Podcasts about twenty

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Best podcasts about twenty

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Latest podcast episodes about twenty

The Secret To Success with CJ, Karl, Jemal & Eric Thomas

Listener Perks Organifi Is giving our listeners up to 20% off of their order! Just go to www.organifi.com/success. Support your journey from sunrise to sunset with fan-favorite superfoods backed by science to replenish micronutrients, support energy and balance hormones from am to pm with our customer favorites. Onnit - A world-renowned nootropic supplement with over one million bottles sold, Alpha BRAIN promotes cognitive functions, including memory, mental speed, and focus. It can help you remember names, zero in on complex tasks, and think more clearly under stress. Save 10% on your order by going to onnit.com/SECRET BABBEL is an app that makes learning a new language fun & easy with no artificial lesson plans! Make your way over to www.babbel.com/SUCCESS to receive up to 60% off of your subscription. Enjoy the perks of lessons, podcast & live classes &. There's also a Twenty day money back guarantee! SUCCESS. Indeed Indeed makes it easy to hire great talent. According to ComScore, Indeed is the #1 job site worldwide. • Start hiring RIGHT NOW with a SEVENTY-FIVE DOLLAR SPONSORED JOB CREDIT to upgrade your first job post at Indeed.com/SUCCESS . Go to Indeed.com/SUCCESS to claim your SEVENTY-FIVE DOLLAR CREDIT NOW.

One More Thing Before You Go
That Thing About Childhood Trauma, PTSD, and The key to Inner Peace.

One More Thing Before You Go

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 60:44


In This episode: a story of a quest for inner peace, overcoming the dark side of negativity – from being born with her right foot up against her right shin, being adopted, merciless teased as the first girl boarder at a boy's boarding school, growing up with two adoptive alcoholic parents, and finding her mother dead on the bathroom floor when she was 19. How do you cope with that? How do you access those deep held emotions and tensions, to heal from mental and physical ailments? We're going to find out how when we have a conversation with Ann Hince who lived through it..and can show you how you can too. I am your host Michael Herst welcome to One More Thing Before You Go. When Ann was 19, she woke one morning to find her mother dead in her bathroom. Twenty years later the tears from that trauma were still just under the surface. Ann found a simple technique that helped her release these emotions - but she went further and can now put her awareness inside her body - and has changed the bone structure of her skull and grown ½ an inch at age 55. Ann has found that seeking out our truth, what we truly feel, and accepting those feelings, is the key to inner peace. I am just like many other people. Just like you perhaps? I had a childhood with plenty of trauma and dysfunction. I had PTSD into my 30s, the result of two alcoholic parents. I became a software engineer because it was so comforting to know that logic could work in part of my life, even though it never seemed to work in my chaotic life as a child. In my 30s and 40s I was afforded the luxury of being a stay-at-home mom to my two boys. Realizing how traumatized I still was when my boys were young, I set out to become the calm mom I wanted to be. I changed. Things changed. Life changed. I had no idea where I was heading, I just continued to do “my release work” which is what I called it. Nothing felt better, so why not? And here I am years later, the calm mom I wanted to be (well, most of the time), with powerful brainwaves (see below), with others feeling calm around me, with seemingly magical events happening daily, and with the ability to sense and release tension deep within my body. My goal is to reach those people who really want inner change, inner peace, those who have the desire and will to do the inner work. There are many who do not want to look inside, but if you are someone who does, who really wants change, then it is my pleasure to show you the path. Find out more and how to contact Ann to help you: https://beforeyougopodcast.com This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy

Classical Conversations Podcast
EE Twenty-five Reasons to Homeschool Classically, Part 5

Classical Conversations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 35:48


Join Shelly Stockton and special guests Debra Switzer, Jenn Martin, and Barby Hobcroft for part five of the series Twenty-five Reasons to Homeschool Classically. Listen in on this final episode as these homeschool veterans discuss the hard work of homeschooling, subject integration, and falling in love with learning.

THE NEURO SIDE OF INFLUENCE AND LEADERSHIP
The Most Powerful Phrase in Selling, Communication and Influence

THE NEURO SIDE OF INFLUENCE AND LEADERSHIP

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:15


We all do it. Scrolling Instagram, listening to a news program, hearing a sales pitch, picking out a podcast to listen to. We're asking ourselves one thing. “It's a basic human question, it's not designed to be arrogant or anything. But we want to know, what does any of this stuff mean to ME?” When you hear someone answer this question, their message feels complete. Without it, anyone is just a talking head. René breaks down the science behind this powerful phrase and the concept of the “tie down” that it leads to so naturally. Until you've tied down your message, you haven't provided value. Whether you're a sales exec, CEO, coach, pastor or just a parent hoping to get your teen to hear something once in a while, this episode is for you! Show Resources: https://theneuroside.com/ (TheNeuroSide.com) https://meetrene.com/ (MeetRene.com) https://amplifiimylife.com/ (Amplifiimylife.com) https://AmplifyBook.com (AmplifyBook.com) 01:25 - “What that means to you is…” 01:51 - How René learned this power phrase 05:40 - How does this phrase fit into the “tie down”? 06:50 - You have to show the value to THEM, because THEY won't find it themselves 07:25 - What it means to one person is not the same as it means to the next person 07:45 - Tyler and Alyssa Lorenzen's list of 20 tie down phrases 10:22 - You're CUEING the brain that value is about to be delivered 11:11 - “Conceptually Selling” by Heiman and Miller - People Buy for their own reasons, not yours. 11:50 - Sometimes “what it means” is values alignment 12:25 - We are only valuable to people if we are helping them create value 13:40 - Features/Benefit conversations 15:50 - The AMPLIFII™ Opening event is a dinner because incorporating multiple senses has power 16:35 - René's Blackberry Holster 18:20 - Influence doesn't happen until you tie it down 20:15 - The Ramble Dance 22:00 - What matters most? Client Value 23:05 - https://amplifybook.com/ (AmplifyBook.com) Twenty other tie down phrases: I share this story with you because Why this matters to you is I believe this matters to you because The point of all this is This is relevant to you because The reason I share this with you is Well, my point is I bring this to your attention because I invite you to consider the following This is applicable in your situation because Well, what's in it for you is The reason you should care is This is pertinent information because The value to you is This relates to you because The reason this is cool is This is significant because This directly correlates to you because This is very fitting because This story is appropriate because

Ben Davis & Kelly K Show
Feel Good: Non-Verbal Autistic Delivers Commencement Speech

Ben Davis & Kelly K Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 2:28


Twenty-four-year-old valedictorian Elizabeth Bonker could speak as a toddler, but suddenly, at 15 months old, her “words were taken." Hear how she ended up delivering her college commencement speech as Valedictorian! SOURCE: https://www.wdjx.com/non-verbal-autistic-college-valedictorian-delivers-commencement-speech/

Jared Dillian Podcasts
Drugs are bad. Even if you work at Waffle House

Jared Dillian Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 12:41


More than 100K Americans died from drug overdoses last year. Twenty years ago, the US had fewer than 20K overdose deaths. What has changed?

Firewall
Is Hunger in America Really Our Policy Choice?

Firewall

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 38:24


Twenty-five billion dollars in additional public spending is all it would take to close the remaining gaps in the food system. So why don't we do it? Bradley talks about how politics and the crazy spending whims of the rich get in the way of the most basic societal goals. Plus, why states should get busy in regulating tech, Mayor Adams' best option for Rikers Island, and a killer new book on negotiating.

Marvel's Pull List
The Death of Captain Marvel w/ Marvel Multiverse RPG Playtest Rulebook Author & Designer Matt Forbeck

Marvel's Pull List

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 67:00


It's a hefty week for our Wednesday Warriors as Ryan and Jasmine run through all TWENTY books hitting shelves this week including our picks this week: NEW MUTANTS #25, IMMORTAL X-MEN #2, WOLVERINE #21 and more!Tune in as we hand out the “Time To Make Some Mutant Jelly” Award — our weekly award named after a phrase pulled directly from an issue in this week's pull list! Think you know which issue this name came from? Let us know by sending us an email at PullList@marvel.com or by tweeting at us using #MarvelsPullList! Just make sure to mark it “Okay to read”!And finally, for this week's reading club, writer and designer of the Marvel Multiverse RPG Playtest Rulebook, Matt Forbeck joins us to discuss a Marvel graphic novel classic, The Death of Captain Marvel.What we're reading with Matt Forbeck: The Death of Captain MarvelPrevious reading clubs mentioned in this week's show:Magick (1983) with Leah WilliamsDark Reign with Tini Howard and Tom BrevoortAs always, shout out your local comic shop or send us your questions or comments by emailing us at pulllist@marvel.com or tweet using #MarvelsPullList. Make sure to mark it "Okay to read!"   Follow us at: @agentm, @jasmiest, and @KaraMcGuirk New comics this week (5/18)ELEKTRA: BLACK, WHITE & BLOOD #4 ETERNALS #12FANTASTIC FOUR #43IMMORTAL X-MEN #2 IRON FIST #3  MARVEL'S VOICES: IDENTITY #1NEW MUTANTS #25THE MARVELS   #10SAVAGE AVENGERS #1SILK #5SPIDER-PUNK #2STAR WARS: DOCTOR APHRA #20STAR WARS: HAN SOLO & CHEWBACCA #2 THOR #25VENOM: LETHAL PROTECTOR  #2WOLVERINE #21WOLVERINE: PATCH #2X-CELLENT #3X-FORCE #28X-MEN: RED #2 New Weekly Infinity Comics: X-MEN UNLIMITED INFINITY COMIC #35   (5/16/2022)MS. MARVEL: NO NORMAL ADAPTATION #1  (5/17/2022)MS. MARVEL: NO NORMAL ADAPTATION #2  (5/17/2022)MS. MARVEL: NO NORMAL ADAPTATION #3. (5/17/2022)MS. MARVEL: NO NORMAL ADAPTATION #4 (5/17/2022)PATSY WALKER INFINITY COMIC #2 (5/17/2022)ALLIGATOR LOKI INFINITY COMIC #6 (5/17/2022)

Escaping NXIVM
Escaping NXIVM Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars

Escaping NXIVM

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:24


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

Brainwashed
Brainwashed Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars

Brainwashed

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:24


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

White Hot Hate
White Hot Hate Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars

White Hot Hate

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:24


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

Carrie Low VS.
Carrie Low VS. Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars

Carrie Low VS.

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:24


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

Evil By Design
Evil By Design Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars

Evil By Design

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:24


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

The Next Call with David Ridgen
The Next Call Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars

The Next Call with David Ridgen

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:50


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

Uncover: The Village
Uncover Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Warss

Uncover: The Village

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:24


Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks

Uncorked Crime
Episode103: Cathy Moulton

Uncorked Crime

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 43:53


On September 14th, 1971, 16 year old Cathy Moulton was dropped off in downtown Portland, Maine to do a little shopping. She visited a friend before making the walk back home. Unfortunately, she would never make it there. Cathy's disappearance would go cold quickly, with no new leads of where she might be. Twenty four years later, a new detective on the case was able to track down where Cathy went from Portland, but that trail ended before Cathy or her body were found. What happened to Cathy Moulton that afternoon? Will her family ever get an answer? 

Hand Me My Purse.
No. 43: Being an Indie Music Artist + Recreating Yourself FOR Yourself + “How I Do” turned Twenty w/Res + A GIVEAWAY

Hand Me My Purse.

