Podcasts about jobs act

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Best podcasts about jobs act

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Latest podcast episodes about jobs act

The Deduction
The Woes of Temporary Tax Policy

The Deduction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 20:34


From the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in 2017 to the Inflation Reduction Act signed into law just this summer, lawmakers across the political spectrum are often tempted to implement temporary tax reforms.But is this how tax policy should be done?Garrett Watson joins Jesse to discuss the pros and cons of writing tax laws that have an end date and why we find ourselves having a debate at the end of each year about so many temporary provisions.Links:https://taxfoundation.org/making-the-tax-cuts-and-jobs-act-individual-income-tax-provisions-permanent/https://taxfoundation.org/economic-growth-opportunity-tax-reforms/https://taxfoundation.org/temporary-tax-policies-in-budget-reconciliation/https://taxfoundation.org/cbo-report-us-gdp-budget-deficit/https://taxfoundation.org/tax-extenders-expiring-tax-provisions-2021/Support the show

Bold Dominion
71 - How is Virginia leading the push for broadband expansion?

Bold Dominion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 33:32


Episode Notes You're listening to this show thanks to high speed internet. And as awesome as this podcast may be, there's a whole lot more that makes high speed internet indispensable for modern life. During the pandemic, school, work, health, and social life all moved online. Access to the internet was, and still is, a must. That made life awfully challenging for families where high-speed internet was not available. Some good news on this podcast, for once! The 2021 Infrastructure, Investment and Jobs Act allotted $65 billion dollars to expand internet access across the country. That's through a program called Broadband Equity Access and Deployment, or BEAD. In this nationwide push, Virginia has emerged as a leader. Our commonwealth was prioritizing broadband access way before BEAD. As governor, Ralph Northam set a goal to get all Virginia communities online by 2024, and that has been continued by Glenn Youngkin. As other states receive BEAD funding, experts are advising to follow Virginia's footsteps. To help us understand what Virginia's doing right, we talk with Christopher Ali, Professor of Telecommunications at Penn State University, and Dr. Tamarah Holmes, Director of Broadband at the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development. Find out more on our prior episode on broadband expansion.

Invest:Insights by Capital Analytics
Finding solutions to the city's most pressing issues

Invest:Insights by Capital Analytics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 6:55


Apr 26, 2022 Public officials are consistently working to find innovative solutions to complex issues. Invest:Insights sat down with Jim Gilvin, mayor of the City of Alpharetta, to discuss how he creatively approaches his community's more divisive issues and what it takes to try and find solutions that can appease the majority. He also spoke on the ways in which his city is addressing local infrastructure needs while considering the recent passing of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Federalist Society's Teleforum: “Digital Discrimination” Under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


The 2021 Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act requires the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Justice to “ensure that Federal policies promote equal access to robust broadband internet access service by prohibiting deployment discrimination.” Listen to this discussion on the FCC’s ongoing efforts to effectuate this portion of the statute and how policymakers can […]

Teleforum
"Digital Discrimination" Under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 51:39


The 2021 Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act requires the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Justice to "ensure that Federal policies promote equal access to robust broadband internet access service by prohibiting deployment discrimination."Listen to this discussion on the FCC's ongoing efforts to effectuate this portion of the statute and how policymakers can best achieve the goal of equitable broadband deployment. The discussion considered what discrimination means in this context, whether broadband providers engage in it, and what regulatory actions would best ensure Americans have access to the broadband they need.Featuring:- Diana Eisner, Vice President, Policy & Advocacy, USTelecom- Jenna Leventoff, Senior Policy Counsel, Public Knowledge- Crystal Tully, Deputy Staff Director, United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science & Transportation- Sanford Williams, Special Advisor to Chairwoman Rosenworcel and Deputy Managing Director, The Office of the Managing Director, Federal Communications Commission- Moderator: Joe Kane, Director of Broadband and Spectrum Policy, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Steve Snyder (UA Local 157) / Anna Fendley (United Steel Workers)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 54:40


United Association Local 157 Plumbers and Pipefitters Field Representative Steve Snyder  joined the America's Work Force Union Podcast and discussed the wave of retirements within  the building trades since the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and the role of apprentice recruitment can play to replace retired members.      Anna Fendley, Director of Regulatory and State Policy for the United Steelworkers (USW),  appeared on the AWF Union Podcast and explained how the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductor (CHIPS) for America Act doubled down on investment in the nation's manufacturing sector and what it will mean for union labor. She also talked about the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and the Inflation Reduction Act, which will strengthen American unions.

The Daily Scoop Podcast
Biden Administration's approach to cyber; New mental health program for vets

The Daily Scoop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 26:21


The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency has a new order for federal agencies to patch their systems. At DefenseTalks, CISA Chief Information Officer Robert Costello tells FedScoop and DefenseScoop's Billy Mitchell how his defense background informs his work at CISA. The Department of Veterans Affairs has a new learning program for vets and their families. Mike Nolan, senior manager of the military recruiting program at Salesforce, discusses the partnership with VA and the new mental health module Salesforce is launching on the platform. This interview is underwritten by Salesforce. The Biden Administration is promoting $1 billion available to state, local and tribal governments for cybersecurity through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. Also at DefenseTalks, Deputy National Security Advisor for Cyber & Emerging Technology Anne Neuberger details the White House's approach to cybersecurity. The Daily Scoop Podcast is available every weekday afternoon. If you want to hear more of the latest from Washington, subscribe to The Daily Scoop Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher. And if you like what you hear, please let us know in the comments.

Voice of the People: Radio By and For the 99%
Greater Northwest Passenger Rail Summit - 9/17/2022

Voice of the People: Radio By and For the 99%

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 120:00


This week we cover the Greater Northwest Passenger Rail Summit held in Billings, Montana on August 22 and 23, 2022. Excerpts from the Summit include: how the recently passed infrastructure bill (Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act) opens the door to expand passenger rail service, the importance of geographic, class and racial equity, a personal look at the needs of native peoples, possible stakeholders in Montana and Idaho, the environmental benefits of rail service, and a discussion on how the host freight railroads can be a help or hindrance to this effort. Soundman Jim and Friend of the Show Richard Bishop attended and contributed to the show. See if you can pick out Jim's stakeholder comment. For more information go to the Big Sky Passenger Rail Authority website at https://www.bigskyrail.org/

The Civil Engineering Academy Podcast
CEA - The ASCE Director of Technical Advancement - Lindsay O'Leary

The Civil Engineering Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 36:29


Have you ever wondered what goes behind the scenes of everything ASCE does? The institutes? The events? The codes and standards? Today's guest has the answer. Lindsay O'Leary is a licensed civil engineer who found her passion in the nonprofit arena and now supports civil engineers and the advancement of the profession working at ASCE. Tune in to Learn: A career path Lindsay took that most civil engineers are not aware of Lessons from working in the civil engineering consulting sector for 10+ years 3 career-changing benefits of actively participating in professional organizations What engineers need to make good managers — and it has nothing to do with them 4 effective tips for young engineers just getting started in their careers How ASCE advocates for decision-making in the government regarding infrastructure The ASCE process to develop the codes and standards civil engineers use daily Our Partners: Built Bar - https://civilengineeringacademy.com/built [civac for 10 percent off] Audible - https://civilengineeringacademy.com/audible Resources Mentioned: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) - https://asce.org Infrastructure Report Card - https://infrastructurereportcard.org Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) - https://asce.org/sei Environmental Water Resources Institute - https://asce.org/ewri ASCE 7 - https://www.asce.org/publications-and-news/asce-7 The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act - https://transportation.house.gov/committee-activity/issue/infrastructure-investment-and-jobs-act American National Standards Institute (ANSI) - https://www.ansi.org University of Central Florida - https://www.ucf.edu Connect With Lindsay: Email - loleary@asce.org LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/lindsayoleary/ Twitter (@LindsayAnneO) - https://twitter.com/LindsayAnneO CEA Resources: Website - https://civilengineeringacademy.com The Ultimate Civil FE Review Course - https://civilfereviewcourse.com The Ultimate Civil PE Review Course - https://civilpereviewcourse.com FE and PE Practice Exams - https://civilengineeringacademy.com/exams Free Facebook Community - https://ceacommunity.com YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPeFLBZ2gk0uO5M9uE2zj0Q Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/theceacademy Twitter - https://twitter.com/civilengacad Reach out to Isaac - isaac@civilengineeringacademy.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/civilengineeringacademy/message

Net Assessment
Galvanizing America's Defense Industrial Policy

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 54:19


This week, Chris, Zack, and Melanie talk about a new report, “Rebuild: Toolkit for a New American Industrial Policy,” from the Center for a New American Security. The United States government has a number of ways to intervene in the economy to advance the national interest. The use of tariffs and the Defense Production Act by the last two administrations, as well as passage of the Infrastructure and Jobs Act, CHIPS and Science Act, and Inflation Reduction Act, are measures that some argue will help the United States compete more aggressively with China. Should the United States have an industrial policy? What objectives should an industrial policy serve, and how is that determined? How would such a policy be implemented? Zack gives a shoutout to the Institute for the Study of War for helping us better understand the war in Ukraine, Chris praises Cornell University Press executive editor Roger Haydon on his retirement, and Melanie suggests a good read on how the United States and Taiwan can best prepare the island for a Chinese invasion. This episode's reading: https://warontherocks.com/2022/09/galvanizing-americas-defense-industrial-policy

RETIREMENT MADE EASY
The Basics of Charitable Giving + College Savings Plans, Ep #115

