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Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, October 1, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Virgin and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 460All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Thrse of Lisieux“I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul.” These are the words of Thérèse of Lisieux, a Carmelite nun called the “Little Flower,” who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, The Story of a Soul, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24. Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering a redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent “to save souls and pray for priests.” And shortly before she died, she wrote: “I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth.” Thérèse was canonized in 1925. On October 19, 1997, Pope John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized in light of her holiness and the influence of her teaching on spirituality in the Church. Her parents, Louis and Zélie, were beatified in 2008 and canonized in 2015. Reflection Thérèse has much to teach our age of the image, the appearance, the “self.” We have become a dangerously self-conscious people, painfully aware of the need to be fulfilled, yet knowing we are not. Thérèse, like so many saints, sought to serve others, to do something outside herself, to forget herself in quiet acts of love. She is one of the great examples of the gospel paradox that we gain our life by losing it, and that the seed that falls to the ground must die in order to live. Preoccupation with self separates modern men and women from God, from their fellow human beings, and ultimately from themselves. We must re-learn to forget ourselves, to contemplate a God who draws us out of ourselves, and to serve others as the ultimate expression of selfhood. These are the insights of Saint Thérèse, and they are more valid today than ever. Saint Thérèse is the Patron Saint of: Florists Missionaries Pilots Priests Learn more about Saint Thérèse! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Saints & Feasts
October 1: Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Virgin and Doctor

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 5:52


October 1: Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Virgin and Doctor1873–1897Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of florists, missions, and aviatorsA sensitive country girl wades into the deepThérèse Martin was a weepy child, as emotionally brittle as porcelain. She was easily offended and easily pleased. A furled brow or a sideways glance from her father would dissolve her into tears. A beautiful flower or a kind word and she would beam a smile. She grew up in a brotherless home. Her father, an uncle, and priests were the men in her life. Her parents were canonized in 2015, the only married couple ever raised to the altars. Thérèse and her four sisters all became nuns, with the cause for beatification and canonization of her sister Léonie being opened in 2015. The Martin home was totally absorbed in the mysteries of God, prayer, saints, the Sacraments, and the Church.Thérèse grew up in Normandy, a region of Northern France. She left only once, to go on a month-long pilgrimage to Italy, where she met Pope Leo XIII at a public audience and begged his special permission to enter the Carmelites before the required age. On this trip she was also the object of some tender male glances. Conscious of her delicate emotions and eager to flee the world's “poisonous breath,” upon returning from Italy Thérèse pulled every lever to enter her local Carmel. She finally entered at the age of fifteen in 1888. She was given the religious name “of the Child Jesus” and received permission to adopt a second name too, “of the Holy Face.” Once the door of the convent shut behind her, it never reopened. Her short life ended there just nine years later. Thérèse was a dedicated nun who strictly followed the demanding Carmelite rule. She kept silence when required, avoided seeking out her blood sisters, fasted, ingratiated herself with nuns she did not naturally find sympathetic, and spent long hours in prayer and work.In the convent, Thérèse's childish sweetness matured into a more durable spirituality. Her sensitivity mellowed. She was able to accept criticism. Her youthful presumption that all priests were as perfectas diamonds became more realistic, and she prayed and sacrificed ardently for priests. The hard realities of convent life narrowed Thérèse's spiritual goals. She no longer desired to be a great soul like Saint Joan of Arc. But with this narrowing came a deepening, a concentrated focus. She decided she would be God's heart, not His hands or feet or mind. She decided that the only way she could fly close to the blazing sun of the Holy Trinity would be to become small.Her petite voie (“little way” or “by small means”) was to spiritually reduce herself to a tiny creature carried in the claws of the divine eagle, Jesus Christ. As Christ soared in the heavens, she would be in His grasp, going only where He could go, until she was burned up in the Father-Son-Spirit love of the fireball of the Trinity. This was no broad path or wide way but a little way for a great soul. The goal was to reduce oneself to nothing so the Lord could transport you. The goal was to remove the “self” from “oneself.”When Thérèse's sister Céline entered the convent in 1894, she was given permission to bring her camera. Céline's pictures of Thérèse would be among the first ever taken of a saint. They complimented Thérèse's letters and spiritual writings perfectly, heightening interest in Thérèse after she died. The intriguing photos and profound writings hinted at the secret depths concealed behind a convent's four walls. Saint Thérèse suffered intensely from tuberculosis and died at an age when many lives are just beginning to flower. She was canonized in 1925, declared co-patron of France in 1944, and named the thirty-third Doctor of the Church by Pope Saint John Paul II in 1997, the youngest Doctor to date and probably the youngest the Church will ever recognize.Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus and of the Holy Face, you discovered deep truths in a confined space. Your soul was fertile ground for the mysteries of our faith. Lend heavenly assistance to all who try to emulate your example of suffering, prayer, and tender dedication to God.

Learn Focusing - The Focusing Way
The Journey to Mount Carmel - Father Jeffrey Kirby STL

Learn Focusing - The Focusing Way

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 44:01


The Journey to Mount Carmel - Father Jeffrey Kirby STL The Journey to Mount Carmel is a spiritual path. The Spiritual way can be long and arduous and one must face difficulties along the way. Carmel, or more properly Mount Carmel, has a special place in Christian contemplative Spirituality. The profit Elijah first went to this mountain to live in its caves, to get away from the exterior noise of the the outside world and begin to listen for God's voice from within an inner and private sanctum.  Oh Elijiah's journey to Mount Carmel, 500 years before Christ offered the solitude of a hermitic life in service to God and from that silence God gifted his prophecy through a select few who went to the mountain to listen to Him.   The term Carmelite takes its name from mount Carmel and at a moment when the church was again in need of contemplative force, Our Lady of Mount Carmel appeared to Saint Simon stock and gave him the instructions on the Brown Scapular.  The Saints who've worn the Brown scapular are too many to name here. The Brown Scapular is worn by clergy and laity alike. Once invested in and having taken the vows of this sacred promise, one wears the scapular daily for life as a sign of love and devotion to Jesus and the His Mother. The promises of wearing the scapular are not primary the reason for wearing it, through many since can attest to the how accepting the scapular is life altering. Wearing the brown scapular is part of the journey to mount carmel. The ceremony is brief and beautiful, personal and permanent. It changes you.  To help prepare for the investiture ceremony Fr. Jeffrey Kirby has written a wonderful volume with complete instructions and he joins us to talk about the process.   BUY A JOURNEY TO MOUNT CARMEL VISIT SOPHIA INSTITUTE PRESS HERE 

The Mike Thakur Show
From Harvard to Monk to Entrepreneur w/ John Cannon

The Mike Thakur Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 32:18


After graduating from Harvard Business School and Oxford, serving Fortune 500 clients as an investment banker, and running his own management consulting practice, John experienced a profound conversion and gave up everything to live as a Carmelite monk for 7 years where he also received degrees in philosophy and theology. His fascination with the lives of the Saints and the world-changing ventures they built led him to step back into the world of entrepreneurship to found a first-of-its-kind network of Spirit-led founders. 

Real Presence Live
Marie Goihl & Marilyn Baker - RPL 09.20.22 1/2

Real Presence Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 26:01


What it means to be a secular Carmelite

Catholic Conversations
88: Traditionally: How to Pray + Religious Vocation an Unnecessary Mystery

Catholic Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 75:35


My friend Colton Marks is on to discuss his vocation to traditional Carmelite hermits. We talk about how to pray. What are the modern errors on how to pray? What are the steps I need to take? What am I doing wrong?Plus! Toward the end of the episode we discuss How to Discern a Religious Vocation. Why are most people doing it wrong? It's not that difficult, we tell you what you need to do!Please pray for my friend as he begins his journey. Book Recommendations from Colton Holy Scriptures especially the Gospels and the Psalms Chris Life of the Soul by Blessed Columba Marmion OSBVirtues of Mary by Fr. Luigi Lanzoni Life Everlasting by Reginald Garrigou Lagrange OPOur Savior and His Love for Us by Reginald Garrigou Lagrange OPLife of the Venerable Louis de Ponte SJ by an Anonymous Father of the same order Story of a Soul by St. Therese of LisieuxOn Union with God by St. Albert the GreatThe Interior Castle by St. Teresa of AvilaOn Holiness of Life by St. Bonaventure THE DISCALCED HERMITS OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL website if you want to support or learn a little about them edcarm.org   Contact Me:Email: FonsecaProduction@gmail.comWebsite: http://catholicconversations.buzzsprout.comIG: @ffonzeFacebook: Adrian Fonseca Facebook: Catholic Conversations Twitter: @AdrianFonzeYouTube: Catholic ConversationsYouTube: Adrian Fonseca

Midnight Carmelite
Season 5 Premiere: Interview with Dr. Larry Chapp of Gaudium et Spes 22 on the Universal Call to Holiness, Vocation, Evangelization and the Spiritual Life

Midnight Carmelite

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 84:59


An interview on the universal call to holiness, vocation, evangelization, in the light of Carmelite spirituality, the Catholic Worker movement, and saints such as St. Therese, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. John of the Cross, and St. Teresa Benedicta (Edith Stein) Please check out Dr. Chapp's work at Gaudium et Spes 22. If you find this episode valuable, please share it with others. If you want to leave a tip, please check out the tip jar. (https://checkout.luminoustradition.com/products/tip-jar/). Learn more at Luminous Tradition (https://luminoustradition.com/)

Faith and More
S03 E14: St. John of the Cross - Contemplative, Mystic, and Poet

Faith and More

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 69:27


John of the Cross, venerated as Saint John of the Cross, was a Spanish Catholic priest, mystic, and a Carmelite friar of converso origin. He is a major figure of the Counter-Reformation in Spain, and he is one of the thirty-seven Doctors of the Church. John of the Cross is known gratefully for his writings. Links to articles shared... St. John of the Cross Bio 100 Quotes of St. John of the Cross Help children and orphans in Uganda... Disciples of Hope Ministries ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Infinite thanks to ALL of you for listening! I pray you find what you are looking/searching for - and more - here! Please keep listening and share the show with as many people as you feel it would benefit/help! If you would like to make an offering to the show. I created a "wish list" on Amazon.com. It's a never-ending gift, so to speak. Please do not feel obligated, in any way. Some have asked for ways to make offerings to/for the show. This is it. Here's the link to the show's wish list... Faith and More Podcast Wish List Check out our website!! This is an incredibly easy way to access the show, show notes, listen to the show, request prayers, and contact me! https://faithandmorepodcast.wixsite.com/my-site Contact me at... faithandmorepodcast@gmail.com or at anchor.fm/faith-and-more #stjohn #stjohnofthecorss #avila #jesus #darknightofthesoul #darknight #carmelites #carmelitereformation #prayer #contemplativeprayer #sttheresa #stthersaofavila #johnofthecross #mystics #mysticism #loveyourself #forgiveness #faith #hope #love #peace #digdeep #healing #trulyamazing #faithandmore --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/faith-and-more/message

In Your Embrace
Episode 97: Unlikely Heroes

In Your Embrace

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 71:40


5 September 2022 | St. Teresa of Calcutta | Menlo Park, Calif. This week, I share some initial experiences from my new pastoral assignment in South San Francisco, where I am learning to breathe with both lungs! We take a look at the character of Galadriel in Amazon's newly-released Rings of Power series, asking: is she in continuity with Galadriel as we know her from the books? Finally, I am joined by my friend Daniel Murphy for the first of many Carmelite conversations to come. We discuss St. Thérèse, an unlikely hero, through the rubric of the Hero's Journey, and try to glimpse the summit of Mount Carmel through the prism of her unique life. Send me a message at inyourembrace.com/contact to let me know you're listening! Opening music: “The angel cried,” megalynarion of Great and Holy Pascha from the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, sung by Archangel Voices, 2010. All rights reserved. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/in-your-embrace/message

Lectio et Oratio
Episode 2 -- The Practice of the Presence of God -- Letter 2 (Spiritual Director)

Lectio et Oratio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 13:33


Does the practice of the presence of God take time and effort to develop? Yes! In a letter to a spiritual director Br Lawrence describes the growth of his prayer life after he became a Carmelite friar. The Lord does not always give us an easy time. He leads us to himself by trials and aridities. What is most important is faith and perseverance. The Lord gives himself to those who seek Him.