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 68:32


Hey Friends & Kin!FYI:  THIS, JUST LIKE ALL EPISODES OF HAND ME MY PURSE, CONTAINS PROFANITY. THIS PODCAST IS FOR ADULTS AND CONTAINS ADULT CONTENT. Now that we've gotten that out of the way..._________Friends & Kin, in this episode I get to sit in conversation with one of my homegirls.  My friend, artist, singer, musician, DJ - RES. If you are a lover of music and you were here for the start of the Neo-Soul/Alternative R&B movement of the early 2000s, (and are at least ALMOST 40 years old) you should be familiar with her debut album, "HOW I DO".Res and I talk candidly about being a creative, the difference between being an artist signed to a major label versus being an indie artist - the pros and cons. We also discuss what she is up to now and the plans for her upcoming album, "RESet,  along with so much more! You want to make sure you listen to this episode because there is a GIVEAWAY associated with this episode and it will happen QUICK! If you live in the DMV area, Res will be performing at CITY WINERY in DC on Saturday, May 21st.  I will be there! The giveaway is for two free tickets to the show.  Please make sure to follow me AND Res on Instagram (see below for links) and enter the giveaway! I hope to see you at the show & if you're there, come say, "Heeeeeeey!". From this episode's, "WE GOT TO DO BETTER" segment:“I am even more certain that to create dangerously is also to create fearlessly, boldly embracing the public and private terrors that would silence us, then bravely moving forward even when it feels as though we are chasing or being chased by ghosts” – Edwidge Danticat"GO WHERE YOU ARE LOVED. NOT WHERE YOU ARE TOLERATED..."MeMe's JAM No. 43Follow Res on InstagramGET YOUR TICKET FOR RES' SHOW AT CITY WINERY IN DC ON 5/21/2022FIND A THERAPIST._______ Listen. Subscribe. Rate. Review.Apple Podcasts.Stitcher.Spotify.Google Podcasts.Pandora.And as always, "Thank you for your support..."(said exactly like the 80s Bartles and Jaymes commercials)xoxo  MeMe *****************J O I N * T H E * S Q U A DInstagramFacebookTwitterHAND ME MY PURSE. SPOTIFY PLAYLIST*********************Music:  Gloomy Tunez

The John Batchelor Show
#OzWatch: Relentless and chilly twenty inches in 48 hours. Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 8:50


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #OzWatch: Relentless and chilly twenty inches in 48 hours. Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/may/14/queensland-floods-more-heavy-rain-forecast-after-300-homes-inundated-in-laidley

Bloody Elbow Presents
Twenty Random Questions with Zane Simon | Crooklyn's Corner 29

Bloody Elbow Presents

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 52:30


EPISODE 29 1. What's your go to meal when you're cooking for family or friends? 2. What's a movie you think everyone should watch? 3. Most embarrassing moment 4. Ever had a near-death experience? 5. What is your biggest fear? 6. What is you biggest achievement? 7. What's at the top of your bucket list? 8. What were you like in high school? 9. What's the wildest thing you've ever done? 10. If you could challenge one person in the world to play a best of 3 Scrabble set, who would it be? 11. If you could have dinner with one famous person, past or present, who would it be and why? 12. What's your personal goal for the future? 13. If you could have Biden follow through with just one of his major campaign promises, which would it be? 14. What's your take on Elon Musk? 15. Is there any movie that you wouldn't mind seeing a remake/reboot of? 16. You're allowed to have a world famous chef of your choosing prepare a meal for you and your wife. Who is the chef and what are they making? 17. What was your favorite toy growing up? 18. What's your fantasy vacation destination? 19. Who is your favorite music artist? 20. Go to karaoke song? If you enjoy our shows, "heart" us here on SC, or "like" & share over or on your BE Presents Podcast platform of choice: * YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloodyElbowPresents * Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bloody-elbow-presents/id984162015 * iHeartRadio: www.iheart.com/podcast/269-Blood…Presents-30639274 * Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/55S2dpKYVqndaPTUojkELm?si=oGGPZ4kESkWZigLNnEg1ug * Stitcher: www.stitcher.com/podcast/bloody-e…esents?refid=stp * TuneIn: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports--Recreation-Podcasts/Bloody-Elbow-Presents-p1190843/ * OverCast: overcast.fm/itunes984162015/bloody-elbow-presents * Player FM: player.fm/series/bloody-elbow-presents * & Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/b53e5086-2334-497c-82c0-24ddb5e0cfbb/Bloody-Elbow-Presents For previous episodes of the show, check out our playlists on any of our BE Presents channels.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

The Dating Den
With Jessica Baum: How to Identify Your Attachment Style to Finally Have the Big Love You've Dreamed Of

The Dating Den

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 39:38


Marni speaks with the author of Anxiously Attached: Becoming More Secure in Life and Love, Jessica Baum. Jessica is the founder of the Relationship Institute of Palm Beach, a practice that provides couples therapy, family counseling, and addiction therapy. She has worked with thousands of clients for over a decade. She helps clients make a meaningful connection with themselves so they can better understand how they relate to people in relationships.   Key takeaways from this episode:   Understanding an Anxious Attachment style What it means to do “the work” Being compassionate toward other people Why your body is holding on to past trauma Cultivating a great, deep love   How the Anxious Attachment Style Relates to Your Love Life [2:17]   Attachment styles are embedded patterns that get developed early in life. They get embedded in our nervous system. We repeat hurts from childhood in our adult relationships because it is the way we learned to adapt, connect, and survive. For anxious people, it comes with a lot of self-sacrifices.   Twenty-five percent of the population has an anxious attachment style. Secure people can feel anxiety in their relationships but people with an anxious attachment system tend to be hyperfocused on the external. They normally have a deep-seated abandonment wound. The way they survive is to make plans and keep things close. They may seem controlling but they are just trying to create calmness in their world.   People with an anxious attachment style are externally focused because they have trouble getting their own needs met.   Is It Intuition or a Past Trauma? [10:35]   When we are young and our hippocampus is not fully formed, we have implicit memory. When we are little we store sensations in our body. When sensations feel big, we know it is an old feeling that is resurfacing. Jessica reminds us that big sensations can be painful and cause us to lash out.   Awareness, compassion, and the right support can help us change behavior.   What are you doing to distract yourself from having real relationships?   Anxiously Attached: The Book [19:22]   A lot of couples go to Jessica when they are activated without understanding on a conscious level why they are acting the way they are. In her book, Anxiously Attached: Becoming More Secure in Life and Love, Jessica breaks down what is happening to the nervous system of both people in the relationship and describes what they can do to gain a better understanding of what is happening, and what the other person is feeling.   Jessica says that when we form adult relationships we internalize them and they become part of how we build our secure sense of self. It is through these experiences we learn how to self-regulate.   You can't fake safety but you can cultivate it.   Make a Connection: Visit Our Website Plug Into Your Superpower Retreat — Apply at DatingwithDignity.com/pluginform Join Our Dating Den Facebook Community Here! Learn how to attract your perfect equal… watch our latest training here! Interested in working with us? Book a Breakthrough session at DWDVIP Get a Free Coaching Session with Marni on Our Podcast — Sign up Here to Be a Guest On Our Show Download a Complimentary Copy of our Book — How to Find a Quality Guy Without Going on 200 Dates  

Movies That Made Us Gay
146. Chicago with special guest Pickens Barringer

Movies That Made Us Gay

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 82:35


“Slick your hair and wear your buckle shoes… And all that jazz.”  We watched the 2002 Rob Marshall directed musical ‘Chicago' with our buddy Pickens Barringer, and all a sudden we are overcome with belting THAT JAZZZ while dancing to Bob Fosse choreo. Twenty years later it's still one of the best stage to screen musicals ever. We talk about the casting perfection going on here. That Oscar was in the clear for Catherine Zeta Jones in the first number alone. Everything going on here is seamlessly staged by Marshell, and we talk about the multiverse of Roxie and Velma casting possiblities. We adore these two husband killing broads, and nod in agreement that ‘They had it comin', because that's Chicago!  Thanks for listening and don't forget to subscribe, rate and review us on Apple Podcasts! www.patreon.com/moviesthatmadeusgay Facebook/Instagram: @moviesthatmadeusgay Twitter: @MTMUGPod Scott Youngbauer: Twitter @oscarscott / Instagram @scottyoungballer Peter Lozano: Twitter/Instagram @peterlasagna

KZYX News
Water, cannabis, sub-station at Redwood Valley MAC meeting

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:29


May 12, 2022 — The Redwood Valley Municipal Advisory Council held a hybrid meeting last night on zoom and at the grange. The council agreed to form a committee that would educate community members about local water issues, and advocate for Redwood Valley's interests as water resources dwindle. The council decided to recommend that a cannabis grow not be allowed to increase its area of operations, due in part to a lack of information about where it would get its water. Lieutenant Jason Caudillo from the Sheriff's Department warned of a possible increase in criminal activity as the Redwood Trail progresses. Caudillo also said the future of the sheriff's sub-station at the Measure B-funded training center in the former Jehovah's Witness church on East Road appears to be uncertain, as the cost of repairing extensive water damage to an outbuilding mounts. Asked when the sheriff's sub-station would open, Caudillo said damage caused by a broken pipe would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to repair, so “I do not have an answer for you.” The Sheriff's Department paid one-third of the $389,000 purchase price of the property in 2019. Too much water is rare in Redwood Valley, where ag water has been shut off, and the community only has rights to surplus water from the much-reduced Lake Mendocino. The water district has rationed water use to 55 gallons per person per day. Council member Adam Gaska talked about why he's joining the committee on water issues, in a town that overlooks the lake. “Redwood Valley has zero right to that water,” he emphasized. “Twenty years ago, when Russian River really started signing up people for contracts, I remember Danny Thomas had written up this missive that had said, whisky's for drinking, water's for fighting. And I think I was like twenty at the time, and I'm like, it's gonna get serious.” Supervisor Glenn McGourty filled the council in about how much water is coming through the controversial Potter Valley Project, which is limping along with a missing transformer that curtails the amount of water that comes into the Russian River from the Eel through a diversion tunnel in Potter Valley. “You will see Lake Mendocino come up a little bit, primarily because of the water that's coming through the Potter Valley Project, even at the low rate that it's flowing in at the moment, it's still coming in, and will continue through most of the summer, but at a reduced rate,” he said. “Normally, we'd expect about fifteen to sixteen thousand acre feet to come through, and it'll be more like four to seven thousand.” The Municipal Advisory councils, or MACs, were formed in unincorporated parts of the county so that community members could have a venue to form cohesive approaches to planning concerns. They generally have the ear of their county supervisor, and they receive alerts about certain kinds of permits, so they can make comments to various governing bodies. They are not legislative bodies, themselves. Gaska thinks the MAC is the best local venue to educate community members about a variety of complex issues, including water policy. “Our business is communication. It is people having a voice,” he said. “RVMAC, we can't promise you anything. But we allow you the space and the time to be heard. Which is important, because then we also decide who else needs to hear that. Is it Glenn? Does Glenn need to hear that? Does Jason Caudillo from the sheriff need to hear that? And they're here. That's what our board does.” Water played a significant role in the council's lack of enthusiasm for a request from a cannabis permit holder to double the grow size to 10,000 square feet of outdoor cannabis. A map showing 14 hoop houses led to confusion about whether the request was to change the whole grow site to outdoor or grow some outdoors and some in the hoop houses. Council members Chris Boyd and Marybeth Kelly had additional reasons for opposing the permit's approval. “All of a sudden, we'll see huge increases in water trucks going up the road,” Boyd said. “And with all of these problems we're having with water, we don't need to add noise pollution and diesel pollution to the picture. So I'm not for this.” “Not to mention the state of the roads,” Kelly added. “Road E is one of the worst.” McGourty reported some of the things that the Board of Supervisors is considering as the county works on an ordinance to regulate water hauling. He favors requiring permits and business licenses for wells that are the source of water for water trucks, and giving Code Enforcement the responsibility of checking water truckers' documents. But, he pointed out, many people with some illegal cannabis also need water for legitimate domestic uses. “So how do you separate that out?” he asked. “Do you say no to health and public safety because they have a cannabis grow? So those are some of the things we have to work through.” Council member Sattie Clark said she believes that regulating water use, through policies based on rigorously gathering information, isn't all about busting illegal cannabis growers. “We all need to be looking at our water in a more holistic sense,” she opined. “Because it's kind of like, whoever takes it, gets it. And this conversation that we're having about hydrological studies for new wells, et cetera, is really just good management of our water resources…we need clarity about where this water is going and whether it's sustainable, whether it's healthy for our community as a whole.” McGourty encouraged the council to seek state money, saying that, while the county is broke, the state is flush with cash, and likely to spend some on small disadvantaged communities. Redwood Valley has gotten some relief for a major disaster. After the fire of 2017, PG&E awarded the MAC a $10,000 community planning grant. Boyd said the MAC decided to spend $5,000 of that grant on a new heating and cooling system for the grange, which became a hub in the wake of the fires. “Part of what we discovered in going through the fire and the emergencies is that the grange is a central locus for the community when we go through any emergency,” she declared.