RETIREMENT MADE EASY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 22:48


Do you have a plan for charitable giving in retirement? What about saving for a grandchild's college education? Retirement planning goes far deeper than covering your basic bills in retirement—it's about all of the goals you have. In this episode of the Retirement Made Easy podcast, I'll cover two things I'm often asked about: charitable giving and college savings plans. Check it out! You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... [3:21] Check out the resources at RetirementMadeEasyPodcast.com! [5:28] The basics of college savings plans (529 plans) [8:42] The alternative options to a 529 plan [11:16] How to determine your goals for retirement [12:32] The basics of charitable giving in retirement [16:22] Learn about donor-advised funds [18:32] How to properly name your beneficiaries The basics of college savings plans (529 plans) Are you familiar with 529 plans? I have clients with young grandkids who have set a goal to help pay for their college education. 529 plans are the most popular way to save money. Depending on the state you live in, there may even be a state income tax deduction on your contributions. In Missouri, the maximum deduction is up to $16,000 for a couple married filing jointly. Someone filing singly can contribute up to $8,000 in a 529 plan per year.  The real beauty of a 529 plan is that the money grows tax-free as long as it's used for qualified education expenses. Plus, you get to determine how and when the money is distributed for education expenses (K-12, trade school, or bachelor's program). Qualified expenses can include books, tuition, and even laptops. What happens if the money isn't used for college? What are the alternatives to a 529 plan? Listen to hear the different options.  Charitable giving in retirement Once you turn 72, you have to take a required minimum distribution (RMD) from your retirement savings. As you get older, you have to take a little bit more. For example, when you're 80, you have to take 4.95% of your IRA or 401k balance. So if you have $1 million in your IRA, you'll have to take an annual RMD of $49,500 and pay income taxes on that amount.  But you can take part of or all of an RMD and send it directly to a church or charity that you're passionate about—and you won't be taxed on that money. If you wanted to contribute the entire $49,500, you can do a qualified charitable distribution. On your tax return, you report the distribution and you will not be taxed on it. Neither will the church or charity.  Learn about donor-advised funds Donor-advised funds are becoming popular because of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, where the standard deduction increased to $29,500. If you want to give sizable charitable contributions, you can take that money and place it in a fund. You can itemize that as a charitable gift in that year.  The money sits in the fund and you get to determine how and when the money is distributed—but it must be given to a 501C3. You can also invest the money in the fund in mutual funds, ETFs, stocks, etc., and watch it grow tax-free.  How do you properly make a church or charity the beneficiary of an account? Listen to find out! Resources & People Mentioned 3 Steps to Retirement Planning UGMA and UTMA accounts Coverdell Education Savings Accounts 529 College Savings Plans Connect With Gregg Gonzalez Email at: Gregg@RetireSTL.com  Podcast: https://RetirementMadeEasyPodcast.com Website: https://StLouisFinancialAdvisor.com Follow Gregg on LinkedIn Follow Gregg on Facebook Follow Gregg on YouTube Subscribe to Retirement Made EasyOn Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

Urban Forum Northwest
Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland

Urban Forum Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 54:15


Today, Thursday, September 15 on Urban Forum Northwest- *Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland (D) WA-10 comments on the possible impact of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and the positive potential impact this legislation on her district and the country. *Wendell Stemley, President, National Association of Minority Contractors (NAMC) provides an update on the status of the national organization that he leads. He will also comment on the possible impact of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on his membership. *Bob Armstead, President, Washington State Chapter-NAMC comments on the possibilities for his membership with the passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. His concern is enforcement and legitimate opportunities for his members. *Yolanda Brooks, Community Engagement Specialist, Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) 2022 Regional Contracting Forum Wednesday, September 21 8:00 am-4:00 pm (PDT) at the Muckleshoot Casino and Event Center. *Dr. Rayburn Lewis, Board Chair, Central District Community Preservation and Development Authority (CDCPDA) comments on the organizations upcoming election. *Reggie Johnson, Tacoma State Farm Agent comments on his community work with the Elizabeth Wesley Foundation an organization that raises private funds to assist Black Students in the Tacoma/Pierce County area. Urban Forum Northwest streams live at www.1150kknw.com. Visit us at www.urbanforumnw.com for archived programs and relevant information. Like us on facebook. Twitter@Eddie_Rye.

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW
Urban Forum NW 09 - 15 - 22

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 54:22


Today, Thursday, September 15 on Urban Forum Northwest- *Congresswoman Marilyn Strickland (D) WA-10 comments on the possible impact of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and the positive potential impact this legislation on her district and the country. *Wendell Stemley, President, National Association of Minority Contractors (NAMC) provides an update on the status of the national organization that he leads. He will also comment on the possible impact of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on his membership. *Bob Armstead, President, Washington State Chapter-NAMC comments on the possibilities for his membership with the passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. His concern is enforcement and legitimate opportunities for his members. *Yolanda Brooks, Community Engagement Specialist, Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) 2022 Regional Contracting Forum Wednesday, September 21 8:00 am-4:00 pm (PDT) at the Muckleshoot Casino and Event Center. *Dr. Rayburn Lewis, Board Chair, Central District Community Preservation and Development Authority (CDCPDA) comments on the organizations upcoming election. *Reggie Johnson, Tacoma State Farm Agent comments on his community work with the Elizabeth Wesley Foundation an organization that raises private funds to assist Black Students in the Tacoma/Pierce County area. Urban Forum Northwest streams live at www.1150kknw.com. Visit us at www.urbanforumnw.com for archived programs and relevant information. Like us on facebook. Twitter@Eddie_Rye.

ADAPT
ADAPT- Focus - Il Jobs act e l'ultimo commento di Enrico Letta, Segretario Pd. Il parere di Francesco Nespoli - Puntata del 14/09/2022

ADAPT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 6:01


America's Work Force Union Podcast
Jac Weitzel and Emily Pritzkow (Wisconsin Building Trades Council) / Thomas Modica (IBEW 807)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 54:40


Wisconsin Building Trades Council Executive Director Emily Pritzkow and South Central Wisconsin Building Trades Council Executive Director Jac Weitzel joined the America's Work Force Union Podcast and discussed union diversity and what it means for the two women to hold leadership positions within the building trades. They also talked about the work opportunities the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is delivering to Wisconsin and the need to grow apprenticeship programs to meet the demand for workers.      The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 807 Local Chairman Thomas Modica appeared on the AWF Union Podcast and spoke about a tentative Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) reached between the Local and the railroads. 

Fastest 5 Minutes, The Podcast Government Contractors Can't Do Without
Fastest 5 Minutes Special Edition: Developments Related to Domestic Preferences

Fastest 5 Minutes, The Podcast Government Contractors Can't Do Without

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 11:39


This special edition of the Fastest 5 Minutes podcast covers recent developments related to domestic preferences including executive orders, final regulations, the Made in America Office, and the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and is hosted by Peter Eyre, Addie Cliffe, and Allison Skager. Crowell & Moring's "Fastest 5 Minutes" is a biweekly podcast that provides a brief summary of significant government contracts legal and regulatory developments that no government contracts lawyer or executive should be without.

FORward Radio program archives
Sustainability Now! | Amy Townsend-Small | Abandoned Oil + Gas Wells | Sept. 5, 2022

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 58:00


On this week's show, your host, Justin Mog, grabs his college rock hammer for an in-depth conversation with environmental scientist, Dr. Amy Townsend-Small, associate professor of environmental science in the University of Cincinnati's College of Arts and Sciences. Amy has spent years studying abandoned or idled oil and gas wells across the country. Her geology research is helping policymakers understand the scope of the problem and the implications for the environment and public health and safety. In a study of idled or abandoned wells in Texas, she found they could be leaking millions of kilograms of methane each year. This is a very timely conversation in light of the recent news that Kentucky is going to invest $25M to cap leaking oil and gas wells. The U.S. Department of the Interior awarded the funds to Kentucky as part of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. Kentucky has a disproportionate number of derelict oil and gas wells. Follow Amy at https://twitter.com/ATownsendSmall She recommends the PBS Frontline documentary Plastic Wars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dk3NOEgX7o As always, our feature is followed by your community action calendar for the week, so get your calendars out and get ready to take action for sustainability NOW! Sustainability Now! is hosted by Dr. Justin Mog and airs on Forward Radio, 106.5fm, WFMP-LP Louisville, every Monday at 6pm and repeats Tuesdays at 12am and 10am. Find us at http://forwardradio.org The music in this podcast is courtesy of the local band Appalatin and is used by permission. Explore their delightful music at http://appalatin.com

Simply Tax
Mandatory Capitalization Of R&D #148

Simply Tax

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 46:46


For tax years beginning after December 31, 2021, the legislation informally known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act eliminated the option to deduct research and development (R&D) expenditures, which include software development costs. Host Damien Martin sits down with guest Mike Boenzi, the national leader of FORVIS' R&D tax credit services, to break down the new mandatory treatment and help you prepare for the immediate and long-term potential impacts of this change. Here's what they cover: Who is Mike Boenzi? @00:53 What is IRC Sec. 174 and how did it change effective January 1, 2022? @05:00 How might this change impact taxpayers? @07:06 Are there practical tips for documentation? @15:44 What is the history of the R&D tax credit and who should consider it? @21:05 What's the significance of recent developments in IRS examinations and guidance? @34:53 What are takeaways and action items? @43:21 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Archived webinar: Preparing for the Required Capitalization of Research & Development Costs: A Practical Perspective (August 31, 2022) Articles: The R&D Tax Credit: Lowering the Cost of Innovation for Food & Agriculture Businesses (August 16, 2022) Missouri to Reinstate the Research & Development Tax Credit (June 17, 2022) Mandatory Capitalization of R&E Costs - Are you Ready? (February 22, 2022) Simply Tax: Simply Tax Talks | February 1, 2022 | A Big R&D Change (February 1, 2022) Episode 44: The R&D Tax Credit (September 26, 2018) Learn more about Sam and get additional resources here! GET MORE SIMPLY TAX We're excited to also provide video content to strengthen your tax mind! Check it out on our YouTube channel. A complete archive of our episodes is available on our website and YouTube playlist. We'd love to hear from you! Email feedback and questions to SimplyTax@FORVIS.com.  

