had to run everything ourselves. “You own your availability,” was the line. “No, I'm not buying Datadog. I can build my own metric stack just fine, thank you very much.” Like, “No, I'm not going to use these outsourced load balancers or databases because I need to own my availability.”And what I realized is that all of those decisions lead to actually delivering and focusing on things that were not the core product. And so now, like, I've really flipped 180, that, if any—anything that you're building that does not directly relate to the core product, i.e. How your business makes money, should one hundred percent be outsourced to an expert that is better than you. Mongo knows how to run Mongo better than you.Corey: “What does your company do?” “Oh, we handle expense reports.” “Oh, what are you working on this month?” “I'm building a load balancer.” It's like that doesn't add the value. Don't do that.Pete: Right. Exactly. And so it's so interesting, I think, to hear Werner say that, you know, we're just building primitives, and you asked for this. And I think that concept maybe would work years ago, when you had a lot of builders who needed tools, but I don't think we have any, like, we don't have as many builders as before. Like, I think we have people who need more complete solutions. And that's probably why all these businesses are being super successful against Amazon.Corey: I'm wondering if it comes down to a cloud economic story, specifically that my cloud bill is always going to be variable and it's difficult to predict, whereas if I just use EC2 instances, and I build load balancers or whatnot, myself, well, yeah, it's a lot more work, but I can predict accurately what my staff compensation costs are more effectively, that I can predict what a CapEx charge would be or what the AWS bill is going to be. I'm wondering if that might in some way shape it?Pete: Well, I feel like the how people get better in managing their costs, right, you'll eventually move to a world where, like, “Yep, okay, first, we turned off waste,” right? Like, step one is waste. Step two is, like, understanding your spend better to optimize but, like, step three, like, the galaxy brain meme of Amazon cost stuff is all, like, unit economics stuff, where trying to better understand the actual cost deliver an actual feature. And yeah, I think that actually gets really hard when you give—kind of spread your product across, like, a slew of services that have varying levels of costs, varying levels of tagging, so you can attribute it. Like, it's really hard. Honestly, it's pretty easy if I have 1000 EC2 servers with very specific tags, I can very easily figure out what it costs to deliver product. But if I have—Corey: Yeah, if I have Corey build it, I know what Corey is going to cost, and I know how many servers he's going to use. Great, if I have Pete it, Pete's good at things, it'll cut that server bill in half because he actually knows how to wind up being efficient with things. Okay, great. You can start calculating things out that way. I don't think that's an intentional choice that companies are making, but I feel like that might be a natural outgrowth of it.Pete: Yeah. And there's still I think a lot of the, like, old school mentality of, like, the, “Not invented here,” the, “We have to own our availability.” You can still own your availability by using these other vendors. And honestly, it's really heartening to see so many companies realize that and realize that I don't need to get everything from Amazon. And honestly, like, in some things, like I look at a cloud Amazon bill, and I think to myself, it would be easier if you just did everything from Amazon versus having these ten other vendors, but those ten other vendors are going to be a lot better at running the product that they build, right, that as a service, then you probably will be running it yourself. Or even Amazon's, like, you know, interpretation of that product.Corey: A few other things that came out that I thought were interesting, at least the direction they're going in. The changes to S3 intelligent tiering are great, with instant retrieval on Glacier. I feel like that honestly was—they talk a good story, but I feel like that was competitive response to Google offering the same thing. That smacks of a large company with its use case saying, “You got two choices here.” And they're like, “Well, okay. Crap. We're going to build it then.”Or alternately, they're looking at the changes that they're making to intelligent tiering, they're now shifting that to being the default that as far as recommendations go. There are a couple of drawbacks to it, but not many, and it's getting easier now to not have the mental overhead of trying to figure out exactly what your lifecycle policies are. Yeah, there are some corner cases where, okay, if I adjust this just so, then I could save 10% on that monitoring fee or whatnot. Yeah, but look how much work that's going to take you to curate and make sure that you're not doing something silly. That feels like it is such an in the margins issue. It's like, “How much data you're storing?” “Four exabytes.” Okay, yeah. You probably want some people doing exactly that, but that's not most of us.Pete: Right. Well, there's absolutely savings to be had. Like, if I had an exabyte of data on S3—which there are a lot of people who have that level of data—then it would make sense for me to have an engineering team whose sole purpose is purely an optimizing our data lifecycle for that data. Until a point, right? Until you've optimized the 80%, basically. You optimize the first 80, that's probably, air-quote, “Easy.” The last 20 is going to be incredibly hard, maybe you never even do that.But at lower levels of scale, I don't think the economics actually work out to have a team managing your data lifecycle of S3. But the fact that now AWS can largely do it for you in the background—now, there's so many things you have to think about and, like, you know, understand even what your data is there because, like, not all data is the same. And since S3 is basically like a big giant database you can query, you got to really think about some of that stuff. But honestly, what I—I don't know if—I have no idea if this is even be worked on, but what I would love to see—you know, hashtag #AWSwishlist—is, now we have countless tiers of EBS volumes, EBS volumes that can be dynamically modified without touching, you know, the physical host. Meaning with an API call, you can change from the gp2 to gp3, or io whatever, right?Corey: Or back again if it doesn't pan out.Pete: Or back again, right? And so for companies with large amounts of spend, you know, economics makes sense that you should have a team that is analyzing your volumes usage and modifying that daily, right? Like, you could modify that daily, and I don't know if there's anyone out there that's actually doing it at that level. And they probably should. Like, if you got millions of dollars in EBS, like, there's legit savings that you're probably leaving on the table without doing that. But that's what I'm waiting for Amazon to do for me, right? I want intelligent tiering for EBS because if you're telling me I can API call and you'll move my data and make that better, make that [crosstalk 00:17:46] better [crosstalk 00:17:47]—Corey: Yeah it could be like their auto-scaling for DynamoDB, for example. Gives you the capacity you need 20 minutes after you needed it. But fine, whatever because if I can schedule stuff like that, great, I know what time of day, the runs are going to kick off that beat up the disks. I know when end-of-month reporting fires off. I know what my usage pattern is going to be, by and large.Yeah, part of the problem too, is that I look at this stuff, and I get excited about it with the intelligent tiering… at The Duckbill Group we've got a few hundred S3 buckets lurking around. I'm thinking, “All right, I've got to go through and do some changes on this and implement all of that.” Our S3 bill's something like 50 bucks a month or something ridiculous like that. It's a no, that really isn't a thing. Like, I have a screenshot bucket that I have an app installed—I think called Dropshare—that hooks up to anytime I drag—I hit a shortcut, I drag with the mouse to select whatever I want and boom, it's up there and the URL is not copied to my clipboard, I can paste that wherever I want.And I'm thinking like, yeah, there's no cleanup on that. There's no lifecycle policy that's turning into anything. I should really go back and age some of it out and do the rest and start doing some lifecycle management. It—I've been using this thing for years and I think it's now a whopping, what, 20 cents a month for that bucket. It's—I just don't—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —I just don't care, other than voice in the back of my mind, “That's an unbounded growth problem.” Cool. When it hits 20 bucks a month, then I'll consider it. But until then I just don't. It does not matter.Pete: Yeah, I think yeah, scale changes everything. Start adding some zeros and percentages turned into meaningful numbers. And honestly, back on the EBS thing, the one thing that really changed my perspective of EBS, in general, is—especially coming from the early days, right? One terabyte volume, it was a hard drive in a thing. It was a virtual LUN on a SAN somewhere, probably.Nowadays, and even, like, many years after those original EBS volumes, like all the limits you get in EBS, those are actually artificial limits, right? If you're like, “My EBS volume is too slow,” it's not because, like, the hard drive it's on is too slow. That's an artificial limit that is likely put in place due to your volume choice. And so, like, once you realize that in your head, then your concept of how you store data on EBS should change dramatically.Corey: Oh, AWS had a blog post recently talking about, like, with io2 and the limits and everything, and there was architecture thinking, okay. “So, let's say this is insufficient and the quarter-million IOPS a second that you're able to get is not there.” And I'm sitting there thinking, “That is just ludicrous data volume and data interactivity model.” And it's one of those, like, I'm sitting here trying to think about, like, I haven't had to deal with a problem like that decade, just because it's, “Huh. Turns out getting these one thing that's super fast is kind of expensive.” If you paralyze it out, that's usually the right answer, and that's how the internet is mostly evolved. But there are use cases for which that doesn't work, and I'm excited to see it. I don't want to pay for it in my view, but it's nice to see it.Pete: Yeah, it's kind of fun to go into the Amazon calculator and price out one of the, like, io2 volumes and, like, maxed out. It's like, I don't know, like $50,000 a month or a hun—like, it's some just absolutely absurd number. But the beauty of it is that if you needed that value for an hour to run some intensive data processing task, you can have it for an hour and then just kill it when you're done, right? Like, that is what is most impressive.Corey: I copied 130 gigs of data to an EFS volume, which was—[unintelligible 00:21:05] EFS has gone from “This is a piece of junk,” to one of my favorite services. It really is, just because of its utility and different ways of doing things. I didn't have the foresight, just use a second EFS volume for this. So, I was unzipping a whole bunch of small files onto it. Great.It took a long time for me to go through it. All right, now that I'm done with that I want to clean all this up. My answer was to ultimately spin up a compute node and wind up running a whole bunch of—like, 400, simultaneous rm-rf on that long thing. And it was just, like, this feels foolish and dumb, but here we are. And I'm looking at the stats on it because the instance was—all right, at that point, the load average [on the instance 00:21:41] was like 200, or something like that, and the EFS volume was like, “Ohh, wow, you're really churning on this. I'm now at, like, 5% of the limit.” Like, okay, great. It turns out I'm really bad at computers.Pete: Yeah, well, that's really the trick is, like, yeah, sure, you can have a quarter-million IOPS per second, but, like, what's going to break before you even hit that limit? Probably many other things.