New Books in History
Guy Beiner, "Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:01


Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919 (Oxford UP, 2021), edited by Guy Beiner, offers a multi-level and multi-faceted exploration of a century of remembering, forgetting, and rediscovering the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, arguably the greatest catastrophe in human history. Twenty-three researchers present original perspectives by critically investigating the hitherto unexplored vicissitudes of memory in the interrelated spheres of personal, communal, medical, and cultural histories in different national and transnational settings across the globe. The volume reveals how, even though the Great Flu was overshadowed by the commemorative culture of the Great War, recollections of the pandemic persisted over time to re-emerge towards the centenary of the 'Spanish' Flu and burst into public consciousness following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The chapters chart historiographical neglect (while acknowledging the often-unnoticed dialogues between scientific and historical discourses), probe silences, and trace vestiges of social and cultural memories that long remained outside of what was considered collective memory. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in World Affairs
Guy Beiner, "Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:01


Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919 (Oxford UP, 2021), edited by Guy Beiner, offers a multi-level and multi-faceted exploration of a century of remembering, forgetting, and rediscovering the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, arguably the greatest catastrophe in human history. Twenty-three researchers present original perspectives by critically investigating the hitherto unexplored vicissitudes of memory in the interrelated spheres of personal, communal, medical, and cultural histories in different national and transnational settings across the globe. The volume reveals how, even though the Great Flu was overshadowed by the commemorative culture of the Great War, recollections of the pandemic persisted over time to re-emerge towards the centenary of the 'Spanish' Flu and burst into public consciousness following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The chapters chart historiographical neglect (while acknowledging the often-unnoticed dialogues between scientific and historical discourses), probe silences, and trace vestiges of social and cultural memories that long remained outside of what was considered collective memory. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Medicine
Guy Beiner, "Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:01


Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919 (Oxford UP, 2021), edited by Guy Beiner, offers a multi-level and multi-faceted exploration of a century of remembering, forgetting, and rediscovering the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, arguably the greatest catastrophe in human history. Twenty-three researchers present original perspectives by critically investigating the hitherto unexplored vicissitudes of memory in the interrelated spheres of personal, communal, medical, and cultural histories in different national and transnational settings across the globe. The volume reveals how, even though the Great Flu was overshadowed by the commemorative culture of the Great War, recollections of the pandemic persisted over time to re-emerge towards the centenary of the 'Spanish' Flu and burst into public consciousness following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The chapters chart historiographical neglect (while acknowledging the often-unnoticed dialogues between scientific and historical discourses), probe silences, and trace vestiges of social and cultural memories that long remained outside of what was considered collective memory. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books Network
Guy Beiner, "Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:01


Pandemic Re-Awakenings: The Forgotten and Unforgotten 'Spanish' Flu Of 1918-1919 (Oxford UP, 2021), edited by Guy Beiner, offers a multi-level and multi-faceted exploration of a century of remembering, forgetting, and rediscovering the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, arguably the greatest catastrophe in human history. Twenty-three researchers present original perspectives by critically investigating the hitherto unexplored vicissitudes of memory in the interrelated spheres of personal, communal, medical, and cultural histories in different national and transnational settings across the globe. The volume reveals how, even though the Great Flu was overshadowed by the commemorative culture of the Great War, recollections of the pandemic persisted over time to re-emerge towards the centenary of the 'Spanish' Flu and burst into public consciousness following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The chapters chart historiographical neglect (while acknowledging the often-unnoticed dialogues between scientific and historical discourses), probe silences, and trace vestiges of social and cultural memories that long remained outside of what was considered collective memory. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Dr. Laura Call of the Day
Will I Ever Get Over This Breakup?

Dr. Laura Call of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 7:27


Twenty-two-year-old Jen struggles to move on from her heartbreak and disappointment over a potential engagement. - Dr. Laura: "You need to go through this so that you know you can survive this in the future."What would you like to tell your younger self while going through adolescent heartbreak? Email me your thoughts at: drlaura@drlaura.com To participate on the radio program; call 1-800-Dr-Laura / 1-800-375-2872 or make an appointment - https://www.drlaura.com/make-an-appointment. Find me on social media at:Facebook.com/DrLauraInstagram.com/DrLauraProgramTwitter.com/DrLauraProgramPinterest.com/DrLauraYouTube.com/DrLauraBecome a Dr. Laura Family Member: https://www.drlaura.com/ See https://www.drlaura.com/privacy-policy for privacy information.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Tortoise Podcast
Downfall: twenty days that did for Rishi Sunak

The Tortoise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 50:04


How did Rishi Sunak go from one of the most popular members of the government to one of the least in a matter of days? Matthew d'Ancona pieces together what happened.Tortoise is a news start-up devoted to slow journalism. We take news slowly. We tell stories that really matter, and take time to see the full picture.If you want more slow and considered journalism, you can become a member of Tortoise and get access to more of our stories, contribute to our journalism and join us at events in our newsroom, in person and online. Just go to tortoisemedia.com/friend and use the code Slow50 for membership for just £50 per year. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1001 RADIO DAYS
THE TWENTY MINUTE ALIBI and THE MYSTERIOUS LODGER CASEY CRIME PHOTOGRAPHER

1001 RADIO DAYS

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:43


Casey, Crime Photographer, known by a variety of titles on radio (aka Crime Photographer, Flashgun Casey, Casey, Press Photographer) was a media franchise from the 1930s to the 1960s. The character was the creation of novelist George Harmon Coxe. Casey was featured in the pulp magazine Black Mask novels, comic books, radio, film, television and legitimate theatre. Jack "Flashgun" Casey, was a crime photographer for the newspaper The Morning Express. With the help of reporter Ann Williams, he solved crimes and recounted his stories to Ethelbert the bartender (portrayed by John Gibson) and other friends at the Blue Note, their favorite tavern and jazz club where the Archie Belyer Orchestra and Teddy Mitchell Trio were featured. The role of Ann Williams was portrayed throughout most of the run of the series by Jan Miner perhaps best remembered as "Madge" the manicurist on Palmolive' television soap commercials from the 1960s and 1970s Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BLUE CAST by TENCEL™  / CARVED IN BLUE®
BLUE CAST 209 - Back to Blue

BLUE CAST by TENCEL™ / CARVED IN BLUE®

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 32:49


BLUE CAST Ep209 - Back to BlueThis BLUE CAST Episode, Tricia Carey talks with Mohsin Sajid, founder of ENDRIME.They catch up on highlights from both Kingpins Show in April 2022 and Amsterdam Denim Days Festival, held straight after.  Mohsin Sajid is a highly accomplished denim specialist, denim historian an educator. With more than 20 year's experience working with a number world's leading international denim brands and mills. Mohsin has a keen interest in raising the next generation of denim designers reflecting in his role as MA denim lecturer at The Royal College of Art, and BA denim lecturer at Ravensbourne University London. Mohsin together with his wife Sadia Rafique they both run consultancy company ENDRIME® and their Denim History educational platform where they teach denim making masterclasses & historical denim lectures each year. Mohsin is at the helm of guiding the next generation of responsible denim designers.Mohsin is also a organiser of Transformers ED educational series started in 2019. Mohsin is currently writing 2 books, 1st book on denim manufacturing processes; a comprehensive textbook from 1870 to modern ergonomic denim of today, which he hopes to complete in 2022/3 in time with the 150 anniversary of the birth of the jean.  Mohsin's second book will be about his ENDRIME archive – and resource book for others designers which he hopes to complete in 2022. Tricia Carey is a well-known advocate for innovation and sustainability in the textile and apparel industry. Twenty years ago, Tricia joined Courtalds Fibers NY to develop the marketing plan for a brand new fiber called TENCEL. When Lenzing Fibers acquired Tencel Inc. in 2004, Tricia became the USA Merchandising Manager for Womenswear, Menswear, and Intimates. Today, Tricia directs the Global Denim Segment, as well as the Americas Business Development teams, with a special interest in advancing more sustainable apparel development from fiber to consumer use. Tricia holds a Bachelor's degree in Fashion Merchandising from The Fashion Institute of Technology and certificates in Digital Marketing and Strategy from Cornell University and MIT. Her experience in fabric sales, global sourcing, and apparel business development make her an invaluable partner for brands and retailers who want to re-evaluate their supply chains and optimize the application and benefits of Lenzing's botanic fibers. Tricia also serves as Secretary of Accelerating Circularity Project, is a member of the FIT Textile Department Advisory Board and was Vice Chair at Textile Exchange from 2014-2018.  In 2020 she was nominated as B2B Content Marketer of the Year by Content Marketing Institute, as well as top 100 Denim Legend by WeAr Magazine.  In 2019 Tricia was awarded the RIVET 50, influential denim industry leaders.  She has been a speaker as various industry events including United Nations, Transformers, Texworld, Premiere Vision, Wear Conference, and more. She is based in New York City and can be reached through LinkedIn.BLUE CAST by TENCEL™ / CARVED IN BLUE®A podcast series created by Michael Kininmonth and Tricia Carey from Lenzing's TENCEL™ Denim team. Each month, they will host an in-depth talk with a special guest working in the industry or on the fringes of the denim community. Listen for discussions on sustainability, career trajectories, personal denim memories and more.Graphics, recording and editing by Mohsin Sajid and Sadia Rafique from ENDRIME® for TENCEL™ / CARVED IN BLUE®.Find us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook @carvedinblue. And get in touch denim@lenzing.comhttps://carvedinblue.tencel.com/https://www.youtube.com/c/bluelenzhttps://bluecast.buzzsprout.com

The Daily Crime
"Morgan is on their mind every day"

The Daily Crime

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:36


Twenty seven years have passed since 6-year-old Morgan Nick disappeared from a baseball field in Alma, Ark. The case remains unsolved, but in recent months, there have been some developments in the case. Mercedes Mackay, a reporter with THV11 in Little Rock, Ark., shares the latest. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bloody Elbow Presents
Twenty Random Questions with Mookie Alexander | Crooklyn's Corner 28

Bloody Elbow Presents

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 50:28


EPISODE 28 1. You are the biggest sports fan I know. Are there any you don't or won't watch? 2. What were you like in high school? 3. What's a typical day off look like for you? 4. What would be your ideal vacation destination? 5. What irrational fears do you have, if any? 6. What's your favorite movie and why? 7. If you could choose one of Joe Biden's campaign promises to come true, which would you select? 8. If you were forced to choose a single meal we'll say 6 courses (meat, 2 sides, bread, salad, dessert), what would that meal look like? 9. Are you an animal lover? Pets? 10. What was your favorite toy growing up? 11. Who was your favorite superhero? 12. Ever had a near-death experience? 13. If you could ask a single question to any scientist, past or present, what would you ask? 14. Do you believe humans will encounter intelligent extraterrestrial beings in your lifetime? 15. What's been your most embarrassing moment? 16. If you could have anyone be your hype man to summarize your life at an awards ceremony, who would you want your hype man to be? 17. What's been the most challenging thing you've ever undertaken? 18. Where do you see yourself in 20 years? 19. What's your biggest accomplishment so far? 20. Are you hopeful for humanity or have you, like so many others, resigned yourself to the fact that we are a blight on this planet? If you enjoy our shows, "heart" us here on SC, or "like" & share over or on your BE Presents Podcast platform of choice: * YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloodyElbowPresents * Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bloody-elbow-presents/id984162015 * iHeartRadio: www.iheart.com/podcast/269-Blood…Presents-30639274 * Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/55S2dpKYVqndaPTUojkELm?si=oGGPZ4kESkWZigLNnEg1ug * Stitcher: www.stitcher.com/podcast/bloody-e…esents?refid=stp * TuneIn: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports--Recreation-Podcasts/Bloody-Elbow-Presents-p1190843/ * OverCast: overcast.fm/itunes984162015/bloody-elbow-presents * Player FM: player.fm/series/bloody-elbow-presents * & Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/b53e5086-2334-497c-82c0-24ddb5e0cfbb/Bloody-Elbow-Presents For previous episodes of the show, check out our playlists on any of our BE Presents channels.