The HyperFast Agent Podcast
Take Advantage of Cost Segregation this Year – With Erik Oliver

The HyperFast Agent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 31:30


Erik Oliver has a degree in accounting and has been working with CPAs across the country for the past seven years to help accelerate real estate investment deductions, helping to save investors money on taxes. Cost segregation is accelerated depreciation, helping real estate investors take depreciation deductions against their incomes, by segregating various costs in real estate investment – such as carpets or tile – and front loading these deductions in the early years of an investment, rather than spreading it out across a 15 or 30 year period. The government incentivizes this to help stimulate the economy and the Tax and Jobs Act of 2018 increased depreciation deductions to 100% through December 2022.    Join Erik Oliver  and Host Dan Lesniak as they discuss… ∙ What cost segregation is and how to take advantage of the deductions against your income ∙ How the Tax and Jobs Cut Act of 2018 increased depreciation deductions to 100% through December 2022 and why you should act now before the year is over.  ∙ Why you should pay for a tax strategist – and not just a tax preparer – to strategize on reducing your tax bill ∙ What cost segregation is and how to take advantage of the deductions against your income QUOTES TO SHARE

The Mark And Melynda Show
8-29-22 Hour 3 Podcast

The Mark And Melynda Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 39:18


We talked about a hidden element in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and an 18-year-old Leander man has been arrested, he will face terroristic threat charges. All that and more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

UU Church of Peoria Sermons
Clean and Equitable Jobs Act (CEJA)

UU Church of Peoria Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 15:32


Smart Talk
How will Pa. benefit from infrastructure bill?

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 13:43


Pennsylvania is in line to receive $17.8 billion dollars as part of the $110 billion dollar Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act signed into law by President Joe Biden last November. Most of that money will go toward upgrading or repairing roads and bridges, but public transportation, safe drinking water, electric vehicle charging stations and expansion of broadband also have been earmarked for funding. Since an infrastructure package was approved after years of debate, the public hasn't heard much about it. Joining us today is Mitch Landrieu, Senior Adviser to the President and Coordinator of the Infrastructure and Jobs Act and former Mayor of New Orleans.Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All In Real Estate Podcast
Episode 107 | Real Estate Investment through Home Equity with Matthew Sullivan

All In Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 51:57


Founder and CEO of QuantmRE Matthew Sullivan got his start in finance and technology long before he came to the world of real estate. Before Matthew came to the US, he started his career as a stock broker, and then he moved into corporate finance. For the last 25 years or so, he has been an entrepreneur in technology and finance. Real estate always intrigued him, and once he arrived in the US around nine years ago he immersed himself in the real estate industry. It was on the heels of the “Jumpstart Our Business Startups'' (JOBS) Act which helped pave the way for online investment platforms. This gave rise to real estate investing and crowdfunding platforms.  The amount of capital invested in these systems is in the billions of dollars. This application of Fintech (financial technology) helps homeowners gain access to their home equity for investment purposes. Ultimately, homeowners can get cash from home equity with no monthly payments, no interest, and no added debt. Investors do not require the homeowners to go into further debt, but do help them unlock their home equity to allow for investment purposes.  Matthew and his team built a platform to allow homeowners to gain access to their equity, and in turn sells fractions of these equity bundles to investors. This makes the equity in homes tradeable and investible. Homeowners gain by unlocking their equity so it can work on their behalf in investment vehicles. Even if the property goes down in value, investors can still make a profit based on the structure of the agreement, as it is an option agreement with a cushion built into it. Blockchain Technology is the Foundation and Creates Trust The platform leverages blockchain technology and delivers tokens to investors to keep track of the shares. There is a layer of trust with the blockchain because there is no ability to go beyond the actual offering. If it is at 100 tokens, that is all that is available for trading and it is recorded on the blockchain. Ultimately, investors can invest in owner-occupied housing that is not for sale, that the owners do not plan to sell. The homeowners often have a basic need to raise capital. This platform offers a way to give homeowners some of their own money that is locked in their equity. Contact Matthew by email at investors@republic.co. Visit Matthew at QuantmRE. Stop by his LinkedIn profile to learn more. Follow David at @daviddmorse on Instagram and Joe at @joe.quattrucci. Join David & Joe at Keller Williams Arizona Realty, where productive agents redefine their business. Reach out by DM, email at davidmorse@kw.com or directly at 480-767-3000.  

Unlimited Partners
Jake Hoffberg of Equifund | How a Jazz Musician Got into Publishing; Private Equity Crowdfunding in the Digital Age

Unlimited Partners

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 54:10


Today's Unlimited Partner is Jake Hoffberg the Publisher for Equifund, which helps "retail investors diversify their portfolio, increase passive income, and grow their net worth using private market investments. Companies can use Equifund's technology to raise money under multiple US exemptions: Reg D, Reg A+, Reg CF and Reg S." After learning that The Jobs Act of 2012 would ease methods of capital raising, Jake dove in headfirst and learned the ins and outs of the new laws. He saw first hand how to navigate, what to do, what not to do. Eventually he joined Equifund where he has become the Publisher, helping to provide private funding rounds for investors into vehicles they also take part in. This better aligns the interests of all parties involved. Equifund also helps prepare companies to go public, helping them get used to the new reporting they will be required to submit. Topics include: Attending Indiana University as a jazz musician and figuring out he wanted a different experience Learning about promotions and events while at college Getting into publishing and selling in the world of children's books Investing in his self by buying copyrighting courses Getting hired at Agora Equifund (started by Jordan Gillissie) and how crowdfunding became legal due to The Jobs Act of 2012 Lowe v. SEC, 472 U.S. 181 (1985) and here's the link for the SCOTUS audio which I love to listen to sometimes Trying to protect investors by vetting incoming deals, avoiding snake oil salesmen Helping companies go public the right way Company curation in a crowdfunding world, having skin in the game Jake's song is Yoko Kanno (Cowboy Bebop) - Got To Knock a Little Harder Sponsors: Tegus Research My Marketplace Builder Links: Thomas McGannon LinkedIn Follow us on social media: Like and subscribe and all that stuff...stay in touch as we will have exciting updates and content soon... @uppodpod Twitter @uppodpod Instagram UP YouTube Channel up-pod.com Email us: show@up-pod.com,

Mapable USA
Why Reg.A is the Superior Crowdfunding Choice over Reg.D or Reg.CF

Mapable USA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 43:43


MapableUSA.com: Despite being around for years now, there's still major confusion from issuers regarding the benefits and drawbacks of Regulation A (Reg.A), Regulation CF (Reg.CF), and Regulation D (Reg.D) crowdfunding offerings. What option is right for you? in this podcast, Mike Brette, the CEO and Founder of Small Cap Equity Advisors goes over why he believes Reg.A is the superior choice in most instances, plus provides advice as to what issuers should be doing (and what they shouldn't be doing as well) in order to achieve a successful capital raise.

Our American States
Transportation and the Infrastructure Bill OAS Episode 168

Our American States

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 37:10


ResourcesInfrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Implementation, AASHTOInfrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, NCSLU.S. DOT Infrastructure and Investment Jobs Act information

Cross-border tax talks
The IRA and Book Minimum Tax: Not a Pillar Two Podcast

Cross-border tax talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 48:12


Doug McHoney (PwC's Global International Tax Services Leader) is joined by Aaron Junge in Westminster Studios. Aaron is International Tax Partner in PwC's Washington's National Tax Services and was previously Tax Counsel in the House Ways and Means Committee during the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act implementation. Doug and Aaron discuss the corporate alternative minimum tax (also called the ‘Book Minimum Tax') and other Inflation Reduction Act tax provisions, which President Biden signed into law on August 16. More specifically, they cover the BMT effective date and its scope, what are applicable corporations, changes to the aggregation rules, what is applicable financial statement income, common adjustments, calculating the AMT foreign tax credit, and what guidance we might see from Treasury.

Water Values Podcast
Public Policy in the Water Sector with Mae Stevens

Water Values Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 41:23


Mae Stevens, Chair of the Water Practice at Banner Public Affairs, delivers a terrific interview discussing some of the ins and outs of Capitol Hill, unpacking the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and providing tips to ensure the water sector gets its due from Congress. In this session, you'll learn about: Mae's background on The…

Feds At The Edge by FedInsider
Ep. 66 Digital Transformation as Infrastructure

Feds At The Edge by FedInsider

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 59:34


An argument can be made that the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021 is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to ensure the viability of the American dream for the next several generations. This is an interview with a group of federal and state leaders who are serious about using the money effectively to optimize this long-term investment. The discussion begins with an observation that COVID forced rural communities to realize that their children couldn't attend school without broadband access. Broadband access also could improve telemedicine and business. The IIJA addresses this disparity by improving broadband to rural areas. Lee Jones from the USDA identifies the Rural Partners Network as a pioneer in connecting rural communities to foster economic growth. They help with navigating federal programs and listening to the community for guidance on projects. The IIJA will, by necessity, include information technology to manage the funding effectively.  There will be rural participants who fear this concept and may not have the trust in the federal government that others have.  Shannon McCarthy from the State of Alaska understands these concerns and has incorporated ways to deal with this reluctance, including ways for citizens to be anonymous. Everything involves risk, especially multi-million-dollar federal projects. One unfortunate circumstance is when COVID increased everyone's online presence, there was a corresponding increase in cyber-attacks.  If the Rural Partners Network can help rural communities with understanding federal programs, then CISA also helps with understanding cyber risk. Free information about preventing a cyber-attack is provided by CISA. Dr. David Mussington from CISA details the free tools that are available to understand these new attacks and ways to prevent organizations from digital-born disasters.

