Podcasts about Heresy

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Belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs

  • 1,097PODCASTS
  • 2,891EPISODES
  • 57mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
Heresy

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Best podcasts about Heresy

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Latest podcast episodes about Heresy

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
Necromunda Fast Shot 13 - Underhive Pharmacopoeia

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


In this episode we talk about drugs and pharmaceuticals available to your gangs in Necromunda!If you're playing a sweet campaign and want to shout it out and possibly attract some more players, send an email in to eyeofhoruspodcast at gmail.com and we might be able to find you some more gangers ready to bang! Pics from the Helm'Ayr's Own Campaign Sean is running:https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/helmayrsown/Episode Contributors:Seanhttps://www.instagram.com/alwaysstrikesfirst/Leedhamhttps://www.instagram.com/leedhamtekani/Timhttps://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/Gang Bang Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/166222270782073/EOH Patreon:https://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/

Society of Reformed Podcasters
PB| Open Theism: Heresy or Misunderstanding?

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 73:22


In this episode we discuss open theism.

Footnoting History
Uncle Remus, Joel Chandler Harris, and the South, Part II

Footnoting History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 17:53


(Elizabeth) How did Joel Chandler Harris's stories on Br'er Rabbit, Br'er Bear, and Br'er Fox go from beloved to problematic in the mid-twentieth century? In this episode, Elizabeth traces the story of how Joel Chandler Harris's work became Song of the South.     Click here for tips for Teaching with Podcasts! Or here to buy some FH Merch! We are now on Youtube with accessible captions checked by members of our team! And you can find out how to support us through our FH Patreon to help keep our content open access!

No Easy Answers
Principles & Heresy: Patriotic Socialism, Land Back, and Free Speech

No Easy Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 29:09


I recorded this episode on 11/17/21 while driving home - I had a few things to say about the way left discourse is unfolding on Twitter. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/noeasyanswers/support

Radio Tambua
The “Prosperity Gospel” and Psalm 130

Radio Tambua

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 17:01


The “Prosperity Gospel” (Word-Faith) movement promotes a distorted view of man's authority, identity, health and wealth.  But the prayer in Psalm 130 shows us the right way to rely on God for every need, as Rodgers Atwebembeire explains.

The Good Fight Radio Show
Reawaken Heresy at John Hagee‘s Church

The Good Fight Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 89:07


This broadcast discusses the "Reawaken America" event that took place Nov 11-13, 2021 at John Hagee's Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, TX. On display were many heretical movements, teachers and artists. Bethel or Beth-Hell? Series https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLx...

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
The Border Princes Episode 9 - The Big Spooky Lore of Vampires One (With Tim!)

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


On this Episode of the Border Princes Podcast we take a deep dive into the Lore of Vampires with our very first guest, Tim from the Eye of Horus!Sean disappears near the end of the show againAs well as our usual content with what we have been up to and the mailbag.Into/Outro- Furious: SinyellsMusic break- The Corrs - Breathless (Punk Rock Factory Cover)Contact us on theborderprincespodcast@gmail.comFollow us on instagram! @theborderprincespodcastAnd join our facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/6374647945878951/Follow on Podbean for extra content! https://theborderprincespodcast.podbean.com/

Society of Reformed Podcasters
BB| The Place of Creeds in Determining Heresy

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:40


Why are opinions contrary to the Nicene Creed or the Apostles' Creed deemed to be…

The Remembrancers' Retreat | A Horus Heresy Warhammer 30K Podcast
Sons of Horus Praetor, Armigers in Titanicus, Legio Focus: Legio Audax

The Remembrancers' Retreat | A Horus Heresy Warhammer 30K Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 75:23


Join the gang as we slide a little away from our Traitor Legio coverage, and talk about new Heresy models coming! Then, we get right into Legio Audax! If you enjoy our programs, consider supporting our podcast through Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/RR30KPODCAST (https://www.patreon.com/RR30KPODCAST) Be sure to join our Discord Server! https://discord.gg/DCRDEej (https://discord.gg/DCRDEej) Thank you to everyone who listens, interacts, and gives us feedback! We sincerely appreciate it! Support this podcast

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
Episode 189 - The Khan! And a Merchant Princeling Drops By!

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Welcome to Episode 189, we talk about the new rules Forgeworld have dropped, admire The Khan, Tim tries to explain fentanyl to Michael, then we dive into some information we gathered around the traps! In the middle segment Tim has a conversation with Tom Sargent discussing the UK scene and the new Merchant Princeling podcast!Part 1 - New Stuff (The Khan, PDFs) WWBD, Round the TrapsLet The Devil In - Green LungPart 2 - Chatting to Tom SargentPursuit of Vikings- Amon AmarthPart 3 - Wrap-Up!Merchant Princelings Podcast:https://open.spotify.com/show/5LLRYqECeCLj32cJxJx6nMVeil of Darkness Event:https://fb.me/e/1HdFjnO0kInvestigate our Corporate Dirtbags!Versatile Terrainhttps://www.versatileterrain.co.uk/Grimdark Terrainhttps://grimdarkterrain.com/Crystal Fortresshttps://www.crystal-fortress.com/Black Label Paintinghttps://www.facebook.com/blacklabelpaintimg/Quartermasterhttps://itunes.apple.com/au/app/quartermaster-5/id879731050EOH PATREON:https://www.patreon.com/eyeofhoruspodcastCULT OF PAINT CLASSES:https://www.cultofpaint.com/30K GLOBAL EVENT CALENDAR:https://www.facebook.com/groups/147669179268284/Mournival Eventshttps://www.facebook.com/groups/190699548351507DEATH OF HOPE:https://youtu.be/x9wV2sGlXjY

Radio Tambua
YOU Can Witness to Cultists!

Radio Tambua

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 14:21


It can be intimidating to share the Gospel with a cult member! How do you begin? Rodgers Atwebembeire gives us three important things to keep in mind:1) Know basic Bible teachings (and be able to explain them)2) Pray for the one you're evangelizing3) Emphasize the role of God's grace in salvation

Messianic Apologetics
What is Heresy? What is Not Heresy?

Messianic Apologetics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 18:08


John McKee addresses how important it is going to be in the future for people of faith to employ a much more restrictive and limited use of the word “heresy.”

Saints and Sinners Unplugged
Syncretism, Heresy and Apostasy

Saints and Sinners Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 43:12


Society of Reformed Podcasters
BB| All About Heresy

Society of Reformed Podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:08


Another discussion is currently rising out from under the already tumultuous waters of current discussion…

Legends of Tabletop Podcast
189 Alan Bahr - Heirs of Heresy

Legends of Tabletop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 69:27


I'm excited to have Alan Bahr on to talk about his new game Heirs to Heresy. I heard the playthrough he ran for the Fandible podcast and knew I had to pick this up. Spoilers it's a great book! You are one of the thirty Knights Templar who awoke on Friday, 13 October 1307, only to find themselves wanted criminals and branded heretics by the King of France. Abandoned by the Vatican and sent away early in the morning, you must leave Paris on a day of reckoning and try to find your way across a dark, mythic Europe to a mystical utopia where you can rebuild! Heirs to Heresy starts as a historical-fantasy roleplaying game, but is heavily influenced by Gnosticism, European Folklore, esotericism, and the myths and legends that surround the Templars. The game will ask you to craft the secrets of the Templar treasure, the enemies, and mysteries they will face, as your Knights undertake a mystical journey to the center of themselves along the road to Avallonis. The mechanics are a blend of narrative, storytelling rules, and classic adventure-gaming inspired roleplaying rules that work to create rich aspect-driven characters. As Templar Knights, your skill at arms is unquestionable, but it is the potential access to gnostic spells, unique powers, or intensely powerful faith sets you apart from your comrades. Can you tap into your potential, guarding the mysterious Templar treasure on this last quest you will take for the order and find the answer to the burning question: are the Templars Heirs to Heresy? https://ospreypublishing.com/heirs-to-heresy-the-fall-of-the-knights-templar https://alanbahr.net/ https://twitter.com/alanbahr https://fandible.com/heirs-to-heresy-fall-of-the-faithful/ https://www.birdscoffeecompany.com/coffees/legends-of-tabletop-legendary-brew Use Code Legends10 to get 10% off your order https://www.patreon.com/legendsoftabletop Theme music created by Brett Miller http://www.brettmillermusic.net/

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
Engine Kill 16 - the new TRAITOR LEGIOS book!

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


We do a delve into the new Traitor Legios book!Contributors on this episode:Tomhttps://www.instagram.com/heresyenthusiast/Jackiehttps://www.instagram.com/reds.corps/Timhttps://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/Mournival Titanicus Errata:https://archive.org/download/mournivaladeptustitanicusarmylist/Mournival%20Adeptus%20Titanicus%20Army%20List.pdfTitanicus Matched Play Missions:https://archive.org/download/at18matchedplaymissionsgsrev1a/AT18-Matched-Play-Missions-GS-rev-1a.pdfInvestigate our Corporate Dirtbags!Grimdark Terrainhttps://www.patreon.com/grimdarkterrainFaultline 40khttps://www.facebook.com/faultline40k/Versatile Terrainhttps://www.versatileterrain.co.uk/Crystal Fortresshttps://www.crystal-fortress.com/Black Label Paintinghttps://www.facebook.com/blacklabelpaintimg/Quartermasterhttps://itunes.apple.com/au/app/quartermaster-5/id879731050EOH PATREON:https://www.patreon.com/eyeofhoruspodcast30K GLOBAL EVENT CALENDAR:https://www.facebook.com/groups/147669179268284/Mournival Eventshttps://www.facebook.com/groups/190699548351507

Radio Tambua
Why Is Apologetics Essential? (Jude 3–4)

Radio Tambua

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 22:01


The urgency of contending for the faith was paramount to Jude in his letter to the saints.  What does this mean for us? The answer may surprise you, as Rodgers Atwebembeire explains.

Footnoting History
Uncle Remus, Joel Chandler Harris, and the South, Part I

Footnoting History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 20:03


(Elizabeth) By the end of the nineteenth century, Joel Chandler Harris's Uncle Remus folktales were famous not only in the South, but throughout the United States. For much of the last century, however, they have been sharply critiqued for their presentation of antebellum plantation life. But who was Joel Chandler Harris? In this episode, Elizabeth dives into his story and the people from whom he learned these tales. Click here for tips for Teaching with Podcasts! Or here to buy some FH Merch! We are now on Youtube with accessible captions checked by members of our team! And you can find out how to support us through our FH Patreon to help keep our content open access!