Lectio et Oratio
Episode 1 -- The Practice of the Presence of God -- Letter 1

Lectio et Oratio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 14:48


What is one of the most fruitful of spiritual practices? The practice of the presence of God. In Letter 1 (of 16 that survive), Brother Lawrence speaks of himself in a veiled way and his practice of living as often as he can in an awareness of God"s presence. Not a priest, but a simple lay brother in a Carmelite monastery, Br Lawrence became known throughout Europe for his simple wisdom. He spent fifty years cooking, fixing broken sandals, and praying much. Throughout the day, he tried to keep himself before the Lord. And his methods have been handed down to us.

Catholic News
September 2, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 1:58


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Pope John Paul the first will be beatified this Saturday. Venerable John Paul I was born Albino Luciani on October 17, 1912 in the town of Canale d'Argordo in northern Italy's Belluno province. He was the most recent pope to be born in Italy and the first pope to be born in the twentieth century. He was elected to the papacy on August 26, 1978. He would be dead just a month later. Though his time as Roman Pontiff was brief, he had such an impact that some Catholics have sought his intercession as a saint. The photogenic smile of the pope helped cement his reputation and his nickname, the Smiling Pope. John Paul I was pope for 33 days, from August 26 to September 28, 1978. His 33-day pontificate was the 10th shortest in history. The last pope to have such a brief pontificate was Leo XI, whose pontificate lasted 27 days in April 1605. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252191/nine-things-to-know-about-john-paul-i Today, the Church celebrates the September Martyrs, a group of 191 faithful Christians who were martyred at the hands of the French Revolution on September 2 and 3, 1792. After refusing to take an oath in support of the civil consititution of the clergy, an act condemned by the Vatican which placed Catholic priests under the authority and control of the state, these priests and religious brothers and sisters were imprisoned in a Carmelite convent and then massacred in the space of two days by revolutionary mobs. They were beatified on October 17, 1926 by Pope Pius XI. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/martyrs-of-september-582

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, September 2, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Twenty-second Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 435All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed John Francis Burt and Companionsclass="content"> Sep 2, 2020 Franciscan Media Image: Massacre à la Salpêtrière, 3 septembre 1792 | anonymous (Unrelated, but similar incident during the French Revolution.) Saints of the Day for September 2 Blessed John Francis Burté and Companions (d. September 2, 1792 and January 21, 1794) Audio file Blessed John Francis Burté's and Companions' Stories These priests were victims of the French Revolution. Though their martyrdom spans a period of several years, they stand together in the Church's memory because they all gave their lives for the same principle. In 1791, the Civil Constitution of the Clergy required all priests to take an oath which amounted to a denial of the faith. Each of these men refused and was executed. John Francis Burté became a Franciscan at 16 and after ordination taught theology to the young friars. Later he was guardian of the large Conventual friary in Paris until he was arrested and held in the convent of the Carmelites. Appolinaris of Posat was born in 1739 in Switzerland. He joined the Capuchins and acquired a reputation as an excellent preacher, confessor, and instructor of clerics. Preparing for his assignment to the East as a missionary, he was in Paris studying Oriental languages when the French Revolution began. Refusing the oath, he was swiftly arrested and detained in the Carmelite convent. Severin Girault, a member of the Third Order Regular, was a chaplain for a group of sisters in Paris. Imprisoned with the others, he was the first to die in the slaughter at the convent. These three plus 182 others—including several bishops and many religious and diocesan priests—were massacred at the Carmelite house in Paris on September 2, 1792. They were beatified in 1926. Born in 1737, John Baptist Triquerie became a Conventual Franciscan. He was the chaplain and confessor of Poor Clare monasteries in three cities before he was arrested for refusing to take the oath. He and 13 diocesan priests were martyred in Laval on January 21, 1794. He was beatified in 1955. Reflection “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity” was the motto of the French Revolution. If individuals have “inalienable rights,” as the Declaration of Independence states, these must come not from the agreement of society—which can be very fragile—but directly from God. Do we believe that? Do we act on it? Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Carmelite Conversations
The Prophetic Life and the Call of Discalced Carmelite Seculars to the Living Flame of Love, Homily by Deacon Rusty Baldwin, OCDS

Carmelite Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 10:11


Members from several communities of the Order of the Discalced Carmelite Seculars gathered for a yearly retreat at the Maria Stein Spiritual Center in Ohio in August 2022.  The Sunday Mass fell on the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time in Year C. Deacon Baldwin presents us with an in-depth parallel of the life of the Prophet Jeremiah with the life of our Lord Jesus Christ.  He focuses on the purifying fire of love of the Holy Spirit, which also set St. Elijah on fire with zeal for the Lord. We, in Carmel, are taught about this living flame of love through the writings of St. John of the Cross.  It is very important for us as Carmelites to pray for this purification and transformation that comes through this fire of love.  In 2018, a letter from the Superior General of the Discalced Carmelites, Fr. Saverio Cannistra, OCD, warns us not to become like the world, but be transformed by the living flame of love, so that we may truly love God and love our neighbor…so that we may know God so that He may be known. Every Discalced Carmelite Secular will be edified, encouraged and inspired by these words regarding our vocation to Carmel.  For non-Carmelites, it is still a universal call to love…to holiness.  Let us never forget who we are!!

Catholic Fragments Podcast
Episode 15: Pope Saint John Paul II on Marriage

Catholic Fragments Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 25:27


This episode begins to discover what Pope Saint John Paul II has to say about the sacrament of marriage and interpreting our existence as gift. To read the original Wednesday audiences featuring the series of Theology of the Body catecheses, see: https://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/audiences/1979.index.html For more on Carmelite spirituality and the contemplative itinerary of prayer, see: https://www.amazon.com/Shoeless-Carmelite-Spirituality-Disquieted-World-ebook/dp/B098BD814F/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1660174656&sr=8-1 To participate in the self-paced online mini course on Saint Teresa of Ávila and The Interior Castle, visit: https://www.myinteriorcastle.com/offers/G25hczTs/checkout For more rich content in Catholic theology, philosophy and spirituality, visit: https://www.myinteriorcastle.com Follow us on Social Media- Facebook at "Donald Wallenfang" Twitter- @septimasmoradas Instagram- myinteriorcastle313 YouTube- "Donald Wallenfang"

Catholic Fragments Podcast
Episode 14: Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity and Her Prayer to the Most Holy Trinity

Catholic Fragments Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 24:37


This episode explores the classic Prayer to the Most Holy Trinity by Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity, OCD. To read the Prayer to the Most Holy Trinity by Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity, see: https://carmelitesofrochester.org/new-page-82 For more on Carmelite spirituality and the contemplative itinerary of prayer, see: https://www.amazon.com/Shoeless-Carmelite-Spirituality-Disquieted-World-ebook/dp/B098BD814F/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1660174656&sr=8-1 To participate in the self-paced online mini course on Saint Teresa of Ávila and The Interior Castle, visit: https://www.myinteriorcastle.com/offers/G25hczTs/checkout For more rich content in Catholic theology, philosophy and spirituality, visit: https://www.myinteriorcastle.com Follow us on Social Media- Facebook at "Donald Wallenfang" Twitter- @septimasmoradas Instagram- myinteriorcastle313 YouTube- "Donald Wallenfang"

Catholic Fragments Podcast
Episode 13: Saint John of the Cross and the Dark Night of the Soul

Catholic Fragments Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 28:44


This episode features the concept of the dark night of the soul within the poetry and commentaries of Saint John of the Cross. To read more of the writings of Saint John of the Cross, see: https://www.ccel.org/ccel/john_cross For more on Carmelite spirituality and the contemplative itinerary of prayer, see: https://www.amazon.com/Shoeless-Carmelite-Spirituality-Disquieted-World-ebook/dp/B098BD814F/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1660174656&sr=8-1 To participate in the online mini-course on Saint John of the Cross and the dark night of the soul, visit: https://www.myinteriorcastle.com/offers/oijqWzoc/checkout To watch the music video of Kirk Franklin's song "Love Theory," visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aD8OK07iIY For more rich content in Catholic theology, philosophy and spirituality, visit: https://www.myinteriorcastle.com Follow us on Social Media- Facebook at "Donald Wallenfang" Twitter- @septimasmoradas Instagram- myinteriorcastle313 YouTube- "Donald Wallenfang"

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 414All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Teresa Benedicta of the CrossA brilliant philosopher who stopped believing in God when she was 14, Edith Stein was so captivated by reading the autobiography of Teresa of Avila that she began a spiritual journey that led to her baptism in 1922. Twelve years later she imitated Saint Teresa by becoming a Carmelite, taking the name Teresa Benedicta of the Cross. Born into a prominent Jewish family in Breslau, Germany—now Wroclaw, Poland—Edith abandoned Judaism in her teens. As a student at the University of Göttingen, she became fascinated by phenomenology--an approach to philosophy. Excelling as a protégé of Edmund Husserl, one of the leading phenomenologists, Edith earned a doctorate in philosophy in 1916. She continued as a university teacher until 1922, when she moved to a Dominican school in Speyer; her appointment as lecturer at the Educational Institute of Munich ended under pressure from the Nazis. After living for four years in the Cologne Carmel, Sister Teresa Benedicta moved to the Carmelite monastery in Echt, Netherlands, in 1938. The Nazis occupied that country in 1940. In retaliation for being denounced by the Dutch bishops, the Nazis arrested all Dutch Jews who had become Christians. Teresa Benedicta and her sister Rosa, also a Catholic, died in a gas chamber in Auschwitz on August 9, 1942. Pope John Paul II beatified Teresa Benedicta of the Cross in 1987 and canonized her 12 years later. Reflection The writings of Edith Stein fill 17 volumes, many of which have been translated into English. A woman of integrity, she followed the truth wherever it led her. After becoming a Catholic, Edith continued to honor her mother's Jewish faith. Sister Josephine Koeppel, O.C.D., translator of several of Edith's books, sums up this saint with the phrase, “Learn to live at God's hands.” Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross is a Patron Saint of: Converts to Christianity Europe Learn more about Saint Benedicta of the Cross! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

In Your Presence
The Compassion of St. Edith Stein, Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