Interplace
A Few Green Deals and More Automobiles

Interplace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 27:32


Hello Interactors,Quite a week in political news. The United States, the second biggest CO2 emitter behind China and 12th per capita, is finally making progress on climate change legislation. It’s not perfect, but it’s cause for celebration if you care about healthy air and water, the survival of life on this planet…or getting a rebate on a brand new car! Don’t get me wrong, these laws are important and necessary achievements AND they will likely fill American roads with even more cars. Yippee!As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…LET’S MAKE A DEAL“We on the Left are very good at criticizing people”, Washington Senator Pramila Jayapal once said, “but we need to build the base to pull people to the Left.” As the leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, and chief drafter of the Inflation Reduction Act, she did just that. President Biden is set to sign it into law. It’s the country’s largest climate legislation ever. Jayapal worked with a cadre of climate experts who have been waiting for this moment for decades. The law is expected to drive down inflation while dropping U.S. CO2 emissions 40% by 2030. It’s more modest than hoped, but is a HUGE first step. No surprise, not a single Republican voted for itHowever, 41 Republicans did vote to fight climate change, they just won’t admit it. The bi-partisan CHIPS and Science Act (CHIPS) was signed it into law last week. It includes a $280 billion investment in American semiconductor research and development, but nearly one quarter ($67 billion) is for zero-carbon industries and climate change research. Between last year’s Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Law, CHIPS, and the Inflation Reduction Act, the United States has made serious strides to fight climate change. It’s not enough, but it’s more than ever before achieved. By investing in clean energy and renewables they not only become increasingly affordable, but they also reduce demand for fossil fuels.Republicans also continue to vote for clean energy in their home states. Between 2010 and 2019, six of the top ten states with the largest increase in wind electricity generation were red states. Including Texas. Nearly one quarter of their energy comes from wind. This saves Texans $20 million dollars a year in energy costs. Reducing carbon, saves money. Including cars. Charging an electric vehicle (EV) today costs the equivalent of filling a gas tank with $1 per gallon gas. EVs, like traditional cars, also need safe and reliable roads.The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passed into law last November includes $110 billion in new spending for highways, roads, and bridges, compared to $39 billion on public transit. This is a HUGE investment in public transit and our roads and bridges need repaired, but the ratio of spending on roads relative to transit is roughly the same as it’s always been. Policy makers continue to believe adding more roads will ease congestion. Adding road capacity to ease traffic is like loosening your belt so you can eat more. But Americans do tend to overeat and most like their cars.One of the big drivers of the CHIPs law were automakers. There are still hurting from supply chain snafus strangling their supply of semi-conductor chips needed to make cars. Automotive News reported, since the start of 2021, 13.5 million vehicles were cut from factory schedules due to chip shortages. Nearly 4.3 million of those were to be assembled in North America. Increasingly more chips are needed in cars as they strive for advances in autonomous driving. Bosch, a German supplier of car technology, says chips account for about $200 of value in a car sold today, but by 2030 it’s expected to grow to $800 per vehicle. Carmakers need more chips, and they need onshore guarantees they can get them. Hence the CHIPS law.Electric vehicles are like giant phones on wheels. And like phone makers, automakers hope to one day make money on software subscriptions and services. Until then, the only way to make money is to sell large volumes of cars. Increased volumes drive prices down. Lower EV prices mean even more people can afford a car. Electric vehicles are also more affordable to own due to low energy rates and fewer repairs. But they’re still expensive. Norway, one of the wealthiest countries in the world, has the highest EV per capita of any country. But owners admit that is largely due to government incentives. Hence the U.S. focus on EV rebates and automaker deals found in the Inflation Reduction Act.CARS CAN BE EXHAUSTINGEVs charged with clean energy not only reduce CO2 emissions, they also reduce Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). These are gases produced when fossil fuels explode. They then float into the air and become smog and acid rain. Floating in the ambient air they can trigger or compound asthma, lung disease, heart disease, and diabetes. They not only reduce birth rates they also increase death rates.Noxious gases are only part of the air quality problem. So are particulates. Especially those measuring 10 and 2.5 micrometers or smaller. For comparison, fine beach sand is 90 micrometers in diameter, human hair is 50-80, and dust or pollen particles are about 10 (PM10). Like Nitrogen Oxides, Particulate matter at 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) or less can also come from exploding fossil fuels.PM2.5 is the number one environmental contributor to human mortality with disparities along racial-ethnic and socio-economic lines. One recent study took data from 2014 and found four out of the top six sources of PM2.5 are the same for POC, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians. Those are: industry, light-duty gasoline passenger vehicles, construction sites, and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. The only sector where Whites were disproportionately exposed to PM2.5 were coal mining and agriculture. Getting to clean energy powered EVs will reduce exposure from passenger EVs, but construction equipment and heavy-duty vehicles are destined to be diesel for decades.While the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports a national downward trend in PM2.5, exposure rates vary by region. One recent study divided the nation into 8.6 million gridded cells to get a more accurate account of the spatial distribution of PM2.5. Looking at data over the last 36 years, they found the national average has indeed gone down. However, those areas with the least PM2.5 and those with the most are unchanged since 1981. This suggests the transition to EVs will most benefit those areas where PM2.5 is already low – predominantly White sparsely populated suburbs and exurbs. Meanwhile, those areas where construction and heavy-duty diesel vehicles are most concentrated – predominantly poor, ethnically, and racially diverse urban areas will continue to be disproportionately exposed to PM2.5.But another source of PM2.5 and PM10 is non-exhaust related. It comes from dust made from car brakes, tire wear, and decomposed concrete. The heavier the vehicle, the more dust is created. Unfortunately, EVs are heavier than traditional cars due to a chassis full of weighty battery packs. However, EVs also come with optional regenerative braking. Letting off the accelerator triggers a generator that charges the battery while also slowing the car. Hitting the brakes on an EV can also engage the generator which further reduces dust accumulation. Some automakers also have ways to collect the dust as it’s generated so it doesn’t hit the pavement or fly into the air. But it’s not standard and some drivers choose to turn off regenerative braking because they don’t like how it ‘feels. But when used, it can help reduce particulate matter.One study out of the UK shows that for urban driving, with the right amount of regenerative braking, EVs can reduce PM10 by ~26%. But on the freeway, they found “no level of regenerative braking can mitigate against the increase in PM10 due to increased vehicle weight.” Some of that increase in PM10 comes from increased tire dust from heavy passenger EVs. Vehicle weight would have to drop 22% for PM10 improvements like those found in urban environments. And while a reduction of ~27% was estimated for PM2.5 across all road types, those figures assume 90% of braking comes from regenerative brakes.For the sake of argument, let’s assume EVs are cleaner and healthier. And through the magic of innovation, competition, and incentives more people can afford a car than ever before. Let’s also optimistically assume income disparities will lessen worldwide, more people will rise out of poverty, move to the city, and one day even own a car (many associate higher social status with car ownership). In addition, urban populations are growing exponentially – a trend expected to continue until 2050. The promise of an EV future – as aided by the passing of three new U.S. laws – will then result in increasingly more cars on the road. If you like sitting in traffic, you’re going to love the EV future. If you survive.The United Nations reported last month nearly 1.3 million people a year die in road traffic crashes. It’s the leading cause of death among children and young adults. While interior car safety technologies reduce motorist deaths over time, they do nothing for pedestrians, cyclists, or motorcyclists. And the poorer you are the greater the chance of death. And probably worse than we know. Little data is collected in the poorest countries, and many don’t bother reporting them anyway.While these three relatively green U.S. laws will indeed reduce CO2 emissions, they will also increase car related injuries and deaths. Worse yet, investments in an EV future only strengthens car dependency locking in perpetually more traffic, traffic related fatalities, and continued poor air and water quality. It’s a system of car dependency embedded in our culture, technology, and governments.AUTOS MAKE THE WORLD GO ‘ROUNDHere's how this self-sustaining systems works. Car companies need a ton of capital to make the steel, plastics, and chips comprising a car. To offset these costs, they must sell large volumes of cars. When the economy is growing, they sell more cars because car dependent societies require more vehicles to meet the demands of economic growth. When there is a downturn, there always is, carmakers suffer because they can no longer cover the cost of production. So, what do car companies do when they’re in financial trouble? They ask their governments to bail them out and/or provide incentives to spur more people to buy more cars. Both the CHIPS act and the Inflation Reduction Act do this. And remember when Obama saved GM from bankruptcy after the 2008 financial crisis?Democrats and Republicans both routinely save the auto industry. Why? There are many factors, but here are two. Democrats want to support union jobs that feed factory labor and Republicans want to perpetuate the rugged-individualist mystique and lifestyle that comes with private car ownership. Car addicts on both sides of the aisle believe there are two kinds of people: those who own cars and those who wish they could. Both parties also insist on a mythical infinite economic growth curve despite being limited by the natural resources and ecosystems to achieve it.Once there are cars, roads are needed. Roads are presented as an economically easy and obvious answer to transportation efficiency. The only requirement is they be mostly free of cars. Roads with no cars is a waste of money, but roads full of cars is a waste of time. Time is money, so society accepts efforts made to ease congestion. Part of that acceptance is to prioritize the use of public roads for the movement of cars. As roads fill up, society demands more of them, and governments and road construction companies happily oblige; more union jobs for the Democrats and more space allocated to the rugged Republican individualist. Private vehicle ownership lifestyles propped up by union jobs and taxpayer dollars.But public road space is constrained by private property. The only apparent way to make room for more cars is to take space away from others. For example, pedestrians and cyclists. Politicians, policy makers, and civil engineers (all steeped in, educated by, and benefactors of car culture) characterize this social demotion as ‘pedestrian safety’. The more cars there are on the road, and the more space they demand, the more ‘safety measures’ are put in place for pedestrians. i.e. more crosswalk paint for peds and bike lane paint for bikes. These are smart people, but an eight-year-old can tell you paint is not only a weak safety measure, it’s unjust. This paternalistic pandering signals to poor little pedalers and pedestrians that the best way to keep them safe is to relegate them to the gutter. ‘Pedalers’, ‘peddlers’, and ‘pedestrians’ – what unpleasant peasantry. Evidently, these well-intentioned people missed that day in kindergarten when most of us learned ‘sharing is caring’. To show they care, cities sometimes provide park benches at select corners and sidewalks so one can marvel at the safe roads made for those marvelous machines while breathing deathly fumes and particulate matter in dreary anticipation of witnessing a car accident. An endless stream of drivers solemnly staring through the glass of a windshield – or their phone.It's enough to scare you into taking the bus. Good idea. Where do I catch one? Good question. How long do I have to wait? Who knows? Are they clean? Sometimes. Are they safe? Mostly. How about we just take a car? Ok. This is precisely the line of reasoning car culture conspirators have engineered. Because public dollars are transparently spent on enabling mass transit (which some argue should be a public utility…like providing safe, reliable, and clean water), it’s easy for public officials and the ‘road gang’ to point out just how expensive it is to operate. Less evident, intentionally hidden, and ridiculously complex is the public finance calculus behind the myriad of finance schemes, tax havens, kickbacks, rebates, incentives, and old-fashioned back-room dealings between hundreds of members of the ‘road gang’ and every level of government. All messaged and sold to society as an economically rational ‘public good.’ Private vehicle, good. Public transit, bad. Got it?And when economic times turn bad, the interconnected and interdependent ‘road gang’ schemes for more financial complexity which ultimately includes more money from a government who is incented to keep them afloat. More jobs lead to more consumer spending which increases GDP which leads to more votes. But where in the budget does one find more money? The ‘road gang’ has ideas. How about pulling from an obvious expenditure they’ve already convinced the public is a bad investment by underfunding it – public transit. Especially if that money can be spent to create jobs in the auto and road construction industry. There’s a reason the infrastructure legislation is called the ‘Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.’ Yes, this law increased spending on transit, but it also boosted spending for the ‘road gang’. The rich get richer – more tax dollars funding more cars and more roads – and the poor stay poor – busses stuck in traffic, bus stops inconveniently placed, timetables unpredictable, busses uncomfortable, and sometimes unsafe. It not only locks in car culture, but it also locks in where people live.Land use policies are also intent on perpetuating car dependency. Real estate companies seek land to be converted into car-oriented neighborhoods, city planners and lawmakers arrange for plenty of parking, and gas stations are strategically plopped in prized plots. TV shows, movies, books, cartoons, brochures, and advertising promote images of bucolic suburban lifestyles coupled with messages of wealth and status. The more land is developed this way, the more attractive it becomes to own a car. Sprawling and sparsely populated areas make mass transit inefficient, and cash strapped transit agencies are forced to cut service to better serve the needs of the urban carless. This makes car ownership in these areas not only a luxury, but the only viable option. That is, if you’re able to buy, own, or drive one in the first place. Those unable or willing to own a car are relegated to lower social status with little to no alternatives. Peasantry. Just as intended.I’m sure nobody in the Progressive Caucus set out to intentionally perpetuate car culture when crafting this recent legislation, it’s just how our society has evolved. These new laws are intended to create local jobs, lower costs of living, and cut CO2 emissions. They’re not intended to dislodge a hegemonic, human slaughtering, car cabal. In fact, these laws are feeding the car beast with trendy green technology. These laws are also not intended to significantly alter how public land and road space is allocated. In fact, twelve new highways are already slated to be built.And while transportation equity advocates were finally at the bargaining table with progressive Democrats, these laws are not intended to shift our urban areas toward equitable public space for all. Yes, the air in cities will be cleaner, but they won’t be free of harmful particulates. And the streets will most assuredly become more congested and dangerous. It seems we are sacrificing fewer lives to air pollution, more lives to traffic fatalities, so that ultimately all life on this planet has a future. It can be hard to see human sacrifice as progress, but I suspect members of the Progressive Caucus are intent on reversing this. The language in the Inflation Reduction Act begins to expose the inequities and unfairness stemming from decades of dominant car-oriented economic, societal, governmental, and physical systems. It could be the ‘road gang’ is in their sites and they’re using the widespread electrification transition as a gateway to a new possible future.Perhaps, if given a chance in the next six years, they not only can continue transitioning to green energy, but also regreening cities. This will require the reversal of inequitable, dangerous, and unhealthy car-dependent patterns of public and private land use. The sure-fire way to slow cars in urban areas is to skinny the streets. This frees space for protected bike lanes and wider sidewalks, so wheels and feet of all sizes feel safe sharing public roadways. The more people are pulled from their cars, the more space is created for those who must drive.Damaged ecosystems must also be reestablished, and urban landscapes and neighborhoods must be reconnected with paths that connect people with each other and their regreened city. Every human life is best lived when connected to nature, but car culture, EV or otherwise, not only isolates people from each other but from their natural environment. It’s time to make concrete jungles actual jungles.Whether we like it not, the damaging effects of climate change are forcing human connections with nature. Floods, droughts, high winds, and heat are all natural phenomena that are best mitigated with systems of integrated nature-based solutions. Nature is our best teacher. Infrastructure funding and chips and EVs incentives will help us all to go green, but it doesn’t stop there. To ‘go green’ also means to regreen cities, and to do that requires fewer cars. The best public good a government can provide are those for the common good. Those goods are uncommon today, but Pramila Jayapal and the Progressive Caucus eased their criticality, compromised, pulled centrists Left, and made good progress on the common good. Let’s hope they set a good example and can continue to make progress.Otherwise, 2024 could send these three steps forward two steps back. Although, when it comes to energy, red states look blue. Meanwhile more and more members of the ‘road gang’ are increasingly all-in on electrification and renewables. Who knows, maybe automaker’s next private vehicle for the rugged individualists will be a sporty electric two-seater convertible skinny enough to fit in a bike lane. If so, you can bet they’ll lobby to have that lane protected. Safety measures, and all. They’ll insist on protection from the peasantry in their old bloated, road-hogging cars and trucks. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