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
Necromunda Fast Shot 12 - Playing Alternate Gangs

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


In this episode of Necromunda Fast Shot, we catch up with Krell over in Sweden, find out about what he's been playing and then delve into some of the spooky/occult Delaque lore from the new HOUSE OF SHADOWS. In the second hour, Leedham and Tim talk about the Pit Slaves and Mutie gangs they ran, using the rules from HOUSE OF CHAINS! If you're playing a sweet campaign and want to shout it out and possibly attract some more players, send an email in to eyeofhoruspodcast at gmail.com and we might be able to find you some more gangers ready to bang! Episode Contributors:Krellhttps://www.instagram.com/airbrushiscivilization/Leedhamhttps://www.instagram.com/leedhamtekani/Timhttps://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/Gang Bang Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/166222270782073/EOH Patreon:https://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/

Novara Media
#NovaraFM: History, Humanity, Heresy

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 96:33


Who dares to rewrite 40,000 years of history? Archaeologist David Wengrow and the late anthropologist David Graeber offer a radically different story of our social evolution in their new book, The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity. Drawing on groundbreaking research gathered over a decade of collaboration, their mighty 700-page tome upends just […]

Good Doctrine
Ep. 99 | Is It Christian Culture or Just Your Culture?

Good Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 33:17


Is everything you've ever known a lie? Probably. Culture. It's the air we breathe, and we don't often think about it, but should Christians have a unique "culture" that's distinct from the culture of their community? Intro/Outro music from bensound.com

Jay's Analysis
The Vatican, Natural Theology & The Denial of the Trinity: Open Forum Q n A Debate

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 171:52


Part 2 due to stream issues. Today we will have open forum Q n A and debate concerning the Vatican support for the new "Abrahamic Faith Center" based on Francis' joint statement with the Grand Imam, with the explicit acceptance of humanism. Having become primarily a geopolitical tool / NGO, the Vatican is now positioning itself to become the head of the world religions, with a new sense of "Petrine Office" extending to a federation of the world religions. Shedding any pretenses of traditional Christianity, the Vatican is openly fostering the Antichrist system of the world, just as Dostoyevsky's famous Grand Inquisitor chapter predicted it would. As a result, the Roman Catholic world is captive to various strong delusions causing them to double down on bizarre, heterodox ideas that result in the denial of the Triad and the necessity of Christ for salvation. We will be taking superchats and Discord questions and debate challenges.

Jay's Analysis
Do the Monotheistic Religions Worship the Same God?

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 52:35


Part1: Today we will have open forum Q n A and debate concerning the Vatican support for the new "Abrahamic Faith Center" based on Francis' joint statement with the Grand Imam, with the explicit acceptance of humanism. Having become primarily a geopolitical tool / NGO, the Vatican is now positioning itself to become the head of the world religions, with a new sense of "Petrine Office" extending to a federation of the world religions. Shedding any pretenses of traditional Christianity, the Vatican is openly fostering the Antichrist system of the world, just as Dostoyevsky's famous Grand Inquisitor chapter predicted it would. As a result, the Roman Catholic world is captive to various strong delusions causing them to double down on bizarre, heterodox ideas that result in the denial of the Triad and the necessity of Christ for salvation. We will be taking superchats and Discord questions and debate challenges.

FellowshipNWA Sunday Morning
I Timothy: Warning Against Heresy & Greed (Full Service)

FellowshipNWA Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


FellowshipNWA Mosaic
I Timothy: Warning Against Heresy & Greed (Full Service)

FellowshipNWA Mosaic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


The Remembrancers' Retreat | A Horus Heresy Warhammer 30K Podcast
The Khan, Dominators, & Armor Through the Ages

The Remembrancers' Retreat | A Horus Heresy Warhammer 30K Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 70:45


Jason, Austin, and Jesse discuss the exciting new Heresy content appearing recently! If you enjoy our programs, consider supporting our podcast through Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/RR30KPODCAST (https://www.patreon.com/RR30KPODCAST) Be sure to join our Discord Server! https://discord.gg/DCRDEej (https://discord.gg/DCRDEej) Thank you to everyone who listens, interacts, and gives us feedback! We sincerely appreciate it! Support this podcast