In Your Presence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 29:34


Today, August 9, is the 80th anniversary of the death of St. Edith Stein, killed in the gas chambers of Auschwitz along with thousands if other Jews. She was a profound and an intense woman. Just look at her photo as a Carmelite, with those penetrating eyes. It is said she was always an over-achiever. Born in Germany in 1891, she studied under Edmund Husserl, and converted to Catholicism, and eventually known by her religious name, St. Teresa Benedicta of the cross. How beautifully she embraced the cross that God sent her, and her people. Here is a meditation to help us deep in the meaning of humility. Preached by Fr. Eric Nicolai at Copper Ridge Conference Centre, north of Vancouver, BC. Music: Bert Alink, Mossy Garden. Thumbnail: The so-called "passport" photo taken in the doorway of Cologne Carmel. A passport picture that Edith Stein (1891–1942) had to have taken for her passport (ca. December 1938-1939) before moving to Echt, Netherlands. For more meditations, see my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/EricNicolai/videos

Daybreak
Daybreak for August 9, 2022

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 51:22


Tuesday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Optional Memorial of St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, 1891-1942; abandoned Judaism, but was so taken with the autobiography of St. Teresa of Avila that she became a Catholic, and then a Carmelite nun; taken by the Nazis from the convent in the Netherlands, and died at Auschwitz in 1942 Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for 8/9/22 Gospel: Matthew 18:1-5, 10, 12-14

Father and Joe
Father and Joe E272: Suffering in Union with Christ

Father and Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 26:32


Saint Theresa Benidicata of the Cross was a Carmelite nun, who converted to Catholicism from Judaism. During her life she was a renowned philosopher, despite joining the cloister of the Carmelite Monastery.  Unfortunately her life was ended by the holocaust brought upon the world by Nazi of WWII. While many elements of this episode are rich, particularly, I want to point out that a holocaust equal or worse than the Nazi's is taking place right now in China. The podcast Father and Joe brings us, as individuals, closer to the Holy Spirit and His Church.Seek Peace. Be Open to God and Love. Learn from Your Sufferings. Thank you for listening.FatherAndJoe@gmail.comAlso you can find is on twitter @FatherAndJoeCatholic, Church, God, Suffering, Life, Jesus, Carmelite, Convert, Nun, Holocaust, China, 

Catholic Saints & Feasts
August 9: Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, Virgin and Martyr

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 7:11


August 9: Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, Virgin and Martyr1891–1942Optional Memorial; Liturgical Color: RedCo-Patron Saint of EuropeA Jewish intellectual discovers St. Teresa of Ávila, converts, and dies for her raceEdith Stein, today's saint's given name, was a highly cultured European intellectual. She obtained a doctorate in philosophy summa cum laude from a German university after being accepted as a student by a renowned philosopher. She mastered numerous languages and worked as both a nurse and interpreter during World War I. She was a naturally gifted and effective teacher. She translated various works of Saint John Henry Newman from English and a work of Saint Thomas Aquinas from the original Latin. She published a book called Potency and Act on some foundational concepts in Thomism. Her erudition opened doors to elite circles of artists, philosophers, and other creators of culture. Yet she decided, in the flower of her life, to leave the shore, to wade into the sea of God, and to dive deep for the pearl of great price. Years after converting to Catholicism, Edith took vows as a Carmelite nun, becoming Teresa Blessed (or “Benedicta”) of the Cross. Yet in the convent, her worldly achievements counted little. When she first walked through the doors, one of Mother Superior's initial questions to her was: “Can you sew?” The science of the Cross had begun.Edith Stein was born and raised a Jew, the last of eleven children in a pious, middle-class German family. But she lost a living faith as a teenager and stopped praying. After passing all of her courses with distinction, and after serving at a war hospital in Austria, she finished a doctorate on the subject of empathy. She then became a full-time assistant to her philosophical mentor. Edith had various positive experiences with individual Christians during the war years. She saw, first hand, how Christians understood their own loss and suffering in light of the Cross of Christ. On a visit to the Cathedral of Frankfurt, these experiences of others' faith merged, rather suddenly, with a profound experience of her own. From the back of the church, Edith saw a woman with a shopping bag enter, kneel in prayer for a few moments, genuflect, and then depart. Our saint was deeply moved by the mystery of it. The woman clearly came into the church to have a short conversation with someone. Edith had never seen anyone do this in a synagogue or in a Protestant church. It struck her—Truth is a person, not a mere concept. God is living, breathing Truth in the person of Jesus Christ.A couple of years later, in 1921, while spending time at a friend's home, she discovered an autobiography of Saint Teresa of Ávila in the home's library and started reading it. She read all night. She read until the sun came up. In the morning she bought a Catholic Catechism and devoured that too. She had finally found the truth she couldn't quite find in her philosophical studies. She would convert to Catholicism. On January 1, 1922, Edith Stein was baptized. She was confirmed the next month by the local bishop in his private chapel. When she went home to tell her mother that she was now Catholic, the two could only cry in each other's arms at their complex emotions. After her conversion, Edith taught at a Dominican high school, engaged in scholarly work, and lectured on women's issues with the encouragement of her bishop.Finally, in 1933, after experiencing the dawning anti-semitism of the Third Reich, Edith fulfilled a long-held dream and entered the Carmelite convent in Cologne. Before entering, she went home to say a bittersweet goodbye to her family and attended synagogue one last time with her mother, who felt betrayed and who never responded to any of her daughter's many subsequent letters. Sister Teresa Benedicta took final vows in 1938. On New Year's Eve of that same year, she secretly transferred to a Carmelite convent in the Netherlands to escape Germany's insane anti-semitism. There, she was a model nun, devoted to Saint John of the Cross and to the Carmelite spirituality of the Cross. She prayed in front of the tabernacle for long hours and wrote for many more.After the Dutch bishops released a letter protesting the deportation of Dutch Jews, the retaliation against the Church was swift and merciless. The gestapo soon pounded on the doors of all local convents to take away any Jewish converts. On August 2, 1942, Edith was praying in the chapel when the gestapo came. She had five minutes to leave. Edith and her sister Rosa, also a convert who was helping in the convent, were taken away. They were transported in trains, like cattle, to Auschwitz, gassed to death, and cremated, most likely on August 9, along with hundreds of other Jews. Edith Stein was sharply aware of her double spiritual identity as a Jew and a Catholic. She knew she was dying, spiritually and physically, for each of her identities. Her iconic life and death, so redolent of the tensions of the twentieth century, caused Saint John Paul II to name her a co-patron of Europe. She was beatified in Cologne in 1987 and canonized in 1998 after a miraculous healing of a little girl in the state of Massachusetts was attributed to her intercession.Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, you were Jewish by blood, Catholic by baptism, and Carmelite by solemn vows. Your multiple spiritual identities, complex mind, and education found their unity in Christ. May we follow your example in finding our unity in Him as well.

The Endow Podcast
116. Audio Chapter 1 of Edith Stein

The Endow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 41:17


Welcome to The Endow Podcast! This podcast is a forum for women to foster conversations about the intellectual life and intentional community for the cultivation of the feminine genius.On this episode, Annette Bergeon, Executive Director, reads Chapter 1 from the St. Edith Stein Endow Study Guide, "Seeker of Truth." This study introduces women to one of the twentieth century saints John Paul II canonized during his pontificate. A young Jewish woman who suffered through the Holocaust, converted to Catholicism and found her vocation by joining the beautiful Carmelite sisters. Her story encompasses elements of philosophy (particularly phenomenology, which was a strong interest of John Paul II's), and theology and offers compelling insights into Jewish life in 1930's Germany.To learn more about hosting this Endow Study, visit: https://www.endowgroups.org/study-guide-st-edith-stein-seeker-of-truth/Support the Endow PodcastWhat's on your mind and heart? Let our host, Simone Rizkallah, know by connecting with her and The Endow Team on social media!Facebook at www.facebook.com/endowgroupsInstagram at www.instagram.com/endowgroupsWant to start your own Endow Group? Learn more by visiting our website at www.endowgroups.org or reach out to us at info@endowgroups.org. We look forward to serving you!

All Around Growth
Ep. 395 - Spiritual Posture and Cultural Slouching

All Around Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:29


Join Rob on a "free talk" episode like the good old truck-driving days as he waxes about spirituality and the slouch culture observed when interacting with people on a daily basis.  ~Connect on social media!  Telegram Group Chat - https://t.me/allaroundgrowth MeWe Group - https://mewe.com/join/theallaroundgrowthcommunity  Twitter - https://twitter.com/allaroundgrowth Flote - https://flote.app/allaroundgrowth Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/allaroundgrowth Facebook Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/allaroundgrowth ~Follow this link to ALL EPISODES   ~ How To Leave a Rating & Review in Apple Podcast AppThis really *does* affect the algorithm......as of recording in August 2022 - I would invite you to do this!The podcast game is changing - help us with a rating and review!~Have a Question or any feedback for Rob?Send me an email at allaroundgrowth@gmail.com~Discussion Links:Divine Intimacy - Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen OCDThis Book of Meditations is a classic and is steeped in Carmelite spirituality. For every day it offers two meditations, arranged according to the liturgical season (1962 Missal), that enable the soul to enter the conscious presence of God and to reflect on the theme of the day. These are followed by a Colloquy that helps the person at prayer to start a friendly conversation with God where acts of praise and love, petition and thanksgiving are made, together with good resolutions for the future. Here we are at the very heart of prayer, which is a heart-to-heart encounter in faith with the living God. Divine Intimacy is the highest state attainable on earth. In this union of love, the soul produces acts of love which have an immense apostolic influence on a multitude of souls. This knowledge of the ways that lead to God, according to the teaching of the renowned Spanish mystics, is distilled into the pages of this book.Divine Intimacy - Chad Lemoine  2022 Goal Setting Workbook Feeling discouraged? Miserable in your job? Just lost your business? Give yourself a new beginning!Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

The Coconuts Podcast
An eggs-istential crisis in Malaysia + more top stories | WTF SEA + HK | August 4, 2022

The Coconuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 40:44


Chicken shortages are never fun, but after months of short supply, Malaysia now apparently has an oversupply of poultry in the country. This chicken crisis is making us go ‘What the bok?' so Coconuts KL reporter Aminah Farid joins us to shed some light on the situation. Tune in! Other stories include: Yahoo!, Steam, PayPal now accessible in Indonesia as IT Ministry feels the heat | Hong Kong gov't advisors recommend Covid-19 vaccines for children as young as six months old | 2 killed after U-turn bridge on Rama II Road collapses | Carmelite nuns slam Maid in Malacañang movie for ‘malicious' depiction of them playing mahjong at height of 1986 revolution | Macca-scuse me? Australian fined AUD2,664 over undeclared McMuffins bought in Bali | Tiesto and Zedd to headline ZoukOut Singapore in December WTF is up in Southeast Asia + Hong Kong delivers impactful, weird, and wonderful reporting by our journalists on the ground in eight cities: Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Manila, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Yangon, and Bali. Listen to headline news on matters large and small, designed for people located in – or curious about – Southeast Asia and Hong Kong. WTF is up in Southeast Asia + Hong Kong is available on Apple, Spotify, Google, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Subscribe today!