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, feels like on some level if something gets to that point, it a misconfiguration somewhere. But honestly, that's the thing I find weirdest about the world in which we live is that at a small-scale—if I have a bill in my $5 a month shitposting account, great. If I screw something up and cost myself a couple hundred bucks in misconfiguration it's going to stand out. At large scale, it doesn't matter if—you're spending $50 million a year or $500 million a year on AWS and someone leaks your creds, and someone spins up a whole bunch of Bitcoin miners somewhere else, you're going to see that on your bill until they're mining basically all the Bitcoin. It just gets lost in the background.Pete: I'm waiting for those—I'm actually waiting for the next level of them to get smarter because maybe you have, like, an aggressive tagging system and you're monitoring for untagged instances, but the move here would be, first get the creds and query for, like, the most used tags and start applying those tags to your Bitcoin mining instances. My God, it'll take—Corey: Just clone a bunch of tags. Congratulations, you now have a second BI Elasticsearch cluster that you're running yourself. Good work.Pete: Yeah. Yeah, that people won't find that until someone comes along after the fact that. Like, “Why do we have two have these things?” And you're like—[laugh].Corey: “Must be a DR thing.”Pete: It's maxed-out CPU. Yeah, exactly.Corey: [laugh].Pete: Oh, the terrible ideas—please, please, hackers don't take are terrible ideas.Corey: I had a, kind of, whole thing I did on Twitter years ago, talking about how I would wind up using the AWS Marketplace for an embezzlement scheme. Namely, I would just wind up spinning up something that had, like, a five-cent an hour charge or whatnot on just, like, basically rebadge the CentOS Community AMI or whatnot. Great. And then write a blog post, not attached to me, that explains how to do a thing that I'm going to be doing in production in a week or two anyway. Like, “How to build an auto-scaling group,” and reference that AMI.Then if it ever comes out, like, “Wow, why are we having all these marketplace charges on this?” “I just followed the blog post like it said here.” And it's like, “Oh, okay. You're a dumbass. The end.”That's the way to do it. A month goes by and suddenly it came out that someone had done something similarly. They wound up rebadging these community things on the marketplace and charging big money for it, and I'm sitting there going like that was a joke. It wasn't a how-to. But yeah, every time I make these jokes, I worry someone's going to do it.Pete: “Welcome to large-scale fraud with Corey Quinn.”Corey: Oh, yeah, it's fraud at scale is really the important thing here.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I still remember a year ago now at re:Invent 2021 was it, or was it 2020? Whatever they came out with, I want to say it wasn't gp3, or maybe it was, regardless, there was a new EBS volume type that came out that you were playing with to see how it worked and you experimented with it—Pete: Oh, yes.Corey: —and the next morning, you looked at the—I checked Slack and you're like well, my experiments yesterday cost us $5,000. And at first, like, the—my response is instructive on this because, first, it was, “Oh, my God. What's going to happen now?” And it's like, first, hang on a second.First off, that seems suspect but assume it's real. I assumed it was real at the outset. It's “Oh, right. This is not my personal $5-a-month toybox account. We are a company; we can absolutely pay that.” Because it's like, I could absolutely reach out, call it a favor. “I made a mistake, and I need a favor on the bill, please,” to AWS.And I would never live it down, let's be clear. For a $7,000 mistake, I would almost certainly eat it. As opposed to having to prostrate myself like that in front of Amazon. I'm like, no, no, no. I want one of those like—if it's like, “Okay, you're going to, like, set back the company roadmap by six months if you have to pay this. Do you want to do it?” Like, [groans] “Fine, I'll eat some crow.”But okay. And then followed immediately by, wow, if Pete of all people can mess this up, customers are going to be doomed here. We should figure out what happened. And I'm doing the math. Like, Pete, “What did you actually do?” And you're sitting there and you're saying, “Well, I had like a 20 gig volume that I did this.” And I'm doing the numbers, and it's like—Pete: Something's wrong.Corey: “How sure are you when you say ‘gigabyte,' that you were—that actually means what you think it did? Like, were you off by a lot? Like, did you mean exabytes?” Like, what's the deal here?Pete: Like, multiple factors.Corey: Yeah. How much—“How many IOPS did you give that thing, buddy?” And it turned out what happened was that when they launched this, they had mispriced it in the system by a factor of a million. So, it was fun. I think by the end of it, all of your experimentation was somewhere between five to seven cents. Which—Pete: Yeah. It was a—Corey: Which is why you don't work here anymore because no one cost me seven cents of money to give to Amazon—Pete: How dare you?Corey: —on my watch. Get out.Pete: How dare you, sir?Corey: Exactly.Pete: Yeah, that [laugh] was amazing to see, as someone who has done—definitely maid screw-ups that have cost real money—you know, S3 list requests are always a fun one at scale—but that one was supremely fun to see the—Corey: That was a scary one because another one they'd done previously was they had messed up Lightsail pricing, where people would log in, and, like, “Okay, so what is my Lightsail instance going to cost?” And I swear to you, this is true, it was saying—this was back in 2017 or so—the answer was, like, “$4.3 billion.” Because when you see that you just start laughing because you know it's a mistake. You know, that they're not going to actually demand that you spend $4.3 billion for a single instance—unless it's running SAP—and great.It's just, it's a laugh. It's clearly a mispriced, and it's clearly a bug that's going to get—it's going to get fixed. I just spun up this new EBS volume that no one fully understands yet and it cost me thousands of dollars. That's the sort of thing that no, no, I could actually see that happening. There are instances now that cost something like 100 bucks an hour or whatnot to run. I can see spinning up the wrong thing by mistake and getting bitten by it. There's a bunch of fun configuration mistakes you can make that will, “Hee, hee, hee. Why can I see that bill spike from orbit?” And that's the scary thing.Pete: Well, it's the original CI and CD problem of the per-hour billing, right? That was super common of, like, yeah, like, an i3, you know, 16XL server is pretty cheap per hour, but if you're charged per hour and you spin up a bunch for five minutes. Like, it—you will be shocked [laugh] by what you see there. So—Corey: Yeah. Mistakes will show. And I get it. It's also people as individuals are very different psychologically than companies are. With companies it's one of those, “Great we're optimizing to bring in more revenue and we don't really care about saving money at all costs.”Whereas people generally have something that looks a lot like a fixed income in the form of a salary or whatnot, so it's it is easier for us to cut spend than it is for us to go out and make more money. Like, I don't want to get a second job, or pitch my boss on stuff, and yeah. So, all and all, routing out the rest of what happened at re:Invent, they—this is the problem is that they have a bunch of minor things like SageMaker Inference Recommender. Yeah, I don't care. Anything—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —[crosstalk 00:28:47] SageMaker I mostly tend to ignore, for safety. I did like the way they described Amplify Studio because they made it sound like a WYSIWYG drag and drop, build a React app. It's not it. It basically—you can do that in Figma and then it can hook it up to some things in some cases. It's not what I want it to be, which is Honeycode, except good. But we'll get there some year. Maybe.Pete: There's a lot of stuff that was—you know, it's the classic, like, preview, which sure, like, from a product standpoint, it's great. You know, they have a level of scale where they can say, “Here's this thing we're building,” which could be just a twinkle in a product managers, call it preview, and get thousands of people who would be happy to test it out and give you feedback, and it's a, it's great that you have that capability. But I often look at so much stuff and, like, that's really cool, but, like, can I, can I have it now? Right? Like—or you can't even get into the preview plan, even though, like, you have that specific problem. And it's largely just because either, like, your scale isn't big enough, or you don't have a good enough relationship with your account manager, or I don't know, countless other reasons.Corey: The thing that really throws me, too, is the pre-announcements that come a year or so in advance, like, the Outpost smaller ones are finally available, but it feels like when they do too many pre-announcements or no big marquee service announcements, as much as they talk about, “We're getting back to fundamentals,” no, you have a bunch of teams that blew the deadline. That's really what it is; let's not call it anything else. Another one that I think is causing trouble for folks—I'm fortunate in that I don't do much work with Oracle databases, or Microsoft SQL databases—but they extended RDS Custom to Microsoft SQL at the [unintelligible 00:30:27] SQL server at re:Invent this year, which means this comes down to things I actually use, we're going to have a problem because historically, the lesson has always been if I want to run my own databases and tweak everything, I do it on