Finding Subjects: A Personal Journal
Episode 174: I love You Yeah Yeah Yeah

Finding Subjects: A Personal Journal

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 21:02


Twenty-five years ago, today... Doctor S, told me not to play... So, I had to learn to sit around... But within I always was a clown... Twenty-five years ago I was diagnosed with a heart problem. On this episode, I talk briefly about encountering an adversity and owning it! #adversity #mindfulness #podcast #mentalhealth #positivity #spirituality #God --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/finding-subjects-podcast/message

Here Wee Read
50 - American Desi: Jyoti Rajan Gopal and Supriya Kelkar

Here Wee Read

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 49:58


Jyoti Rajan Gopal is a writer, mom, and Kindergarten teacher. Growing up, she lived in Thailand, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, and China. Twenty-eight years ago, she moved to New York and now lives in Yonkers in a quirky old Victorian, with her husband and two daughters. Her favorite place in the house is the wrap around porch where she loves to gather with family or friends, read, write, and drink coffee.Supriya is an author, illustrator, and screenwriter who grew up in the Midwest, where she learned Hindi as a child by watching three Hindi movies a week. Winner of the New Visions Award for her middle grade novel AHIMSA, (Tu Books, 2017), Supriya has worked on the writing teams for several Hindi films and she is the author of several middle grade and picture books.Purchase American Desi here.Connect with Charnaie online in the following places:Blog: http://hereweeread.comPersonal Website: charnaiegordon.comPodcast Email Address: hereweereadpodcast@gmail.comFind Charnaie on the following social media platforms under the username @hereweeread: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest.Feel free to share this podcast on your social media platforms to help spread the word to others. Thanks for listening!

The Fourteen Twenty Podcast
Fourteen Twenty ep. 200

The Fourteen Twenty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 79:33


Has anyone ever worn #200? The guys discuss Rich Strike and the Kentucky Derby, the NHL playoffs so far and the key elements of winning in the post-season, the MLB changing baseballs and a round of Who's Better? Sit back, grab a few beers and let's get into ‘er! And be sure to use Seat Geek and promo code 1420POD for all your ticket needs and you will get $20 off your first purchase and SeatGeek.com or on the SeatGeek app! Also, listen to us on the Newsly app subscribe at www.newsly.me using promo code 1420SP0RTS for a free months subscription

911 Free Fall with Andy Steele
911 Free Fall, May 5, 2022

911 Free Fall with Andy Steele

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 57:56


911 Free Fall with Andy Steele Architect Andrew Salter on waking up to controlled demolition after living 9/11 This week on 9/11 Free Fall, New York-based architect Andrew Salter joins host Andy Steele to share his experience on 9/11 and his story of discovering the evidence of controlled demolition and trying to inform others around him. Andrew was a high-schooler in Manhattan on September 11, 2001. His father, who worked in the Financial District, ran for his life when the towers came down. For many hours, Andrew had no idea if his father had survived. When they were finally reunited that evening, his father was “cloaked in dust from head to toe.” Twenty years later, Andrew, a signatory to AE911Truth's petition, is emblematic of a younger generation that experienced 9/11 in their youth and may now be ready to tear down the false official narrative of this world-changing event. Don't miss this illuminating episode of 9/11 Free Fall.