Screaming in the Cloud
Making Multi-Cloud Waves with Betty Junod

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:13


About Betty Betty Junod is the Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware helping organizations along their journey to cloud. This is her second time at VMware, having previously led product marketing for end user computing products.  Prior to VMware she held marketing leadership roles at Docker and solo.io in following the evolution of technology abstractions from virtualization, containers, to service mesh. She likes to hang out at the intersection of open source, distributed systems, and enterprise infrastructure software. @bettyjunod  Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/BettyJunod Vmware.com/cloud: https://vmware.com/cloud TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, I like to poke fun at a variety of different things, and that can range from technologies or approaches like multi-cloud, and that includes business functions like marketing, and sometimes it extends even to companies like VMware. My guest today is the Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware, so I'm basically spoilt for choice. Betty Junod, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today and tolerate what is no doubt going to be an interesting episode, one way or the other.Betty: Hey, Corey, thanks for having me. I've been a longtime follower, and I'm so happy to be here. And good to know that I'm kind of like the ultimate cross-section of all the things [laugh] that you can get snarky about.Corey: The only thing that's going to make that even better is if you tell me, “Oh, yeah, and I moonlight on a contract gig by naming AWS services.” And then I just won't even know where to go. But I'll assume they have to generate those custom names in-house.Betty: Yes. Yes, I think they do those there. I may comment on it after the fact.Corey: So, periodically I am, let's call it miscategorized, in my position on multi-cloud, which is that it's a worst practice that when you're designing something from scratch, you should almost certainly not be embracing unless you're targeting a very specific corner case. And I stand by that, but what that has been interpreted as by the industry, in many cases because people lack nuance when you express your opinions in tweet-sized format—who knew—as me saying, “Multi-cloud bad.” Maybe, maybe not. I'm not interested in assigning value judgment to it, but the reality is that there are an awful lot of multi-cloud deployments out there. And yes, some of them started off as, “We're going to migrate from one to the other,” and then people gave up and called it multi-cloud, but it is nuanced. VMware is a company that's been around for a long time. It has reinvented itself in a few different ways at different periods of its evolution, and it's still highly relevant. What is the Multi-Cloud Solutions group over at VMware? What do you folks do exactly?Betty: Yeah. And so I will start by multi-cloud; we're really taking it from a position of meeting the customer where they are. So, we know that if anything, the only thing that's a given in our industry is that there will be something new in the next six months, next year, and the whole idea of multi-cloud, from our perspective, is giving customers the optionality, so don't make it so that it's a closed thing for them. But if they decide—it's not that they're going to start, “Hey, I'm going to go to cloud, so day one, I'm going to go all-in on every cloud out there.” That doesn't make sense, right, as—Corey: But they all gave me such generous free credit offers when I founded my startup; I feel obligated to at this point.Betty: I mean, you can definitely create your account, log in, play around, get familiar with the console, but going from zero to being fully operationalized team to run production workloads with the same kind of SLAs you had before, across all three clouds—what—within a week is not feasible for people getting trained up and actually doing that. Our position is that meeting customers where they are and knowing that they may change their mind, or something new will come up—a new service—and they really want to use a new service from let's say GCP or AWS, they want to bring that with an application they already have or build a new app somewhere, we want to help enable that choice. And whether that choice applies to taking an existing app that's been running in their data center—probably on vSphere—to a new place, or building new stuff with containers, Kubernetes, serverless, whatever. So, it's all just about helping them actually take advantage of those technologies.Corey: So, it's interesting to me about your multi-cloud group, for lack of a better term, is there a bunch of things fall under its umbrella? I believe Bitnami does—or as I insist on calling it, ‘bitten-A-M-I'—I believe that SaltStack—which I wrote a little bit of once upon a time, which tells me you folks did no due diligence whatsoever because everything I've ever written is molten garbage—Betty: Not [unintelligible 00:04:33].Corey: And—so to be clear, SaltStack is good; just the parts that I wrote are almost certainly terrible because have you met me?Betty: I'll make a note. [laugh].Corey: You have Wavefront, you have CloudHealth, you have a bunch of other things in the portfolio, and yeah, all those things do work across multiple clouds, but there's nothing that makes using any of those things a particularly bad idea even if you're all-in on one cloud provider, too. So, it's a portfolio that applies to a whole bunch have different places from your perspective, but it can be used regardless of where folks stand ideologically.Betty: Yes. So, this goes back to the whole idea that we meet the customers where they are and help them do what they want to do. So, with that, making sure these technologies that we have work on all the clouds, whether that be in the data center or the different vendors, so that if a customer wants to just use one, or two, or three, it's fine. That part's up to them.Corey: The challenge I've run into is that—and maybe this is a ‘Twitter Bubble' problem, but unfortunately, having talked to a whole bunch of folks in different contexts, I know it isn't—there's almost this idea that you have to be incredibly dogmatic about a particular technology that you're into. I joke periodically about the Rust Evangelism Strikeforce where their entire job is talking about using Rust; their primary IDE is PowerPoint because they're giving talks all the time about it rather than writing code. And great, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but there are the idea of a technology purist who is taking, “Things must be this way,” well past a point of being reasonable, and disregarding the reality that, yeah, the world is messy in a way that architectural diagrams never are.Betty: Yeah. The architectural diagrams are always 2D, right? Back to that PowerPoint slide: how can I make pretty boxes? And then I just redraw a line because something new came out. But you and I have been in this industry for a long time, there's always something new.And I think that's where the dogmatism gets problematic because if you say we're only going to do containers this way—you know, I could see Swarm and Kubernetes, or all-in on AWS and we're going to use all the things from AWS and there's only this way. Things are generational and so the idea that you want to face the reality and say that there is a little bit of everything. And then it's kind of like, how do you help them with a part of that? As a vendor, it could be like, “I'm going to help us with a part of it, or I'm going to help address certain eras of it.” That's where I think it gets really bad to be super dogmatic because it closes you off to possibly something new and amazing, new thinking, different ways to solve the same problem.Corey: That's the problem is left to our own devices, most of us who are building things, especially for random ideas, yeah, there's a whole modern paradigm of how I can build these things, but I'm going to shortcut to the thing I know best, which may very well the architectures that I was using 15 years ago, maybe tools that I was using 15 years ago. There's a reason that Vim is still as popular as it is. Would I recommend it to someone who's a new user? Absolutely not; it's user-hostile, but back in my days of being a grumpy sysadmin, you learned vi because it was on everything you could get into, and you never knew in what environment you were going to be encountering stuff. These days, you aren't logging in to remote systems to manage them, in most cases, and when it happens, it's a rarity and a bug.The world changes; different approaches change, but you have to almost reinvent your entire philosophy on how things work and what your career trajectory looks like. And you have to give up aspects of what you've considered to be part of your identity and embrace something new. It was hard for me to accept that, for example, Docker and the wave of containerization that was rolling out was effectively displacing the world that I was deep in of configuration management with Puppet and with Salt. And the world changes; I said, “Okay, now I'll work on cloud.” And if something else happens, and mainframes are coming back again, instead, well, I'm probably not going to sit here railing against the tide. It would be ridiculous to do that from my perspective. But I definitely understand the temptation to fight against it.Betty: Mm-hm. You know, we spend so much time learning parts of our craft, so it's hard to say, “I'm now not going to be an expert in my thing,” and I have to admit that something else might be better and I have to be a newbie again. That can be scary for someone who's spent a lot of time to be really well-versed in a specific technology. It's funny that you bring up the whole Docker and Puppet config management; I just had a healthy discussion over Slack with some friends. Some people that we know and comment about some of the newer areas of config management, and the whole idea is like, is it a new category or an evolution of? And I went back to the point that I made earlier is like, it's generations. We continually find new ways to solve a problem, and one thing now is it [sigh] it just all goes so much faster, now. There's a new thing every week. [laugh] it seems sometimes.Corey: It is, and this is the joy of having been in this industry for a while—toxic and broken in many ways though it is—is that you go through enough cycles of seeing today's shiny, new, amazing thing become tomorrow's legacy garbage that we're stuck supporting, which means that—at least from my perspective—I tend to be fairly conservative with adopting new technologies with respect to things that matter. That means that I'm unlikely to wind up looking at the front page of Hacker News to pick a framework to build a banking system in, and I'm unlikely to be the first kid on my block to update to a new file system or database, just because, yeah, if I break a web server, we all laugh, we make fun of the fact that it throws an error for ten minutes, and then things are back up and running. If I break the database, there's a terrific chance that we don't have a company anymore. So, it's the ‘mistakes will show' area and understanding when to be aggressive and when to hold back as far as jumping into new technologies is always a nuanced decision. And let's be clear as well, an awful lot of VMware's customers are large companies that were founded, somehow—this is possible—before 2010. Imagine that. Did people—Betty: [laugh]. I know, right?Corey: —even have businesses or lives back then? I thought we all used horse-driven carriages and whatnot. And they did not build on cloud—not because of any perception of distrust; because it functionally did not exist at the time that they were building these things. And, “Oh, come out into the cloud. It's fine now.” It… yeah, that application is generating hundreds of millions in revenue every quarter. Maybe we treat that with a little bit of respect, rather than YOLO-ing it into some Lambda-driven monster that's constructed—Betty: One hundred—Corey: —out of popsicle sticks and glue.Betty: —percent. Yes. I think people forget that. And it's not that these companies don't want to go to cloud. It's like, “I can't break this thing. That could be, like, millions of dollars lost, a second.”Corey: I write my weekly newsletters in a custom monstrosity of a system that has something like 30-some-odd Lambda functions, a bunch of API gateways that are tied together with things, and periodically there are challenges with it that break as the system continues to evolve. And that's fine. And I'm okay with using something like that as a part of my workflow because absolute worst case, I can go back to the way that my newsletter was originally written: in Google Docs, and it doesn't look anywhere near the same way, and it goes back to just a text email that starts off with, “I have messed up.” And that would be a better story than most of the stuff I put out as a common basis. Similarly, yeah, durability is important.If this were a serious life-critical app, it would not just be hanging out in a single region of a single provider; it would probably be on one provider, as I've talked about, but going multi-region and having backups to a different cloud provider. But if AWS takes a significant enough outage to us-west-2 in Oregon, to the point where my ridiculous system cannot function to write the newsletter, that too, is a different handwritten email that goes out that week because there's no announcement they've made that anyone's going to give the slightest toss about, given the fact that it's basically Cloud Armageddon. So, we'll see. It's about understanding the blast radius and understanding your use case.Betty: Yep. A hundred percent.Corey: So, you've spent a fair bit of time doing interesting things in your career. This is your second outing at VMware, and in the interim, you were at solo.io for a bit, and before that you were in a marketing leadership role at Docker. Let's dive in, if you will. Given that you are no longer working at Docker, they recently made an announcement about a pricing model change, whereas it is free to use Docker Desktop for anyone's personal projects, and for small companies.But if you're a large company, which they define is ten million in revenue a year or 250 employees—those two things don't go alike, but okay—then you have to wind up having a paid plan. And I will say it's a novel approach, but I'm curious to hear what you have to say about it.Betty: Well, I'd say that I saw that there was a lot of flutter about that news, and it's kind of a, it doesn't matter where you draw the line in the sand for the tier, there's always going to be some pushback on it. So, you have to draw a line somewhere. I haven't kept up with the details around the pricing models that they've implemented since I left Docker a few years ago, but monetization is a really important part for a startup. You do have to make money because there are people that you have to pay, and eventually, you want to get off of raising money from VCs all the time. Docker Desktop has been something that has been a real gem from a local developer experience, right, giving the—so that has been well-received by the community.I think there was an enterprise application for it, but when I saw that, I was like, yeah, okay, cool. They need to do something with that. And then it's always hard to see the blowback. I think sometimes with the years that we've had with Docker, it's kind of like no matter what they do, the Twitterverse and Hacker News is going to just give them a hard time. I mean, that is my honest opinion on that. If they didn't do it, and then, say, they didn't make the kind of revenue they needed, people would—that would become another Twitter thread and Hacker News blow up, and if they do it, you'll still have that same reaction.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: It seems to be that Docker has been trying to figure out how to monetize for a very long time because let's be clear here; I think it is difficult to overstate just how impactful and transformative Docker was to the industry. I gave a talk “Heresy in the Church of Docker” that listed a bunch of things that didn't get solved with Docker, and I expected to be torn to pieces for it, and instead I was invited to give it at ContainerCon one year. And in time, a lot of those things stopped being issues because the industry found answers to it. Now, unfortunately, some of those answers look like Kubernetes, but that's neither here nor there. But now it's, okay, so giving everything that you do that is core and central away for free is absolutely part of what drove the adoption that it saw, but goodwill from developers is not the sort of thing that generally tends to lead to interesting revenue streams.So, they had to do something. And they've tried a few different things that haven't seemed to really pan out. Then they spun off that pesky part of their business that made money selling support contracts, over to Mirantis, which was apparently looking for something now that OpenStack was no longer going to be a thing, and Kubernetes is okay, “Well, we'll take Docker enterprise stuff.” Great. What do they do, as far as turning this into a revenue model?There's a lot of the, I guess, noise that I tend to ignore when it comes to things like this because angry people on Twitter, or on Hacker News, or other terrible cesspools on the internet, are not where this is going to be decided. What I'm interested in is what the actual large companies are going to say about it. My problem with looking at it from the outside is that it feels as if there's significant ambiguity across the board. And if there's one thing that I know about large company procurement departments, it's that they do not like ambiguity. This change takes effect in three or four months, which is underwear-outside-the-pants-superhero-style speed for a lot of those companies, and suddenly, for a lot of developers, they're so far removed from the procurement side of the house that they are never going to have a hope of getting that approved on a career-wide timespan.And suddenly, for a lot of those companies, installing and running Docker Desktop just became a fireable offense because from the company's perspective, the sheer liability side of it, if they were getting subject to audit, is going to be a problem. I don't believe that Docker is going to start pulling Oracle-like audit tactics, but no procurement or risk management group in the world is going to take that on faith. So, the problem is not that it's expensive because that can be worked around; it's not that there's anything inherently wrong with their costing model. The problem is the ambiguity of people who just don't know, “Does this apply to me or doesn't this apply to me?” And that is the thing that is the difficult, painful part.And now, as a result, the [unintelligible 00:17:28] groups and their champions of Docker Desktop are having to spend a lot more time, energy, and thought on this than it would simply be for cutting a check because now it's a risk org-wide, and how do we audit to figure out who's installed this previously free open-source thing? Now what?Betty: Yeah, I'll agree with you on that because once you start making it into corporate-issued software that you have to install on the desktop, that gets a lot harder. And how do you know who's downloaded it? Like my own experience, right? I have a locked-down laptop; I can't just install whatever I want. We have a software portal, which lets me download the approved things.So, it's that same kind of model. I'd be curious because once you start looking at from a large enterprise perspective, your developers are working on IP, so you don't want that on something that they've downloaded using their personal account because now it sits—that code is sitting with their personal account that's using this tool that's super productive for them, and that transition to then go to an enterprise, large enterprise and going through a procurement cycle, getting a master services agreement, that's no small feat. That's a whole motion that is different than someone swiping a credit card or just downloading something and logging in. It's similar to what you see sometimes with the—how many people have signed up for and paid 99 bucks for Dropbox, and then now all of a sudden, it's like, “Wow, we have all of megacorp [laugh] signed up, and then now someone has to sell them a plan to actually manage it and make sure it's not just sitting on all these personal drives.”Corey: Well, that's what AWS's original sales motion looked a lot like they would come in and talk to the CTO or whatnot at giant companies. And the CTO would say, “Great, why should we pick AWS for our cloud needs?” And the answer is, “Oh, I'm sorry. You have 87 distinct accounts within your organization that we've [unintelligible 00:19:12] up for you. We're just trying to offer you some management answers and unify the billing and this, and probably give you a discount as well because there is price breaks available at certain sizing.” It was a different conversation. It's like, “I'm not here to sell you anything. We're already there. We're just trying to formalize the relationship.” And that is a challenge.Again, I'm not trying to cast aspersions on procurement groups. I mean, I do sell enterprise consulting here at The Duckbill Group; we deal with an awful lot of procurement groups who have processes and procedures that don't often align to the way that we do things as a ten-person, fully remote company. We do not have commercial vehicle insurance, for example, because we do not have a commercial vehicle and that is a prerequisite to getting the insurance, for one. We're unlikely to buy one to wind up satisfying some contractual requirements, so we have to go back and forth and get things like that removed. And that is the nature of the beast.And we can say yes, we can say no on a lot of those questionnaires, but, “It depends,” or, “I don't know,” is the sort of thing that's going to cause giant red flags and derail everything. But that is exactly what Docker is doing. Now, it's the well, we have a sort of sloppy, weird set of habits with some of our engineers around the bring your own device to work thing. So, that's the enterprise thing. Let me be very clear, here at The Duckbill Group, we have a policy of issuing people company machines, we manage them very lightly just to make sure the drives are encrypted, so they—and that the screensaver comes out with a password, so if someone loses a laptop, it's just, “Replace the hardware,” not, “We have a data breach.”Let's be clear here; we are responsible about these things. But beyond that, it's oh, you want to have some personal thing installed on your machine or do some work on that stuff? Fine. By all means. It's a situation of we have no policy against it; we understand this is how work happens, and we trust people to effectively be grownups.There are some things I would strongly suggest that any employee—ours or anyone else—not cross the streams on for obvious IP ownership rights and the rest, we have those conversations with our team for a reason. It's, understand the nuances of what you're doing, and we're always willing to throw hardware at people to solve these problems. Not every company is like that. And ten million in revenue is not necessarily a very large company. I was doing the math out for ten million in revenue or 250 employees; assuming that there's no outside investment—which with VC is always a weird thing—it's possible—barely—to have a $10 million in revenue company that has 250 employees, but if they're full time they are damn close to a $15 an hour minimum wage. So, who does it apply to? More people than you might believe.Betty: Yeah, I'm really curious to how they're going to like—like you say, if it takes place in three or four months, roll that out, and how would you actually track it and true that up for people? So.Corey: Yeah. And there are tools and processes to do this, but it's also not in anyone's roadmap because people are not sitting here on their annual planning periods—which is always aspirational—but no one's planning for, “Oh, yeah, Q3, one of our software suppliers is going to throw a real procurement wrench at us that we have to devote time, energy, resources, and budget to figure out.” And then you have a problem. And by resources, I do mean resources of basically assigning work and tooling and whatnot and energy, not people. People are humans, they are not resources; I will die on that hill.Betty: Well, you know, actually resource-wise, the thing that's interesting is when you say supplier, if it's something that people have been able to download for free so far, it's not considered a supplier. So, it's—now they're going to go from just a thing I can use and maybe you've let your developers use to now it has to be something that goes through the official internal vetting as being a supplier. So, that's just—it's a whole different ball game entirely.Corey: My last job before I started this place, was a highly regulated financial institution, and even grabbing things were available for free, “Well, hang on a minute because what license is it using and how is it going to potentially be incorporated?” And this stuff makes sense, and it's important. Now, admittedly, I have the advantage of a number of my engineering peers in that I've been married to a corporate attorney for 11 years and have insight into that side of the world, which to be clear, is all about risk mitigation which is helpful. It is a nuanced and difficult field to—as are most things once you get into them—and it's just the uncertainty that befuddles me a bit. I wish them well with it, truly I do. I think the world is better with an independent Docker in it, but I question whether this is going to find success. That said, it doesn't matter what I think; what matters is what customers say and do, and I'm really looking forward to seeing how it plays out.Betty: A hundred percent; same here. As someone who spent a good chunk of my life there, their mark on the industry is not to be ignored, like you said, with what happened with containers. But I do wish them well. There's lot of good people over there, it's some really cool tech, and I want to see a future for them.Corey: One last topic I want to get into before we wind up wrapping this episode is that you are someone who was nominated to come on the show by a couple of folks, which is always great. I'm always looking for recommendations on this. But what's odd is that you are—if we look at it and dig a little bit beneath the titles and whatnot, you even self-describe as your history is marketing leadership positions. It is uncommon for engineering-types to recommend that I talk to marketing folks.s personally I think that is a mistake; I consider myself more of a marketer than not in some respects, but it is uncommon, which means I have to ask you, what is your philosophy of marketing because it very clearly is differentiated in the public eye.Betty: I'm flattered. I will say that—and this goes to how I hire people and how I coach teams—it's you have to be super curious because there's a ton of bad marketing out there, where it's just kind of like, “Hey, we do these five things and we always do these five things: blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.” But I think it's really being curious about what is the thing that you're marketing? There are people who are just focused on the function of marketing and not the thing. Because you're doing your marketing job in the service of a thing, this new widget, this new whatever, and you got to be super curious about it.And I'll tell you that, for me, it's really hard for me to market something if I'm not excited about it. I have to personally be super excited about the tech or something happening in the industry, and it's, kind of like, an all-in thing for me. And so in that sense, I do spend a ton of time with engineers and end-users, and I really try to understand what's going on. I want to understand how the thing works, and I always ask them, “Well”—so I'll ask the engineers, like, “So… okay, this sounds really cool. You just described this new feature and you're super excited about it because you wrote it, but how is your end-user, the person you're building this for, how did they do this before? Help me understand. How did they do this before and why is this better?”Just really dig into it because for me, I want to understand it deeply before I talk about it. I think the thing is, it shows a tremendous amount of respect for the builder, and then to try to really be empathetic, to understand what they're doing and then partner with them—I mean, this sounds so business-y the way I'm talking about this—but really be a partner with them and just help them make their thing really successful. I'm like the other end; you're going to build this great thing and now I'm going to make it sound like it's the best thing that's ever happened. But to do that, I really need to deeply understand what it is, and I have to care about it, too. I have to care about it in the way that you care about it.Corey: I cannot effectively market or sell something that I don't believe in, personally. I also, to be clear because you are a marketing professional—or at least far more of one than I ever was—I do not view what I do is marketing; I view it as spectacle. And it's about telling stories to people, it's about learning what the market thinks about it, and that informs product design in many respects. It's about understanding the product itself. It's about being able to use the product.And if people are listening to this and think, “Wait a minute, that sounds more like DevRel.” I have news for you. DevRel is marketing, they're just scared to tell you that. And I know people are going to disagree with me on that. You're wrong. But that's okay; reasonable people can disagree.And that's how I see it is that, okay, I'll talk to people building the service, I'll talk to people using the service, but then I'm going to build something with the service myself because until then, it's all a game of who sounds the most convincing in the stories that they tell. But okay, you can tell an amazing story about something, but if it falls over when I tried to use it, well, I'm sorry, you're not being accurate in your descriptions of it.Betty: A hundred percent. I hate to say, like, you're storytellers, but that's a big part of it, but it's kind of like you want to tell the story, so you do something to that people believe a certain thing. But that's part of a curated experience because you want them to try this thing in a certain way. Because you've designed it for something. “I built a spoon. I want you to use that to eat your soup because you can't eat soup with a fork.”So, then you'll have this amazing soup-eating experience, but if I build you a spoon and then not give you any directions and you start throwing it at cars, you're going to be like, “This thing sucks.” So, I kind of think of it in that way. To your point of it has to actually work, it's like, but they also need to know, “What am I supposed to use it for?”Corey: The problem I've always had on some visceral level with formal marketing departments for companies is that they can say that a product that they sell is good, they can say that the product is great, or they can choose to say nothing at all about that product, but when there's a product in the market that is clearly a turd, a marketing department is never going to be able to say that, which I think erodes its authenticity in many respects. I understand the constraints behind, that truly I do, but it's the one superpower I think that I bring to the table where even when I do sponsorship stuff it's, you can buy my attention but not my opinion. Because the authenticity of me being trusted to call them like I see them, for lack of a better term, to my mind at least outweighs any short-term benefit from saying good things about a product that doesn't deserve them. Now, I've been wrong about things, sure. I have also been misinformed in both directions, thinking something is great when it's not, or terrible when it isn't or not understanding the use case, and I am thrilled to engage in those debates. “But this is really expensive when you run for this use case,” and the answer can be, “Well, it's not designed for that use case.” But the answer should not be, “No it's not.” I promise you, expensive is in the eye of the customer not the person building the thing.Betty: Yes. This goes back to I have to believe in the thing. And I do agree it's, like not [sigh]—it's not a panacea. You're not going to make Product A and it's going to solve everything. But being super clear and focused on what it is good for, and then please just try it in this way because that's what we built it for.Corey: I want to thank you for taking the time to have a what for some people is no doubt going to be perceived as a surprisingly civil conversation about things that I have loud, heated opinions about. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Betty: Well, they can follow me on Twitter. But um, I'd say go to vmware.com/cloud for our work thing.Corey: Exactly. VM where? That's right. VM there. And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:07].Betty: [laugh].Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Betty: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Betty Junod, Senior Director of Multi-Cloud Solutions at VMware. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a loud, ranting comment at the end. Then, if you work for a company that is larger than 250 people or $10 million in revenue, please also Venmo me $5.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Cantankerous Catholic
Exposed: Pope Francis is a Communist