Contractor Success Forum
What the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act means for you

Contractor Success Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:20 Transcription Available


The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is putting $1.2 trillion towards our country's infrastructure - with $550 billion being spent this year on projects from repairing and replacing dams and constructing new water systems out west, to new power systems and charging stations. What does this mean for contractors, especially as we could be heading for a recession? It means you should be looking into federal contracting if you aren't already. Learn more on this week's episode.  Topics we cover in this episode include:Details of The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs ActHow smaller contractors can benefitHow the federal money is being allocatedHow the bill can help contractors through a potential recessionHow trade groups can help you get into federal contractingWhat you need to know about bonding and federal contractingLINKSVisit the episode page at https://contractorsuccessforum.com/infrastructure for more details and a transcript of the show.Find all episodes and related links at ContractorSuccessForum.com.Join the conversation on our LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/contractor-success-forumFIND US ONLINERob Williams, Profit Strategist | IronGateESS.comWade Carpenter, CPA, CGMA | CarpenterCPAs.comStephen Brown, Bonding Expert | McWins.com

Contractor Success Forum
What the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act means for you

Contractor Success Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:20 Transcription Available


The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is putting $1.2 trillion towards our country's infrastructure - with $550 billion being spent this year on projects from repairing and replacing dams and constructing new water systems out west, to new power systems and charging stations. What does this mean for contractors, especially as we could be heading for a recession? It means you should be looking into federal contracting if you aren't already. Learn more on this week's episode.  Topics we cover in this episode include:Details of The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs ActHow smaller contractors can benefitHow the federal money is being allocatedHow the bill can help contractors through a potential recessionHow trade groups can help you get into federal contractingWhat you need to know about bonding and federal contractingLINKSVisit the episode page at https://contractorsuccessforum.com/infrastructure for more details and a transcript of the show.Find all episodes and related links at ContractorSuccessForum.com.Join the conversation on our LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/contractor-success-forumFIND US ONLINERob Williams, Profit Strategist | IronGateESS.comWade Carpenter, CPA, CGMA | CarpenterCPAs.comStephen Brown, Bonding Expert | McWins.com

Vandenack Weaver Truhlsen - Legal Visionaries

Are you thinking of buying a plane or do you already own one? If so you should listen to today's podcast to learn all the tax issues that are associated with aircraft. Our host,Mary Vandenack, CEO, Founder and Managing Partner at Vandenack Weaver Truhlsen, walks us through some of the questions regarding taxation of aircraft. How does the Tax Cut and Jobs Act impact ownership? Does the plane have to be used for business purpose? What is a 50% test? Does ownership structure matter? What should you consider before buying a plane? These questions and others are answered by our host so you can avoid any surprises come tax time.A Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Shoreline Podcast Network
A Rising Tide: How the Infrastructure Act is Pumping up NOAA

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 78:33


On this jam-packed episode, hosts Peter Ravella and Tyler Buckingham turn their attention to the 2021 Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and the opportunities it will provide for coastal communities from around the American Shoreline. Now, in it's first year, the dramatic funding impacts of the new law are being felt across government, including at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Up first, Assistant Administrator of the National Ocean Service Nicole LeBoeuf explains how NOAA's broad mission greatly overlaps with the core intentions of the Infrastructure Act, and how NOAA's last 50 years of science and policy expertise at the local and regional levels and have prepared the Agency for this transformational moment and beyond. Then (27:50), Joelle Gore and Carrie Selberg Robinson join the show to discuss several specific grant opportunities that are currently available at the Agency (and will be for the next 5 years), and how local coastal communities can become involved in applying for them! Don't miss it, only on ASPN!

Consumer Choice Radio
EP135: Clean Car Salesmen (w/ Paul Jossey)

Consumer Choice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 46:05


Yaël + David back at it, deconstructing the "Inflation Reduction Act" bill, throwing shade on the Canadian Conservative Leadership election, and debating just how far we should go in trying to battle the Chinese Communist Party. INTERVIEW: Paul H. Jossey is principal attorney at Jossey PLLC, which specializes in JOBS Act capital raises. He is the founder of thecrowdfundinglawyers.com, which provides legal commentary on cryptocurrencies, equity crowdfunding, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. He is also an adjunct fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. https://cei.org/studies/a-market-approach-to-regulating-stablecoins-the-futures-money/ -How should we regulate stablecoins? -The bottom-up vs. top-down approach -Let the crypto market decide -Securities vs. commodities for Bitcoin and other cryptos Broadcast on Consumer Choice Radio on August 6, 2022. Syndicated on Sauga 960AM and Big Talker Network. Website: https://consumerchoiceradio.com ***PODCAST***  Podcast Index: https://bit.ly/3EJSIs3 Apple: http://apple.co/2G7avA8  Spotify: http://spoti.fi/3iXIKIS RSS: https://omny.fm/shows/consumerchoiceradio/playlists/podcast.rss Our podcast is now Podcasting 2.0 compliant! Listen to the show using a Bitcoin lightning wallet-enabled podcasting app (Breeze, Fountain, etc.) to directly donate to the show using the Bitcoin lightning network (stream those sats!).  More information on that here: https://podcastindex.org/apps  Produced by the Consumer Choice Center. Support us: https://consumerchoicecenter.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Millennial Investing - The Investor’s Podcast Network
MI Rewind: You Can Become An "Angel Investor" w/ Chris Lustrino