top of an EC2 instance. If I want to managed database, relational database service, great, I use RDS. RDS Custom basically gives you root into the RDS instance. Which means among other things, yes, you can now use RDS to run containers.But it lets you do a lot of things that are right in between. So, how do you position this? When should I use RDS Custom? Can you give me an easy answer to that question? And they used a lot of words to say, no, they cannot. It's basically completely blowing apart the messaging and positioning of both of those services in some unfortunate ways. We'll learn as we go.Pete: Yeah. Honestly, it's like why, like, why would I use this? Or how would I use this? And this is I think, fundamentally, what's hard when you just say yes to everything. It's like, they in many cases, I don't think, like, I don't want to say they don't understand why they're doing this, but if it's not like there's a visionary who's like, this fits into this multi-year roadmap.That roadmap is largely—if that roadmap is largely generated by the customers asking for it, then it's not like, oh, we're building towards this Northstar of RDS being whatever. You might say that, but your roadmap's probably getting moved all over the place because, you know, this company that pays you a billion dollars a year is saying, “I would give you $2 billion a year for all of my Oracle databases, but I need this specific thing.” I can't imagine a scenario that they would say, “Oh, well, we're building towards this Northstar, and that's not on the way there.” Right? They'd be like, “New Northstar. Another billion dollars, please.”Corey: Yep. Probably the worst release of re:Invent, from my perspective, is RUM, Real User Monitoring, for CloudWatch. And I, to be clear, I wrote a shitposting Twitter threading client called Last Tweet in AWS. Go to lasttweetinaws.com. You can all use it. It's free; I just built this for my own purposes. And I've instrumented it with RUM. Now, Real User Monitoring is something that a lot of monitoring vendors use, and also CloudWatch now. And what that is, is it embeds a listener into the JavaScript that runs on client load, and it winds up looking at what's going on loading times, et cetera, so you can see when users are unhappy. I have no problem with this. Other than that, you know, liking users? What's up with that?Pete: Crazy.Corey: But then, okay, now, what this does is unlike every other RUM tool out there, which charges per session, meaning I am going to be… doing a web page load, it charges per data item, which includes HTTP errors, or JavaScript errors, et cetera. Which means that if you have a high transaction volume site and suddenly your CDN takes a nap like Fastly did for an hour last year, suddenly your bill is stratospheric for this because errors abound and cascade, and you can have thousands of errors on a single page load for these things, and it is going to be visible from orbit, at least with a per session basis thing, when you start to go viral, you understand that, “Okay, this is probably going to cost me some more on these things, and oops, I guess I should write less compelling content.” Fine. This is one of those one misconfiguration away and you are wailing and gnashing teeth. Now, this is a new service. I believe that they will waive these surprise bills in the event that things like that happen. But it's going to take a while and you're going to be worrying the whole time if you've rolled this out naively. So it's—Pete: Well and—Corey: —I just don't like the pricing.Pete: —how many people will actively avoid that service, right? And honestly, choose a competitor because the competitor could be—the competitor could be five times more expensive, right, on face value, but it's the certainty of it. It's the uncertainty of what Amazon will charge you. Like, no one wants a surprise bill. “Well, a vendor is saying that they'll give us this contract for $10,000. I'm going to pay $10,000, even though RUM might be a fraction of that price.”It's honestly, a lot of these, like, product analytics tools and monitoring tools, you'll often see they price be a, like, you know, MAU, Monthly Active User, you know, or some sort of user-based pricing, like, the number of people coming to your site. You know, and I feel like at least then, if you are trying to optimize for lots of users on your site, and more users means more revenue, then you know, if your spend is going up, but your revenue is also going up, that's a win-win. But if it's like someone—you know, your third-party vendor dies and you're spewing out errors, or someone, you know, upgraded something and it spews out errors. That no one would normally see; that's the thing. Like, unless you're popping open that JavaScript console, you're not seeing any of those errors, yet somehow it's like directly impacting your bottom line? Like that doesn't feel [crosstalk 00:35:06].Corey: Well, there is something vaguely Machiavellian about that. Like, “How do I get my developers to care about errors on consoles?” Like, how about we make it extortionately expensive for them not to. It's, “Oh, all right, then. Here we go.”Pete: And then talk about now you're in a scenario where you're working on things that don't directly impact the product. You're basically just sweeping up the floor and then trying to remove errors that maybe don't actually affect it and they're not actually an error.Corey: Yeah. I really do wonder what the right answer is going to be. We'll find out. Again, we live, we learn. But it's also, how long does it take a service that has bad pricing at launch, or an unfortunate story around it to outrun that reputation?People are still scared of Glacier because of its original restore pricing, which was non-deterministic for any sensible human being, and in some cases lead to I'm used to spending 20 to 30 bucks a month on this. Why was I just charged two grand?Pete: Right.Corey: Scare people like that, they don't come back.Pete: I'm trying to actually remember which service it is that basically gave you an estimate, right? Like, turn it on for a month, and it would give you an estimate of how much this was going to cost you when billing started.Corey: It was either Detective or GuardDuty.Pete: Yeah, it was—yeah, that's exactly right. It was one of those two. And honestly, that was unbelievably refreshing to see. You know, like, listen, you have the data, Amazon. You know what this is going to cost me, so when I, like, don't make me spend all this time to go and figure out the cost. If you have all this data already, just tell me, right?And if I look at it and go, “Yeah, wow. Like, turning this on in my environment is going to cost me X dollars. Like, yeah, that's a trade-off I want to make, I'll spend that.” But you know, with some of the—and that—a little bit of a worry on some of the intelligent tiering on S3 is that the recommendation is likely going to be everything goes to intelligent tiering first, right? It's the gp3 story. Put everything on gp3, then move it to the proper volume, move it to an sc or an st or an io. Like, gp3 is where you start. And I wonder if that's going to be [crosstalk 00:37:08].Corey: Except I went through a wizard yesterday to launch an EC2 instance and its default on the free tier gp2.Pete: Yeah. Interesting.Corey: Which does not thrill me. I also still don't understand for the life of me why in some regions, the free tier is a t2 instance, when t3 is available.Pete: They're uh… my guess is that they've got some free t—they got a bunch of t2s lying around. [laugh].Corey: Well, one of the most notable announcements at re:Invent that most people didn't pay attention to is their ability now to run legacy instance types on top of Nitro, which really speaks to what's going on behind the scenes of we can get rid of all that old hardware and emulate the old m1 on modern equipment. So, because—you can still have that legacy, ancient instance, but now you're going—now we're able to wind up greening our data centers, which is part of their big sustainability push, with their ‘Sustainability Pillar' for the well-architected framework. They're talking more about what the green choices in cloud are. Which is super handy, not just because of the economic impact because we could use this pretty directly to reverse engineer their various margins on a per-service or per-offering basis. Which I'm not sure they're aware of yet, but oh, they're going to be.And that really winds up being a win for the planet, obviously, but also something that is—that I guess puts a little bit of choice on customers. The challenge I've got is, with my serverless stuff that I build out, if I spend—the Google search I make to figure out what the most economic, most sustainable way to do that is, is going to have a bigger carbon impact on the app itself. That seems to be something that is important at scale, but if you're not at scale, it's one of those, don't worry about it. Because let's face it, the cloud providers—all of them—are going to have a better sustainability story than you are running this in your own data centers, or on a Raspberry Pi that's always plugged into the wall.Pete: Yeah, I mean, you got to remember, Amazon builds their own power plants to power their data centers. Like, that's the level they play, right? There, their economies of scale are so entirely—they're so entirely different than anything that you could possibly even imagine. So, it's something that, like, I'm sure people will want to choose for. But, you know, if I would honestly say, like, if we really cared about our computing costs and the carbon footprint of it, I would love to actually know the carbon footprint of all of the JavaScript trackers that when I go to various news sites, and it loads, you know, the whatever thousands of trackers and tracking the all over, like, what is the carbon impact of some of those choices that I actually could control, like, as a either a consumer or business person?Corey: I really hope that it turns into something that makes a meaningful difference, and it's not just greenwashing. But we'll see. In the fullness of time, we're going to figure that out. Oh, they're also launching some mainframe stuff. They—like that's great.Pete: Yeah, those are still a thing.Corey: I don't deal with a lot of customers that are doing things with that in any meaningful sense. There is no AWS/400, so all right.Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, I think honestly, like, I did talk to a friend of mine who's in a big old enterprise and has a mainframe, and they're actually replacing their mainframe with Lambda. Like they're peeling off—which is, like, a great move—taking the monolith, right, and peeling off the individual components of what it can do into these discrete Lambda functions. Which I thought was really fascinating. Again, it's a five-year-long journey to do something like that. And not everyone wants to wait five years, especially if their support's about to run out for that giant box in the, you know, giant warehouse.Corey: The thing that I also noticed—and this is probably the—I guess, one of the—talk about swing and a miss on pricing—they have a—what is it?