The Cantankerous Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 59:35


Episode 148In episode 145, I played the audio summary of a report from the Lepanto Institute titled Vatican Agency Directly Tied to Communism, Abortion, and Idolatry. As a result of that report, I asked the head of the Lepanto Institute, Michael Hichborn, to come on the show and talk about it. During the interview Michael informed us of something much more devastating, and you're going to hear it straight from the horses mouth. ResourcesIn an effort to provide you with the best, most helpful experience we can, any resource mentioned in The Cantankerous Catholic podcast will always be listed in this section. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases on links that are for purchases made from Amazon. This costs you nothing, but Amazon pays me a small commission on purchases made through those links. This helps to support this apostolate. Register for our next free Sharing the Catholic Faith webinar: https://webinar.getresponse.com/BhGUM/indefectibility-infallibility-heresy-schism--apostasy (Indefectibility, Infallibility, Heresy, Schism & Apostasy). (There will be a video recording for those who can't attend the live event, but you must register to get the link.) https://wwb.gr8.com/ (Sixpack System Bulletin Inserts) The Lepanto Institute & Michael HichbornMichael Hichborn's email address. https://lepantoin.org/ (The Lepanto Institute) https://lepantoin.org/pope-francis-encourages-communist-groups-as-veritable-invisible-army/ (Pope Francis Encourages Communist Groups as “Veritable Invisible Army”) https://lepantoin.org/vatican-agency-directly-tied-to-communism-abortion-and-witchcraft/ (Vatican Agency Directly Tied to Communism, Abortion, and Idolatry) https://www.complicitclergy.com/ (Complicit Clergy) https://courageousclergy.com/ (Courageous Clergy) The Wanderer Catholic Newspaper. Get one month for one dollar by texting the word “news” to 830-331-5729. https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=85YEDSUJHVN42&source=url (Help Keep the Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy Apostolate Alive) FOR CHECKS: make checks payable to Cassock Media, P.O. Box 41, Villa Ridge, Missouri 63089 https://app.getresponse.com/site2/joe_sixpack_answers/?u=BhGUM&webforms_id=YZQe (I Want To Learn More About The Catholic Church!) https://mariancatechist.com/product/basic-catholic-catechism-course/ (Marian Catechist Apostolate Basic Course) https://www.avoicelikebutter.com/ (Rick Stender)—Official Voice of The Cantankerous Catholic SubscribeMake sure you never miss an episode of The Cantankerous Catholic by subscribing through one of these links, or wherever else you get your podcasts. https://thecantankerouscatholic.captivate.fm/listen (Subscribe to The Cantankerous Catholic here) Catholic News Notes#5 https://www.dailywire.com/news/supreme-court-will-consider-first-of-two-abortion-laws-monday (Supreme Court Will Consider First Of Two Abortion Laws Monday) #4 https://www.dailywire.com/news/psaki-tests-positive-for-coronavirus (Psaki Tests Positive For Coronavirus) #3 https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/campaigns/scary-poll-for-biden-and-democrats-on-halloween ('Scary' poll for Biden and Democrats on Halloween) #2 https://mynorthwest.com/3210900/rantz-seattle-fire-units-offline-spends-overtime/ (Rantz: Seattle Fire turns units offline, spends hundreds of thousands in overtime) #1 https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/249458/spanish-bishop-critical-of-joe-biden-s-claim-that-pope-said-he-can-receive-communion (Spanish bishop critical of Joe Biden's claim that pope said he can receive Communion) Catholic BootcampThis week Joe Sixpack—The Every Catholic Guy's Catholic Bootcamp is titled For the Love of God. Catholic QuotesThis week's quote is from St. Therese of Lisieux. Catholic StoriesThis episode features a story about a little Indian girl. Joe Sixpack's Stuffhttps://www.joesixpackanswers.com/ (JoeSixpackAnswers.com)... Support this podcast