Millennial Investing - The Investor’s Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 51:36


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:04:28 - What an online private market is, what equity crowdfunding is, and how Title II of the JOBS Act made both possible.07:20 - How running a ratings business helped Chris with his own business.07:20 - How a ratings business remains objective when analyzing other private businesses.10:58 - What to look for when analyzing a private business and how it is different from analyzing a publicly traded company.33:20 - How Chris views diversification when investing in private companies and how important it is.35:47 - How returns in private businesses differ from traditional public stocks.44:12 - How investors actually realize returns and how they get liquidity.48:53 - What specific security types people should avoid as investments.49:25 - What SAFE is as an acronym (S-A-F-E), and not just the word “safe” as a security type.And much, much more!*Disclaimer: Slight timestamp discrepancies may occur due to podcast platform differences.EPISODE RESOURCESGet a FREE audiobook from Audible.Related episode: Investing Strategies and Personal Finance Tips w/ Shark Tank's Kevin O'Leary - MI058.HBO Documentary on Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes, The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley.Jason Calacanis' book Angel.Mohnish Pabrai's book The Dhandho Investor.All of Robert's favorite books.Find Pros & Fair Pricing for Any Home Project for Free with Angi.Reclaim your health and arm your immune system with convenient, daily nutrition. Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase.Confidently take control of your online world without worrying about viruses, phishing attacks, ransomware, hacking attempts, and other cybercrimes with Avast One. https://avast.com/Help protect your family's financial future with TD Term Life Insurance.Invest in high quality, cash flowing real estate without all of the hassle with Passive Investing.Push your team to do their best work with Monday.com Work OS. Start your free two-week trial today.Combine hundreds of search filters to quickly find better leads, close more deals, and unlock your investing potential with the power of PropStream!Our tool for picking stock winners and managing our portfolios: TIP Finance Tool.Check out our favorite Apps and Services.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.New to the show? Check out our Millennial Investing Starter Packs.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.Read this episode's transcript and full show notes on our website.Connect with Chris: Website | Twitter | LinkedInConnect with Robert: Website | Instagram | TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside the Castle
Inside the Castle Mission Showcase - Puerto Rico Flood Risk Management

Inside the Castle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022


After Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico had significant infrastructure damage and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been working with locals to reduce flooding and ensure public health and safety for the citizens of Puerto Rico. Funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and emergency supplemental acts have provided a unique opportunity to construct new projects and promote resilience in Puerto Rico. Listen in to learn more about the Corps mission in Puerto Rico. For more information, visit the Jacksonville District website at: https://www.saj.usace.army.mil/

Building PA Podcast
Some things to think about next time you're driving through a construction zone!

Building PA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 32:27


We've all been there, you're in your car on your way to your annual family vacation destination or just making your daily trip to work, and you're stopped or slowed down because of traffic due to road construction. It seems like road construction and repair are everywhere, and you're right, it is! And whether you believe it or not, it's a good thing. With the recent Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, road construction and repair of bridges and highways are booming and making our infrastructure in PA better and safer.We invited the Executive Director of CAWP (The Constructors of Western Pennsylvania), Rich Barcaskey to give us some insight into heavy highway repair, construction, and the importance of being a patient and responsible driver when you are driving through construction zones. One of the most important, if not the most important concern for the CAWP is the safety of their workers. As drivers, we can do our part by obeying the speed limit, minimizing distractions, and staying alert while driving through construction areas. This summer CAWP developed a new initiative to recognize the hard-working men and women working in heavy highway and construction. The program is called CAWP Cares and includes a bag packed with essentials for workers to help them take care of themselves— sunscreen, a cooling towel,  a tick-removal kit, and many more useful items to have on the job. CAWP has also included a printed brochure with daily tips to help them with their mental health and physical well-being. To learn more about the Constructors of Western Pennsylvania check out CAWP.org.

Dive In with NOAA Fisheries
Bipartisan Infrastructure Law: A Transformational Opportunity for Habitats

Dive In with NOAA Fisheries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 20:42


Historic coastal and climate resilience funding for NOAA, made possible by the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, will improve habitat restoration, coastal resilience, and weather forecasting infrastructure.

Teleforum
Consumers' Research v. FCC and the Legality of the Universal Service Fund Contribution Regime

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 60:22


With billions of dollars allocated to broadband funding in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the future of the FCC’s Universal Service Fund (USF) is a hotly debated topic. Now, with multiple lawsuits challenging the very legality of the USF contribution system, as well as new guidance from the Supreme Court on the limits of federal agencies’ power, the future of the Fund hangs in the balance. Join industry experts to discuss the issues raised in Consumers’ Research v. FCC and where the lawsuits stand in the aftermath of West Virginia v. EPA.Featuring:Robert Frieden, Emeritus Professor of Telecommunications and Law, Penn State UniversityHarold Furchtgott-Roth, Senior Fellow and Director, Center for the Economics of the Internet, Hudson InstituteMichael Romano, Sr. VP of Industry Affairs and Business Development, NTCA – The Rural Broadband AssociationModerator: Arielle Roth, Legislative Counsel, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt---To register, please click the link above

Boardroom Governance with Evan Epstein
Francine McKenna: "You Cannot Restrain The Heartless Except Via Enforcement."

Boardroom Governance with Evan Epstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 82:30


0:00 Intro.1:37 Start of interview.3:03 Francine's "origin story". She grew up in Chicago and graduated from Purdue in accounting but "she hated it." She began in internal audit at Chicago's Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust. She later worked with KPMG/BearingPoint in the early 1990s. She also worked at JP Morgan where she focused on Y2K risk. Post Sarbanes Oxley she worked at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP until 2006. She then pivoted as an investigative reporter and feature writer. At MarketWatch, and for The Wall Street Journal and Barron's, McKenna reported on public company accounting, fraud and financial investigations, and the potentially dubious financial reporting practices of pre-IPO companies. She also started teaching at different universities. She has now joined full-time as a Lecturer at University of Pennsylvania Wharton Business School.17:53 On Ernst & Young's $100 million penalty by the SEC for employees cheating on CPA ethics exams and misleading investigation. To put this case into context, it's important to understand KPMG's case from 2019 ($50 million penalty by the SEC). Note this teaching case study on the KPMG/PCAOB scandal.24:50 Criminal convictions in KPMG case.26:01 EY's role in misleading the investigation of the SEC.31:38 On KPMG receiving its largest UK fine (£14.4M) for providing false information about its audits of Carillion and Regenersis. On why the "Big 4 Audit Firms" are "Too Big to Fail."33:16 What's really going on with the Big 4  audit firms? Audit services vs consulting services. "When there is tension between professionalism and commercialism, [the latter] will always win out." "You cannot restrain the heartless except via enforcement."37:50 On lessons for directors in frauds of private companies. "I use Theranos as a warning case for students in accounting: it's the canary in the coalmine in case the audit profession doesn't evolve." There were three audit firms involved in the Theranos case: EY at the beginning but then walked away, then KPMG until they had a dispute about stock option valuations (staying only to do consulting), and PwC did forensic work winding down the company. None of them audited the firm, they only provided services. "They [the audit firms] made more money, with less liability, by providing other services [actively choosing not to provide auditing services.]" "Private companies avoiding going public [the deeper scrutiny] is the shape of things to come." How the JOBS Act stripped away some of the scrutiny over emerging growth companies [EGCs]. Some, like SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce, are in favor of this lighter regulatory approach.47:22 On whether unicorns require a stricter regulatory framework. "We are seeing this [laissez-faire] attitude to the max in the crypto industry."50:00 On whether Sarbanes Oxley had a negative effect on the US IPO market. "We should not have marginal/shady companies in the public markets." On the negative effect of relaxing the rules in the JOBS Act. "We should be talking about the quality of companies, not the quantity of listings."55:26 On the difference between valuations (in private companies) and marketcap (in public companies). "I'm a big believer in the power of short sellers and activist investors to highlight [price inefficiencies and fraud] because they put their money where their mouth is." "The SEC has been very disappointing in both Republican and Democratic administrations in terms of actually calling accounting fraud by its name." On the role of whistleblowers.01:04:02 On the rise (and increasing political polarization) of ESG. "I'm cynical towards it, firms are looking to get a piece of clients' wallets." "The trend first emerged in Europe with firms providing side audits like carbon emissions." "My head is tainted with the idea that it's all a big marketing ploy." The audit mandate in the proposed SEC's climate change disclosure rules. On the proxy proposals (like Exxon's) and greenwashing.01:10:28 - Three books that have greatly influenced her life: Siddartha, by Hermann Hesse (1922)The Road Less Traveled, by M. Scott Peck (1978)The Origins of Totalitarianism, by Hannah Arendt (1951)01:13:18 - Who were your mentors, and what did you learn from them? From her time at Continental Illinois:Peggy Jackson TurnerJudy Port01:15:03 - Are there any quotes you think of often or live your life by? "Der Mensch Tracht, un Gott Lacht (Man Plans, and God Laughs)" (Yiddish)"Morallity cannot be legislated, but behavior can be regulated. Judicial decrees may not change the heart, but they can restrain the heartless." Martin Luther King Jr.01:16:12 -  An unusual habit or an absurd thing that he loves: collecting metal objects.01:17:47 -  The living person she most admires: Judge Jed S. Rakoff, Jordan Peele.Francine McKenna is a full-time Lecturer at University of Pennsylvania Wharton Business School. She teaches ACCT 611 and 613, Introduction to Financial Accounting for MBAs. She is also an independent writer and commentator and authors the newsletter The Dig, where she scrutinizes accounting, audit and corporate governance issues at public and pre-IPO companies.__You can follow Francine on social media at:Twitter: @retheauditorsLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/francinemckenna/Substack: https://thedig.substack.com/__ You can follow Evan on social media at:Twitter: @evanepsteinLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/epsteinevan/ Substack: https://evanepstein.substack.com/__Music/Soundtrack (found via Free Music Archive): Seeing The Future by Dexter Britain is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License

Marketers Take Flight Podcast
How AEC Firms Can Prepare Now for The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA)

Marketers Take Flight Podcast

Play Episode Play 16 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 37:11


In this episode, I have Melinda Colón. She is the CEO, strategic marketer, and mentor of FortisOBM. She is a problem solver and connector who helps firms in the AEC industry grow their businesses. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) is a $550 billion investment across five years that include roads, bridges, major projects, passenger and great trains, general safety, safe street programs, pedestrian safety programs, buses, rail cars, and stations, broadband expansions, ports and waterways, airport runways, the gates, the taxiways, water and infrastructure, power and grid systems, and cybersecurity.The Bill is going to touch nearly every AEC firm because it spans all market sectors. And it will also bring more work, which means more proposals! And, who could use another proposal (or two)?!?!Knowing that these proposals are coming, what work can your business development and proposal teams start doing now to prepare? Melinda shares some actions your teams can do today to start preparing.Here are some highlights:Overview of Infrastructure Bill: 4:49Example of how the Bill works: 7:24Is this similar to the last big bill?: 11:16What is the timing for some of these projects?: 14:03Where is the money flowing to?: 15:25Look locally: 16:44Tips for what marketers can do to prepare: 21:15Recap of Tips: 30:31Rate, Review & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts“I love Lindsay and Marketers Take Flight.”