—there's a VPC IP Address Manager, which tracks the the IP addresses assigned to your VPCs that are allocated versus not, and it's 20 cents a month per IP address. It's like, “Okay. So, you're competing against a Google Sheet or an Excel spreadsheet”—which is what people are using for these things now—“Only you're making it extortionately expensive?”Pete: What kind of value does that provide for 20—I mean, like, again—Corey: I think Infoblox or someone like that offers it where they become more cost-effective as soon as you hit 500 IP addresses. And it's just—like, this is what I'm talking about. I know it does not cost AWS that kind of money to store an IP address. You can store that in a Route 53 TXT record for less money, for God's sake. And that's one of those, like, “Ah, we could extract some value pricing here.”Like, I don't know if it's a good product or not. Given its pricing, I don't give a shit because it's going to be too expensive for anything beyond trivial usage. So, it's a swing and a miss from that perspective. It's just, looking at that, I laugh, and I don't look at it again.Pete: See I feel—Corey: I'm not usually price sensitive. I want to be clear on that. It's just, that is just Looney Tunes, clown shoes pricing.Pete: Yeah. It's honestly, like, in many cases, I think the thing that I have seen, you know, in the past few years is, in many cases, it can honestly feel like Amazon is nickel-and-diming their customers in so many ways. You know, the explosion of making it easy to create multiple Amazon accounts has a direct impact to waste in the cloud because there's a lot of stuff you have to have her account. And the more accounts you have, those costs grow exponentially as you have these different places. Like, you kind of lose out on the economies of scale when you have a smaller number of accounts.And yeah, it's hard to optimize for that. Like, if you're trying to reduce your spend, it's challenging to say, “Well, by making a change here, we'll save, you know, $10,000 in this account.” “That doesn't seem like a lot when we're spending millions.” “Well, hold on a second. You'll save $10,000 per account, and you have 500 accounts,” or, “You have 1000 accounts,” or something like that.Or almost cost avoidance of this cost is growing unbounded in all of your accounts. It's tiny right now. So, like, now would be the time you want to do something with it. But like, again, for a lot of companies that have adopted the practice of endless Amazon accounts, they've almost gone, like, it's the classic, like, you know, I've got 8000 GitHub repositories for my source code. Like, that feels just as bad as having one GitHub repository for your repo. I don't know what the balance is there, but anytime these different types of services come out, it feels like, “Oh, wow. Like, I'm going to get nickeled and dimed for it.”Corey: This ties into the re:Post launch, which is a rebranding of their forums, where, okay, great, it was a little crufty and it need modernize, but it still ties your identity to an IAM account, or the root email address for an Amazon account, which is great. This is completely worthless because as soon as I change jobs, I lose my identity, my history, the rest, on this forum. I'm not using it. It shows that there's a lack of awareness that everyone is going to have multiple accounts with which they interact, and that people are going to deal with the platform longer than any individual account will. It's just a continual swing and a miss on things like that.And it gets back to the billing question of, “Okay. When I spin up an account, do I want them to just continue billing me—because don't turn this off; this is important—or do I want there to be a hard boundary where if you're about to charge me, turn it off. Turn off the thing that's about to cost me money.” And people hem and haw like this is an insurmountable problem, but I think the way to solve it is, let me specify that intent when I provision the account. Where it's, “This is a production account for a bank. I really don't want you turning it off.” Versus, “I'm a student learner who thinks that a Managed NAT Gateway might be a good thing. Yeah, I want you to turn off my demo Hello World app that will teach me what's going on, rather than surprising me with a five-figure bill at the end of the month.”Pete: Yeah. It shouldn't be that hard. I mean, but again, I guess everything's hard at scale.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.Pete: But still, I feel like every time I log into Cost Explorer and I look at—and this is years it's still not fixed. Not that it's even possible to fix—but on the first day of the month, you look at Cost Explorer, and look at what Amazon is estimating your monthly bill is going to be. It's like because of your, you know—Corey: Your support fees, and your RI purchases, and savings plans purchases.Pete: [laugh]. All those things happened, right? First of the month, and it's like, yeah, “Your bill's going to be $800,000 this year.” And it's like, “Shouldn't be, like, $1,000?” Like, you know, it's the little things like that, that always—Corey: The one-off charges, like, “Oh, your Route 53 zone,” and all the stuff that gets charged on a monthly cadence, which fine, whatever. I mean, I'm okay with it, but it's also the, like, be careful when that happen—I feel like there's a way to make that user experience less jarring.Pete: Yeah because that problem—I mean, in my scenario, companies that I've worked at, there's been multiple times that a non-technical person will look at that data and go into immediate freakout mode, right? And that's never something that you want to have happen because now that's just adding a lot of stress and anxiety into a company that is—with inaccurate data. Like, the data—like, the answer you're giving someone is just wrong. Perhaps you shouldn't even give it to them if it's that wrong. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing what happens this coming year. We're already seeing promising stuff. They—give people a timeline on how long in advance these things record—late last night, AWS released a new console experience. When you log into the AWS console now, there's a new beta thing. And I gave it some grief on Twitter because I'm still me, but like the direction it's going. It lets you customize your view with widgets and whatnot.And until they start selling widgets on marketplace or having sponsored widgets, you can't remove I like it, which is no guarantee at some point. But it shows things like, I can move the cost stuff, I can move the outage stuff up around, I can have the things that are going on in my account—but who I am means I can shift this around. If I'm a finance manager, cool. I can remove all the stuff that's like, “Hey, you want to get started spinning up an EC2 instance?” “Absolutely not. Do I want to get told, like, how to get certified? Probably not. Do I want to know what the current bill is and whether—and my list of favorites that I've pinned, whatever services there? Yeah, absolutely do.” This is starting to get there.Pete: Yeah, I wonder if it really is a way to start almost hedging on organizations having a wider group of people accessing AWS. I mean, in previous companies, I absolutely gave access to the console for tools like QuickSight, for tools like Athena, for the DataBrew stuff, the Glue DataBrew. Giving, you know, non-technical people access to be able to do these, like, you know, UI ETL tasks, you know, a wider group of a company is getting access into Amazon. So, I think anything that Amazon does to improve that experience for, you know, the non-SREs, like the people who would traditionally log in, like, that is an investment definitely worth making.Corey: “Well, what could non-engineering types possibly be doing in the AWS console?” “I don't know, jackhole, maybe paying the bill? Just a thought here.” It's the, there are people who look at these things from a variety of different places, and you have such sprawl in the AWS world that there are different personas by a landslide. If I'm building Twitter for Pets, you probably don't want to be pitching your mainframe migration services to me the same way that you would if I were a 200-year-old insurance company.Pete: Yeah, exactly. And the number of those products are going to grow, the number of personas are going to grow, and, yeah, they'll have to do something that they want to actually, you know, maintain that experience so that every person can have, kind of, the experience that they want, and not be distracted, you know? “Oh, what's this? Let me go test this out.” And it's like, you know, one-time charge for $10,000 because, like, that's how it's charged. You know, that's not an experience that people like.Corey: No. They really don't. Pete, I want to thank you for spending the time to chat with me again, as is our tradition. I'm hoping we can do it in person this year, when we go at the end of 2022, to re:Invent again. Or that no one goes in person. But this hybrid nonsense is for the birds.Pete: Yeah. I very much would love to get back to another one, and yeah, like, I think there could be an interesting kind of merging here of our annual re:Invent recap slash live brunch, you know, stream you know, hot takes after a long week. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. The real way that you know that it's a good joke is when one of us says something, the other one sprays scrambled eggs out of their nose. Yeah, that's the way to do it.Pete: Exactly. Exactly.Corey: Pete, thank you so much. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—hopefully, you know, come back. We miss you, but you're unaffiliated, you're a startup advisor. Where can people find you to learn more, if they for some unforgivable reason don't know who or what a Pete Cheslock is?Pete: Yeah. I think the easiest place to find me is always on Twitter. I'm just at @petecheslock. My DMs are always open and I'm always down to expand my network and chat with folks.And yeah, right, now, I'm just, as I jokingly say, professionally unaffiliated. I do some startup advisory work and have been largely just kind of—honestly checking out the state of the economy. Like, there's a lot of really interesting companies out there, and some interesting problems to solve. And, you know, trying to spend some of my time learning more about what companies are up to nowadays. So yeah, if you got some interesting problems, you know, you can follow my Twitter or go to LinkedIn if you want some great, you know, business hot takes about, you know, shitposting basically.Corey: Same thing. Pete, thanks so much for joining me, I appreciate it.Pete: Thanks for having me.Corey: Pete Cheslock, startup advisor, professionally unaffiliated, and recurring re:Invent analyst pal of mine. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment calling me a jackass because do I know how long it took you personally to price CloudWatch RUM?Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Poddin' Next Door
#106 - "Won't He Do It"