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
The Border Princes Episode 8 - The One Where The Lads Celebrate Freedom Day (NSW)

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


On this Episode of the Border Princes Podcast we continue our magic series with the Lore of Light!Jeff isn't drunkSean disappears mysteriously halfway through the showJack plays some gamesAs well as our usual content with what we have been up to and the mailbag.Into/Outro- Furious: SinyellsMusic break- Power Rangers: Punk Rock Factory                    - Be Quite And Drive: Deftones Contact us on theborderprincespodcast@gmail.comFollow us on instagram! @theborderprincespodcastAnd join our facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/6374647945878951/Follow on Podbean for extra content! https://theborderprincespodcast.podbean.com/

Fortune's Wheel: A Podcast History of the Late Middle Ages

Happy Halloween 2021, Everyone! And I can't think of a single better way to spend Halloween than to learn about some good old fashioned heresy! I hope you enjoy the show! And be safe out there today!

YUTORAH: R' Moshe Taragin -- Recent Shiurim
A Midrash for Toldot: Is Heresy Always Theological?; Intellectual Humility and Manipulative Personalities

YUTORAH: R' Moshe Taragin -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 10:28


Footnoting History
History for Halloween VIII

Footnoting History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 15:40


Oh my gosh, we're back again! Our annual tradition continues as this year we bring you yet another round of creepy and fantastic history for the scariest holiday of the year.   Click here for tips for Teaching with Podcasts! Or here to buy some FH Merch! We are now on Youtube with accessible captions checked by members of our team! And you can find out how to support us through our FH Patreon to help keep our content open access!

Good Doctrine
Ep. 98 | Who Do We Work With?

Good Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 39:03


We're notoriously curmudgeonly... and nothing changes in this episode! We speak together about what it takes for Christians from different "camps" to work together effectively. Intro/Outro music from bensound.com

Grace in Focus
Will We Have a Better / Deeper Understanding of 1 John 1:9 if We Understand the Gnostic Heresy John Was Trying to Correct?

Grace in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 13:50


On this episode of Grace in Focus radio, Bob and Shawn will be discussing 1 John 1:9. First, Bob will provide some background to the Gnostic Heresy. In addition, we will hear the guys unpack the concept of forgiveness. Is forgiveness a positional benefit, a fellowship issue or both? You won’t want to miss this

The Doxology Podcast
Heresy Month In Review

The Doxology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 50:20


We've changed up the formula just a bit. Instead of ending with one more heresy from church history, the guys decided to revisit some of the major questions that arose this month. Will heretics be in heaven? Is Semi-Donatism a thing? Why should we even study heresy? Tune in... if you dare...   Find us on: Email: doxologypodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @doxologypodcast

Screaming in the Cloud
Heresy in the Church of Docker Desktop with Scott Johnston