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Federalist Society's Teleforum: Consumers’ Research v. FCC and the Legality of the Universal Service Fund Contribution Regime

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


With billions of dollars allocated to broadband funding in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the future of the FCC's Universal Service Fund (USF) is a hotly debated topic. Now, with multiple lawsuits challenging the very legality of the USF contribution system, as well as new guidance from the Supreme Court on the limits of […]

RTP's Free Lunch Podcast
Deep Dive 229 – Overcoming the Challenges to Clean Infrastructure

RTP's Free Lunch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 63:30


On November 15, 2022, President Biden signed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. On May 11, 2022, the White House released the Permitting Action Plan, to "accelerate and deliver infrastructure projects on time, on task, and on budget."The infrastructure bill represents a major public investment in infrastructure development. And yet significant obstacles to infrastructure development remain. Does the infrastructure bill help overcome some of those obstacles? How does the Permitting Action Plan address those obstacles? How can the federal government work with states, localities, tribes and territories to overcome these challenges?In this webinar, energy policy experts discussed these questions and more.Featuring:- Edward Boling, Partner, Perkins Coie LLPAlex Herrgott, President & CEO, The Permitting Institute- [Moderator] Mario Loyola, Senior Fellow, Competitive Enterprise InstituteVisit our website – www.RegProject.org – to learn more, view all of our content, and connect with us on social media.

Explain to Shane
The Challenge of Putting Federal Broadband Funds to Good Use (with Mark Jamison)

Explain to Shane

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 22:56


Following the passage of the https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/3684/text (Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act) (IIJA), a Department of Commerce branch known as the https://www.ntia.doc.gov/ (National Telecommunications and Information Administration) (NTIA) has been tasked with allocating $42.5 billion of federal broadband infrastructure funding to state and local governments through the https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/resources/grant-programs/broadband-equity-access-and-deployment-bead-program (Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment (BEAD) program). This $42.5 billion is part of a larger $65 billion sum that the IIJA puts toward broadband infrastructure. How can NTIA and the states ensure the money is spent effectively and that people are held accountable? How can remaining barriers to broadband adoption be overcome without just throwing money at the issue? On this episode, https://www.aei.org/profile/shane-tews/ (Shane )welcomes AEI Nonresident Senior Fellow https://www.aei.org/profile/mark-jamison-2/ (Mark Jamison) back to the podcast. Dr. Jamison has previously appeared on the show to talk about tech antitrust issues, but is an internet and telecommunications expert by training. In addition to his fellowship at AEI, Dr. Jamison directs the Public Utility Research Center at the University of Florida's Warrington College of Business—where he also teaches. Dr. Jamison previously served on the Federal Communications Commission transition team for President-elect Trump, and as a special adviser to the governor of Florida's internet task force. He is currently working with the Florida state government to help write the state's strategic broadband plan. See https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/resources/states (here) and https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/resources/state-broadband-leaders-network-sbln (here) for more information on NTIA's state-level broadband initiatives.

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe
He's One of the Real OGs of Investment Crowdfunding

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 30:52


Devin: What do you see as your superpower?Woodie: I have a passion to get it done, and I will show up and get it done. I think that is where my strength and my superpower lie in terms of, you know, just be there, get it done, be the changemaker that you want to be. Don’t rely on others to do it. Have them help you where they’re willing to. But you need to be the source of all that change.A Real OGSherwood “Woodie” Neiss is on a short list of those who deserve serious credit for leading Congress to pass and getting then-President Barack Obama to sign the 2012 JOBS Act. He’s earned the title of Real OG in the investment crowdfunding world.Now a principal at Crowdfund Capital Advisors and a partner in Crowd Capital Ventures, he’s continuing to grow and advocate for the industry he had such a pivotal hand in creating.Woodie shared some stories about the work of getting the legislation passed. First, he recalls how the legislation came to have a provision prohibiting the sale of crowdfunded securities for twelve months even though there is no market.I remember sitting in Senator Bennett's office working with one of his staffers on how we prevent pumping and dumping. We didn't have that in there. And I, being an entrepreneur, having had that background of starting a business, funding it and exiting it, I really looked at him. I was like, “listen, these are long-term investments. Let's just put a 12 month holding period on it.” He's like “12 months.” And we wrote that down. So people all the time are like, “Well, where did the 12 months come from?” And, you know, I hear other people talking about it while the— “The regulators put it in there.”And I was like, “No, literally, it was a meeting that I was having with Andy Greene in Senator Bennett’s office. And we were like, “How do we prevent pumping and dumping?” And that's how we did it.He also shared the story of brokering the final compromise that got the bill passed.We were the the the pawns. We actually were going through Congress and we were entrepreneurs. We're not lobbyists. Not even close to it. We're not lawyers. So we don't even understand the legal frameworks under which these bills are turned into laws. But we understood that Washington operates by people sharing information, not even information that they'll share within their own parties. So we found ourselves as being this intermediary between Democrats, between Republicans, between Democrats and Republicans, between the House and the Senate. It was fascinating that people got to know us. They trusted us with the information that we were essentially bartering. And I think that's why we were able to come up with—I don't know if—you probably don't remember, but—probably nobody remembers because I was there with Jason [Best] and the bill was stalled and we realized that we needed to come up with a compromise between the Democrats and the Republicans. So, we just wrote the compromise. We sat down with the three bills that were in the Senate and we said, “Well, what are the best of both worlds and what are they trying to accomplish?” We merged that together and we went back to all three of the senators that were pushing this forward; there were two Democrats and one Republican at the time. We presented this as the commonsense compromise to investment crowdfunding. And they're like, “Well, the other party's on board?” And we just said, “Yes.” And that is what became the final framework that was in the law.Many people take credit for the passage of the JOBS Act. Woodie is undoubtedly one who deserves recognition.Woodie will speak at SuperCrowd22, providing additional data and context for understanding the practice of raising money and investing via investment crowdfunding. Superpowers for Good readers can register for the virtual conference on September 15 and 16 for half price with the code super50. ‘We Have a 100% Complete Data Set.’Since the Rose Garden signing ceremony in April of 2012, Woodie and his partners, including Jason Best, have developed a unique data set. They have tracked every transaction completed under the JOBS Act framework.Spooled up well before transactions legitimately using the framework began, Crowdfund Capital Advisors has a detailed record of every transaction. Every single one. “We have a 100% complete data set.”Perhaps nothing puts a point on this so precisely as Woodie’s humble brag, “We provide reports that the SEC purchases from us, ‘The State of the Industry.’”Let’s look at a few highlights Woodie shared.“There have been 5,000 companies across all 50 states that have gone out to raise money online, mainly from their customers,” Woodie says. “But you can do it from your social network, your fans and your followers as well. These are not only startups, but they are revenue-generating businesses.”“There have been over one and a half million investors that have invested in these. They’ve put $1.3 billion into these startups,” he says. (If he were sitting over my shoulder now, he’d say the number has risen to $1.4 billion since we recorded this interview last month.)Crowdfunding isn’t just about making investors and entrepreneurs wealthy. “These startups and small businesses have supported over 220,000 jobs,” Woodie says.Entrepreneurs and investors across the country, not just in New York and Silicon Valley, are participating. Companies based in 5,500 cities have successfully issued securities under the new rules.“The success rate when it comes to investment crowdfunding is 66.82 percent right now,” Woodie says. “So, that means 66 percent of all the companies out there are successful in the round.”“If you go to VC, your chance of getting that capital is about 2 percent,” he says by contrast. “So, why waste your time and energy and money, when you can go online and have a higher chance of success with your community, your customers, your crowd?” “I want to be clear, there’s a ton of risk in this. Many of these companies will fail over time,” Woodie says. “There are good ones in there, and they will succeed. These people that invest in them early will have phenomenal returns.”“The average valuations have crept up over time. In the beginning, it was close to between $5 and $10 million,” Woodie says. “Right now, it’s about $16.7 [million].”Get every episode in your inbox!Positive Results for Women and Minorities“Women and minorities are some of the biggest beneficiaries, and they actually have a higher success rate than the overall industry average,” Woodie says.Measuring the difference is more challenging than it might seem at first blush. “You have a lot of offerings that are put together by women and minority founders,” he says. “It could be just a woman on the founding team. It could be all women. It could be a minority on the founding team. It could be all minorities. It could be all minority women. There’s a whole blend of how these offerings look in terms of their management teams.”Woodie points out that “at least 50 percent of the offerings now have at least one woman or minority on the founding team.”“The women and minority offerings just seem to do better because their community looks like them and invests in them because they believe in them and they understand the challenges that they face as entrepreneurs in the capital markets,” he says.Woodie leverages his superpower in all his work, taking personal responsibility for change.How to Develop Personal Responsibility for Change As a SuperpowerWoodie credits his father with teaching him this vital principle to initiate the change you want to see in the world. The thoughts and memories of his father, who passed away just three weeks before our interview, were fresh and a bit raw.Woodie’s dad was a powerful role model. “My father’s father was a painter,” Woodie says. “My father went to the military. He put himself through school. He had got two PhDs and an MD. He went on to run pharmaceutical companies.”Woodie reflected on what he learned from his dad. “It’s the lessons of showing up. It’s not going to happen on its own. It’s not going to happen by itself. You need to be the changemaker if you want it to happen,” he recalls. “That’s what lives in me, which is this passion to be like, ‘Well, if something’s going to happen, I’m going to be the one that needs to make it happen.’”Woodie offers some advice for developing this capacity for changemaking.“I would tell them to start small,” he says, referring to his message for you.“I’ll be the first to tell you I try, I fail, but try again and fail,” Woodie says. “Then you keep on trying until you succeed. It’s about picking little things to do and accomplishing that. Because what it does is, well, it gets something done, but it gets you moving in the right direction, and you feel good about it.”He offers a second, powerful insight for getting big projects done.“Take any task you have and break it down into 100 tasks,” he says. “Every day, complete 1 percent of that [list]. In 100 days, you will have that task complete.”Finally, he calls out the mutual support he shares with his wife, identifying that as an essential part of his superpower.I look over at my spouse, and I talk about what we accomplished, and we commend each other. I think that's really important. If you don't have that support network yourself, find someone else that can go, “I am proud of you. Way to go.” Because you can't just rely on yourself for this; you need other people to be your champion as well. That type of positive reinforcement helps you come back in the morning, the next day, add a few more things to the list and get it done.Woodie concludes with this summary, “Start small. Check off those boxes. Big things will come.”If you follow Woodie’s example and advice, you can develop taking personal responsibility for change as a superpower that enables you to do more good. Get full access to Superpowers for Good at devinthorpe.substack.com/subscribe