Interior Integration for Catholics
I Am a Rock: How Trauma Hardens us Against Being Loved

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 75:49


  Summary:  Real love (agape) is given freely -- but it is not received freely in our fallen human condition.  Join me in this episode as we discuss the costs of opening our hearts to loveand the price of being loved fully, of being loved completely, in all of our parts.  We review why so many people refuse to be loved -- and we examine the psychological and human formation reasons for turning away from love.  Finally we discuss what we can do to get over our natural-level impediments to receiving love.   Lead-in  I am a rock I am an island I've built wallsA fortress deep and mightyThat none may penetrateI have no need of friendship -- friendship causes painIt's laughter and it's loving I disdainI am a rock I am an island I am a rock -- Paul Simon wrote it in 1965 and Simon and Garfunkel  Released it as a single in 1966, and it rose to #3 on the charts -- why because it resonated with people.  It was popular because it spoke out loud what many people's parts feel.   The desire to become a rock, the impulse to build the walls, to keep everyone out, to repudiate love and laughter, to not need anything or anyone.    Kate McGahan -- untitled poem   I don't need anyone, I said.Then you cameI need I need! I NEED YOU. I needed you.What did you teach me?Not to need you.NOT TO NEED. -  I don't want to be in love, anymore. I just want to be left alone. And no, I am not depressed or something. No suicide is happening here... I am fine. Trust me. Sharmajiassamwale So you want love.  But you also don't want love.  But you want love.  But you don't.  You do.  You don't.  You're conflicted.  How do you understand this conflict within you?  Can you and I understand this push-pull, this attraction - avoidance, this Yes and No within us more clearly.  Yes we can.  And we must.  Or we will wind up always skating along the edge of love, never really entering in.  And there are consequences for that -- and no one put it more succinctly than the English poet and playwright Robert Browning, who said: “Without love, our earth is a tomb”   Intro We do want to be loved, but we don't.  Why?  Because we want the benefits of love, but we don't want the costs   The Benefits To love and be loved is to feel the sun from both sides.  David Viscott  If you don't have that memory of being loved, you are condemned to search the world for something to fill you up. -- Michael Jackson The costs.  Real love is given freely, but it is not received freely in this fallen world.   Almost no one talks about the costs of being loved.  I find that so strange.  People don't think this way.  There are costs to receiving love, to accepting love, to allowing love in to our hearts.   It's painful to be loved in this fallen world.  this is not well understood by many people, especially those who are not in touch with trauma, or who haven't suffered as much as others Bernard Brady's 2003 book "Christian Love: How Christians Through the Ages have Understood Love  Second sentence of the book, in the preface:  "Loving seems entirely natural and being loved seems wonderfully good." Not to many people RCC member -- so glad you can discuss tolerating being loved.     Real love -- Agape -- burns away things that are sinful within us -- it doesn't coexist with the vice within us. Bernard Brady: Christian Love, p. 16:  "…love transforms those who love and those who are loved."   Every true love and friendship is a story of unexpected transformation. If we are the same person before and after we loved, that means we haven't loved enough.”   ― Elif Shafak, The Forty Rules of Love Change is scary “Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.”― Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment    Real love also purifies us from anything that is not morally wrote, but that is disordered or dysfunctional or imperfect Real love is the greatest good.  And because it's the greatest good, it requires us to give up lesser goods.  Perceived good and actual goods.   Coping strategies, crutches that helped us in the past Analogy of the safe -- limited room, silver and gold.  Vulnerability I will lose what I have I will lose to possibility of being loved in the future I don't want to find out I am unlovable.  I can't bear that.    Because for love to be real, for love to be agape means me allowing you to love all of me.  All my parts.  My entire being Not just the acceptable parts of me in the shop window, those that I allow others to see.   The greatness of the adventure of loving can be intimidating Love, in some sense, is nothing other than an invitation to great joy and suffering, so they shy away from it.  Paul Catalanotto Refusal to love is also refusal to live  The Catholic Weekly  Dietrich von Hildrebrand those who "wish to linger with small joys in the state of harmless happiness … in which they feel themselves to be master of the situation … lacking any element of surprise or adventure.   Let's go on this adventure of being loved and loving together.  I want you to come with me into the themes of this podcast.  I want you to really engage with what I'm presenting to you.  Not just listen like the Athenians listened to Paul about the resurrection of the dead.  Acts 17:32: Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, “We will hear you again about this.”  But they weren't really that interested.  Only a few of the Athenians joined him.  Stay with me in this Episode 96 of Interior Integration for Catholics, released on August 1, 2022, and titled "I Am a Rock: How Trauma Hardens us Against Being Loved" I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist, passionate Catholic and I am very pleased that we can share and engage with this information. Why do I think being loved is so important?   First because receiving love is absolutely essential.  It is our starting point in the spiritual life.  And second, because most people will not realxly allow themselves to be loved. Psychiatrist and Harvard Professor George Valliant wrote:  It's very hard, for most of us to tolerate being loved.-- That's been my experience as well.  The vast majority of people have chosen to severely limit how much love they will let in, how much love they will tolerate.   You can't love unless you are willing to be loved.   1 John 4:19:  We love because he first loved us  Look at the order here.  God loved us first.  We can't generate any love on our own.  We can reflect love, we can channel love, but we can't create love out of nothing like God can.  We have to cooperate in love and be open to love in order to love, in order to follow the two great commandments.   That is what this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast is all about -- it's about preparing the way for you to have a much deeper, richer and much more intimate relationship with God in the three Person of the Trinity -- Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and with the Blessed Virgin Mary our Mother.  A deep, personal relationship with God and Mary.  That's what  I want from you.  And if you won't tolerate taking in real love, if you deprive yourself of real love, you are going to wind up in a de facto hell on earth.  The most miserable people on earth are the loveless people -- loveless not because no one will love them -- but loveless because they actively or passively reject love.  And so many people do that.   And there are spiritual consequences to cutting ourselves off from real love.  Our heart become small, they become hard, they become closed, they become fearful, they fester in wounds.  And if we persist in refusing to be loved and to love, there is no other place for us to be in the afterlife than in hell.  That's what I think hell is -- a place for those who have refused love.  That's how serious all of this is.  Eternal consequences of the highest order.    Hallmark Movie Love What so many of our parts really want is what I call Hallmark movie love -- in Latin, this is rendered "Lovus Hallmarkius"  Hallmark love.  Yes, I've given it a ridiculous translation, but that because Hallmark love is not only a ridiculous concept, it's a dangerous one.  I mean it.  Really Dr. Peter -- all those sweet, feel-good Christmas movies?  What are you some kind of grinch, to criticize Hallmark movies?  I mean really, come on.. That's a bit much.  Hear me out, hear me out.   What is Hallmark love -- love is always just around the corner, painless, fun.  They are delightful.  Love is so gratifying and enjoyable, love takes away suffering. Clean and tidy.   It's a myth.  The Hallmark company is selling illusions.  Their movie production arm is peddling falsehoods about love to an audience who wants what they are offering to be true.  But it isn't.   Kristine Brown captured this theme in her online article Living in a Hallmark Movie  December 11, 2015  I want to live in a Hallmark movie.  I want to walk down the cobblestone Main Street into the corner coffee shop where everyone greets you with a smile and a Merry Christmas. I want to move to a new town where you immediately become acquainted with everyone and your child makes instant friends at school and there's always time to bake Christmas cookies and decorate trees and drink hot cocoa with peppermint sticks. I want to live in a Hallmark movie. I want to walk my child to school holding hands and have him tell me how much he loves me and what a great mom I am. I want to live where kids don't make bad choices and parents don't make mistakes. Where the toughest decision is whether to stay in the small town where you grew up or chase after a promising dream in the big city. Where things always just work out. And the movie always ends with a kiss from your true love and snow. Always snow. But life isn't a Hallmark movie, not even close. Example of the life of Christ -- the greatest lover ever, who died in making the greatest act of love ever, and it was nothing like a Hallmark movie.  We assume that we want love -- and we do.  Or parts of us do Made for love and in love -- That's a beautiful line in the Litanies of the Heart, written by Dr. Gerry for Souls and Hearts -- "Lord Jesus, you created me in love, for love."   Colossians 3:14  And above all these put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony.   Discussion of Parts Reference Episode 71: A New and Better Way of Understanding Myself and Others   Definition of Parts:  Separate, independently operating personalities within us, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in our lives, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has an image of God and a whole religion developed around its understanding of God, self, and the relationship between God and self.   Parts have different roles within the self system.  Narrow slice of experience, very limited vision.   Some parts don't care about being loved.  They are focused on never being hurt like that again.  They are focused on protection from harm, defending the self system against threats from others, very protective.  IIC 89:  Your Trauma, Your Body: Protection vs. Connection Conflict “I wished I didn't need an ocean of space to feel comfortable. I still wanted to be loved. Yet again I felt like two people: one who desperately needed a hug, and one who would break apart at the slightest touch. How could I get people to keep their distance without leaving completely? How long would it take for them to get tired of the way I flinched and evaded?” ― Ruby Walker, Advice I Ignored: Stories and Wisdom from a Formerly Depressed Teenager   Using a metaphor to describe how trauma hardens us against being loved  Overview Roots = unresolved trauma  Single trunk -- shame  Five Main stems -- acronym CRIES -- as in cries for help.    C R I E S -- Each of these main stems is driven by shame in the trunk, shame that results from the unresolved trauma in the roots.   Cognitions Relationships Identity Emotions Spirituality Each main stem has branches -- branches that cross and interweave in this big bush  And the branches have fruits.   Roots -- Unresolved trauma This includes the original trauma, original sin.   Underground, not seen --  Check out Episodes 88 and 89 -- a lot about the nature of trauma in those episodes  Primary effect of unresolved trauma is shame.   Single Trunk -- Shame Discussed shame at great length in Episodes 37 to 49 of this podcast.  Definitions of shame in episode 37:  Shame is:  a primary emotion, a bodily reaction, a signal,  a judgement, and an action.   I encourage you to go through those episodes again -- really get a grip on shame, because understanding shame is the key to understanding almost all psychological dysfunction, and understanding shame is the key to really comprehending why you have difficulties with your human formation.  Can't stress that enough.   Shame -- the central role of shame. Issue of survival.  Life and death.  Deep assumptions that my shame is so bad that it will kill me.  Our protector parts assume they have a need to defend against our exiled parts that have burdens of shame -- protectors believe they have to keep the shame out of awareness, keep it buried, distant.  They don't know that we can work with shame and the parts that carry the shame in collaborative, cooperative, constructive ways.  Our protector parts don't know that shame can be resolved -- the burden of shame can be lifted and there can be healing.   “When you're a child trapped in a situation of physical or psychological deprivation, you learn shame as an efficient, elegant mechanism of survival: shame simultaneously shields you from the reality that danger is out of your control (since the problem is not that you're unloved and deprived; it's that you're Bad) and prevents you from doing or saying anything challenging that might provoke a threat.” ― Kai Cheng Thom, I Hope We Choose Love: A Trans Girl's Notes from the End of the World Go back and really get the shame piece of this.   Main Stems off the trunk:  Cognitions, Relationships, Identity, Emotions, Spirituality -- Acronym CRIES  Emotions  Stem:  Five aspects Grief, Anger, Fear, Flooding, Shutdown  -- GAFFS -- so many of these emotions are generated by the shame that results from unresolved trauma Love is affective -- Bernard Brady -- discussed this at length in episode 94  Love is a movement from your heart, your soul -- a movement from the innermost depths of your being.  From your core self.  So the emotions are intimately involved with love   Grief  Emotional reaction to deep sense of loss.   Sadness about what you don't have that you need.   Parts want to be seen and heard and known and loved by the one who might love you.  All of you wanting to be loved.  All of you wanting to be healed.  So parts surge up, wanting to come to the surface.   Parts that carry grief have never been loved -- never been connected with in an emotional way, never been included in relationship with your innermost self or with others.  Never been seen. Anticipatory Grief -- if I allow myself to be love, I could lose that love.  The one who loves me could die.     Fear -- this is an emotion that drives so much fleeing from love.  This really is the big one.   Philophobia -- fear of love  All of us have parts that fear love.  Being loved arouses anxiety because it threatens long-standing psychological defenses formed early in life in relation to emotional pain and rejection, therefore leaving a person feeling more vulnerable.  Robert Firestone Fears of being revealed Fears of vulnerability Fears of loneliness Fear of the unknown Fears of being hurt one more time -- like Charlie Brown and Lucy and the football, winding up flat on your back again. Fears of betrayal  Fears of abandonment So much of this fear is driven by shame.   All this fear is a barrier to being loved.   “To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.”  Betrand Russell All the bruised lives, searching hearts ... Everyone wants a love story but few will risk what it takes to live one. - Donna Lynn Hope Flooding:  Emotional overwhelm -- flooding.  Emotions become all dysregulated. Hyperarousal -- moving into fight or flight mode.  Intensity of emotions because very great. Often because old emotions from previous unresolved trauma are welling up -- parts that carry the burden of intense emotions want to be seen, heard, known and understood, they no longer want to be exiled, banished into the unconscious -- they want a voice, they want relationship they want redemptions.  