Poddin' Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 98:00


On this episode: The ”Poddin' Next Door" crew opens with the usual banter and slappers for your head tops. The guys hit on Jesus cheaters, Tik Tok education, Hall of Fame Sport's Bar, Fun facts, working as a cashier, investing in Hellcats, a crashing economy, racist glasses, struggle meals, putting horses down, and other misinformation. Listen on most Digital Streaming Platforms. Apple, Amazon, Spotify, Google…… Follow + Subscribe: Instagram - @poddinnextdoor YouTube - Poddin' Next Door

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The 6 Figure Product Business Podcast
Branding Secrets for Ecommerce- How To Create a Wildly In Demand Brand

The 6 Figure Product Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:35


Your brand is what people say about you when you are not in the room. Your brand is literally why people like you and buy from you. In this week's episode we are diving deep into how you create a wildly in demand brand that attracts your dream customers, while making you stand out against competitors. Your brand goes beyond your logo.   If you are an ecommerce business and are struggling to get traction in you business, this episode is a MUST HAVE TO listen to. We discuss: The power of your brand and how you can show up and add your personality to create your secret sauce “vibe” Two brands I absolute love and hate and WHY Visual Branding tips so you stop repelling your dream customers off the page   Join My 5 Day FREE Video Training Series https://marketing-by-kerrie.mykajabi.com/Create-A-Wildly-In-Demand-Brand In this FREE video training series, I will show you HOW to build a brand that gets continuous sales, customer superfans that shout your name from their social media accounts.   A brand is so much more than a logo. It's how you attract the right dream customers to whip out their credit cards and buy your products, (when you know there is a cheaper version on Amazon)     Each day you will receive a short 20 minute video that unpacks an important aspect of creating a brand with actionable steps you can implement each day. We will have a dedicated FB group where i will be doing live q&a's so you can ask questions and get REAL TIME feedback on your brand.   JOIN BY CLICKING HERE  DOWNLOAD MY FREE RESOURCE If you want to learn more, be sure to download my new FREE GUIDE which walks you through HOW TO INCREASE YOUR WEBSITE CONVERSION RATE.  My Programs JOIN MY COURSE- SLAY & SCALE PRODUCT ACADEMY Click Here to Learn More about Slay & Scale If you are a product business and you want to get more customers, make more consistent sales & profit and generate a heck of a lot more traffic, then Slay & Scale Product Academy is perfect for you. Click here and get started for $99 today.   Let's Be Friends Follow Kerrie on Instagram Follow The 6 Figure Product Business Podcast on Instagram

Marketplace Minute
Airlines again warn of major disruptions from new 5G signals - Morning Briefing - Marketplace Minute - January 18, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 1:50


The new signals are scheduled to launch Wednesday, but airlines are urging further delay near major airports; oil prices hit seven-year high following UAE attack; family of warehouse worker who died in tornado sues Amazon

Disrupt Yourself Podcast with Whitney Johnson
252 Smart Growth Chapter 1: Explorer (Official Audiobook)

Disrupt Yourself Podcast with Whitney Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 71:46


This week, Whitney shares the entire first chapter of her new book Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company, which covers the launch point of any new S Curve of learning: Exploration. Exploring something new is exciting, and we can be better decision makers if we consider criteria like: Is this achievable? Is it worth the cost? Does it align with my values? We also take a lesson that TV host Mike Rowe (Dirty Jobs) shared on this very podcast. If you're learning a new musical instrument, a TikTok dance, or a major career shift, this chapter will be your road map. Smart Growth is now available as an audiobook, paperback, hardcover, and Kindle edition on Amazon, or wherever books are sold:  Smart Growth: How to Grow Your People to Grow Your Company  

Life, Death, and Taxonomy
Episode 209 – Giant River Otter: Apex in the Amazon

Life, Death, and Taxonomy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:13


“…And today we're walking about a lanky tooth missile that isn't scared of nobody. But more on that later.” The Amazon is home to many of the western hemisphere's most successful predators. But the most surprising apex predator isn't the piranha, the anaconda, or even the legendary jaguar – it's the giant otter! Alone, they […]

Kingdom Cross  Roads Podcast
It's A Wonderful Time – Doug Stebleton pt 2

Kingdom Cross Roads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:52


It's a Wonderful Time Doug Stebleton pt 2 How many times have you watch a movie and wondered, “What if…?”  “What if “this” would  happen?”  “What if the plot was twisted just a bit?”  And then let your imagination just run with it?  What would the results be? In this world that is growing darker and darker it seems every single day, sometimes, we need to just let our imaginations go back to far simpler time. A time when family values were cherished and not trashed. A time when life as, well, simpler!  Even if it is only to take a brief mental and spiritual break from the rotten here and now. Amen! Well, my guest today has been helping people to just that. Doug Stebleton has been working in the entertainment business since 1987. Born and raised in Glasgow, Montana, he came to Hollywood at age 19 and has lived and worked in southern California since then. His expertise is music publishing for film and television. His company owns a catalog of songs that are licensed to film and television studios and to independent productions. Some of the company's credits include Blood Diamond, Borat, Little Miss Sunshine, Zoolander, Big Bang Theory, Blue Bloods, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, The Sopranos, Ugly Betty, CSI, Scrubs and ER.  Doug is also a film producer, which we will get into in just a moment, as well as an author. But it is his love of history that drives him to make films and documentaries that are inspiring, informative and educational – all at the same time. His passion for Hollywood films and time travel…yes, “time travel,” has inspired him to publish a great book, titled, https://amzn.to/30pZ9Sq (“It's a Wonderful Time.”)  This book is based on the film that has been played at Christmas time for over 50 years, “It's a Wonderful Life,” with James Stewart and Donna Reed. But we will get into that in a few minutes – and you will definitely want to hear all about this book. You also produced a film titled, “I Want Your Money” that was released in over 500 theatres across the US back in 2010? If I remember correctly, this was about big government getting out of control. Is that right? And now you are also working on a television series called, “Kars and Stars” (with a “K”). What is that about and what channels will it be on? Right now, you are co-producing, “Big Life,”  with a projected release date of March 2022? This is about a truck driver who spends too much time on the road, causing problems with his son…but now the dad needs the sons help as they try to patch up the relationship. Does that about sum it up? Your book, https://amzn.to/30pZ9Sq (“It's A Wonderful Time”) has its roots to something you observed way back in 1985, while you were driving for Mr. Tebet. Can you share with us what happened and then how the inspiration for this book came to you? Give us the brief synopsis of your book, https://amzn.to/30pZ9Sq (“It's A Wonderful Time.”) You have received some rave reviews since it was released, right? This is just book one in a series?  What is the name of the series? When will your next book be published? What's the time frame you're looking at? Now, you also are involved with a ministry in Simi Valley, California, where you're from, called https://www.goodfight.org/ (“Good Fight Ministries,” ) with Pastor Joe Schimmel. I was intrigued by the website and all they are doing to expose the dark side of the world of music, Hollywood, cults, pop culture, etc. They have a variety of resources to help understand the day and time we are living in. I was amazed by how much information is actually on the website. The videos alone are worth going there for.  There is one series, “They Sold Their Soul for Rock and Roll” and others… hard hitting but spot on truth. Amen! How do you help out https://www.goodfight.org/ (“Good Fight Ministries?”) Doug, this is all so interesting.  How can someone obtain a copy of your book, https://amzn.to/30pZ9Sq (“It's a Wonderful Time?”) Is it on Amazon? Support this podcast