Lockbox
Ep 144: Unlock Your Equity

Lockbox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 27:19


Listen to the insightful Lockbox episode w/ Matthew Sullivan about investing in single family homes equity even if you don't own the home. Originally from the UK, Matt has been entrepreneur for past 30 years. His previous work in telecom, finance and tech have all come together in his company, Quantum RE. In this episode, we discuss: - US real estate market vs the world - Jobs ACT started the online solicitation investment fund movement - How to invest in someone else's equity - Structure of Quantums downside protection - The philosophy of ‘dogged' determination   Connect with guest Website: https://www.quantmre.com   Connect with Jeff: https://steezy.digital/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeffrey.brogger  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffrey-brogger/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeffbrogger FREE DOWNLOAD: The Ultimate Real Estate Goal Setting Framework This SMART spreadsheet will automatically breakdown the number of phone calls, appointments, or open houses you need in order to achieve your income goal!!! Click below to download this SMART spreadsheet today! https://steezy.digital/ultimate-real-estate-goal-setting-framework   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Solving Water: A Xylem Podcast
Discussing ”Draining: The Economic Impact of America's Hidden Water Crisis” with DigDeep Founder & CEO George McGraw

Solving Water: A Xylem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 29:15


George McGraw, Founder and CEO of DigDeep, a human rights nonprofit working to ensure every American has clean, running water forever, joins Solving Water to break down the nonprofit's latest report, “Draining: The Economic Impact of America's Hidden Water Crisis,” released in late June. McGraw details new information about the lack of access to clean, safe water in the United States; the importance of finding and gathering valuable Census data; the initial impact of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act; and future water projects and priorities for DigDeep as they continue to work to close the water access gap for vulnerable communities and areas throughout the country. Read the report, “Draining: The Economic Impact of America's Hidden Water Crisis," and learn more about DigDeep and how you can get involved: https://www.digdeep.org/draining

BDO in the Boardroom
Weighing Anticipated Tax Regulatory Impacts on Corporate Business Strategy

BDO in the Boardroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 23:12


Join BDO's Center for Corporate Governance Amy Rojik as she and her colleague Todd Simmens, National Managing Partner of Tax Risk Management, to discuss how the board's oversight of corporate strategy and risk management would be remiss without an understanding and consideration of evolving global and domestic tax regulations anticipated to significantly impact decision-making at the board level. Key Takeaways:Companies are advised to continue to remain abreast of legislative activity to inform on-going scenario planning, inclusive of the tax department and appropriate advisors. Tax implications need to be considered early on in contemplation of transactions as well as operational decisions and human resource matters.Expectations for a robust tax bill in 2022 under the Biden Administration's ‘Build Back Better' plans may have lost sight of the power that individual members of the House and Senate can have.Mid-term U.S. political elections may put some of the more contentious progressive tax increases being considered on the back burner.With regard to Biden's budget (aka the Green Book): As a reminder, certain of the Jobs Act provisions expire in 2025/2026; other provisions are permanent (e.g. Corporate Tax Rate increase from 21% to 28%, individual rates and capital gains as well as international regulations and policy changes such as the replacement of BEATS and onshoring of taxes) and would require legislation to enact tax changes.Internationally, companies are advised to be in tune to the OECD's agendaThe IRS continues to experience operational challenges including staffing issues, processing, refund delays and extended communication response times. Filers are advised to communicate with the IRS using certified mail or other form to demonstrate proof on communications. It is the responsibility of board of directors to be very aware of what tax professionals have to say about what is going on at the business level. Resources:2022 BDO Tax Outlook Survey

Thoughts on the Market
U.S. Politics: How the Midterms Could Affect Your Tax Rates

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 5:19 Very Popular


As some provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act start to kick in and others are set to expire, the future of U.S. tax rates may hinge on the results of the upcoming midterm elections. Head of U.S. Public Policy Research and Municipal Strategy Michael Zezas and Head of Global Valuation, Accounting and Tax Todd Castagno discuss.-----Transcript-----Michael Zezas: Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Michael Zezas, Head of U.S. Public Policy Research and Municipal Strategy for Morgan Stanley. Todd Castagno: And I'm Todd Castagno, Head of Global Valuation, Accounting and Tax for Morgan Stanley Research. Michael Zezas: And on this special edition of the podcast, we'll be talking about the 2022 U.S. midterm elections and the potential impact on individual and corporate taxes. It's Tuesday, June 7th, at 10:00 AM in New York. Michael Zezas: If you're a regular listener, you may have heard my conversation with our chief U.S. Economist, Ellen Zentner, last week about the economic implications of this year's midterm elections. This week, Todd Castagno and I are going to continue the midterm election topic because individual and corporate taxes could be set to increase starting this year. But the question is how high, when and what the impact from the election could be. So, Todd, you and I have talked about this and we agree that taxes are likely headed higher for both individuals and corporations. Maybe you can tell us why that is. Todd Castagno: Thanks, Michael. And it's really a driving function of how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was passed. And that's because Congress used the budget reconciliation legislation, which is primarily temporary. So, for instance, the individual provisions generally all expire at the end of 2025. And business tax increases have already started to phase in this year. So extension of the status quo for both businesses and individuals really is a function of the political landscape heading into midterms and then the next presidential election. Michael Zezas: Okay. So let's start with the individual taxes. Maybe you can name some provisions set to expire and what the changes would be. Todd Castagno: So Michael, let's first provide an overview of what the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act did for individuals. First, it reduced individual tax rates. Second, it almost doubled the standard deduction, meaning fewer taxpayers require itemized deductions. It provided a generous 20% deduction for small businesses, and pass-through businesses. It provided a much more generous child tax care credit, that's also refundable. And then the alternative minimum tax was reduced, so fewer taxpayers were caught in that tax. All these provisions are set to expire at the end of 2025 if Congress does not act. Michael Zezas: Let's shift over to corporate taxes. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act lowered the corporate tax rate to 21% in 2017. Is there a chance we could see that climb? And to what level? Todd Castagno: That's true. One of the only permanent items of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was to reduce the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. However, starting this year, there are other tax increases within the corporate tax system. For instance, the requirement to amortize R&D costs over 5 years starts this year. That will primarily affect technology companies. And then there's elimination of favorable media expensing for capital expenditures, that starts to phase out next year, and that primarily would impact manufacturing and industrial companies. And then there's more restrictive deductibility of interest expense. So these in conjunction, will raise tax obligations. And it really depends on the political climate of how these get extended, and if that 21% corporate rate may nudge higher. Michael Zezas: Todd. Last October, you and I talked in the podcast about a two pillar tax overhaul which would come out of global tax reform. Nine months later, how do you see that playing out? Todd Castagno: So there's an ongoing effort to A, change the mix of which countries get to tax corporate income and B, the establishment of a global minimum corporate tax rate of 15%. The wheels are still in motion, but let's say the bus has slowed down. For instance, in the U.S., the required reforms are part of the build back better legislation, which has recently stalled. And then in Europe, nearly unanimous agreement, but they're still one or two states that are not fully on board. Todd Castagno: Michael, I want to turn it back to you. Investors and policymakers clearly have some worries about inflation risks. How will that factor into what kinds of effective tax increases would be palatable for lawmakers? Michael Zezas: Sure. Policymakers in Washington, D.C. have become really sensitive to inflation. And so tax increases now serve a purpose as a tool for Democrats to achieve some of their spending goals, like investing in clean energy, but doing so without contributing to inflation by increasing government deficits. So given that if Democrats manage to get a new spending bill focused on energy across the finish line, the tax increases will likely need to match that spending. So that keeps corporate tax increases and tax increases focused on high income earners on the table. Todd Castagno: Finally, before we close, I'm curious if you've heard anything from our economist or equity strategist on what the impact will be on growth, or corporate bottom lines, if some or all of these expirations occur? Michael Zezas: Well, tax increases mean higher costs for companies and households. So this becomes one of several factors that our equity strategists say will contribute to the crimping of the bottom line of U.S. companies. And they don't think that's in the price of the stock market quite yet. And so what that ultimately means is that the volatility we've been experiencing in markets is something they think is going to continue. Michael Zezas: Todd, thank you so much for talking. Todd Castagno: Great talking with you, Michael. Michael Zezas: And thanks for listening. If you enjoy the show, please share Thoughts on the Market with a friend or colleague, or leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. It helps more people find the show.