The Bledsoe Show
Maximize Your Environment

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 69:58


00:00.00 Max Shank Welcome back to Monday mornings with max and Mike Today we're going to talk about the easiest way to improve your life and that is your environment your environment includes people. Your environment includes the physical space physical objects. The actual climate or weather and not only can you perfectly adapt to the environment you're in but actually 1 of the easiest ways to change is just to change your environment and that's one of the reasons that joining a community of. Healthy fit people is by far the easiest way to get healthy and fit yourself because I believe in the 5 monkey rule which is that you become most like the 5 people that you spend the most time with so let's talk about. Environment how to adapt to it. How others have adapted to it in the past and how you can also change it completely which is a very amazing talent. Mike thanks for joining me again. 01:07.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, this is this is a fun topic topic because um I was at a talk couple weeks ago at an event and this guy was talking about the 3 things that that drive change and ah, you're. Changing your environment and the people you're around your community is by far the least stressful and the easiest to comebine and can have the you know, easiest long-term effects. The other two is people make change when the first one is when people make change when something. Horrible Happens. There's something traumatic that happens or like they they had a blind spot and then all something you know someone goes into the doctor and they got holy shit you got diabetes or you got cancer. It's like oh fuck and then you realize that your your you know your life is finite and oh I had better make a change. Ah, that one that finding change and creating change from that place. Not a lot of fun. Um, that one's yeah pain pain and suffering. Um and then the other one being the other one you could do is strategic. 02:09.57 Max Shank Um, so that's like pain motivation the motivation of pain hunger pain desire Very synonymous. 02:22.51 mikebledsoe You know someone might go hire a coach and then we create a strategy for maybe do some mindset training or whatever it is on how to get you to change your behavior or your lifestyle just by creating a strategy That's also very difficult. It takes some willpower which we'll say for later time. 02:40.85 Max Shank Well, it takes proportional desire to the activity that they're willing to undertake I think having a more tactical approach that may include hiring a coach and coming up with a more concrete plan is a great way to go about it. Use your rational mind. 02:41.78 mikebledsoe But. 03:00.41 Max Shank I would say that the desire comes from kind of the same place. You feel a lack of health or a lack of community or a lack of confidence or a lack of something and there's some feeling there that makes you go You know what? Not only do I want more but I think it's possible that I could. 03:19.18 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so and changing your environment and your community. It's by far the easiest that's that's 1 reason that I run my coaching business the way I do and I suggest other coaches do the same which is make them community oriented have people going through the process together. 03:20.23 Max Shank Get more. 03:38.23 mikebledsoe Because it does normalize things. You know if you're hanging out with a bunch of people who are running triathlons. That's gonna become a normal thing for you to do if you're playing with hanging out with a bunch of tennis players you be playing tennis if you hang out with a bunch of musicians. You're probably gonna pick up an instrument and. It's going to be almost automatic in a lot of ways. So It's going to be easy. Super super easy. 04:01.14 Max Shank It will be easy I Think that's an important point that I would like to I'd like to stop at the definition station real quick about the word easy because in. 04:14.12 mikebledsoe But here we go again. 04:21.14 Max Shank In practice. Ah easy is something that you that you want to do easy is something that doesn't require a lot of time perhaps but I think difficult and easy are more defined by whether you want to do it or not. I think people find it very easy to do something. They love pretty much all day long so they would be willing to spend a hundred times more effort because it doesn't feel like they have to force themselves to do it because the activity itself is intrinsically enjoyable. And if you join a community that is playful with their goal achieving like there's a lot of playfulness in some entrepreneurs and that is ah maybe a defining characteristic of the ones who do much much better is it's a fun exciting game. That they want to play not not just because they want to purchase a boat in the future but because that game is exciting to them so there's that intrinsic joy in the activity itself that makes something easy. I think I think that's what makes it easy is if you want to do it. 05:34.90 mikebledsoe Absolutely absolutely yeah I think they as humans we tend to adopt the the desires of others when we're in a group or we choose the group based on our desires or at least we can I don't think that's what happens when we're young and growing up and we're. Pretty much forced to hang out with whoever's in our you know whoever our parents decide to put in our geographical you know sphere. But um, you know some of the some of the easiest changes I've ever made was when I moved locations. Um I. 05:59.94 Max Shank Um. 06:12.61 mikebledsoe You know there's so many benefits. Yeah I tell people all the time is if you're gonna if you if you're gonna be moving make a list if you're gonna move. Especially if you're moving to whole new New city. But even if you're moving to a new house or apartment or whatever it is. That's when. 06:13.39 Max Shank It's a big shakeup. It's a big shakeup. 06:29.60 mikebledsoe You can introduce new habits most easily because everything in your life is changing so I'll use up. The big thing is if you're moving to a new city. You're likely gonna be hanging out with a whole new social circle and ah, which means that you could either if you if you're not. Intentional about it. You probably end up hanging out with a lot of the same type of people you were hanging out with and you're gonna end up recreating. You know a similar lifestyle of wherever you were so that saying of no matter where you go or wherever you go, you will be there and so what i. What I've done intentionally is when I've landed it in a new town I know that those people they're not going to be judging me on my history because they don't even know it anyone? um anyone we ever interact with is seeing us for for the entirety of. The time we've known each other like when I when I see you max you know I think what we met probably six seven years ago maybe six years ago I'm thinking um I'm basically thinking of max over that entire period of time and probably the things that I was introduced to you initially are gonna stand out. 07:32.97 Max Shank And. 07:44.50 mikebledsoe The most and so as you can imagine. Yeah, if you if you live if you live with your you know with your family or near your family. Your family are they're gonna treat you like your a little kid because they knew you as a little kid and so that's. 07:44.96 Max Shank Like a first impression. 07:57.80 Max Shank And you'll probably act out that role just the same as you have always been acting out that role. 08:01.92 mikebledsoe Totally totally. So every time I've moved I've had the opportunity to upgrade my identity I can I can then decide I'm gonna be someone who you know the person the next iteration of myself that I want to be and I can. 08:10.77 Max Shank The. 08:20.80 mikebledsoe Consciously choose to present myself to new people in that way and I can be careful about the people I surround myself with who are the people I surround myself with now and it's not same people same type of person that I surround myself with before now. It's not. Dramatically drastic changes. But there are some small changes I've noticed as I've gotten older I've I've shrunk The friend circle quite a bit and gotten more selective because I see you know how influenced how influenced I am by the people. 08:39.53 Max Shank Further. 08:57.19 mikebledsoe I surround myself with so if you want to make a change and you want to you know, moving to a new city that I don't think there's ah, a quicker faster easier way to do it Although that may sound like a big fucking deal to somebody because it is but I think that. 09:07.57 Max Shank Oh. 09:15.44 mikebledsoe Moving to a new city is you know, logistically maybe difficult but from a making change perspective so much easier. 09:22.61 Max Shank Yeah, it definitely will shake things up in a big way. Ah, one of the reasons I like talking to new people is exactly what you were talking about I Love talking to new people because I don't know what I'm going to say. And I try not to be too attached to the way I think about things So I I try to really take a conversation as it comes and what I find really interesting is sometimes I will surprise myself with what I say. To a person that I've never interacted with before and it's it's because it's just a different um Interaction. You know this person has no clue who I am I don't have any clue who they are and I'm only bringing what I think right now I'm not necessarily bringing what I thought. Last year. So I'm excited to see like oh this is a really different way that I'm answering this question than the way I used to answer this Question. So I think every time you meet somebody new at least in my case, it feels. It feels different because I'm in such a state of. 10:26.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, no. 10:38.30 Max Shank Ah, flux. 10:39.13 mikebledsoe Yeah I agree with that. Yeah different people bring different parts of us out and I you know we're talking about the community. The people you surround yourself with but there's a lot of other environmental factors aside from the people we're surrounded by that impact. How we live our lives. Um. 10:57.61 Max Shank Well hold hold on before we go on though. Let's let's hone in on the the people thing because I think you want to understand the difference between thinking there are like good and bad people versus there are complementary people. And there are ah mutually destructive pairings so there are like complementary pairings and there are mutually destructive pairings but I try not to think of it like oh this person is better or I'm better and they're worse I mean you could make that argument certainly that some people are better and worse. 11:35.78 mikebledsoe I Think most will do. 11:35.82 Max Shank And many people do. But I think of it more like yeah and ah, of course we don't really know what their experience was like so it's such a slippery slope because then you got to like what think their parents were bad or their parents' parents were bad. It's like where does the blame. Really end with the goodness and badness of our Fellows. So I Just think about the fact that there is a different interaction happening. You know, like musical notes you get this note and then this other note you play them together and you get. Ah. A certain frequency and then you meet someone slightly different and the whole interaction is completely Different. So I think the way people interact with each other ah really sets the tone for relationships in a. 12:14.43 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 12:28.21 Max Shank In a monumental way so you can be ah playful in Conversation. You can be playful in movement and sport or you know I'm not sure what the opposite of playful is maybe like stiff or like. Hateful Almost I'm not sure I'm not sure what would the opposite of playful would be ah but you know what I'm saying like the interactions with other people are so big in how you evaluate and interpret your life that if they're if they're not playful if they're not loving then. 12:50.57 mikebledsoe I'm trying to think of it. Now. 13:07.75 Max Shank Ah, you you it. It can be a real problem and sometimes carving it out is really uncomfortable thought for people but it's not like the other person's bad and I'm good. It's just like this this pairing doesn't work together. 13:15.87 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 13:22.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, and and those pairings may not work. They may work together for a period of time and then they don't and it doesn't mean Yeah, ah I've definitely experienced that. Um, that with my my ex-wife even that was there was a period of time where that worked great and then there was a period of time. It stopped working. 13:28.20 Max Shank Oh yeah, a lot of stuff works for a while. Um I mean if we're talking about. Love Yeah, if we're talking about love. Ah, if we're talking about love and romance I mean my lord. 13:42.16 mikebledsoe And it served both of us to to walk away. Yeah, what are the antonyms for be sad. 13:47.63 Max Shank Could be sad. 13:54.00 Max Shank Be sad and work Those are good opposites so that's. 13:55.89 mikebledsoe Be sad and work that makes sense. 14:03.84 mikebledsoe Yeah. 14:06.40 Max Shank That's big I think drawing clear boundaries about what kind of interactions you are going to participate in sometimes it is better to just like take your ball and go home play with yourself. 14:14.52 mikebledsoe I like to I like to extrapolate on these types of things and that you know as above so below you know things that are happening at the smallest level are also happening at the largest level and when I look at say a relationship between 2 people. We can ah extrapolate that out to interactions between different cultures. We could say you know 2 different countries. You know you got a culture over here and that has certain values and you have a country over here. It has certain values and these countries may get along really well these two groups of people. 14:37.49 Max Shank Um, so it. 14:51.70 mikebledsoe Me say countries because I think the whole idea is going away but the yeah these two groups of people are either getting along or they have a lot of conflict and I really I think about this a lot and then also what. 14:53.78 Max Shank At groups. 15:08.32 mikebledsoe But I like about looking at culture more and large groups of people was I think it's ah easier to see what has created the way that they are as ah as a culture. So I really like to look at the Eu. The european union is a really good example of this and so. What you have ah is you have a lot of the countries in the north and you have a lot of countries in the south that have all they all said you know what we're gonna try to get along. You know we we haven't tried to kill each other in like you know a few decades. So maybe we should you know. All fall under the same currency and you know give each other a pass on the passport thing and all the things that happens with the european union but what happened in the last decade yeah I think was that the the euro was probably what a decade maybe 2 decades old I forget how long it's been around. 15:49.80 Max Shank Ah. 16:07.86 mikebledsoe I Think it's been around like 20 maybe a little more than 20 years at this point nonetheless. Um, they basically took all these countries and they put them on the same currency and so some countries whose value of their currency was low automatically got propped up really quick. And in some countries whose value is really high got brought down really quick and what you ended up with was it tan be yeah oh yeah, yeah I thought you're talking about the discrepancy but the yeah. 16:28.61 Max Shank Right? It's like a marriage it I mean it's like a union you know, know that that's what I'm saying that too I mean in a. Ah marriage or in a business partnership or a union of countries or big groups. Um, you know there's there's give and take and yeah. 16:54.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, so so I mean what? what ended ones up ends up happening this this really is a interesting study for me and what ends up happening is you have places like Portugal greece who especially Greece I think from what I understand. They went from being like ah you know, not that wealthy of a country to hopping on the euro and then all of a sudden people didn't have to work much anymore because they were instantly more wealthy and so there was a little less work that had to be done which in Greece there. 17:22.13 Max Shank Um. 17:30.80 mikebledsoe They're they're not. They don't work as hard as say the Germans So I think we can look at that's exact. That's what that's what yeah, that's what I'm getting at yeah is when you look at the northern countries in the European Union These countries are very good at planning. 17:34.17 Max Shank Um, pretty different climate also interesting to think about? yeah. 17:48.93 mikebledsoe They're very good at saving. Um and they're there's they're way more strategic in a lot of ways whereas when you look at the southern countries you look at italy you've got portugal. You've got greece all these countries life is good. 24 7 3 65 the necessity to think ahead is just so much lower like why would you? you have you have generations of people that didn't really have to think ahead more than a day or 2 and then yeah. 18:16.68 Max Shank It's in. 18:20.62 Max Shank Yeah, let's go fit. It's fine. Let's go fishing. We'll be all right? It's fine. Let's go fishing. 18:24.91 mikebledsoe And exactly and then you have the swedes who if they don't you know it's It's winter is coming. Yeah, it's it's June and they're doing everything they can do to you know, prepare for something that's months and months away. 18:31.48 Max Shank Winter is coming. 18:41.56 Max Shank Well and you get the opposite side of the spectrum too when you go to the middle of the freaking desert where it circles back to now it's a different type of harshness of climate and you need a different set of wisdom that is still ah forward thinking. 18:51.26 mikebledsoe In here. 18:58.83 mikebledsoe Yeah, collecting water. 19:01.50 Max Shank And I think it's so yeah, it's so fascinating to look at like the Island Lifestyle because that's what we think of when we think of chill vibes. We think of a beach with palm trees and people. 19:17.51 mikebledsoe This shit happens near the equator. 19:18.47 Max Shank Taking it easy that that but not in the middle of the desert very severe there. It's just where there's like a union of sunny weather and water and food and it doesn't require a lot of. 19:25.55 mikebledsoe You're right. 19:36.62 Max Shank Harsh planning. It doesn't require ah an insane amount of ah like shelter ah manufacturing elegance either. You know. 19:44.58 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, and so like but and this really gets my interest a lot because it really highlights how different groups of people can be and how different individuals can be and. You know when people talk about you know, global currencies or they talk about trying to bring everybody under a standard set of rules and I immediately go you I don't if you if you want to do that I don't think you really understand how this shit works because we. If we try to bring everyone on the same standard. We don't need everyone having the same architectural standards in Hawaii as we do in Maine these are different architectural standards. These are different currency standards. There's these are all very very different and the result in the year Eu was Germany had to come in and bail out Greece basically and there was there was a lot of people that had a lot of feelings about who really should belong in the eu and should they should they build these countries out because they really just had a lack of planning so in my opinion. 20:53.60 Max Shank Little little more accurate agreement ahead of time a little more clear operating agreement to go on what if this happens what if this have you know some contingency plans right? And and I think yeah. 20:59.60 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, but yeah, so this was a number of years ago, but it you know things have yeah I don't think things have gotten that much better. 21:15.29 Max Shank Whenever whenever you're trying to solve something where you think it's really really urgent. You typically don't think forward as many consequences of that band-aid like the quicker you are to slap a solution on you're like okay, everybody drop everything. 21:25.25 mikebledsoe Right. 