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 281 - Destination Fly Fishing with Jako Lucas - Capt Jack Productions

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 71:01


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/281 Presented By: Trxstle, Fly Fishing Film Tour, Anglers Coffee, Togens Fly Shop Sponsors: https://wetflyswing.com/sponsors Jako Lucas from Capt Jack Productions is back this time to take us around the world to hear some of the most prized locations that he's fished and some of the places that he thinks are definitely doable for us today. Jako has been to many of the exotic destinations and shares a few of these stories. We dig into Jako's top 20 Destination Fly Fishing and find out what species is best to fish in that area. Jako also tells us what he's been up to with Capt Jack Productions - 2022 destination plans and making a new film that we should be excited about. This one is another one that's too good to slow up! Destination Fly Fishing Show Notes with Jako Lucas 03:15 - Jako was on the podcast first at WFS 068 04:31 - Jako and Capt Jack Productions is working on a new movie and is busy with his clothing brand called Fly Religion 06:55 - Payara, the Vampire fish 10:19 - Wolf fish is one of the species you can catch in the Amazon waters 10:35 - Jeff Currier was on the podcast at WFS 065 where we talked about all other species to catch on the fly 11:00 - Jako was on the Way Points Podcast with Jim Klug 14:45 - Jako was invited to be an ambassador for Yellow Dog Flyfishing Adventures 16:02 - Seychelles 16:10 - Tanzania's Tigerfish 16:13 - Dorado fishing in Bolivia 16:36 - WFS 068 is where Jako first shared his top destinations with us 19:04 - Some notable fishing destinations Jako also likes 20:04 - Jako's bucket list places 21:22 - Goliath Tigerfish in Patagonia, Chile 23:39 - Permit fishing in Mexico 23:47 - In April 2022, Jako plans a trip to Xcalak 28:46 - Jake Jordan was on the podcast at WFS 204 - Jako commends him for the great work he's doing 30:28 - The Billfish are where the Frigate Birds are 33:25 - Captain Jack Production has a YouTube channel 33:29 - Follow Capt Jack Productions on Instagram  35:35 - Capt Jack Productions' Gangster of the Flats 36:01 - Capt Jack Productions filmed Glorious Bastards in Australia 40:22 - Fishing Big Tarpon in Costa Rica 44:47 - Bruce Chard was on the podcast at WFS 124 where we talked about Giant Tarpons 46:06 - Pacu, the jungle freshwater Permit 46:47 - Yellow Dog Flyfishing Adventures legitimately gets people to Cuba 49:59 - Greg Collett was on the podcast at WFS 242 where we talked about Ecuador Conservation 1:01:26 - Jako highly recommends fly fishing in Seychelle and some other places depending on your budget 1:05:13 - What's coming up for Jako in 2022 1:08:14 - Jako's favorite sport Destination Fly Fishing Conclusion with Jako Lucas Jako Lucas from Capt Jack Productions shared his top 20 Destinations for fly fishing. Jako took us around the world to hear some of the most prized locations that he's fished and some of the places that are definitely doable for us today. We found out what species is best to fish in the mentioned destinations. Jako also shared what he's been up to with Capt Jack Productions - 2022 destination plans and a new film that they are working on that we should be excited about. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/281

RFK Refugees Podcast
Can Kang Conquer?

RFK Refugees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 52:51


Welcome in ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, to the RFK Refugees Podcast. Ted and Jon break down the rumored Paul Arriola departure, DC United's quiet offseason, and all the latest Washington Spirit ownership drama. Thank you for listening! If you like what you hear and you want to help support our show and get exclusive content, head on over to ourhttps://patreon.com/rfkrefugees ( Patreon) or subscribe to ourhttp://twitch.tv/rfkrefugees ( Twitch) page with your free Amazon sub (or your American Fiat Currency!) Vamos! https://rfkrefugees.com/ (RFKRefugees.com) Support this podcast

Fuel for the Soul with John Giftah | Inspirational Christian Sermons
Don't Force GOD to do it your Way! | John Giftah

Fuel for the Soul with John Giftah | Inspirational Christian Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:11


In this short inspirational Christian sermon, Evangelist John Giftah shares a word from Daniel 3 challenging us to never force GOD to do it our way but rather to trust and allow Him to do it His way in our lives. You can buy my new bestselling book, UNVEIL YOUR PURPOSE (a #1 Newly Released Bestseller on Amazon) here: India: https://www.amazon.in/UNVEIL-YOUR-PURPOSE-John-Giftah/dp/B08K2CJKP2/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=john+giftah&qid=1611990618&sr=8-1 Global Amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/Unveil-Your-Purpose-Complete-Created-ebook/dp/B08L7XX9PJ/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=john+giftah%27&qid=1611990705&sr=8-2 You can stay in touch with me through these platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/johngiftah Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johngiftah Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sjohngiftah/ Website: https://www.johngiftah.com/ If you're blessed by this sermon, don't forget to share it with someone, and please do rate/ review the podcast so that it will help us reach more people with the message of hope. For supporting the ministry financially: PayPal: paypal.me/johngiftah #JohnGiftah #JohnGiftahPodcast #Christian #Christianity #BibleStudy #Faith #Hope #InspirationalSermon #ChristianMotivation #ChristianInspiration #Motivation #Motivational #Inspirational #Bible #BibleStudy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/john-giftah/message

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse
RERUN | Yara Martinez: Gratitude and Knowing Your Worth

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 74:59


Yara Martinez was last seen on Fox's police drama pilot, DEPUTY, from David Ayer, Aquaman writer Will Beall, and eOne. She co-starred opposite Stephen Dorff as his wife, ‘Dr. Paula Reyes'. Martinez can currently be seen starring as ‘Miss Lint' in Amazon's highly reviewed reboot of the popular superhero franchise, THE TICK. Based on creator Ben Endlund's favorite comic, the series follows Arthur Everest, an obsessive ex-accountant who suspects his city is controlled by an evil supervillain. The pilot episode quickly became the most watched in the network's history. Martinez can also be seen starring as ‘Dr. Luisa Alver' in the CW's Golden Globe nominated comedy series, JANE THE VIRGIN opposite Gina Rodriguez. The series solidifies Martinez as a fan favorite for her portrayal of the recovering alcoholic who accidentally inseminated the titular ‘Jane' in the pilot episode. Martinez is currently shooting the last and final season. Yara also recurs on CBS's BULL playing Michael Weatherly's lead character, Bull's, ex wife. Previously, Martinez starred in the second season of HBO's critically acclaimed TRUE DETECTIVE opposite Colin Farrell and Vince Vaughn and in Amazon's ALPHA HOUSE about four Republican senators sharing the same DC house rental. Additional television credits include THE LYING GAME, NASHVILLE, HOLLYWOOD HEIGHTS, FACELESS, VANISHED, THE APOSTLES, SOUTHLAND, BREAKOUT KINGS, and SPACED. Born in Puerto Rico to Cuban parents, Martinez grew up in Miami and is fluent in both English and Spanish. She studied acting at the New World School of the Arts, and spent a summer with Anne Bogart's SITI company in Saratoga before receiving her BFA and eventually moving to Los Angeles to pursue her passion for television. Guest links: IMDB: Yara Martinez INSTAGRAM: @yaritafrita TWITTER: @yaritafrita Show Links: PMO PEP TALKS: Click here to reserve your seat PMO POP SELF-TAPE CLASS: Click here to sign up INSTAGRAM: @alyshiaochse INSTAGRAM: @thatoneaudition WEBSITE: AlyshiaOchse.com ITUNES: Subscribe to That One Audition on iTunes SPOTIFY: Subscribe to That One Audition on Spotify STITCHER: Subscribe to That One Audition on Stitcher Credits: WRITER: Bebe Katsenes SOUND DESIGN: Zachary Jameson WEBSITE & GRAPHICS: Chase Jennings ASSISTANT: Elle Powell SOCIAL OUTREACH: Bebe Katsenes