Paul Simon  Don't talk of loveWell I've heard the word beforeIt's sleeping in my memoryI won't disturb the slumber of feelings that have diedIf I never loved I never would have criedI am a rock I am an island  “Our biggest challenge is that we have an overwhelming desire for an extraordinary love story but low capacity to hold space for it in our nervous system.”  ― Lebo Grand Dietrich von Hildebrand:  Fear of losing oneself in intense joys or griefs   Anger So much of this anger is driven by fear driven by shame  Our protector parts can use anger to distract from fear and grief.   Behind every angry soul is a wounded child that just wanted you to love them for who they are. Shannon L. Alder  Shutting down Avoiding inner experiences is one of Nathanson's four defensive scripts for avoiding shame.   Hypoarousal -- moving down out of the window of tolerance to the freeze mode.   Example of an electrical panel, or breaker panel v-- metal box with a door down in the basement or utility closet  with the main and the circuit breakers   Fruit: We have a very difficult time tolerating being loved when we are not in our window of tolerance.  Fight or flight mode or freeze mode -- we move very much into self-protection, to a focus on survival, on just perpetuating our existence.   We're not open to love -- we've moved into survival mode, not seeking connection.   We're not open to God.    Fr. Jacques Philippe, Searching for and Maintaining Peace:  The more our soul is peaceful and tranquil, the more God is reflected in it, the more His grace acts through us.  On the other hand, if our soul is agitated and troubled, the grace of God is able to act only with much greater difficulty… God is a God of peace.  He does not operate except in peace, not in trouble and agitation.  We need that emotional regulation, that sense of being in our window of tolerance to be able to connect with God.  So many times fear is identified as a barrier   Fear as a result of shame drove Adam and Eve into the bushes -- hiding from God John 14:27:  Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you; not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid. Cognition Stem  Perceptions extremely sensitive to stimuli  Very vigilant -- scanning for threats in the environment   Negative self-talk I am unloved  I am unlovable  I don't deserved to be loved -- bred in families where there is conditional love -- unattainable ideals of perfection  I will be seen and I will see myself.   I might contaminate anyone who would love me with my badness.   I won't live up to the love.   Doubts fostered about goodness in the world, about the nature of others Skepticism about who actually makes the effort to love  Demanding perfection from others before trying again.  To have the chance of being loved we have to take a chance on being destroyed inside -- Jo Nesbo Pessimistic evaluation of the future No one will love me  I will be deceived, tricked and then betrayed, rejected, abandoned   Distractions Paul Simon:   I have my booksAnd my poetry to protect meI am shielded in my armor  Fruit we can dwell inwardly, on our own damage -- we can focus on our wounds.  Direct our attention to all the things that are wrong with us and pull inward -- self-absorption, ruminating and obsessing about our defects, curling up inside to protect ourselves, not letting anyone in.  So common.   Or we can reach out and embrace love anyway.  We can trust that parts of us may be seeing things inaccurately, thinking about things in ways that are distorted.   Identity Stem  Drawing from Robert Firestone's  Why Do So Many People Respond Negatively to Being Loved? article on psychalive.org  I am inadequate, unworthy of love “We accept the love we think we deserve.”– Stephen Chbosky   Being valued or seen in a positive light is confusing because it conflicts with the negative self-concept that many people form within their family.  Firestone Being loved can provoke an identity crisis  Firestone Your identity, at least for some of your parts, can be very bound up in being unloved and unloveable   Parts may not know who you are if you were loved -- such a radical change Very disconcerting to lose a sense of who I am, even if the identity is a negative one.   Comfort in the familiarity of the dysfunction I know -- so I accept and even seek out rejection and failure -- they are familiar and harmonize with my life narrative.   Deep sense of having to earn conditional love.  But that is not what love is about “Love is not concerned with a person's accomplishments, it is a response to a person's being: This is why a typical word of love is to say: I love you, because you are as you are.” ― Dietrich von Hildebrand, The Art of Living   Little or no ordered self-love -- we will be discussing ordered self love in the next episode.  One of Nathanson's four strategies to cope with shame is to attack the self.   Internal disconnects to survive the trauma -- horror of abuse  Love relationships pull for integration Love is never fragmented; it's an inseparable whole which does not delight in bits and pieces. John A. Andrews  And that integration will bring up the parts of ourselves that we have rejected as too scary, too unacceptable, too unlovable, too dangerous, too overwhelming, too much in some way to be allowed a seat at the table of our consciousness.   Takes a lot of courage to really be loved.   Ursula Wirtz, Trauma and Beyond: The Mystery of Transformation “I consider love to be the matrix for this transformation, which calls new being into existence. Love has the power to reawaken and bring to the fire what has been entombed or distorted by traumatic forces or has retreated out of defensiveness and self-protection. Without love and compassion for the fragility of human identity in the face of death and the reality of evil, the madness found in these barren spaces of the soul might not be meaningfully encountered. For the stripping away of the constricting cocoon of traumatic fixations and the untangling of what has become distorted and convoluted during painful traumatization, love is needed.”  ―  Fruit -- will we let our burdened parts define ourselves-- will we let those traumatized parts of us, and the parts that guard us from those traumatize parts be the ones to determine who we are -- with their limited vision and their narrow slice of experience -- or can we work gently with ourselves and allow ourselves to be seen through the eyes of those who do love us.   Relationship Love affirms the other, love responds to the other, love is unitive -- love is steadfast more of Bernard Brady's characteristics of Agape, of real love described in episode 94   Effects of Shame Lack of trust in others   Lack of confidence How bold one gets when one is sure of being loved. Sigmund Freud  Fear of exposure To myself  To the one who loves me   “To be deeply loved, means a willingness to cut yourself wide open, exposing your vulnerabilities... hopes, hurts, fears and flaws. Hiding behind the highlight reel of who you are, is the real you and that person is just as worthy of love. There is nothing more terrifying or fulfilling, than complete love, it's worth the risk... reach for it.”  ― Jaeda DeWalt Fear of rejection The fear of rejection makes sense: If we've had a steady diet of shame, blame, and criticism, we learned that the world is not a safe place. Something within us mobilizes to protect our tender heart from further stings and insults .The Hidden Reasons We Don't Let Love In  -- John Amodeo Ph.D., MFT   The one who loves me will hurt me. It's inevitable   Fruit in the Behaviors -- all focused around protection from the other leading to relationship sabotage Undue criticism of the other --you are not enough for me.  Withdrawal and isolation -- one of Nathanson's strategies for coping with shame. Paul Simon Hiding in my room safe within my wombI touch no one and no one touches meI am a rock I am an islandAnd a rock feels no painAnd an island never cries  Avoidance  Pursuing unavailable people I found myself in a pattern of being attracted to people who were somehow unavailable, and what I realized was that I was protecting myself because I equate the idea of connection and love with trauma and death.” ― Zachary Quinto Pushing others away Basically, love is scary when it contrasts with childhood trauma. In that situation, the beloved feels compelled to act in ways that hurt the lover: behaving in a punitive manner, distancing themselves and pushing love away.  Robert Firestone  “You push people away, Marley. You don't realise it, but you do. You close yourself off to anyone and anything that doesn't fit in your perfect little hamster ball of life. But you can't experience love only on your own terms. It doesn't work that way.”  ― Kate Lattey, Dream On Aggression -- Fueled by anger. Attacking others is one of Nathanson's four strategies of coping with shame.  Why do we attack?  We are afraid, we are struggling with shame.     “Those who love to be feared fear to be loved, and they themselves are more afraid than anyone, for whereas other men fear only them, they fear everyone.     St. Francis de Sales   Emotionally disconnecting from the relationship Out of anger. Harden my Heart -- 1982 Hit Sung by Quarterflash  … I'm gonna harden my heart, I'm gonna swallow my tears, I'm gonna turn and leave you here  Out of fear and shame   “Many freeze types unconsciously believe that people and danger are synonymous, and that safety lies in solitude. Outside of fantasy, many give up entirely on the possibility of love. The freeze response, also known as the camouflage response, often triggers the individual into hiding, isolating and eschewing human contact as much as possible. This type can be so frozen in retreat mode that it seems as if their starter button is stuck in the ‘off' position. It is usually the most profoundly abandoned child - ‘the lost child' - who is forced to ‘choose' and habituate to the freeze response… Unable to successfully employ fight, flight or fawn responses, the freeze type's defenses develop around classical dissociation.” ― Pete Walker Dietrich von Hildebrand -- shrinking away from commitment.   Difficulties receiving partial, incomplete, imperfect love -- as replacements for God's love Glazed carrots.  Side dish, not the main entrée.   Mother Angelica's Little Book of Life Lessons And Everyday Spirituality :  Allow people to love you as they must love you, not as you want them to love you. Even God does not love us as we wish Him to. Learning to love is learning to accept love as it comes   Spiritual Disconnecting from God, who is love.   Human beings must be known to be loved; but Divine beings must be loved to be known.  Blaise Pascal We to love God to know Him  And so we have to find him lovable -- and so often parts of us don't find him lovable.   Need for Faith and Hope -- Infused virtues.   To be loved but not known is comforting but superficial. To be known and not loved is our greatest fear. But to be fully known and truly loved is, well, a lot like being loved by God. It is what we need more than anything. It liberates us from pretense, humbles us out of our self-righteousness, and fortifies us for any difficulty life can throw at us. Timothy Keller everyone wants perfect love... no one wants to be a perfect lover... - Author: Brijesh Singh   Being loved by God is often even more difficult I John 4:8  "…God is love."  Issues around God images (IIC 23-29)  God is not as tangible, immediate  Transferences to God  Projections onto God.   Edward Vacek:  Love, Human and Divine: The Heart of Christian Ethics.  The sequence in loving and being loved.    (1) God affirms us; (2) God receives a; (3) we accept God's love; (4) we affirm God; (5) God forms community with us; (6) we cooperate with God in loving God in the world; and finally (7) we grow in a limited code responsibility with God. p.. 177 Problems with the sequence -- not tolerating enough contact with God  to be affirmed, to understand him in a totally different way.   1 John 4:19:  We love because he first loved us   Active vs. passive refusal to be loved.   Active refusals to be loved are more obvious Passive refusals to be loved are more common.   Five attachment tasks Felt sense of safety and protection -- have to go through the valley of shame, fear, anger, grief  Feeling seen, heard, known and understood -- have to tolerating being in relationship, being present.   Feeling comforted, soothed and reassured  Feeling cherished, treasured, delighted in   “If your parents' faces never lit up when they looked at you, it's hard to know what it feels like to be loved and cherished. If you come from an incomprehensible world filled with secrecy and fear, it's almost impossible to find the words to express what you have endured. If you grew up unwanted and ignored, it is a major challenge to develop a visceral sense of agency and self-worth.” ― Bessel A. van der Kolk, The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma Feeling the other has your best interests at heart Love heals The more healthy relationships a child has, the more likely he will be to recover from trauma and thrive. Relationships are the agents of change and the most powerful therapy is human love. — Bruce D. Perry  “Love alone brings a human being to full awareness of personal existence. For it is in love alone that man finds room enough to be what he is.” ― Dietrich von Hildebrand, Man, Woman, and the Meaning of Love   “Trauma ruptures and hollows. Compassion mends and fills; love heals.” ― Na'ama Yehud There you have it from a trauma researcher, a philosopher, and a writer --  Example of Sr. Josephine Bakhita Born about 1869 in the village of Olgossa in the Darfur region of Sudan. She was a member of the Daju people  Uncle was a tribal chief, well-to-do family  At age 8, kidnapped by slave traders, forcerd to walk barefoot 600 miles to a slave market  Over the next 12 years, bought and sold many times, at least 12 times  Trauma of the abduction -- Forgot her given name in captivity -- consider that - - a loss of identity   Owners varied in their treatment of her.  Some were sadists  Family of  Turkish general Josephine wrote that as soon as one wound would heal, they would inflict another.  another woman drew patterns on her skin with flour, then cut into her flesh with a blade. She rubbed the wounds with salt to make the scars permanent. She would suffer a total of 114 scars from this abuse. A total of 114 intricate patterns were cut into her breasts, belly and into her right arm   I am definitively loved and whatever happens to me --  I am awaited by this Love.  Action Plan You gotta pray   Point is to focus on developing the relationship with the Persons of the Trinity and with Mary -- as a little child, a little son or daughter.   Litanies of the Heart - the Litany of the Closed Heart the litany of the fearful heart, the litany of the wounded heart.  Soulsandhearts.com/lit Books Intimacy in Prayer -- Personal Prayer:  A Guide for Receiving the Father's Love -- by Frs. Thomas Acklin and Boniface Hicks.  Fr. Jacques Philippe -- Time for God -- excellent guide for learning pray from a more relational perspective.  I also like Fr. Jacques Philippe's book The way of Trust and Confidence  Fr. Thomas Dubay -- Fire Within -- more of a Carmelite approach.  If you haven't been to confession recently, go.  If you feel like you can't go, I want to hear about it.   Calling all Catholic therapists and -- Interior Therapist Community is starting our fall groups.   80 therapists and graduate students in mental health fields in community -- each of us working on our own human formation, but not in isolation.  New Foundations experiential groups are forming -- and we have advanced groups.   2022 Webinar Series: Of Beams and Specks: Therapist-Focused Consultation - Peter Malinoski  $30 Soulsandhearts.com/itc -- call me at 317.567.9594 or email at crisis@soulsandhearts.com  Weekly reflection -- related to this podcast, delivered to your inbox every Wednesday --  We do get around to archiving them in the blog section of our website -- soulsandhearts.com/blog Conversation hours -- every Tuesday and Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time call me at 317.567.9594 or email at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  If I don't pick up, I'm on another call leave a voicemail.   Patroness and Patron.