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 37:02


About ScottScott first typed ‘docker run' in 2013 and hasn't looked back. He's been with Docker since 2014 in a variety of leadership roles and currently serves as CEO. His experience previous to Docker includes Sun Microsystems, Puppet, Netscape, Cisco, and Loudcloud (parent of Opsware). When not fussing with computers he spends time with his three kids fussing with computers.Links: Docker: https://www.docker.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/scottcjohnston TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Once upon a time, I started my public speaking career as a traveling contract trainer for Puppet; I've talked about this before. And during that time, I encountered someone who worked there as an exec, Scott Johnston, who sat down, talked to me about how I viewed things, and then almost immediately went to go work at Docker instead. Today's promoted episode brings Scott on to the show. Scott, you fled to get away from me, became the CEO of Docker over the past, oh what is it, seven years now. You're still standing there, and I'm not making fun of Docker quite the way that I used to. First, thanks for joining me.Scott: Great to be here, Corey. Thanks for the invitation. I'm not sure I was fleeing you, but we can recover that one at another time.Corey: Oh, absolutely. In that era, one of my first talks that I started giving that anyone really paid any attention to was called, “Heresy in the Church of Docker,” where I listed about 10 to 13 different things that Docker didn't seem to have answers for, like network separation, security, audit logging, et cetera, et cetera. And it was a fun talk that I used to basically learn how to speak publicly without crying before and after the talk. And in time, it wound up aging out as these problems got addressed, but what surprised me at the time was how receptive the Docker community was to the idea of a talk that wound up effectively criticizing something that for, well, a number of them it felt a lot of the time like it wasn't that far from a religion; it was very hype-driven: “Docker, Docker, Docker” was a recurring joke. Docker has changed a lot. The burning question that I think I want to start this off with is that it's 2021; what is Docker? Is it a technology? Is it a company? Is it a religion? Is it a community? What is Docker?Scott: Yes. I mean that sincerely. Often, the first awareness or the first introduction that newcomers have is in fact the community, before they get their hands on the product, before they learn that there's a company behind the product is they have a colleague who is, either through a Zoom or sitting next to them in some places, or in a coffee shop, and says, “Hey, you got to try this thing called Docker.” And they lean over—either virtually or physically—and look at the laptop of their friend who's promoting Docker, and they see a magical experience. And that is the introduction of so many of our community members, having spoken with them and heard their own kind of journeys.And so that leads to like, “Okay, so why the excitement? Why did the friend lean over to the other friend and introduce?” It's because the tools that Docker provides just helps devs get their app built and shipping faster, more securely, with choice, without being tied into any particular runtime, any particular infrastructure. And that combination has proven to be a breakthrough dopamine hit to developers since the very beginning, since 2013, when Docker is open-source.Corey: It feels like originally, the breakthrough of Docker, that people will say, “Oh, containers aren't new. We've had that going back to LPARs on mainframes.” Yes, I'm aware, but suddenly, it became easy to work with and didn't take tremendous effort to get unified environments. It was cynically observed at the time by lots of folks smarter than I am, that the big breakthrough Docker had was how to make my MacBook look a lot more like a Linux server in production. And we talk about breaking down silos between ops and dev, but in many ways, this just meant that the silo became increasingly irrelevant because, “Works on my machine” was no longer a problem.“Well, you better back up your email because your laptop's about to go into production in that case.” Containers made it easier and that was a big deal. It seems, on some level, like there was a foray where Docker the company was moving into the world of, “Okay, now we're going to run a lot of these containers in production for you, et cetera.” It really feels like recently, the company as a whole and the strategy has turned towards getting back to its roots of solving developer problems and positioning itself as a developer tool. Is that a fair characterization?Scott: A hundred percent. That's very intentional, as well. We certainly had good products, and great customers, and we're solving problems for customers on the ops side, I'll call it, but when we stood back—this is around 2019—and said, “Where's the real… joy?” For lack of a better word, “Where's the real joy from a community standpoint, from a product experience standpoint, from a what do we do different and better and more capable than anyone else in the ecosystem?” It was that developer experience. And so the reset that you're referring to in November 2019, was to give us the freedom to go back and just focus the entire company's efforts on the needs of developers without any other distractions from a revenue, customer, channel, so on and so forth.Corey: So, we knew this was going to come up in the conversation, but as of a couple of weeks ago—as of the time of this recording—you announced a somewhat, well, let's say controversial change in how the pricing and licensing works. Now, as of—taking effect at the end of this year—the end of January, rather, of next year—Docker Desktop is free for folks to use for individual use, and that's fine, and for corporate use, Docker Desktop also remains free until you are a large company defined by ten million in revenue a year and/or 250 employees or more. And that was interesting and I don't think I'd seen that type of requirement placed before on what was largely an open-source project that's now a developer tool. I believe there are closed-source aspects of it as well for the desktop experience, but please don't quote me on that; I'm not here to play internet lawyer engineer. But at that point, the internet was predictably upset about this because it is easy to yell about any change that is coming, regardless.I was less interested in that than I am in what the reception has been from your corporate customers because, let's be clear, users are important, community is important, but goodwill will not put food on the table past a certain point. There has to be a way to make a company sustainable, there has to be a recurring revenue model. I realize that you know this, but I'm sure there are people listening to this who are working in development somewhere who are, “Wait, you mean I need to add more value than I cost?” It was a hard revelation for [laugh] me back when I had been in the industry a few years—Scott: [laugh]. Sure.Corey: —and I'm still struggling with that—Scott: Sure.Corey: Some days.Scott: You and me both. [laugh].Corey: So, what has the reaction been from folks who have better channels of communicating with you folks than angry Twitter threads?Scott: Yeah. Create surface area for a discussion, Corey. Let's back up and talk on a couple points that you hit along the way there. One is, “What is Docker Desktop?” Docker Desktop is not just Docker Engine.Docker Desktop is a way in which we take Docker Engine, Compose, Kubernetes, all important tools for developers building modern apps—Docker Build, so on and so forth—and we provide an integrated engineered product that is engineered for the native environments of Mac and Windows, and soon Linux. And so we make it super easy to get the container runtime, Kubernetes stack, the networking, the CLI, Compose, we make it super easy just to get that up and running and configured with smart defaults, secured, hardened, and importantly updated. So, any vulnerabilities patched and so on and so forth. The point is, it's a product that is based on—to your comments—upstream open-source technologies, but it is an engineered commercial product—Docker Desktop is.Corey: Docker Desktop is a fantastic tool; I use it myself. I could make a bunch of snide comments that on Mac, it's basically there to make sure the fans are still working on the laptop, but again, computers are hard. I get that. It's incredibly handy to have a graphical control panel. It turns out that I don't pretend to understand those people, but some folks apparently believe that there are better user interfaces than text and an 80-character-wide terminal window. I don't pretend to get those people, but not everyone has the joy of being a Linux admin for far too long. So, I get it, making it more accessible, making it easy, is absolutely worth using.Scott: That's right.Corey: It's not a hard requirement to run it on a laptop-style environment or developer workstation, but it makes it really convenient.Scott: Before Docker desktop, one had to install a hypervisor, install a Linux VM, install Docker Engine on that Linux VM, bridge between the VM and the local CLI on the native desktop—like, lots of setup and maintenance and tricky stuff that can go wrong. Trust me how many times I stubbed my own toes on putting that together. And so Docker Desktop is designed to take all of that setup nonsense overhead away and just let the developer focus on the app. That's what the product is, and just talking about where it came from, and how it uses these other upstream technologies. Yes, and so we made a move on August 31, as you noted, and the motivation was the following: one is, we started seeing large organizations using Docker Desktop at scale.When I say ‘at scale,' not one or two or ten developers; like, hundreds and thousands of developers. And they were clamoring for capabilities to help them manage those developer environments at scale. Second is, we saw them getting a lot of benefit in terms of productivity, and choice, and security from using Docker Desktop, and so we stood back and said, “Look, for us to scale our business, we're at 10-plus million monthly active developers today. We know there's 45 million developers coming in this decade; how do we keep scaling while giving a free experience, but still making sure we can fund our engineers and deliver features and additional value?” We looked at other projects, Corey.The first thing we did is we looked outside our four walls, said, “How have other projects with free and open-source components navigated these waters?” And so the thresholds that you just mentioned, the 250 employees and the ten million revenue, were actually thresholds that we saw others put in place to draw lines between what is available completely for free and what is available for those users that now need to purchase subscription if they're using it to create value for their organizations. And we're very explicit about that. You could be using Docker for training, you could be using Docker for eval in those large organizations; we're not going to chase you or be looking to you to step up to a subscription. However, if you're using Docker Desktop in those environments, to build applications that run your business or that are creating value for your customers, then purchasing a subscription is a way for us to continue to invest in a product that the ecosystem clearly loves and is getting a lot of value out of. And so, that was again, the premise of this change. So, now to the root of your question is, so what's the reaction? We're very, very pleased. First off, yes, there were some angry voices out there.Corey: Yeah. And I want to be clear, I'm not trivializing people who feel upset.Scott: No.Corey: When you're suddenly using a thing that is free and discovering that, well, now you have to pay money for it, people are not generally going to be happy about that.Scott: No.Corey: When people are viewed themselves as part of the community, of contributing to what they saw as a technical revolution or a scrappy underdog and suddenly they find themselves not being included in some way, shape or form, it's natural to be upset, I don't want to trivialize—Scott: Not at all.Corey: People's warm feelings toward Docker. It was a big part of a lot of folks' personality, for better or worse, [laugh] for a few years in there. But the company needs to be sustainable, so what I'm really interested in is what has that reaction been from folks who are, for better or worse, “Yes, yes, we love Docker, but I don't get to sign $100,000 deals because I just really like the company I'm paying the money to. There has to be business value attached to that.”Scott: That's right. That's right. And to your point, we're not trivializing either the reaction by the community, it was encouraging to see many community members got right away what we're doing, they saw that still, a majority of them can continue using Docker for free under the Docker Personal subscription, and that was also intentional. And you saw on the internet and on Twitter and other social media, you saw them come and support the company's moves. And despite some angry voices in there, there was overwhelmingly positive.So, to your question, though, since August 31, we've been overwhelmed, actually, by the positive response from businesses that use Docker Desktop to build applications and run their businesses. And when I say overwhelmed, we were tracking—because Docker Desktop has a phone-home capability—we had a rough idea of what the baseline usage of Docker Desktops were out there. Well, it turns out, in some cases, there are ten times as many Docker Desktops inside organizations. And the average seems to be settling in around three times to four times as many. And we are already closing business, Corey.In 12 business days, we have companies come through, say, “Yes, our developers use this product. Yes, it's a valuable product. We're happy to talk to a salesperson and give you over to procurement, and here we go.” So, you and I both been around long enough to know, like 12 working days to have a signed agreement with an enterprise agreement is unheard of.Corey: Yeah, but let's be very clear here, on The Duckbill Group's side of things where I do consulting projects, I sell projects to companies that are, “Great, this project will take, I don't know, four to six weeks, whatever it happens to be, and, yeah, you're going to turn a profit on this project in about the first four hours of the engagement.” It is basically push button and you will receive more money in your budget than you had when you started, and that is probably the easiest possible enterprise sale, and it still takes 60 to 90 days most of the time to close deals.Scott: That's right.Corey: Trying to get a procurement deal for software through enterprise procurement processes is one of those things when people say, “Okay, we're going to have a signature in Q3,” you have to clarify what year they're talking about. So, 12 days is unheard of.Scott: [laugh]. Yep. So, we've been very encouraged by that. And I'll just give you a rough numbers: the overall response is ten times our baseline expectations, which is why—maybe unanticipated question, or you going to ask it soon—we came back within two weeks—because we could see this curve hit right away on the 31st of August—we came back and said, “Great.” Now, that we have the confidence that the community and businesses are willing to support us and invest in our sustainability, invest in the sustainable, scalable Docker, we came and we accelerated—pulled forward—items in our roadmap for developers using Docker Desktop, both for Docker Personal, for free in the community, as well as the subscribers.So, things like Docker Desktop for Linux, right? Docker Desktop for Mac, Docker Desktop for Windows has been out there about five years, as I said. We have heard Docker Desktop for Linux rise in demand over those years because if you're managing a large number of developers, you want a consistent environment across all the developers, whether they're using Linux, Mac, or Windows desktops. So, Docker Desktop for Linux will give them that consistency across their entire development environment. That was the number two most requested feature on our public roadmap in the last year, and again, with the positive response, we're now able to confidently invest in that. We're hiring more engineers than planned, we're pulling that forward in the roadmap to show that yes, we are about growing and growing sustainably, and now that the environment and businesses are supporting us, we're happy to double down and create more value.Corey: My big fear when the change was announced was the uncertainty inherent to it. Because if there's one thing that big companies don't like, it's uncertainty because uncertainty equates to risk in their mind. And a lot of other software out there—and yes, Oracle Databases I am looking at you—have a historical track record of, “Okay, great. We have audit rights to inspect your environment, and then when we wind up coming in, we always find that there have been licensing shortfalls,” because people don't know how far things spread internally, as well as, honestly, it's accounting for this stuff in large, complex organizations is a difficult thing. And then there are massive fines at stake, and then there's this whole debate back and forth.Companies view contracts as if every company behaves like that when it comes down to per-seat licensing and the rest. My fear was that that risk avoidance in large companies would have potentially made installing Docker Desktop in their environment suddenly a non-starter across the board, almost to the point of being something that you would discipline employees for, which is not great. And it seems from your response, that has not been a widespread reaction. Yes of course, there's always going to be some weird company somewhere that does draconian things that we don't see, but the fact that you're not sitting here, telling me that you've been taking a beating from this from your enterprise buyers, tells me you're onto something.Scott: I think that's right, Corey. And as you might expect, the folks that don't reach out are silent, and so we don't see folks who don't reach out to us. But because so many have reached out to us so positively, and basically quickly gone right to a conversation with procurement versus any sort of back-and-forth or questions and such, tells us we are on the right track. The other thing, just to be really clear is, we did work on this before the August 31 announcement as well—this being how do we approach licensing and compliance and such—and we found that 80% of organizations, 80% of businesses want to be in compliance, they have a—not just want to be in compliance, but they have a history of being in compliance, regardless of the enforcement mechanism and whatnot. And so that gave us confidence to say, “Hey, we're going to trust our users. We're going to say, ‘grace period ends on January 31.'”But we're not shutting down functionality, we're not sending in legal [laugh] activity, we're not putting any sort of strictures on the product functionality because we have found most people love the product, love what it does for them, and want to see the company continue to innovate and deliver great features. And so okay, you might say, “Well, doesn't that 20% represent opportunity?” Yeah. You know, it does, but it's a big ecosystem. The 80% is giving us a great boost and we're already starting to plow that into new investment. And let's just start there; let's start there and grow from there.