Rockin' the Suburbs
1286: 2021 Favorites - K. Flay feat. Tom Morello, Lunar Vacation, Low, Tom Morello feat. Bruce Springsteen

Rockin' the Suburbs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:19


Listeners Rob Brown and Scot Isom share their favorite music of 2021. Rob's favorite album was "Inside Every Fig is a Dead Wasp" by Lunar Vacation. He also shares a song by K. Flay feat. Tom Morello. Scot's favorite album was "Hey What" by Low. He also shares a cover song by Tom Morello feat. Bruce Springsteen. Episode editor: Jason Pae Become a Rockin' the Suburbs patron - support the show and get bonus content - at Patreon.com/suburbspod Subscribe to Rockin' the Suburbs on Apple Podcasts/iTunes or other podcast platforms, including audioBoom, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon, iHeart, Stitcher and TuneIn. Or listen at SuburbsPod.com. Please rate/review the show on Apple Podcasts and share it with your friends. Visit our website at SuburbsPod.com Email Jim & Patrick at rock@suburbspod.com Follow us on the Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @suburbspod If you're glad or sad or high, call the Suburban Party Line — 612-440-1984. Theme music: "Ascension," originally by Quartjar, covered by Frank Muffin. Visit quartjar.bandcamp.com and frankmuffin.bandcamp.com (c) Artie S. Industries LLC

Dear White Women
150: What to Do to Protect Voting Rights and Abolish the Filibuster

Dear White Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:54


We had a different episode planned for this week, but in light of the fight that is going down in the Senate right now, we needed to re-release this episode on the filibuster, with a special introduction as to why we should all care about the Freedom to Vote Act and The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, and encourage you to call your Senators to act on the filibuster.* * If you're part of the Trump-backed forces of authoritarianism, you probably don't care. But if you truly want America to be a democracy in its current state (and if you love parts of the Constitution, you should probably be all about this too) - you should be really loudly vocally supporting both bills. The problem with bills like these though is that, much like a theory like CRT, people make judgments about what they THINK are in those bills rather than actually sitting down and reading them. And, as a great email from Heather Cox Richardson pointed out, “It's worth reading what's actually in the bills because, to my mind, it is bananas that they are in any way controversial.” We break this down, and then tell you all about the filibuster, so that you're empowered to use your voice to protect democracy. Have questions, comments, or concerns? Email us at hello@dearwhitewomen.com What to listen for: A brief history of voter suppression and the role of the filibuster in legislative action An explanation of what the filibuster is and how it has been employed and changed What the filibuster has been used for (to block progressive legislation) How we can and should address the future of the filibuster A reminder to call the US Capitol Switchboard a 202-224-3121 to call your Senator and tell them you want the voting rights protection bills to pass   Buy our book, Dear White Women: Let's Get (Un)comfortable Talking About Racism, and leave us a review on Amazon! Like what you hear?  Don't miss another episode and subscribe! Catch up on more commentary between episodes by following us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter – and even more opinions and resources if you join our email list.

Cordkillers (All Video)
Cordkillers 392 – What Price is Right? (w/ Lamarr Wilson)

Cordkillers (All Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


If you don’t like a show, just stop watching it! Plus, Netflix is raising prices, we’ve got a trailer for The Bob’s Burgers Movie, and we have not seen the last of “peak-TV!” All that and more on Cordkillers! With special guest Lamarr Wilson. This week on It’s Spoilerin’ Time: The Book of Boba Fett … Continue reading Cordkillers 392 – What Price is Right? (w/ Lamarr Wilson) →

Keep On Cookin'
40 - Vegan Asian with Jeeca Uy

Keep On Cookin'

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 53:43


Jeeca Uy is a vegan with a passion for creating easy vegan recipes, Jeeca uses her Filipino-Chinese upbringing and her international travels to create her distinctive recipes. The Foodie Takes Flight features a wide variety of Asian dishes that span both modern and classic styles.  Jeeca started The Foodie Takes Flight Instagram in 2015, which now has over 600K Followers. Jeeca's reaching the masses with her easy, accessible, and fun pan-asian cuisine. Jeeca's cookbook Vegan Asian can attest to that, having topped Amazon's Asian Cooking, Food & Wine category immediately after its release. Jeeca Uy: www.thefoodietakesflight.com IG: @thefoodietakesflight Dustin Harder: www.veganroadie.com IG: @TheVeganRoadieDavid Rossetti: IG: @drossetti

Soul Seekr
121: Feminine & Masculine Archetypes w/ Melanie Joy

Soul Seekr

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 68:56


Melanie Joy is a returning guest to the Soul Seekr podcast and she is an expert at understanding the feminine and masculine archetypes!She has a Bachelor of Science in International Business and 10 years in the Corporate world. From there, she moved into the love of people and healing.Melanie's passion is in the holistic modalities of Ayurveda and Sound Frequency. Enjoy!LINKS & RESOURCESWant to Start Your Own Podcast? I use Buzzsprout for all my podcasts & love it! It's easy to get onto all the major apps. It's FREE, but if you upgrade to one of the paid plans, you and I both get a $20 Amazon gift card! That's a sweet win-win deal if you ask me! Use this link for either a free or paid plan: https://cutt.ly/ScbUtFWConnect w/ Melanie | https://cutt.ly/yIQKY87 Melanie's Websites | https://cutt.ly/LIQKPeu and https://cutt.ly/cIQKFQf  Melanie's 1st Appearance on Soul Seekr | https://cutt.ly/OIQKnw8 Quarterly Content Generator | https://cutt.ly/xIth2Xp   Wizard Teams (Virtual Teams For YOU Managed by US) | https://cutt.ly/xmVsYTe  Check out my Review of Pixar's "SOUL" Movie | https://cutt.ly/OmVsUNe  FREE Guide on How to Uncover Your Gifts & Share them with the World: https://cutt.ly/CIth7fr Wizard Websites - Learn to Build a Website w/ Virtual Assistants | https://bit.ly/3lCw2kU SHROOM BEACH Clothing | Promo Code "SoulSam" for 15% off with this link | https://cutt.ly/oItje42   MagicMind | https://cutt.ly/VRADrOH  use code "SoulSam" for 20% off!Defiant Mushroom Coffee ("Sam15" for 15% OFF!) | https://defiantcoffee.co/  Permission to Podcast: https://bit.ly/2N2NUoI  FREE Guide on How to Uncover Your Gifts & Share them with the World | https://buff.ly/3gmml7t   Spiritual Blogs & More | https://buff.ly/2Sq6Gtl  FREE Spiritual Glossary: https://soulseekrz.com/terms/  Start Your Dream Business | https://buff.ly/2xpy2IT Freeup | https://cutt.ly/txFc7eV  to hire reliable VA's. (you'll also get a $25 coupon PS. It's free to sign up!)SwagStore by SwagWorx | https://cutt.ly/bbeEK0Q LET'S BE SOCIALJoin the journey — come hangout on social mediaInstagram | https://www.instagram.com/samkabert/ Join the Soul Seekr Facebook Group | https://buff.ly/2yi8ldA Twitter | https://twitter.com/soul_seekr_ LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/kabert/  YouTube | https://buff.ly/3e4kXUO  ASK me ANYTHING: Email, Sam@CloneYourselfU.com and you can book a FREE business strategy call with me by going to Calendly.com/CLONE.THANK YOU!SamSupport the show (http://soulseekrz.com/medicine)

AU Wishbone: Auburn Football
18 Jan 2022: The Happy Place Again!