ESV: Chronological
July 31: 1 Chronicles 3–4

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 8:01


1 Chronicles 3–4 1 Chronicles 3–4 (Listen) Descendants of David 3 These are the sons of David who were born to him in Hebron: the firstborn, Amnon, by Ahinoam the Jezreelite; the second, Daniel, by Abigail the Carmelite, 2 the third, Absalom, whose mother was Maacah, the daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur; the fourth, Adonijah, whose mother was Haggith; 3 the fifth, Shephatiah, by Abital; the sixth, Ithream, by his wife Eglah; 4 six were born to him in Hebron, where he reigned for seven years and six months. And he reigned thirty-three years in Jerusalem. 5 These were born to him in Jerusalem: Shimea, Shobab, Nathan and Solomon, four by Bath-shua, the daughter of Ammiel; 6 then Ibhar, Elishama, Eliphelet, 7 Nogah, Nepheg, Japhia, 8 Elishama, Eliada, and Eliphelet, nine. 9 All these were David's sons, besides the sons of the concubines, and Tamar was their sister. 10 The son of Solomon was Rehoboam, Abijah his son, Asa his son, Jehoshaphat his son, 11 Joram his son, Ahaziah his son, Joash his son, 12 Amaziah his son, Azariah his son, Jotham his son, 13 Ahaz his son, Hezekiah his son, Manasseh his son, 14 Amon his son, Josiah his son. 15 The sons of Josiah: Johanan the firstborn, the second Jehoiakim, the third Zedekiah, the fourth Shallum. 16 The descendants of Jehoiakim: Jeconiah his son, Zedekiah his son; 17 and the sons of Jeconiah, the captive: Shealtiel his son, 18 Malchiram, Pedaiah, Shenazzar, Jekamiah, Hoshama and Nedabiah; 19 and the sons of Pedaiah: Zerubbabel and Shimei; and the sons of Zerubbabel: Meshullam and Hananiah, and Shelomith was their sister; 20 and Hashubah, Ohel, Berechiah, Hasadiah, and Jushab-hesed, five. 21 The sons of Hananiah: Pelatiah and Jeshaiah, his son1 Rephaiah, his son Arnan, his son Obadiah, his son Shecaniah. 22 The son2 of Shecaniah: Shemaiah. And the sons of Shemaiah: Hattush, Igal, Bariah, Neariah, and Shaphat, six. 23 The sons of Neariah: Elioenai, Hizkiah, and Azrikam, three. 24 The sons of Elioenai: Hodaviah, Eliashib, Pelaiah, Akkub, Johanan, Delaiah, and Anani, seven. Descendants of Judah 4 The sons of Judah: Perez, Hezron, Carmi, Hur, and Shobal. 2 Reaiah the son of Shobal fathered Jahath, and Jahath fathered Ahumai and Lahad. These were the clans of the Zorathites. 3 These were the sons3 of Etam: Jezreel, Ishma, and Idbash; and the name of their sister was Hazzelelponi, 4 and Penuel fathered Gedor, and Ezer fathered Hushah. These were the sons of Hur, the firstborn of Ephrathah, the father of Bethlehem. 5 Ashhur, the father of Tekoa, had two wives, Helah and Naarah; 6 Naarah bore him Ahuzzam, Hepher, Temeni, and Haahashtari. These were the sons of Naarah. 7 The sons of Helah: Zereth, Izhar, and Ethnan. 8 Koz fathered Anub, Zobebah, and the clans of Aharhel, the son of Harum. 9 Jabez was more honorable than his brothers; and his mother called his name Jabez, saying, “Because I bore him in pain.”4 10 Jabez called upon the God of Israel, saying, “Oh that you would bless me and enlarge my border, and that your hand might be with me, and that you would keep me from harm5 so that it might not bring me pain!” And God granted what he asked. 11 Chelub, the brother of Shuhah, fathered Mehir, who fathered Eshton. 12 Eshton fathered Beth-rapha, Paseah, and Tehinnah, the father of Ir-nahash. These are the men of Recah. 13 The sons of Kenaz: Othniel and Seraiah; and the sons of Othniel: Hathath and Meonothai.6 14 Meonothai fathered Ophrah; and Seraiah fathered Joab, the father of Ge-harashim,7 so-called because they were craftsmen. 15 The sons of Caleb the son of Jephunneh: Iru, Elah, and Naam; and the son8 of Elah: Kenaz. 16 The sons of Jehallelel: Ziph, Ziphah, Tiria, and Asarel. 17 The sons of Ezrah: Jether, Mered, Epher, and Jalon. These are the sons of Bithiah, the daughter of Pharaoh, whom Mered married;9 and she conceived and bore10 Miriam, Shammai, and Ishbah, the father of Eshtemoa. 18 And his Judahite wife bore Jered the father of Gedor, Heber the father of Soco, and Jekuthiel the father of Zanoah. 19 The sons of the wife of Hodiah, the sister of Naham, were the fathers of Keilah the Garmite and Eshtemoa the Maacathite. 20 The sons of Shimon: Amnon, Rinnah, Ben-hanan, and Tilon. The sons of Ishi: Zoheth and Ben-zoheth. 21 The sons of Shelah the son of Judah: Er the father of Lecah, Laadah the father of Mareshah, and the clans of the house of linen workers at Beth-ashbea; 22 and Jokim, and the men of Cozeba, and Joash, and Saraph, who ruled in Moab and returned to Lehem11 (now the records12 are ancient). 23 These were the potters who were inhabitants of Netaim and Gederah. They lived there in the king's service. Descendants of Simeon 24 The sons of Simeon: Nemuel, Jamin, Jarib, Zerah, Shaul; 25 Shallum was his son, Mibsam his son, Mishma his son. 26 The sons of Mishma: Hammuel his son, Zaccur his son, Shimei his son. 27 Shimei had sixteen sons and six daughters; but his brothers did not have many children, nor did all their clan multiply like the men of Judah. 28 They lived in Beersheba, Moladah, Hazar-shual, 29 Bilhah, Ezem, Tolad, 30 Bethuel, Hormah, Ziklag, 31 Beth-marcaboth, Hazar-susim, Beth-biri, and Shaaraim. These were their cities until David reigned. 32 And their villages were Etam, Ain, Rimmon, Tochen, and Ashan, five cities, 33 along with all their villages that were around these cities as far as Baal. These were their settlements, and they kept a genealogical record. 34 Meshobab, Jamlech, Joshah the son of Amaziah, 35 Joel, Jehu the son of Joshibiah, son of Seraiah, son of Asiel, 36 Elioenai, Jaakobah, Jeshohaiah, Asaiah, Adiel, Jesimiel, Benaiah, 37 Ziza the son of Shiphi, son of Allon, son of Jedaiah, son of Shimri, son of Shemaiah—38 these mentioned by name were princes in their clans, and their fathers' houses increased greatly. 39 They journeyed to the entrance of Gedor, to the east side of the valley, to seek pasture for their flocks, 40 where they found rich, good pasture, and the land was very broad, quiet, and peaceful, for the former inhabitants there belonged to Ham. 41 These, registered by name, came in the days of Hezekiah, king of Judah, and destroyed their tents and the Meunites who were found there, and marked them for destruction to this day, and settled in their place, because there was pasture there for their flocks. 42 And some of them, five hundred men of the Simeonites, went to Mount Seir, having as their leaders Pelatiah, Neariah, Rephaiah, and Uzziel, the sons of Ishi. 43 And they defeated the remnant of the Amalekites who had escaped, and they have lived there to this day. Footnotes [1] 3:21 Septuagint (compare Syriac, Vulgate); Hebrew sons of; four times in this verse [2] 3:22 Hebrew sons [3] 4:3 Septuagint (compare Vulgate); Hebrew father [4] 4:9 Jabez sounds like the Hebrew for pain [5] 4:10 Or evil [6] 4:13 Septuagint, Vulgate; Hebrew lacks Meonothai [7] 4:14 Ge-harashim means valley of craftsmen [8] 4:15 Hebrew sons [9] 4:17 The clause These are . . . married is transposed from verse 18 [10] 4:17 Hebrew lacks and bore [11] 4:22 Vulgate (compare Septuagint); Hebrew and Jashubi-lahem [12] 4:22 Or matters (ESV)