21:33.14 Max Shank Got a solution and they're like but what about what happens next month we can't we don't have time for that. We just have to do this thing right now and next month comes around. You're like hey that solution ah of eating all of our food and burning all the oil. Ah. Is really fucking us over now we we all agree it seemed like a good idea at the time. 21:58.35 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, but but getting back to is you know? ah your environment where you where you grew up what culturally you know if you had parents to grew up in Russia that you might have an attitude of being a little more um, is it called. 22:07.99 Max Shank Any. 22:17.27 Max Shank Severe austere. Yeah. 22:18.33 mikebledsoe Ah, austere. Yeah, you might have a little more austerity and built into your culture I I have a friend whose family's from the Ukraine and and he moved here when he was about 7 and you know he still has that that you could tell he's still got a little bit like you know we got it. We got to save up for winter type of thing even though we're in Austin Texas. 22:39.80 Max Shank Tote Yeah and some people have that to a much greater degree and some people have that to a lesser degree. Some people. Ah you know don't have any food at home and feel totally fine and some people don't feel safe unless they have a multiple year. Supply of food at home at all times and that's that's a huge spectrum. 22:58.70 mikebledsoe My my girlfriend thinks I have my girlfriend says I have food scarcity issues the ah but the more not and I never thought about it I never thought about it in the context of this conversation because now I'm going. Oh um, I'm extremely. 23:04.40 Max Shank Yeah, um I don't know if she is. 23:17.82 mikebledsoe Fair skin probably from the north where people had to plan for this. She's she's a quarter Nicaraguan half Mexican and has some European Eastern European in her but like she came from where the the water was flowing and the the sun was abundant. 23:19.16 Max Shank Ah. 23:36.43 Max Shank Dude just tell her she has ah equatorial privilege or something like that and see how that goes over you'd be like. Okay, yeah, you guys you guys have a dance festival. We have a farm to tend to. 23:41.00 mikebledsoe Um, I'll bring that up in the next conversation we get in about such topics. 23:51.36 Max Shank And some silos that need stocking you guys enjoy the dance festival. So. 23:54.37 mikebledsoe But ah, but I think a good example of this also is you ever watch game of thrones. So what was what was the attitude of the people from the north and lots of discipline you you do what you say and you say what you're gonna do and. 23:59.66 Max Shank Oh yeah. 24:05.44 Max Shank Um, is about as austere as you get is harsh. 24:14.15 mikebledsoe There is a level of honesty that's necessary because life life was on the line all the time. 24:18.42 Max Shank And then in the south. It's like orgies and you know just free wheeling and dealing kind of lifestyle down there right? and you know there's a lot of I mean it's a story right? But there's. 24:28.62 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 24:37.98 Max Shank Ah, guile and lying and backstabbing in all climates. But the austerity of the frozen north versus the temperate tropics is is plain as day in the real world and also in Tv shows. 24:41.40 mikebledsoe Right. 24:51.91 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, you're hang out in Jamaica they're they're so relaxed. Well, that's a thing is like I I from hanging hanging out with people who are from the tropical regions and being living in San Diego for a while taught me how to relax I was like oh I just need to chill the fuck out or um. 24:55.86 Max Shank Oh my god Bahamas is. 25:12.23 mikebledsoe Stressing myself out. There's something to learn from both. 25:15.10 Max Shank I Think it's ah wise to do it animal style which is you're either um, like resting or you're focused. You're just focused on what it is. You're doing So I think it's. 25:27.50 mikebledsoe Um. 25:32.82 Max Shank Really valuable to um work on a project and really devote yourself to something but all of the the feelings of. Your worthiness attached to your suffering ah that like puritanical shit is probably not very wise. So if you can really party ah like Carnival but then plan like a frozen ah farmer in the tundra then ah. I Think you'll probably find pretty good success and also um, a really enjoyable social life and lifestyle. 26:15.34 mikebledsoe Yeah, you get the best of both worlds I mean and it's 2022 so really good to choose that. Even if you live somewhere that does get cold in the winter when you have a heater and you have cars with with heated seats and all this yeah. 26:28.97 Max Shank Oh yeah, my God but you gotta shovel the walk. Maybe you got to scrape ice off your windshield like I went I went to the mountains. 26:34.92 mikebledsoe Ah, there's still more austerity there. But what I'm saying is like overall things have become a choice kind of like being fit. Ah you you have the ability to be in the best best shape any human being could ever be in because of all the access to anything you ever wanted. But you can also be in the worst shape and you could. 26:50.00 Max Shank And. 26:54.43 mikebledsoe You could just completely waste your life away doing nothing and playing video games because life is so easy and there is abundance or you could or you could choose to use the tools that technology has has given us in order to really leverage. 26:58.30 Max Shank The. 27:13.25 mikebledsoe Strategy in a way that makes a really big impact and so the the amount of choice that we have in these things is way higher. So I think it requires a higher level of discipline If you're gonna I think that a lot I think a lot of people tend to.. They don't even really know what austerity is. 27:29.50 Max Shank There's way more pleasure levers. Well there's so many pleasure levers like you can pull the coffee lever you can pull the Tiktok lever. You can get tits on the telephone you can get drugs delivered to your like I can get booze delivered to my door if I want to. Get drugs I can get all kinds of shit just delivered to me so there are pleasure levers everywhere. So ah, um, I'll bring it back to fasting because that's the most. Ah. 27:51.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 28:02.77 Max Shank But apart from safety. That's the most significant consistent and primal desire that we work with hunger desire pain all synonyms. So if you can control that 1 thing with conscious ah thought then you have at least the foundation. 28:21.26 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 28:21.44 Max Shank To control those other things and so um I don't know if there's it's different for everybody though. It obviously seems easier for some people to not eat tons of chocolates than it is for others. Some people. It seems really hard to not eat chocolates and popcorn all day. I find that a little bit challenging myself I would just snack all day long I'll I will just. 28:47.40 mikebledsoe On' the other way I I'm like I for I'll forget to eat type of thing I've I've had to like stay on top of myself my whole life. 28:52.20 Max Shank If you're really interested in something ah eating is irrelevant if you're really interested I'll I'll do that too but like I will I'll go a whole day without eating. Yeah. 29:01.93 mikebledsoe I Think that's accurate. Yeah I'm a very curious person That's probably why I don't eat much. 29:11.18 Max Shank And I'll do that too unless you put a sandwich in front of me like if I see the food if I see the food. It's It's very likely going to be eaten I mean I'll smell it first to make sure it's good just like any other animal but I'm going to eat that food if I see it. 29:26.34 mikebledsoe Yeah. 29:28.92 Max Shank And I can eat such a tremendous quantity of food. It is. It is outrageous like sometimes I will lift the bowl which is like a giant plate. It's like a twelve inch platter that's two feet deep two inches deep not two feet deep like a barrel two inches deep giant ah bowl and I'll fill it and sometimes I'll be carrying it from the kitchen to the table and I'll go holy fuck this this is heavy lifting lifting. This food is heavy to me. And it'll be like 3 to 5 eggs a couple of brotw worstst some rice and cheese and pesto and ricotta and it just becomes this mass of eggs and cheese and meat and and it's shocking. It's shocking. What's that dude are you kit. 30:16.57 mikebledsoe On the wonder you got fat. Ah no wonder you got fat. 30:25.52 Max Shank I will continue eating like a buffet is like a dream.. The only thing is like how much fried chicken versus fried fish am I going to eat at this thing a buffet is like such a perverted Extravagance. Of Human dominance over the food chain like we just have this cornucopia of different animals and plants that you can eat. It is so extravagant I Fucking Love it. 30:52.30 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean look I'm not that much different if it's in the house I'm gonna fucking eat it like if there's chocolate in here if there's if there's a cake if there's anything that I'm oh. 30:59.63 Max Shank The. I had cheesecake this morning with with coffee I had a slice of coffee ah cheesecake with a cup of mocha. Oh my Oh my God and. 31:11.62 mikebledsoe Ah, my mouth is watering now. 31:18.52 Max Shank It was so delicious and I was just thinking This is what balance really looks like. 31:24.14 mikebledsoe The well for me I practice I don't have that kind of shit in my house I and and because I cause I practice because I'll eat it out I practice I practice my discipline when I'm shopping So I do my shopping online I try to shop when. 31:30.46 Max Shank Well yeah. 31:41.13 Max Shank Um, yeah. 31:44.14 mikebledsoe I love shopping online for my food because it's not going to get here for 3 or 4 or 5 days like I'm on like a subscription thing and I I I have to have my order in by Tuesday so I write so it arrives on Saturday so I yeah. 31:48.59 Max Shank You know this. 31:56.95 Max Shank Ah, that's quite a lot of planning required. You must be from a cold climate. 32:02.30 mikebledsoe I. Ah, well, ah, well, the company sets it up like that. So if I want to get this massive discount I get it's like 40% off the food because it's you know they're they're reduced the reducing Yeah food weight. Well it's those things they're they're pushing my buttons. Okay, our goal. 32:09.11 Max Shank Moon. 32:18.10 Max Shank Guaranteed. 32:24.90 mikebledsoe This company's goal is to reduce food waste. Okay I like that they're going to take things that are in you know too much supply. Not enough demand and then they're going to package it and send it my door step before it goes bad, perfect and all really high quality organic food. 32:25.85 Max Shank Love it. 32:33.50 Max Shank Um, super um. 32:39.34 mikebledsoe So it's pushing that button for me, it's like oh I want to you know help reduce food waste I'm a good person and then the and then it's it's all very high well I'm saving 40% off of stuff if I were to go to whole foods I'd spend twice as much as what I'm spending here. 32:53.68 Max Shank So not only do you feel kind good but you feel smart good. Yeah oh yeah, superior Wow you're so you're you're saintly. 32:58.67 mikebledsoe I feel superior and and good. Yeah yeah, superior and and smart. Yeah, so yeah, yeah, practically and then so so then. 33:11.40 Max Shank You're practically feeding people. 33:18.24 mikebledsoe I I really enjoy I didn't always I wasn't always like this but I I enjoy the routine of it as like oh I need to have my order in by I think it's Wednesday at noon I yeah, it's a ritual I got to you know Wednesday at noon and it pops up on my calendar. Oh time to put my misfit market order in and so. 33:28.50 Max Shank It's like a ritual. 33:37.77 mikebledsoe Ah, by the way everyone wants the code for that to shoot me a Dm and you'll save ten bucks after your next quarter. Ah I mean I've been trying to squeeze that ad in for like 3 shows. Yeah, so. 33:42.43 Max Shank I Knew this was an infomercial for for groceries I knew it shoot better. Get paid. 33:55.21 mikebledsoe The um, so yeah, the and 1 thing I noticed was I didn't order a bunch of bullshit every everyone someone because they do have some bullshit in there I could order some some snack food. Yeah and my impulsivity was greatly reduced knowing. 34:02.94 Max Shank Um, it's less impulsive. Maybe. 34:13.96 mikebledsoe I don't get this food until Saturday and I'm normally ordering the time of day that I'm ordering is usually after breakfast. So like I'm um I have energy my willpower is high I'm um my I'm fed so I'm not. 34:14.54 Max Shank Right? I might not even want chocolates by then? no so you're fed. Wow. 34:30.31 mikebledsoe Like the worst time you could go shoppings if you're hungry and stoned I mean what are you gonna buy at the grocery store when you're hungry and Stone. So I go in I'm I'm wide awake. Um I'm dialed in I'm fed I'm gonna make good choices. So Anyways, I have I don't remember how I got down that track. But I. I Hope it's helpful for somebody. 34:49.71 Max Shank It's you know it's an environmental hack. That's what it is. We're we're talking about environment. We're talking about what kind of food makes it into the house because that's where the battle is That's the important battle is what gets past the front door. 34:52.59 mikebledsoe Really is. 35:06.56 Max Shank What gets in the house. So if you just have some good security at the gate you are going to have a much easier time and that reminds me of the most significant gate that requires security in your life which is your mouth. 35:06.87 mikebledsoe That's true. That's true. 35:25.77 Max Shank Both the things that you say and the things that you consume that that is that is where the ruin of many men really comes from is just weak security at the mouth. 35:28.27 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 35:38.41 mikebledsoe True Dad True dad. Yeah, ah this makes me but so the concept of making poor decision making difficult or good decision making easy One of the things that I've done is. 35:52.28 Max Shank Un. 35:57.30 mikebledsoe I've invested in some crypto and for me to move crypto around or cash it out. It's ah it's a task I cannot without my iphone hit the app on my phone because most 99% of people holding crypto can just pull put in and pull out all willy- nily. 36:14.96 Max Shank Does it make you more deliberate but less agile. 36:16.74 mikebledsoe Whenever they feel like it. Absolutely yeah and for for long term investing why you don't need agility. You actually yeah, you want to sacrifice that for the purpose of yeah being deliberate. So. 36:30.33 Max Shank Especially if you're a very inflammatory decision maker like oh my god it went down 5% I got to sell everything right. 36:36.10 mikebledsoe Right? right? and um, like I don't even have I don't I can't even look at um, why don't have any apps on my phone to even track what's happening in the crypto markets I haven't looked at my crypto holdings in over a month 36:48.10 Max Shank Ah. 36:54.50 mikebledsoe And people are like oh it's going down I'm like okay because I can't see it. It doesn't bother me and the thing is is I'm not gonna I wouldn't cash out anyway. But if I was watching it day to day I'd be experiencing the emotional distress. It's an environmental thing like. 37:00.94 Max Shank Well, you yeah you. 37:12.14 mikebledsoe The the apps on your phone is part of your environment the feed the trough I'm always wanted to get like ah I wanted to create a comic of of and maybe there's one out there where the feed is going into a trough and. 37:13.80 Max Shank Um, maybe like the news perhaps or the feed I mean the feed this the fire hose pointed at your face huh. 37:32.70 mikebledsoe People are just feeding on it. 37:32.99 Max Shank Oh I'm sure you could find that comic right now. Ah, but that's a big part of your environment that's chosen I think it's probably rare that a person looks at a screen for less than 2 hours a day. So. 37:36.48 mikebledsoe Now And um. 37:52.77 Max Shank that's that's 2 hours of mostly receiving messages from ah a carefully curated environment to make you feel a certain way and you know we're always, we're always talking about mind control essentially because even the actions that you take. You got to use your mind and then outsource it to your legs to get up and run or kick or jump or whatever so looking at the direct influences on your mind that make you think or feel a certain way is huge. You know looking at your. Investments every single day can be fun if you're one of those people or it can be a stressor looking at the news every day can be fun if you're one of those people or it can be a tremendous stressor to you and it's all how you ah. 38:44.77 mikebledsoe Um I don't know where fun. The news could be but. 38:49.44 Max Shank I Think some people absolutely get off on it. Um, otherwise they wouldn't keep watching right? Um, there's it's like fear pornography. You know I'm I'm like okay okay horror a horror flick. 38:54.78 mikebledsoe I Think they're addicted to the I mean it's all dopamine. Yeah yeah, it's the same people who like horror flicks I could care less about horror flick. 39:08.96 Max Shank By the way have you ever seen a horror movie that was rated pg 13 and really fucking scary have you ever seen something like that. Okay, so have I and it makes me wonder what's so goddamn offensive about a pair of titties I mean if I see. 39:15.47 mikebledsoe I have. 39:27.71 Max Shank Okay, so titties are rated R but I can watch a fucking demon rip some like young child in half and then like eat their ah like guts on screen on screen and and I can't see ah an Aryola I mean are this is like. 39:33.24 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, well totally. 39:46.75 mikebledsoe Dude dude dude. So ah I'm I'm I'm at my this is like five or six years ago I'm at my ex wife's parents house and the ah. 39:47.54 Max Shank Whose idea is this? What's more damaging. 40:03.21 mikebledsoe You know it's a holiday and they're watching movies you know Tv's on all day and then he's a baptist preacher and so anything that involves sex at all is just a big. No. No, we're watching this horror flick and people are just getting murdered left and right it's like the most violent thing ever. And then there's this sex scene that comes on just for a minute he changes the channel and he's like why do they gotta put that in there and I'm sitting there yeah ah I'm sitting there I'm going I like my my brain was just melting in that. 40:29.62 Max Shank No way. 40:42.69 mikebledsoe Spot I I couldn't even say anything I just remember looking at my ex mean like what? what's happening like this was okay. So so the the demonstration the demonstration of destruction. 40:42.97 Max Shank Wow. 40:51.17 Max Shank That is that is like a caricature. That's so funny to me. That's what we're talking about. 41:01.25 mikebledsoe And death and murder and violence totally fine, but the act of love is is the thing we want to avoid that's ah it's very interesting. 41:14.31 Max Shank Ah, yeah, that's that's really weird. But I mean that is pretty much on brand for for religion to be okay with ah killing a lot of folks but not necessarily having orgies on the altar. 41:30.30 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 41:33.52 Max Shank In fact, the the folks who did orgies on the altar the ah the bigger religions were the first ones to to to stop them doing that right woa. Okay, so you're you're so you're I'm. 41:40.97 mikebledsoe Yeah, get a so it is back on track. 41:53.40 Max Shank Um, bringing this train back on the tracks because we were talking about how the screens are a part of your environment and it's really important to be honest with yourself about how big of an impact they are on your environment from a percentage standpoint because whatever you. 41:58.69 mikebledsoe Um. 42:11.65 Max Shank Ah, pay attention to that's essentially what your universe is like it's your perspective of what's going On. So Whether you're watching horror films or pornography or the news which is basically like fear pornography. It's like the stakes are high and we're going to terrify you. But somehow if you had never heard about this thing. It wouldn't have made a difference.. That's what's so shocking to me. 42:35.00 mikebledsoe You know what are some of the things that ah ah, some of the conscious choices you've made about your environment that help you live the the life that you really want to be living enhance the lifestyle. 42:53.00 Max Shank Oh my god I do have a television in my house and it's huge. Just like my genitals. That's how that's how you measure right? I got a giant truck I have a giant Tv I'm here at a party. 42:54.71 mikebledsoe You have a television in your house. Where's it position. 