AU Wishbone: Auburn Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 76:15


John and Van revel in the accomplishments of the AU Hoops team after huge road wins over Alabama and Ole Miss--and they speculate as to just how great this team is, and how great it could be. Plus football news, Guess-the-Game, Listener Questions and more! Our new AU Football book! Nearly 500 pages including full-page player & coach illustrations! WE BELIEVED: A LIFETIME OF AUBURN FOOTBALL is now on sale at www.auwishbone.com Order direct from Amazon here! Be a part of the AU Wishbone Family by becoming a patron of the shows:  https://www.patreon.com/vanallenplexico A proud member of the War Eagle Reader family. Brought to you by White Rocket Entertainment. www.auwishbone.com www.plexico.net Join us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3IQGWpVOTQEpUW4JbSDvOw

Doing It At Home: Our Home Birth Podcast
365: HOME BIRTH STORY - Trusting Birth, Questioning the System and Supporting Parents and Birth Workers with Dr. Nathan Riley

Doing It At Home: Our Home Birth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:45


How do you truly honor birth? Dr. Nathan Riley joins us for the second time on the podcast. First time was back in 2019, and a lot of life has changed for him. For one thing, he's welcomed both of his daughters into the world. And today we talk about the home birth of the youngest (about 5 weeks old at the time of this interview). Nathan shares his perspective of the experience, as a father, partner and physician. Nathan also talks about the space he holds for birth and how he has evolved from an OBGYN practicing in the hospital to a more lifestyle medicine approach where he supports both parents and birth workers. The nuggets in this episode are too many to count and drop at such a rapid rate. You might need to hit pause and rewind a few times, that's how powerful it is! Things we talk about in this episode: hospital model of care, hospital birth, home birth story, fast labor and delivery, trusting and bearing witness to birth, awesome resources around holistic birth, Nathan's journey as a doctor, questioning the medical system Links: Nathan's website: https://www.belovedholistics.com/ DIAH Episode 243 with Dr. Riley - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/doing-it-at-home/id1153134918?i=1000454516925 Doing It At Home book on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3vJcPmU DIAH website: https://www.diahpodcast.com/ DIAH Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/doingitathome/ DIAH YouTube: https://bit.ly/3pzuzQC DIAH Store: https://yoursuccessfulhomebirth.com/ DIAH Merch: https://bit.ly/3qhwgAe  Give Back to DIAH: https://bit.ly/3qgm4r9

Locked On Giants - Daily Podcast On The New York Giants
New York Giants Listener Mailbag

Locked On Giants - Daily Podcast On The New York Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:58


We're answering more of your questions as the Giants inch closer to figuring out who their next general manager is going to be. New York Giants Listener Mailbag https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVmzf-nD8oaTBShrW_zTeXA WANT MORE DAILY NEW YORK GIANTS CONTENT? Follow & Subscribe to the Podcast on these platforms…

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books
Colleen Hoover, REMINDERS OF HIM: A Novel

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 21:07


"Every single time I sit down and write a book, I feel like I have no idea what I'm doing." Colleen Hoover, the New York Times-bestselling author of twenty-two novels, joins Zibby to discuss her latest book, Reminders of Him. Colleen shares how she's adopted her sense imposter as part of the writing process, her reaction to the renewal of interest in her backlist, and what she's done to make sure writing has never felt like a job. Purchase on Amazon or Bookshop.Amazon: https://amzn.to/3nyRTfzBookshop: https://bit.ly/3fv7gBdSubscribe to Zibby's weekly newsletter here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Loop Matinal
Terça-feira, 18/1/2022

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 10:02


Patrocínio: Alphacode Ganhe um desconto exclusivo para fazer seu aplicativo Android ou iOS com a Alphacode! Acesse https://www.alphacode.com.br. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Netflix fica mais cara nos EUA: https://www.reuters.com/technology/exclusive-netflix-raises-monthly-subscription-prices-us-canada-2022-01-14/ Samsung libera o Android 12 para mais aparelhos: https://tecnoblog.net/noticias/2022/01/17/android-12-samsung-galaxy-s20-s20-e-s20-ultra-sao-atualizados-no-brasil/ Vazam futuros tablets da Samsung: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/16/22886595/samsung-tablet-lineup-ultra-notch-rumor God of War é lançado para PC: https://tecnoblog.net/noticias/2022/01/14/god-of-war-chega-ao-pc-lidera-vendas-no-steam-e-realiza-sonho-de-fas/ Amazon volta a aceitar Visa no Reino Unido: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/17/22887637/amazon-uk-visa-credit-card-ban-reversed-deal Espanha restringe incentivo a criptomoedas: https://t.co/dmaneDZuFd Microsoft Edge permite seguir youtubers: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/17/22887626/microsoft-edge-youtube-intergration-following-feature-canary-test Instagram Stories terão contador de views do Facebook: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2022/01/14/instagram-mostrara-contador-de-views-de-stories-do-facebook/ Promotores americanos querem nova investigação sobre o Facebook: https://www.reuters.com/technology/states-ask-us-appeals-court-reinstate-antitrust-lawsuit-against-facebook-2022-01-14/ Metaverso do Facebook entra na mira do FTC: 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-14/meta-s-oculus-unit-faces-ftc-led-probe-of-competition-practices Headset da Apple pode se chamar Apple Vision: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2022/01/17/gurman-headset-de-ar-vr-podera-se-chamar-apple-vision/ Headset da Apple deve custar US$ 2.000: https://9to5mac.com/2022/01/16/apples-ar-vr-headset-could-be-priced-above-2000-feature-m1-pro-like-performance/ Apple exigirá comprovação de reforço da vacina: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/15/22885181/apple-vaccine-covid-19-booster-shot-employees Bug no Safari expõe dados de usuários: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/16/22886809/safari-15-bug-leak-browsing-history-personal-information Apple relaxa regras da App Store na Holanda: https://9to5mac.com/2022/01/15/apple-dating-app-netherlands/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food
Food, Culture, Place with Lori McCarthy — WildFed Podcast #116

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 73:06


One of our favorite repeat guests, Lori McCarthy, is back today to talk about her new book, Food, Culture, Place: Stories, Traditions, and Recipes of Newfoundland. Lori is, of course, from Newfoundland, Canada — which, by the way, should not be confused with the rest of Canada — as it really is its own place entirely, having only become a Canadian province in 1949! With a timezone 30 minutes ahead of Eastern Standard, they really do march to the beat of their own drum, and speak a dialect all their own. Of all the places we've visited in the US and Canada, nowhere is the food culture still as intimately tied to the landscape as it is there. Lori's new book, while we'd categorize it as a cookbook, is also a deep dive into the foodways and cultural heritage of the island they call “The Rock”, which is exemplified in the title — Food, Culture, Place. Lori and Daniel have always had a great rapport, so this interview is full of stories, laughs, and of course, interesting anecdotes from the world of wild foods. Oh, one more thing, we spoke with Lori this morning, and there's been some shipping delays that have postponed the official launch of her book, but she'll have them very soon. She wanted us to let you know, if you want to pre-order a copy you can do that on Amazon, or by emailing her directly at foodcultureplace.ca. She'll get one out to you as soon as they arrive. In the meantime, enjoy the very unique insights, stories, and of course, accent of the one and only, Lori McCarthy. View full show notes, including links to resources from this episode here: https://www.wild-fed.com/podcast/116

Big Fat Negative: TTC, fertility, infertility and IVF

Writer, presenter and brand consultant Pippa Vosper joins us to talk about the loss of her baby boy, Teddy, and the infertility journey that followed, and why she has chosen to write a book about it. Meanwhile, Gabby and Emma are being very boring about their book. Sorry about that - but don't let that put you off ordering it. It's available on Amazon and at all good book shops. Swears throughout. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TRASHFUTURE
Hell Is Other Human Resources ft. Alex Press

TRASHFUTURE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 59:18


We are joined by Alex Press (@alexnpress), of Jacobin and the Primer podcast, to do some more Amazonology. This time, we look at the specifics of how HR operates at this company, how its shittiness ends up hurting workers, and how Amazon is gearing up to export more of its working practices to others. But first, we wonder at why and how it was the parties that finally turned the British establishment against Boris Johnson. If you want access to our Patreon bonus episodes, early releases of free episodes, and powerful Discord server, sign up here: https://www.patreon.com/trashfuture If you're in the UK and want to help Afghan refugees and internally displaced people, consider donating to Afghanaid: https://www.afghanaid.org.uk/ *WEB DESIGN ALERT* Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/ Trashfuture are: Riley (@raaleh), Milo (@Milo_Edwards), Hussein (@HKesvani), Nate (@inthesedeserts), and Alice (@AliceAvizandum)