All Around Growth
Ep. 387 - Faith

All Around Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 26:12


Faith enables us to know God as He knows Himself, although certainly not exhaustively.  God knows Himself not only as the Creator, bur also as the Trinity and as the Author of grace; it is under these aspects that faith presents Him to us.  By faith, we know creatures as He knows them, that is, in relation to Him and dependent upon Him.  Our intellect can give us only natural light on God and creatures; faith, on the contrary, gives us the supernatural light that is a participation in the light of God, in the knowledge God has of Himself and of creatures.- Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.Join Rob as he discusses a topic that he's often been reluctant to discuss - his Christian faith.  What do you have to say about faith and/or spirituality?  Let us know in the group chat!Telegram Group Chat - https://t.me/allaroundgrowth ~Connect on social media!  Telegram Group Chat - https://t.me/allaroundgrowth MeWe Group - https://mewe.com/join/theallaroundgrowthcommunity  Twitter - https://twitter.com/allaroundgrowth Flote - https://flote.app/allaroundgrowth Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/allaroundgrowth Facebook Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/allaroundgrowth ~Follow this link to ALL EPISODES   ~ How To Leave a Rating & Review in Apple Podcast AppThis really *does* affect the algorithm......as of recording in July 2022 - I would invite you to do this!The podcast game is changing - help us with a rating and review!~Have a Question or any feedback for Rob?Send me an email at allaroundgrowth@gmail.com~Discussion Links:Divine Intimacy - Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen OCDThis Book of Meditations is a classic and is steeped in Carmelite spirituality. For every day it offers two meditations, arranged according to the liturgical season (1962 Missal), that enable the soul to enter the conscious presence of God and to reflect on the theme of the day. These are followed by a Colloquy that helps the person at prayer to start a friendly conversation with God where acts of praise and love, petition and thanksgiving are made, together with good resolutions for the future. Here we are at the very heart of prayer, which is a heart-to-heart encounter in faith with the living God. Divine Intimacy is the highest state attainable on earth. In this union of love, the soul produces acts of love which have an immense apostolic influence on a multitude of souls. This knowledge of the ways that lead to God, according to the teaching of the renowned Spanish mystics, is distilled into the pages of this book.Divine Intimacy - Chad Lemoine  "What Is The Royal Path?" (The Royal Path Ep 001) - YouTubeSupport the show

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 403All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint of the Day: Saint Titus BrandsmaGiven the birth name Anno, Brandsma and his siblings grew up on their parents' dairy farm in rural Frisia. As devout Catholics, the family was in the minority among their Calvinist neighbors. From age 11 Anno was educated at a preparatory school for boys who were studying for the priesthood. He joined the Carmelite novitiate in 1898, taking the name Titus in honor of his father. In the years following his 1905 ordination, Brandsma received a doctorate in philosophy and initiated a project to translate the works of Saint Teresa of Avila into Dutch. One of the founders of the Catholic University of Nijmegen, he served as a professor of philosophy and the history of mysticism at the school. While there Brandsma was known more for his availability to faculty and students than for his academic achievements. Working as a journalist Brandsma served as ecclesiastical advisor to Catholic journalists. His long-standing opposition to Nazi ideology came to the attention of the Nazis when they invaded the Netherlands in 1940. In direct opposition to the Third Reich, the Conference of Dutch Bishops sent a letter ordering Catholic newspaper editors not to print Nazi propaganda. Fr. Brandsma was arrested while hand delivering the letter in January 1942. After being imprisoned in several other facilities, in June he was taken to the Dachau camp in Germany. During his brief time at Dachau Fr. Brandsma was well-known for his kindness and spiritual support of other prisoners. His death on July 26, 1942 was a result of the Reich's program of medical experimentation on prisoners. He gave a wooden rosary to the nurse who administered the fatal injection; she later became Catholic and testified to his holiness. In recent years Brandsma has been honored by both the cities of Nijmegen and Dachau. Titus Brandsma was beatified in 1985, and canonized in 2022. Reflection Conscience often creates martyrs. That was the case for Titus Brandsma. Many people “go along to get along,” not realizing that by doing so they are destroying themselves internally. In his homily at the canonization Mass Pope Francis said, “Holiness does not consist of a few heroic gestures, but of many small acts of daily love.” Saint Titus Brandsma is a patron saint of: Catholic journalists FrieslandInternational Union of Catholic Esperantists Tobacconists Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast
Righteous among the nations: Au Revoir les Enfants (1987)

Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 68:15


On the morning of January 15, 1944, Nazis raided a boarding school for boys in Avon, France. The Carmelite monks who ran the school had been hiding some Jewish boys there under false names. As a number of the children and teachers watched, three of their classmates were led away by the Nazis, along with the headmaster, Pere Jacques, who turned back to say only, "Au revoir, les enfants" ("Goodbye, children"). The three boys died in Auschwitz, and the priest went to Mauthausen, dying only a few weeks after the camp was liberated by US forces. Among the children standing by on that unforgettable day was the future French film director Louis Malle. Decades later in 1987, he would memorialize the experience, the boys and the priest (whose cause for canonization was opened in 1990). The film is included on the Vatican's 1995 list of important movies under the category of Values. But Au Revoir les Enfants is about much more than the Holocaust. The bulk of the film is a kind of slice-of-life experience of a French Catholic boarding school. The children in the story don't know what is going on behind the scenes, and Malle proves deft at developing the plot in an unemphatic and invisible manner until the end. It is a coming-of-age story, a Holocaust story, and the story of a heroic priest-martyr all in one. Note: In this episode, we mistakenly referred to the main character as “Lucien”. His name, in fact, is Julien. Article about Pere Jacques: https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1781-au-revoir-les-enfants-p-re-jacques-and-the-petit-coll-ge-d-avon This podcast is a production of CatholicCulture.org. If you like the show, please consider supporting us! http://catholicculture.org/donate/audio

Cafeteria Catholics
Carmelite Martyrs & the Holy Mass #6

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 25:46


cafeteriacatholicscomehome.comhttps://reginaprophetarum.org/#/

Cafeteria Catholics
Carmelite Martyrs & the Holy Mass #4

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 9:58


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Cafeteria Catholics
Carmelite Martyrs & the Holy Mass #3

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 21:48


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Cafeteria Catholics
Carmelite Martyrs & the Holy Mass #2

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 20:15


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Cafeteria Catholics
Carmelite Martyrs & the Holy Mass #1

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 22:35


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Cafeteria Catholics
Carmelite Martyrs & the Holy Mass #5

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 16:54


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Radio Family Rosary
7-15-22: Brigittine-Carmelite Rosary – Pat Kjelstad, OCDS

Radio Family Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 24:59


7-15-22: Brigittine-Carmelite Rosary – Pat Kjelstad, OCDS by

Didde Center Homily Podcasts
CARMEL AND COMPIÈGNE - Homily for the 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Didde Center Homily Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 19:05


"All the way [to the guillotine] the Carmelite sisters sang: the 'Miserere,' 'Salve Regina,' and 'Te Deum.' Beholding them, a total silence fell on the racous, brutal crowd, most of them cheapened and hardened by day after day of the spectacle of public slaughter. At the foot of the towering killing machine, their eyes raised to Heaven, the sisters sang 'Veni Creator Spiritus.' Sister Teresa, their prioress, requested and obtained permission to go last under the knife. The youngest, Sister Constance, went first. She climbed the steps of the guillotine 'with the air of a queen going to receive her crown,' singing Laudate Dominum omnes gentes, 'all peoples praise the Lord.' She placed her head in the position for death without allowing the executioner to touch her. Each sister followed her example, those remaining singing likewise with each, until only the prioress was left, holding in her hand a small figure of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The killing of each marter required about two minutes. It was about eight o'clock in the evening, still bright at midsummer. During the whole time the profound silence of the crowd about the guillotine endured unbroken." --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hucklefather/support

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel – Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 1:41


According to the traditions of the Carmelite order, on July 16, 1251, the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to St. Simon Stock, a Carmelite. During the vision, she revealed to him the Scapularof Our Lady of Mount Carmel, popularly known as the "Brown Scapular." A century and a quarter later, the Carmelite order began to celebrate on this date the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. The post Our Lady of Mt. Carmel – Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
July 16: Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 5:50


July 16: Our Lady of Mount CarmelOptional Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatroness of the Carmelites, and for deliverance from PurgatoryA Crusader legacy enriches the Church's inner lifeA few miles from Lebanon near Haifa, a large city in the north of present-day Israel, is the Holy Land's Masada of Catholic prayer and spirituality. Mount Carmel rises high into the sky, dominating the landscape below. On this promontory, one of the most dramatic and memorable scenes of the Old Testament unfolded. In the ninth century before Christ, the prophet Elijah made a death challenge to hundreds of pagan prophets to determine if the God of the Jews was greater than Baal. Two altars are built. Wood is laid about both. Two oxen are slaughtered and placed on the altars. The pagans pray to Baal to accept their sacrifice. Nothing. They pray through the morning. Nothing. They pray through the afternoon. Elijah mocks them. They hop around the altar. They slice their skin, mixing their blood with that of the oxen. Still nothing. They move to the side. Elijah steps up and gives commands. Yahweh's altar is drenched with water. It is drenched twice more. Elijah pleads that Yahweh accept the sacrifice. And then…a ball of fire cuts through the night sky and BAM! The water evaporates and the sacrifice is totally consumed by the blazing fire of the true God. Then the shocking revenge. Elijah slits the throats of the four hundred and fifty prophets of Baal at a brook that soon runs red.God showed His power in stunning fashion on Mount Carmel centuries before Christ ever walked the earth. Two millennia later, the Holy Land was Crusader territory. Chivalric Orders of Knights had conquered Jerusalem and dotted the Mediterranean Coast with Crusader castles to protect the flow of pilgrims and soldiers to and from the holiest sites of Christianity. Some of those knights and dames knew Mount Carmel was holy ground. So in the crags, folds, and valleys of this isolated mountainscape, pocked with numerous caves and grottoes, hermits retreated to lead lives of prayer, fasting, and penance. When political and social realities changed by the end of the thirteenth century, and Christians once again lost the Holy Land, these hermits returned home and established new “Mount Carmels” throughout Europe, evoking the spiritual isolation of their lost mountain in Northern Israel.The Order of Mount Carmel is an engine room of prayer, a religious family of both male and female contemplative religious. Carmelites' radical dedication to contemplative prayer, detachment, poverty, and death to self has attracted and formed men and women of the greatest holiness: Saints Teresa of Ávila, John of the Cross, Thérèse of Lisieux, and Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein). Integral to Carmelite spirituality is the Virgin Mary under the title of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. The origins of today's liturgical feast are somewhat unclear, but the underlying devotion is not. The Virgin Mary's steady, quiet presence in the life of our Lord is notable for its subtlety. Her inner life and secret generosity is what attracts, more than her actions or speech. No word is limited to a book. The Word of God existed from eternity in the Trinity, became flesh, taught, performed miracles, died and rose long before the Word was written down. Mary is the mother of that rich Word. Her word of “Yes” to the Archangel Gabriel gave space for the Word to dwell among us.In his 1994 book “Crossing the Threshold of Hope,” Pope Saint John Paul II wrote that “Carmelite mysticism begins at the point where the reflections of Buddha end…” The goal of spirituality is not merely to renounce the evil world but to unite the soul to the personal God of Jesus Christ. Purification and detachment are not ends in themselves. They help one cling to God more easily. Our Lady of Mount Carmel is not a chameleon. She doesn't change colors to satisfy any and all “spiritualities.” She is the mother of God and the icon, par excellence, of the queen of the virtues—humility.Our Lady of Mount Carmel, through your example of humble docility to the will of God, we seek your intercession to make us more prayerful, more detached, more recollected, and more committed to whatever God asks of us.