43:06.17 mikebledsoe Yeah, that's pretty much all you need. 43:12.30 Max Shank Um, no my my environment is amazing I have an environment that makes it so easy to play and to exercise my brother came over with his niece or my niece his daughter and son and there's a park. Across the street from my house and and I have every toy I have balls and frisbees and sticks and ropes and games and things like that and it's It's really just the most fun place to be ever and you don't you don't um. You don't play because it's like going to burn calories or because you're going to get some Ah I don't know some ulterior Motive. You just do it because it's fun. Like for its for its own Sake. So My my house is very much. 44:05.51 mikebledsoe There's There's no, there's no necessity necessity for progress to be made. 44:09.18 Max Shank Yeah I mean it's fun to play better at something but playing is by far the best I mean winning is great but playing is the best and once you get to that point then you'll see life a lot differently because you also won't tolerate. Encounters that are not playful and fun like the more you hold a high standard for the types of interactions you want to be in conversations can be kept playful ah activities and sport can be kept playful. It's like. Do you really want to talk with someone who's getting angry and yelling at the time. No Do you really want to play tennis with someone who is getting angry and yelling at the time on the tennis core. It's like no, you don't want to tolerate those sorts of um energies really. So My environment physically is amazing. It's practically cheating I have a pool hot tub I got the whole like spa here at home I Got an outdoor area for exercising I got all the fun Toys Tennis courts across the street. Ah, friends who live close by which is maybe even more important and then the gym is a giant playground really total unfair advantage. Great community, Great friends Once again, um. You You do stuff just because it is fun to do not because you you will get other benefits. No question but ah, just doing stuff that is intrinsically fun with people that you care about is is a huge. Unfair Advantage. So Both the physical spaces that I most occupy and the people that I engage with are very playful, lighthearted funny and I don't have to like filter myself like I can say ah like titties. If I want to and they won't get offended or change the station. So ah, the environment is very open for ah experimentation, exploration and falling or failing which is a big part of learning to I mean I could talk about this literally all day Because. Ah, that's the easiest way to provide a good ah gym environment is to create a community and a space where falling and failing is safe to do both ego wise. Ah so more like metaphorically and then also physically. 46:57.42 Max Shank Like do you have crash pads. Can you teach people How to fall can you? um you know explore your limits without having to be afraid both verbally and physically so I think um I think it's invaluable. 47:11.97 mikebledsoe Beautiful, beautiful. Um, yeah, yeah, well I'll speak about my situation and but I I moved to Austin Texas because I was looking for a new environment to live in I left intonnita is before. 47:18.98 Max Shank That's the easy way. 47:31.41 mikebledsoe Covid hit I think sometimes when I talk to people in Austin I'm like oh you're one of those people that flood California when covid hit. It's like well I left before I was looking for something new before all that mess. Um, and I I wasn't getting I wasn't getting what I needed there for some reason even though. 47:39.50 Max Shank Ah. 47:50.68 mikebledsoe Where you live is basically heaven. Um. 47:53.46 Max Shank Well, you had a lot of things that you were doing that you stopped doing there right? I mean correct me if I'm wrong but was that the time when you like switched businesses and relationships and locations pretty much all at the same time like you're like. 48:07.16 mikebledsoe All the same time. 48:11.10 Max Shank I Don't know what needs to change. So let's change all of it I get it. 48:13.18 mikebledsoe Ah, pretty much pretty much I think I think um, nothing fit anymore and I ended up traveling around I chose Austin Texas because you know I didn't think I wanted to live near a city. But then I realized how much I love all the different amenities. 48:32.16 Max Shank I am. 48:32.28 mikebledsoe And what I realized also is community is the most important thing to me if I yeah my my girlfriend and I we we were I remember we were down in Columbia ah, not this past January about a year and a half ago and you know the world was being. 48:37.73 Max Shank What. 48:51.93 mikebledsoe Was fairly chaotic. We were in lockdowns half the time when we were there. We had the January sixth thing going on up here and I'm like man this is a very disappointing time I don't know what's going to happen next. It seems like this whole situation isn't getting better. It's only getting worse. Okay, if we were gonna get stuck in one because. We're basically stuck in 1 spot for four or five days at a time multiple times while we were there so I'm like all right if we get stuck somewhere for 5 years So let's just do the the thought experiment. Yeah, the thought experiment is you can't leave five mile radius for 5 years 49:21.47 Max Shank 5 years 49:29.75 mikebledsoe Where do you live and and that really got us thinking in a whole new set of terms and the result ended up being Austin Texas because we also realized that if we're gonna be 5 years say we can't leave a five mile mile race in 5 years thing that matters the most is who we're surrounded by so we looked to south for and we looked at Austin because we we had a lot of friends moved to both and and so we ended up here in Austin and made my my ah end up buying a house and the location I bought my house is. 49:54.43 Max Shank Oh yeah, oh. 50:07.31 mikebledsoe Ah, 15 minutes from this place called Kuyja where I saw it in cold plunge two 3 4 days a week and I used to have a son and cold plunge in my house and I and I was planning on getting my own but I realized that when I go do it in community cause I train at my my house I don't. I don't really do a lot of training outside of my house I don't have like that I'm not getting my community somewhere else. Um I'm doing a little more now I'm getting back into it now that? Ah yeah, I'm getting some shit aligned. 50:29.18 Max Shank You don't really do a lot of training period right? You don't really do a lot of training at all. 50:45.30 mikebledsoe But um, the. 50:46.14 Max Shank Ah I'm I'm a fine one to talk. It's sometimes really hard to get me to do like strength exercise. 50:52.78 mikebledsoe Yeah I I probably lived heavy once a week and then I'd fuck around the rest of the time so it is it is now. 50:59.67 Max Shank That's good. It's hard when you're already really strong like I hardly am going to get that much more benefit and I know that's not a popular take for a fitness guy but but. 51:12.17 mikebledsoe Yeah, well the thing is when you got 20 years of fitness under your belt like my girlfriend's like you barely work out and how do you you got muscles and you're strong and I go I've been doing this for twenty years Twenty five years I've been lifting weights for 25 years I don't have to do a lot more. 51:23.48 Max Shank Um, yeah, yeah, maintenance on a maintenance on a skyscraper is very different than building 1 51:31.95 mikebledsoe Yes, so but I chose to to live somewhere that's driving distance. That's easy to go to this place because that's where I get my community fix. So I go hang out if I have a sun and cold plunge in my house I found that I was doing about once a week when I spend. Couple hundred bucks a month to be a member at this place I'm invested partly because I'm paying for it. But that's part of it. But also it's actually overall cheaper than having a sana and cold plunge I mean that sana I had was like $18000 and. 51:54.42 Max Shank You're invested. 51:59.40 Max Shank The people. 52:06.78 mikebledsoe Cold plunges run like 3 to $5000 yeah and I have but. 52:08.10 Max Shank Well, you can get those both a lot cheaper, but okay, yeah, that is our 18 k for a sauna that is extravagant I know what saunnas cost that's like Johnny Rockefeller sauna over here. 52:17.82 mikebledsoe Ah, ah yeah, ah and you had some bells and whistles. Um, but I go and I for the community. So like environment wise. 52:28.88 Max Shank Yeah. 52:35.44 mikebledsoe Like there's certain things I put in place that cause me to interact with people because I know myself in that I'm a very social person but unless there's a reason to see somebody I'll stay at home. Yeah I'll stay at home I'll make my own food I'll. 52:47.66 Max Shank Feels frivolous if there's no reason for it. Yeah. 52:53.33 mikebledsoe Train in my gym I'll work at the house I'll read. It'll be getting dark outside and I realize that I haven't seen anybody in three days and that that's just not good for my mental health and or my girlfriend either because she'll get caught up in the same thing. 52:55.64 Max Shank Totally. 53:01.37 Max Shank Totally and it's hard to it's hard to recognize from the first person perspective that you're that you're lacking that because you get in your head right? You're in your head you're in your head you're in your head. 53:10.54 mikebledsoe Totally totally. 53:19.17 Max Shank That's why it's so valuable to have people and activities where you get out of your head and you just are ah enjoying being with the community or in communion in communication with ah other people. It's It's really big so we have the places and the peoples basically. 53:29.59 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 53:37.90 mikebledsoe Yeah. 53:38.61 Max Shank Of environment and also the the stuff there are some. There are some things that make it way way easier. 53:45.24 mikebledsoe Yeah, or what? ah ah I put little like things in place I make little rules for myself or I'll make something like I said earlier difficult or easy and one of the things is I desire to work on my garden in the backyard. So I got a new house. And I want to have a garden. You know there's a bit of a garden already going from the previous owner. So I hired someone to mow my lawn but there they only mow the front I have to do the back and if I don't go back there and do something in the garden area at least once a week 54:05.50 Max Shank The. 54:21.67 Max Shank It'll get gnarly. 54:22.67 mikebledsoe It'll start getting gnarly. So and I'm gonna look at it every fucking day every day I walk through my living room and I'm gonna look in my backyard and go man that shit's getting gnarly so it causes me and and when I do get out there i' finished work. You know 4 5 six p m I get out there and I start gardening I love it. 54:25.24 Max Shank Um, yeah. 54:41.95 mikebledsoe Got my shirt off out in the sun feels good like it's the best way to end the day and you know if I had no if I if I ah had if I hired if I if I told the people. 54:42.84 Max Shank F. Not really optimizing your exercise though with that. 54:57.44 mikebledsoe Cutting my grass cost me twenty more dollars for them to do my backyard too. You know from a mathematical perspective. You're like wow the amount of time you'd save but it wouldn't it wouldn't cause me to go take action in the garden. So little things like that. Ah. 54:59.83 Max Shank Well worth it. 55:15.80 mikebledsoe You can you can set up for yourself make make it a little inconvenient to do to not do something. 55:21.45 Max Shank And I think the idea of making everyday things into rituals can be really healing for some people and if you're not if you're not rushing through the gardening if you're just doing it at a comfortable pace. And you're really with the task I think that can be really beneficial for you. 55:43.65 mikebledsoe That I just I um I noticed I've become way more process oriented less results oriented when I look at the what I what I love about the garden is it would never be done. You can't finish that project. 55:52.28 Max Shank Ah. 55:59.68 Max Shank Yeah I mean can you ever ah that okay, so the idea of truly ever finishing a project because as soon as you finish 1 you think of things that you would do differently or want to change. 56:12.47 mikebledsoe Totally. But if you were to build a cabinet right? or you build a dresser and then you put it in your room and it's complete project's done and a lot of people in a race to get it done or. 56:20.98 Max Shank Yeah, the project's done but you might still feel some lingering thoughts. Yeah, that's it I think the the racing. 56:31.67 mikebledsoe Brett I would love about the garden is because you know it you can't finish it. It's more about yeah I'll just be out here for an hour and I'll just do what I can do in an hour 56:35.17 Max Shank Yeah, well, it's the difference I mean maintenance like that is very different than creation of something. Especially you know a living breathing thing like your yard versus. Let's say a cabinet. Which would require some maintenance depending on how it's built certain maintenance depending on how it's built but the garden is very different because there's no,, There's no finality to it because it's always growing right. 56:56.21 mikebledsoe A. 57:07.38 mikebledsoe No. 57:12.97 Max Shank I think being ah in touch with dirt and grass and trees and water is really valuable and I don't have a specific study that I would like to cite to to prove that that is the case but I don't think it's too bold to say that ah Animals. Should touch the ground and the trees sometimes. 57:34.23 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, ah I when I go to bed night if I if I've spent time in my yard barefoot on the ground moving some shit around whatever it is if I do that between being in the dirt and then. 57:48.17 Max Shank And. 57:53.42 mikebledsoe Being present while the sun is going down my ability to go to to bed that night the mind is relaxed. The body is relaxed. You know that you can look at the studies on what happens with sunsets and hormones. Maybe you're staring at a computer screen. 57:55.11 Max Shank And. 58:12.14 mikebledsoe Or television screen when the sun goes on outside you pretty much missed this your body's missing the signal that it was time to go to bed and that's why it? yeah you got to stop working. 58:21.79 Max Shank That requires good planning. Well I think that's maybe the fourth dimension of environment I'm just riffing here. But if you I always come really prepared. 58:33.40 mikebledsoe I Thought this show was nothing but a big riff. 58:41.21 Max Shank I Don't know what I don't know what you do I don't maybe the audience can tell that difference too. But no I don't know. Ah I think time is is environmental also because time is like a container and it goes back to what we were talking about with when you turn it on. 58:50.36 mikebledsoe Move. Um, well, it's definitely a structure. So yeah, it is container. 58:59.38 Max Shank And focus. Yeah, and I know for myself. Ah, and people I've coached and known if there's ah a timer counting down things seem to happen a lot faster. And if there's not a timer counting down with an endpoint things happen. However, slow or fast they go. There's just no telling what's gonna happen. But if you set out if you set the stage right? and you say this half hour in this space so this environment of space this environment of time I'm going to do x and then you promise yourself that you're going to stop when the timer is done that is a really good way to. Balance that on off switch so you can really be on instead of just being like half on all the time I have a tendency to always be thinking about this kind of stuff that you and I are discussing on Mondays. How to do a better job coaching people. Ah, mentally physically how to do a better job creating books and videos for people how to make the gym run more smoothly. all all that stuff so it's good to just have a notebook close by if you think of something naturally, but. There's also a big advantage to having these time containers I'm going to sit down here. I'm not going to do anything except this one task and when the timer's up I'm done and of course you got to be flexible with that. But I think. 01:00:46.93 mikebledsoe That's um, that's pretty much what I use for work is I use a software called Mardut method and it's got a program my entire business into it and some tasks. 01:00:47.38 Max Shank That That's a really valuable way to hack the environment. 01:00:58.26 Max Shank Here. 01:01:02.28 mikebledsoe Related to projects. Some are one off tasks and there are other things called chores chores are the ones that repeat on a certain frequency and the frequency is completely customizable but I end up like I knew that when I logged into my to work today that I had 12 tasks to complete. Some of those tasks take a minute or 2 some them some of them will take 2 to 3 hours um well a couple of them will take 2 to 3 hours um and Mondays ah along like Mondays and Tuesdays are long and then the the rest of the week kind of dwindles down and you know fucking off. But. 01:01:24.10 Max Shank It's pretty cool. 01:01:39.91 mikebledsoe The ah but I I hit the play button on the task and all the other tasks disappear and a timer starts on that task and so it it over time. It starts predicting how much. 01:01:40.54 Max Shank Sounds optimized for productivity folks. 01:01:50.29 Max Shank On that task. Cool. 01:01:58.99 mikebledsoe How much work you have ahead of you that day. So I logged in this morning goes you have 7.1 hours of work ahead of you today. It's like oh interesting by Friday it'll say like you know an hour and a half or half an hour but the ah just want to give people. 01:02:13.70 Max Shank If my to do list good god if my if my to do list said you're going to work for 7 hours today I think I would just shoot myself. 01:02:16.42 mikebledsoe Um, ah give people a realistic view of how much I work I don't want to think I work myself to death. 01:02:28.56 mikebledsoe It's a long day what you know it's funny is I was I was working I was working like four or five hours a day five days a week and I and I ended up stacking my schedule I actually enjoy just spending two days plowing 01:02:30.89 Max Shank Ah, not actually that's a little too morbid. Yeah. 01:02:44.77 Max Shank Oh yeah. 01:02:46.30 mikebledsoe And then the third day kind of a midday thing and then Thursday Fridays chill but but hitting that play button and knowing that I'm being timed on the task keeps me on task because I I want an accurate recording of what's happening because. 01:02:54.14 Max Shank Um, Ah, yeah. Ice and ah. 01:03:03.87 mikebledsoe But the more accurate it becomes the ah the quicker you know things happen in my business. It is more honest, yeah in a while. 01:03:09.36 Max Shank It's more honest, It's more honest too I started doing timestamps even in my notebook just writing I just put the the time in brackets of when I when I stopped writing and when I started writing and. 01:03:23.64 mikebledsoe Wow I Only do the date I Only have the date I write my notes in order of when they came to the ideas came to me too. 01:03:26.78 Max Shank Ah, because I'll what's that yeah I like to look at how long I was. That's a smart organizational tool. And then what I'll do after is I'll be like okay, stop at Eleven Thirty nine but then I'll maybe jot like a few bullets of what I want to continue writing about for next time. So I can come back? um. 01:03:53.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, nice. 01:04:00.46 Max Shank I Think that's I think that's pretty good I think we covered a lot of important stuff. We didn't really riff too much on the specific differences between cultures and climates. But I think ah is pretty straightforward how that was fun. 01:04:09.58 mikebledsoe Now we didn't get into I think people get it I think we used a couple examples and yeah, yeah, and I think we can appreciate. That's a big benefit of traveling are you and I have both traveled all over the world and. 01:04:18.88 Max Shank Yeah. 01:04:23.38 Max Shank Big time. 01:04:27.49 mikebledsoe You get to see the value in all these different cultures and and get to see that everybody is at the core the same but also seeing all the differences and the beauty and that and. 01:04:36.56 Max Shank M. 01:04:43.37 mikebledsoe You know one place couldn't exist with the existence of the other like like the re yeah the reason the Canadians can have cheap health care is because the Americans are paying for all of it. You know and no, it's just. 01:04:47.16 Max Shank Man Absolutely and. 01:04:56.66 Max Shank Ah, there is a lot of stuff like that I think I think ultimately compassion is about perspective and compassion is sort of a superpower because the further you extend it the less resentful you become. Less ah prideful and superior and fearful you become and compassion ah is all about perspective. Can you can you understand just how different that other person may be you don't know what their environment's like you don't know what their parents were like you don't Know. What kind of stories they used to believe or currently believe and I think environment is a big part of that you know because then you can also have compassion for yourself and you can set up your environment as if you were a retarded chimp. That's what I do basically. I