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I also have a hard time imagining that you and your leadership team would be short-sighted enough to say, “Okay, that”—even 20% of companies that are willing to act dishonestly around stuff like that seems awfully high to me, but assuming it's accurate, would tracking down that missing 20% be worth setting fire to the tremendous amount of goodwill that Docker still very much enjoys? I have a hard time picturing any analysis where that's even a question other than something you set up to make fun of.Scott: [laugh]. No, that's exactly right Corey, it wouldn't be worth it which is why again, we came out of the gate with like, we're going to trust our users. They love the community, they love the product, they want to support us—most of them want to support us—and, you know, when you have most, you're never going to get a hundred percent. So, we got most and we're off to a good start, by all accounts. And look, a lot of folks too sometimes will be right in that gray middle where you let them know that they're getting away with something they're like, “All right, you caught me.”We've seen that behavior before. And so, we can see all this activity out there and we can see if folks have a license or compliance or not, and sometimes just a little tap on the shoulder said, “Hey, did you know that you might be paying for that?” We've seen most folks at the time say, “Ah, okay. You caught me. Happy to talk to procurement.”So, this does not have to be heavy-handed as you said, it does not have to put at risk the goodwill of the 80%. And we don't have to get a hundred percent to have a great successful business and continuing successful community.Corey: Yeah. I'll also point out that, by my reading of your terms and conditions and how you've specified this—I mean, this is not something I've asked you about, so this could turn into a really awkward conversation but I'm going to roll with it anyway, it explicitly states that it is and will remain free for personal development.Scott: That is correct.Corey: When you're looking at employees who work at giant companies and have sloppy ‘bring your own device' controls around these things, all right, they have it installed on their work machine because in their spare time, they're building an app somewhere, they're not going to get a nasty gram, and they're not exposing their company to liability by doing that?Scott: That is exactly correct. And moreover, just keep looking at those use cases, if the company is using it for internal training or if the company is using it to evaluate someone else's technology, someone else's software, all those cases are outside the pay-for subscription. And so we believe it's quite generous in allowing of trials and tests and use cases that make it accessible and easy to try, easy to use, and it's just in the case where if you're a large organization and your developers are using it to build applications for your business and for your customers, thus you're getting a lot of value using the product, we're asking you to share that value with us so we can continue to invest in the product.Corey: And I think that's a reasonable expectation. The challenge that Docker seems to have had for a while has been that the interesting breakthrough, revelatory stuff that you folks did was all open-source. It was a technology that was incredibly inspired in a bunch of different ways. I am, I guess, mature enough to admit that my take that, “Oh, Docker is terrible”—which was never actually my take—was a little short-sighted. I'm very good at getting things wrong across the board, and that is no exception.I also said virtualization was a flash in the pan and look how that worked out. I was very anti-cloud, et cetera, et cetera. Times change, people change, and doubling down on being wrong gains you nothing. But the question that was always afterwards what is the monetization strategy? Because it's not something you can give away for free and make it up in volume?Even VC money doesn't quite work like that forever, so there's a—the question is, what is the monetization strategy that doesn't leave people either resenting you because, “Remember that thing that used to be free isn't anymore? Doesn't it suck to be you?” And is still accessible as broadly as you are, given the sheer breadth and diversity of your community? Like I can make bones about the fact that ten million in revenue and 250 employees are either worlds apart, or the wrong numbers, or whatever it is, but it's not going to be some student somewhere sitting someplace where their ramen budget is at risk because they have to spend $5 a month or whatever it is to have this thing. It doesn't apply to them.And this feels like, unorthodox though it certainly is, it's not something to be upset about in any meaningful sense. The people that I think would actually be upset and have standing to be upset about this are the enterprise buyers, and you're hearing from them in what is certainly—because I will hear it if not—that this is something they're happy about. They are thrilled to work with you going forward. And I think it makes sense. Even when I was doing stuff as an independent consultant, before I formalized the creation of The Duckbill Group and started hiring people, my policy was always to not use the free tier of things, even if I fit into them because I would much rather personally be a paying customer, which elevates the, I guess, how well my complaints are received.Because I'm a free user, I'm just another voice on Twitter; albeit a loud one and incredibly sarcastic one at times. But if I'm a paying customer, suddenly the entire tenor of that conversation changes, and I think there's value to that. I've always had the philosophy of you pay for the things you use to make money. And that—again, that is something that's easy for me to say now. Back when I was in crippling debt in my 20s, I assure you, it was not, but I still made the effort for things that I use to make a living.Scott: Yeah.Corey: And I think that philosophy is directionally correct.Scott: No, I appreciate that. There's a lot of good threads in there. Maybe just going way back, Docker stands on the shoulders of giants. There was a lot of work with container tech in the Linux kernel, and you and I were talking before about it goes back to LPAR on IBMs, and you know, BS—Berkeley's—Corey: BSD jails and chroots on Linux. Yeah.Scott: Chroot, right? I mean, Bill Joy, putting chroot in—Corey: And Tupperware parties, I'm sure. Yeah.Scott: Right. And all credit to Solomon Hykes, Docker's founder, who took a lot of good up and coming tech—largely on the ops side and in Linux kernel—took the primitives from Git and combined that with immutable copy-on-write file system and put those three together into a really magical combination that simplified all this complexity of dependency management and portability of images across different systems. And so in some sense, that was the magic of standing on these giant shoulders but seeing how these three different waves of innovation or three different flows of innovation could come together to a great user experience. So, also then moving forward, I wouldn't say they're happy, just to make sure you don't get inbound, angry emails—the enterprise buyers—but they do recognize the value of the product, they think the economics are fair and straight ahead, and to your point about having a commercial relationship versus free or non-existing relationship, they're seeing that, “Oh, okay, now I have insight into the roadmap. Now, I can prioritize my requirements that my devs have been asking for. Now, I can double-down on the secure supply chain issues, which I've been trying to get in front of for years.”So, it gives them an avenue that now, much different than a free user as you observed, it's a commercial relationship where it's two way street versus, “Okay, we're just going to use this free stuff and we don't have much of a say because it's free, and so on and so forth.” So, I think it's been an eye-opener for both the company but also for the businesses. There is a lot of value in a commercial relationship beyond just okay, we're going to invest in new features and new value for developers.Corey: The challenge has always been how do you turn something that is widely beloved, that is effectively an open-source company, into money? There have been a whole bunch of questions about this, and it seems that the consensus that has emerged is that a number of people for a long time mistook open-source for a business model instead of a strategy, and it's very much not. And a lot of companies are attempting to rectify that with weird license changes where, “Oh, you're not allowed to take our code and build a service out of it if you're a cloud provider.” Amazon's product strategy is, of course, “Yes,” so of course, there's always going to be something coming out of AWS that is poorly documented, has a ridiculous name, and purports to do the same thing for way less money, except magically you pay them by the hour. I digress.Scott: No, it's a great surface area, and you're right I completely didn't answer that question. [laugh]. So—Corey: No, it's fair. It's—Scott: Glad you brought it back up.Corey: —a hard problem. It's easy to sit here and say, “Well, what I think they should do”—but all of those solutions fall apart under ten seconds of scrutiny.Scott: Super, super hard problem which, to be fair, we as a team and a community wrestled with for years. But here's where we landed, Corey. The short version is that you can still have lots of great upstream open-source technologies, and you'll have an early adopter community that loves those, use those, gets a lot of progress running fast and far with those, but we've found that the vast majority of the market doesn't want to spend its time cobbling together bits and bytes of open-source tech, and maintaining it, and patching it, and, and, and. And so what we're offering is an engineered product that takes the upstream but then adds a lot of value—we would say—to make it an engineered, easy to use, easy to configure, upgraded, secure, so on and so forth. And the convenience of that versus having to cobble together your own environment from upstream has proved to be what folks are willing to pay for. So, it's the classic kind of paying for time and convenience versus not.And so that is one dimension. And the other dimension, which you already referenced a little bit with AWS is that we have SaaS; we have a SaaS product in Docker Hub, which is providing a hosted registry with quality content that users know is updated not less than every 30 days, that is patched and maintained by us. And so those are examples of, in some sense, consumption [unintelligible 00:27:53]. So, we're using open-source to build this SaaS service, but the service that users receive, they're willing to pay for because they're not having to patch the Mongo upstream, they're not having to roll the image themselves, they're not having to watch the CVEs and scramble when everything comes out. When there's a CVE out in our upstream, our official images are patched no less than 24 hours later and typically within hours.That's an example of a service, but all based on upstream open-source tech that for the vast majority of uses are free. If you're consuming a lot of that, then there's a subscription that kicks in there as well. But we're giving you value in exchange for you having to spend your time, your engineers, managing all that that I just walked through. So, those are the two avenues that we found that are working well, that seem to be a fair trade and fair balance with the community and the rest of the ecosystem.Corey: I think the hardest part for a lot of folks is embracing change. And I have encountered this my entire career where I started off doing large-scale email systems administration, and hey, turns out that's not really a thing anymore. And I used to be deep in the bowels of Postfix, for example. I'm referenced in the SVN history of Postfix, once upon a time, just for helping with documentation and finding weird corner cases because I'm really good at breaking things by accident. And I viewed it as part of my identity.And times have changed and moved on; I don't run Postfix myself for anything anymore. I haven't touched it in years. Docker is still there and it's still something that people are actively using basically everywhere. And there's a sense of ownership and identity for especially early adopters who glom on to it because it is such a better way of doing some things that it is almost incomprehensible that we used to do it any other way. That's transformation.That's something awesome. But people want to pretend that we're still living in that era where technology has not advanced. The miraculous breakthrough in 2013 is today's de rigueur type of environment where this is just, “Oh, yeah. Of course you're using Docker.” If you're not, people look at you somewhat strangely.It's like, “Oh, I'm using serverless.” “Okay, but you can still build that in Docker containers. Why aren't you doing that?” It's like, “Oh, I don't believe in running anything that doesn't make me pay AWS by the second.” So okay, great. People are going to have opinions on this stuff. But time marches on and whatever we wish the industry would do, it's going to make its own decisions and march forward. There's very little any of us can do to change that.Scott: That's right. Look, it was a single container back in 2013, 2014, right? And now what we're seeing—and you kind of went there—is we're separating the implementation of service from the service. So, the service could be implemented with a container, could be a serverless function, could be a hosted XYZ as a service on some cloud, but what developers want to do is—what they're moving towards is, assemble your application based on services regardless of the how. You know, is that how a local container? To your point, you can roll a local serverless function now in an OCI image, and push it to Amazon.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's one of that now 34 ways I found to run containers on AWS.Scott: [laugh]. You can also, in Compose, abstract all that complexity away. Compose could have three services in it. One of those services is a local container, one of those services might be a local serverless function that you're running to test, and one of those services could be a mock to a Database as a Service on a cloud. And so that's where we are.We've gone beyond the single-container Docker run, which is still incredibly powerful but now we're starting to uplevel to applications that consist of multiple services. And where do those services run? Increasingly, developers do not need to care. And we see that as our mission is continue to give that type of power to developers to abstract out the how, extract out the infrastructure so they can just focus on building their app.Corey: Scott, I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more—and that could mean finding out your opinions on things, potentially yelling at you about pricing changes, more interestingly, buying licenses for their large companies to run this stuff, and even theoretically, since you alluded to it a few minutes ago, look into working at Docker—where can they find you?Scott: No, thanks, Corey. And thank you for the time to discuss and look back over both years, but also zoom in on the present day. So, www.docker.com; you can find any and all what we just walked through. They're more than happy to yell at me on Twitters at @scottcjohnston, and we have a public roadmap that is in GitHub. I'm not going to put the URL here, but you can find it very easily. So, we love hearing from our community, we love engaging with them, we love going back and forth. And it's a big community; jump in, the waters warm, very welcoming, love to have you.Corey: And we'll of course, but links to that in the [show notes. 00:32:28] Thank you so much for your time. I really do appreciate it.Scott: Thank you, Corey. Right back at you.Corey: Scott Johnston, CEO of Docker. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me that Docker isn't interested in at all because here's how to do exactly what Docker does in LPARs on your mainframe until the AWS/400 comes to [unintelligible 00:33:02].Scott: [laugh].Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Jay's Analysis
Evils of the Vatican: Pope Frank, Heresy, and Globalism with Jay Dyer