The One Piece Podcast
Episode 719, “Flamin’ Hot Kaidos” (with @itsgiusiL)

The One Piece Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 164:42


On this week's episode of The One Piece Podcast we have hosts Zach, Ed & Steve for our recap of One Piece Chapter 1048! This week we have special guests Stephen Paul (translator, One Piece in Shonen Jump and Manga Plus), Dan (our podcast editor), Giusil Vincenzi (YouTuber, transcreation specialist) and Vero (OPP contributor and OPP Atlas mod) on the show for a Manga Recap for One Piece Chapter 1048, “Twenty […] The post Episode 719, “Flamin' Hot Kaidos” (with @itsgiusiL) appeared first on The One Piece Podcast.

You Can Overcome Anything! Podcast Show
You Can Overcome Anything: Ep 212 - You Can Overcome not Knowing What You Want – Laura Lavigne

You Can Overcome Anything! Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 48:52


In Today's episode of You Can Overcome Anything! Podcast Show, CesarRespino.com brings to you a special guest by the name of Laura Lavigne.Laura was born in France, has adulted in the US, and is now living in Mexico.After inventing varied careers and businesses (including doing makeup for Playboy magazine and opening a French bakery when she did not how to bake), Laura finally got brave enough to trust her Core Essences.Twenty years ago she became a Happiness Coach and has since guided thousands of people towards their true selves and happier lives.She does this using any tool that crosses her hyper-creative mind, be they books, blogging, speaking on TEDx, creating the Center for Happiness, taking people on international Happiness Retreats, and more.She now lives in Mexico where her Core Essences are everywhere, and paints hearts, while catching and sharing Life's Magic.Laura's message to you is:You have a Super Power.You have a Gift to give to the world.Your job is to get crystal clear on what the Essence of that is, and then ask Life to guide you in creating a life that lines up with it.To Connect with Laura go to:www.lauralavigne.comTo Connect with CesarRespino go to:

Come Follow Me: Mental Health Insights with Dr. David T. Morgan
Come Follow Me: Mental Health Insights: Week Twenty (5/9/22 to 5/15/22)

Come Follow Me: Mental Health Insights with Dr. David T. Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 10:04


In this episode we'll discuss the Book of Numbers, how it was basically a census or counting of the people. However, there are also several good stories of faith and obedience (or lack thereof) and the associated consequences. We'll talk about the fears of the children of Israel and how this kept them from promised blessings. We'll further discuss how lack of faith in God or understanding of His ways can lead to inaction, which then leads to greater emotional distress. There are free worksheets available for all the invitations made in the weekly podcasts. To get access to them, please sign up for my email newsletter. Not only will you get access to the free worksheets, but access to many more free strategies to help manage your mental health. Please sign up at the following link: NEWSLETTER

Haven Today
Sing A New Song, Ep. 1 - In Christ Alone

Haven Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


Twenty years ago, a modern hymn was written. And little did Keith and Kristyn Getty know that Lord would use their song, In Christ Alone, to spark a revival in modern worship.

gombapresszó
méhhalál, disznóarmageddon, kurva nem tudsz jönni

gombapresszó

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 148:40


A 176 lakosú, Magyarbóly, Kislippó, Illocska és Beremend által körbevett Lapáncsa honlapja. És amit egyáltalán nem láttam jönni, a falu Településképi Arculati Kézikönyve! Az Enter Sandman A-YEON kisasszonytól megfelelő öltözetben. A Rolling Stones magazin 1983-as fotósorozata Carrie Fisherrel. Chill Bump, a Twenty c. sláger előadója. Bitch you can't come. Gecy ronda zsütik. Adászene: Pátkai Rozina ........................... Ha szeretnél támogatni minket, a Patreon oldalunkon megteheted. A gombapresszó Twitter csatornája. Az élő adások helyszine, az MR4 csatorna. Az adászenéket tartalmazó Spotify lista.

ADAPT 2030 | Mini Ice Age Conversations
(MIAC #358) Twenty Percent of the World's Population Know What Is Happening

ADAPT 2030 | Mini Ice Age Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 31:12


How will the global populace react when the food shortages begin Oct 2022 and how will governments react to that in order to retain power ?  Visiting my Sponsors: ADAPT 2030 (PATREON) My Patriot Supply Emergency Food Kit Hemplucid True Leaf Market Heirloom and Organic Seeds ADAPT 2030 AMAZON SHOP

ESV: Straight through the Bible
May 8: 1 Chronicles 22–24

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 10:32


1 Chronicles 22–24 1 Chronicles 22–24 (Listen) 22 Then David said, “Here shall be the house of the LORD God and here the altar of burnt offering for Israel.” David Prepares for Temple Building 2 David commanded to gather together the resident aliens who were in the land of Israel, and he set stonecutters to prepare dressed stones for building the house of God. 3 David also provided great quantities of iron for nails for the doors of the gates and for clamps, as well as bronze in quantities beyond weighing, 4 and cedar timbers without number, for the Sidonians and Tyrians brought great quantities of cedar to David. 5 For David said, “Solomon my son is young and inexperienced, and the house that is to be built for the LORD must be exceedingly magnificent, of fame and glory throughout all lands. I will therefore make preparation for it.” So David provided materials in great quantity before his death. Solomon Charged to Build the Temple 6 Then he called for Solomon his son and charged him to build a house for the LORD, the God of Israel. 7 David said to Solomon, “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house to the name of the LORD my God. 8 But the word of the LORD came to me, saying, ‘You have shed much blood and have waged great wars. You shall not build a house to my name, because you have shed so much blood before me on the earth. 9 Behold, a son shall be born to you who shall be a man of rest. I will give him rest from all his surrounding enemies. For his name shall be Solomon, and I will give peace and quiet to Israel in his days. 10 He shall build a house for my name. He shall be my son, and I will be his father, and I will establish his royal throne in Israel forever.' 11 “Now, my son, the LORD be with you, so that you may succeed in building the house of the LORD your God, as he has spoken concerning you. 12 Only, may the LORD grant you discretion and understanding, that when he gives you charge over Israel you may keep the law of the LORD your God. 13 Then you will prosper if you are careful to observe the statutes and the rules that the LORD commanded Moses for Israel. Be strong and courageous. Fear not; do not be dismayed. 14 With great pains I have provided for the house of the LORD 100,000 talents1 of gold, a million talents of silver, and bronze and iron beyond weighing, for there is so much of it; timber and stone, too, I have provided. To these you must add. 15 You have an abundance of workmen: stonecutters, masons, carpenters, and all kinds of craftsmen without number, skilled in working 16 gold, silver, bronze, and iron. Arise and work! The LORD be with you!” 17 David also commanded all the leaders of Israel to help Solomon his son, saying, 18 “Is not the LORD your God with you? And has he not given you peace2 on every side? For he has delivered the inhabitants of the land into my hand, and the land is subdued before the LORD and his people. 19 Now set your mind and heart to seek t