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 136:11


"In this stream I am joined by Jay Dyer to talk about the multitude of heresy and evil coming from Pope Francis and the Vatican. Be it medical passports, partnering in resetting the Global economic structure, Pachamama worship, mass migration, or outright Christian heresy, the Vatican is a key culprit to the tragic ills that plague our current world. Make sure to check it out and let me know what you think." -COTEL

Faeforge Academy
Episode 70 - Heresy

Faeforge Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:00


Our students have ventured deep under the ground, into what appear to be ancient ruins built by the Celestials from Aludra, Ariadne's home plane. As they delve deeper they encounter clues to the past, and tests of loyalty as the story of Waeljna and Salah come crashing together. What awaits them in the room of glass and further... The Faeforge Academy is a 5th edition, Dungeons & Dragons actual play podcast featuring the Witch+Craft supplement for crafting by Astrolago Press. To stay up to date with everything happening at the Academy be sure to visit our website at http://www.faeforgeacademy.com/ (www.faeforgeacademy.com) and follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/FaeforgeAcademy (@FaeforgeAcademy) The Faeforge Academy is proud to be a part of The Fandomentals Network. To find more stories in the world of Evastria follow us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5Ns7XM70yHZDbf-8hy6Glw (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5Ns7XM70yHZDbf-8hy6Glw) and Twitch: http://twitch.tv/faeforgeacademy (twitch.tv/faeforgeacademy) We are proud to be affiliated with Green Leaf Geek, a dice shop where you can find handmade and curated dice sets! Visit http://greenleafgeek.com/ (Greenleafgeek.com) and use the code "FAEFORGE" on check out for 10% off your order. *Does not apply to Custom Dice Orders* We are also affiliated with Found Familiar coffee! So go to https://foundfamiliar.com?sca_ref=1012867.pccsDMqAdY (https://foundfamiliar.com?sca_ref=1012867.pccsDMqAdY) and use the code "Faeforge" at check out for 10% off your order! We are also proud to be part of the Roll20 Spotlight program! For all your tabletop needs go to roll20.net and see us use it live on twitch.tv/faeforgeacademy! Dungeon Master – Stephen Garcia – http://twitter.com/the_baddm (@the_baddm) Beskey Nevering – Michael Sinclair II – http://twitter.com/michaelcrits (@michaelcrits) Ariadne Zuvan – Adelaide Gardner – http://twitter.com/ohadelaide (@ohadelaide) Khoz Forgeheart – Ian Gould – http://twitter.com/gameofscience (@gameofscience) Ashryn Emberwhisper – Ky Eliot – http://twitter.com/stonefly_ky (@stoneflyky) Sepia Goldenmorrow – Emily Smith – http://twitter.com/emilyjeasmith (@emilyjeasmith) Rain - Kris Clarke - http://twitter.com/kissofhemlock (@kissofhemlock) If you enjoy the show and want to help us make more and better content please consider joining our Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/faeforgeacademy (www.patreon.com/faeforgeacademy) Theme music by Dave Cole of the Four Orbs Podcast. For additional music search dcolemusic on YouTube. Additional background music and ambiance found at http://tabletopaudio.com/ (http://tabletopaudio.com) and http://epidemicsound.com/ (epidemicsound.com) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
Necromunda Fast Shot 11 - Running a Campaign - BC Style!

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


In this episode of Necromunda Fast Shot, we talk to some awesome dudes from Canada about their campaign, ideas they had and how they implemented them! It was a really fun chat and hopefully we'll talk again after their next campaign!If you're playing a sweet campaign and want to shout it out and possibly attract some more players, send an email in to eyeofhoruspodcast at gmail.com and we might be able to find you some more gangers ready to bang! Episode Contributors:Stevehttps://www.instagram.com/hobby.dad/Erichttps://www.instagram.com/wargamer.eric/Adrianhttps://www.instagram.com/dragonbrushage/Leedhamhttps://www.instagram.com/leedhamtekani/Timhttps://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/Gang Bang Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/166222270782073/EOH Patreon:https://www.instagram.com/eyeofhoruspod/

Ordinary Church
Mike and Connor Try to Avoid Heresy

Ordinary Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


For this episode, our topic is... You'll just have to listen to find out. We do think we managed to avoid heresy though. Happy listening!

The Joyce Kaufman Show
Joyce Kaufman: No Restraint Ep. 111- The New Heresy

The Joyce Kaufman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:06


Bow to the woke priests or get cancelled. This is the world we live in and I'm fed up with it.

Bible Reading Podcast
Is Jesus God, or the Son of God, or Both? Reading John 5 #292

Bible Reading Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:41


A Great Controversy exists on the exact relationship of Jesus with God? Is Jesus God -are they the same? Is Jesus also the Son of God? Today we discuss the Bible's teaching on the deity of Christ.

Mother Miriam Live
The mission of the Church is to save souls 'not accommodate them in their heresy'

Mother Miriam Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 56:59


In today's episode, Mother Miriam discusses how many in the Church "are set on destroying marriage and the family," in light of changes made under Pope Francis in the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family.To help keep this and other programs on the air, please donate: https://give.lifesitenews.com/sustainlife?utm_source=mml_101821You can tune in daily at 10 am EST/7 am PST on our Facebook Page: http://FB.com/mothermiriamliveSubscribe to Mother Miriam Live at: http://bit.ly/submml See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast
Border Princes Episode 7 - The One Where The Lads Get Short And Stout

The Eye of Horus | A Warhammer 30K Horus Heresy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


On this Episode of the Border Princes Podcast we continue our magic series with the Lore of Metal!Jeff has a rant about Barbie DollsSean continues his relentless hobby missionJack is still baldWe also delve into Getting Started with Dwarfs!As well as our usual content with what we have been up to and the mailbag.Into/Outro- Furious: SinyellsMusic break- Bruh.Mp4: BIlmuriContact us on theborderprincespodcast@gmail.comFollow us on instagram! @theborderprincespodcastAnd join our facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/6374647945878951/Follow on Podbean for extra content! https://theborderprincespodcast.podbean.com/

Footnoting History
Ivanhoe and the Modern Middle Ages

Footnoting History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 18:32


(Lucy) How did Ivanhoe become a wildly popular school text? And what happened to the interpretation of the text when it did? Across the Anglophone world, Scott's medieval England became reified as a time and place of chivalric adventure, despite the novel's often ironic tone and often pointed social criticisms. This episode examines how Sir Walter Scott's imagined past became something very different as it was reinterpreted in popular culture, in sometimes sinister ways.    Click here for tips for Teaching with Podcasts! Or here to buy some FH Merch! We are now on Youtube with accessible captions checked by members of our team! And you can find out how to support us through our FH Patreon to help keep our content open access!

The Imperial Truth - The Horus Heresy 30K podcast
Episode 148 – A Heresy Kaffeeklatsch

The Imperial Truth - The Horus Heresy 30K podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 99:52


Episode 148 – A Heresy Kaffeeklatsch   00:00:00 – 01:39:52 – Intro, Speculation and Some Logic Teespring store: https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/the-imperial-truth If you want to support the show then consider purchasing from Element Games. http://elementgames.co.uk/?d=10057 Don't forget you can use the codes for extra crystals. Greg – GRE259 Howard – HOW583 You can also support the Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/TheImperialTruth Or via Ko-fi here: https://ko-fi.com/theimperialtruthfullstride If you enjoyed the show then please leave a positive review on Itunes. You can contact the show via Greg@TheImperialTruth.com You can follow us on Twitter: Show – @Imperial_Truth Greg – @ChildofFang Also our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/the.imperial.truth.au And our facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/436768449815184/

Fandible Actual Play Podcast
Heirs to Heresy: Fall of the Faithful

Fandible Actual Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:09


Attacked by those they were sworn to defend, the templars must do all they can to secure their relics against those who would see them taken. The post Heirs to Heresy: Fall of the Faithful appeared first on Fandible Actual Play Podcast.

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show
762: Top 10 Lies/Heresies about Jesus Christ, PLUS what is “heresy”? [Podcast]

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 26:03


Dr Taylor Marshall explains the Bible's reference to heretics in Titus 3:10 and the origin of the word from Greek. He then explains the top 10 heresies about Christ in the first 700 years of Christianity and why each heresy is wrong. Watch this new podcast episode by clicking here: Or listen to the audio […] The post 762: Top 10 Lies/Heresies about Jesus Christ, PLUS what is “heresy”? [Podcast] appeared first on Taylor Marshall.

The Happy Rant
Episode #362 - The Pied Piper and Heresy Rant

The Happy Rant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 34:37


In this episode of The Happy Rant Ted Ronnie and Barnabas wander to and fro through a variety of topics: Dutch Adam & Eve John Piper the punching bag The Pied Piper Book (hit piece on Piper) The Heresy Rant The New Yorker tote bag flex Other brand flexes

Knowing Faith
#121 – The Righteousness of God

Knowing Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 41:59


Jen Wilkin, JT English, and Kyle Worley are joined by Dr. Michael Kruger to look at Romans 3:21-31 and discuss the righteousness of God.Questions Covered in This Episode:Dr. Kruger: How significant is the idea of the “righteousness of God” and can you give us a sense of its importance in current NT scholarship?If you were teaching and preaching this, is it possible to say yes to both meanings of the righteousness of God?What is the difference between what the reformers would have said about Paul and the new perspective?Who would be the names that our listeners might know that hold the new perspective on Paul?What does Paul mean that “the ROG has been manifested apart from the law?”What does it mean to fall short of the glory of God?What is this word “propitiation?”Divine forbearance - passing over former sins?What is the “law of faith?”V. 31, what law is Paul talking about here?Dr. Kruger: What commentaries on Romans have you found helpful?Helpful Definitions:Greek Genitive: Denotes possession or ownership.Righteousness of God: δικαιοσύνη Θεοῦ (dikaiosynē Theou)A. Is God righteous? God's righteousness on display, His character being upheld, Is He faithful to His covenant?B. Is this something that God is giving? Is there a righteous status you can receive from Him?Propitiation: Implying it to Jesus. To satisfy (soak up) all the wrath of God. In terms of what Christ has done, He has fully paid a price in such a way that all of God's wrath has been fully absorbed by what Christ has done so that there is none left for you.Law of works: Mosaic law keeping as a means to be justified.Law of faith: You achieve a righteous status not by works but by trusting in Christ.Guest Bio:Michael Kruger is president and professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte, North Carolina. Dr. Kruger received his B.S. from The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, his M.Div from Westminster Theological Seminary in California and his Ph.D at the University of Edinburgh. Dr. Kruger has served in leadership capacities for the Evangelical Theological Society and has been a visiting scholar at both St. Edmund's College and the Tyndale House at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of many books, including but not limited to: Canon Revisited, A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament, and the Heresy of Orthodoxy. In addition to his many academic accomplishments, Dr. Kruger serves as a Pastor in the Presbyterian Church in America and is married to Melissa - who is a popular author and women's minister. Resources Mentioned in This Episode:Romans 3:21-31, Romans 1:16-17Knowing Faith Episode #19 - Can You Trust Your Bible with Dr. Michael Kruger“Canon Revisited” by Michael KrugerKnowing Faith Romans Episodes“Paul and Palestinian Judaism” E.P. SandersMartyn Lloyd Jones RomansRomans 1Romans 2Romans 3:20-4:35Romans 5Romans 6Romans 7:1-8:4Romans 8:5-17Romans 8:17-39Romans 9Romans 10Romans 11Romans 12Romans 13Romans 14Amazon affiliate links are used where appropriate. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases, thank you for supporting Knowing Faith.Sponsors:Reserve your spot now to attend Southern Seminary Preview Day on October 15. Use the promo code KNOWINGFAITH, and Southern will waive the $25 fee for lodging and meals.To learn more about our sponsors please visit our website.Follow Us:Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | WebsiteSupport Knowing Faith and Become a Patron:patreon.com/knowingfaith