Roadmap To Heaven with Adam Wright
July 6, 2022 (Carmelite Sisters, Crystalina Evert, Scott Hahn )

Roadmap To Heaven with Adam Wright

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 55:25


Adam goes on the road to visit the Carmelite Monastery of St. Joseph to learn about the order and their upcoming Novena. Are you at your wits end with your kids on summer break? Crystalina Evert helps us see the goldmine of opportunity parents have during this time. Dr. Scott Hahn jones by phone to continue his reflection on the gift of the Holy Eucharist during our three year Eucharist Revival. Learn more about Covenant Network Catholic Radio at www.ourcatholicradio.org .

ESV: Every Day in the Word
July 3: 1 Chronicles 3–4; 1 Corinthians 6; Psalm 2; Proverbs 18:17–18

ESV: Every Day in the Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 12:13


Old Testament: 1 Chronicles 3–4 1 Chronicles 3–4 (Listen) Descendants of David 3 These are the sons of David who were born to him in Hebron: the firstborn, Amnon, by Ahinoam the Jezreelite; the second, Daniel, by Abigail the Carmelite, 2 the third, Absalom, whose mother was Maacah, the daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur; the fourth, Adonijah, whose mother was Haggith; 3 the fifth, Shephatiah, by Abital; the sixth, Ithream, by his wife Eglah; 4 six were born to him in Hebron, where he reigned for seven years and six months. And he reigned thirty-three years in Jerusalem. 5 These were born to him in Jerusalem: Shimea, Shobab, Nathan and Solomon, four by Bath-shua, the daughter of Ammiel; 6 then Ibhar, Elishama, Eliphelet, 7 Nogah, Nepheg, Japhia, 8 Elishama, Eliada, and Eliphelet, nine. 9 All these were David's sons, besides the sons of the concubines, and Tamar was their sister. 10 The son of Solomon was Rehoboam, Abijah his son, Asa his son, Jehoshaphat his son, 11 Joram his son, Ahaziah his son, Joash his son, 12 Amaziah his son, Azariah his son, Jotham his son, 13 Ahaz his son, Hezekiah his son, Manasseh his son, 14 Amon his son, Josiah his son. 15 The sons of Josiah: Johanan the firstborn, the second Jehoiakim, the third Zedekiah, the fourth Shallum. 16 The descendants of Jehoiakim: Jeconiah his son, Zedekiah his son; 17 and the sons of Jeconiah, the captive: Shealtiel his son, 18 Malchiram, Pedaiah, Shenazzar, Jekamiah, Hoshama and Nedabiah; 19 and the sons of Pedaiah: Zerubbabel and Shimei; and the sons of Zerubbabel: Meshullam and Hananiah, and Shelomith was their sister; 20 and Hashubah, Ohel, Berechiah, Hasadiah, and Jushab-hesed, five. 21 The sons of Hananiah: Pelatiah and Jeshaiah, his son1 Rephaiah, his son Arnan, his son Obadiah, his son Shecaniah. 22 The son2 of Shecaniah: Shemaiah. And the sons of Shemaiah: Hattush, Igal, Bariah, Neariah, and Shaphat, six. 23 The sons of Neariah: Elioenai, Hizkiah, and Azrikam, three. 24 The sons of Elioenai: Hodaviah, Eliashib, Pelaiah, Akkub, Johanan, Delaiah, and Anani, seven. Descendants of Judah 4 The sons of Judah: Perez, Hezron, Carmi, Hur, and Shobal. 2 Reaiah the son of Shobal fathered Jahath, and Jahath fathered Ahumai and Lahad. These were the clans of the Zorathites. 3 These were the sons3 of Etam: Jezreel, Ishma, and Idbash; and the name of their sister was Hazzelelponi, 4 and Penuel fathered Gedor, and Ezer fathered Hushah. These were the sons of Hur, the firstborn of Ephrathah, the father of Bethlehem. 5 Ashhur, the father of Tekoa, had two wives, Helah and Naarah; 6 Naarah bore him Ahuzzam, Hepher, Temeni, and Haahashtari. These were the sons of Naarah. 7 The sons of Helah: Zereth, Izhar, and Ethnan. 8 Koz fathered Anub, Zobebah, and the clans of Aharhel, the son of Harum. 9 Jabez was more honorable than his brothers; and his mother called his name Jabez, saying, “Because I bore him in pain.”4 10 Jabez called upon the God of Israel, saying, “Oh that you would bless me and enlarge my border, and that your hand might be with me, and that you would keep me from harm5 so that it might not bring me pain!” And God granted what he asked. 11 Chelub, the brother of Shuhah, fathered Mehir, who fathered Eshton. 12 Eshton fathered Beth-rapha, Paseah, and Tehinnah, the father of Ir-nahash. These are the men of Recah. 13 The sons of Kenaz: Othniel and Seraiah; and the sons of Othniel: Hathath and Meonothai.6 14 Meonothai fathered Ophrah; and Seraiah fathered Joab, the father of Ge-harashim,7 so-called because they were craftsmen. 15 The sons of Caleb the son of Jephunneh: Iru, Elah, and Naam; and the son8 of Elah: Kenaz. 16 The sons of Jehallelel: Ziph, Ziphah, Tiria, and Asarel. 17 The sons of Ezrah: Jether, Mered, Epher, and Jalon. These are the sons of Bithiah, the daughter of Pharaoh, whom Mered married;9 and she conceived and bore10 Miriam, Shammai, and Ishbah, the father of Eshtemoa. 18 And his Judahite wife bore Jered the father of Gedor, Heber the father of Soco, and Jekuthiel the father of Zanoah. 19 The sons of the wife of Hodiah, the sister of Naham, were the fathers of Keilah the Garmite and Eshtemoa the Maacathite. 20 The sons of Shimon: Amnon, Rinnah, Ben-hanan, and Tilon. The sons of Ishi: Zoheth and Ben-zoheth. 21 The sons of Shelah the son of Judah: Er the father of Lecah, Laadah the father of Mareshah, and the clans of the house of linen workers at Beth-ashbea; 22 and Jokim, and the men of Cozeba, and Joash, and Saraph, who ruled in Moab and returned to Lehem11 (now the records12 are ancient). 23 These were the potters who were inhabitants of Netaim and Gederah. They lived there in the king's service. Descendants of Simeon 24 The sons of Simeon: Nemuel, Jamin, Jarib, Zerah, Shaul; 25 Shallum was his son, Mibsam his son, Mishma his son. 26 The sons of Mishma: Hammuel his son, Zaccur his son, Shimei his son. 27 Shimei had sixteen sons and six daughters; but his brothers did not have many children, nor did all their clan multiply like the men of Judah. 28 They lived in Beersheba, Moladah, Hazar-shual, 29 Bilhah, Ezem, Tolad, 30 Bethuel, Hormah, Ziklag, 31 Beth-marcaboth, Hazar-susim, Beth-biri, and Shaaraim. These were their cities until David reigned. 32 And their villages were Etam, Ain, Rimmon, Tochen, and Ashan, five cities, 33 along with all their villages that were around these cities as far as Baal. These were their settlements, and they kept a genealogical record. 34 Meshobab, Jamlech, Joshah the son of Amaziah, 35 Joel, Jehu the son of Joshibiah, son of Seraiah, son of Asiel, 36 Elioenai, Jaakobah, Jeshohaiah, Asaiah, Adiel, Jesimiel, Benaiah, 37 Ziza the son of Shiphi, son of Allon, son of Jedaiah, son of Shimri, son of Shemaiah—38 these mentioned by name were princes in their clans, and their fathers' houses increased greatly. 39 They journeyed to the entrance of Gedor, to the east side of the valley, to seek pasture for their flocks, 40 where they found rich, good pasture, and the land was very broad, quiet, and peaceful, for the former inhabitants there belonged to Ham. 41 These, registered by name, came in the days of Hezekiah, king of Judah, and destroyed their tents and the Meunites who were found there, and marked them for destruction to this day, and settled in their place, because there was pasture there for their flocks. 42 And some of them, five hundred men of the Simeonites, went to Mount Seir, having as their leaders Pelatiah, Neariah, Rephaiah, and Uzziel, the sons of Ishi. 43 And they defeated the remnant of the Amalekites who had escaped, and they have lived there to this day. Footnotes [1] 3:21 Septuagint (compare Syriac, Vulgate); Hebrew sons of; four times in this verse [2] 3:22 Hebrew sons [3] 4:3 Septuagint (compare Vulgate); Hebrew father [4] 4:9 Jabez sounds like the Hebrew for pain [5] 4:10 Or evil [6] 4:13 Septuagint, Vulgate; Hebrew lacks Meonothai [7] 4:14 Ge-harashim means valley of craftsmen [8] 4:15 Hebrew sons [9] 4:17 The clause These are . . . married is transposed from verse 18 [10] 4:17 Hebrew lacks and bore [11] 4:22 Vulgate (compare Septuagint); Hebrew and Jashubi-lahem [12] 4:22 Or matters (ESV) New Testament: 1 Corinthians 6 1 Corinthians 6 (Listen) Lawsuits Against Believers 6 When one of you has a grievance against another, does he dare go to law before the unrighteous instead of the saints? 2 Or do you not know that the saints will judge the world? And if the world is to be judged by you, are you incompetent to try trivial cases? 3 Do you not know that we are to judge angels? How much more, then, matters pertaining to this life! 4 So if you have such cases, why do you lay them before those who have no standing in the church? 5 I say this to your shame. Can it be that there is no one among you wise enough to settle a dispute between the brothers, 6 but brother goes to law against brother, and that before unbelievers? 7 To have lawsuits at all with one another is already a defeat for you. Why not rather suffer wrong? Why not rather be defrauded? 8 But you yourselves wrong and defraud—even your own brothers!1 9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous2 will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality,3 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God. Flee Sexual Immorality 12 “All things are lawful for me,” but not all things are helpful. “All things are lawful for me,” but I will not be dominated by anything. 13 “Food is meant for the stomach and the stomach for food”—and God will destroy both one and the other. The body is not meant for sexual immorality, but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body. 14 And God raised the Lord and will also raise us up by his power. 15 Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ? Shall I then take the members of Christ and make them members of a prostitute? Never! 16 Or do you not know that he who is joined4 to a prostitute becomes one body with her? For, as it is written, “The two will become one flesh.” 17 But he who is joined to the Lord becomes one spirit with him. 18 Flee from sexual immorality. Every other sin5 a person commits is outside the body, but the sexually immoral person sins against his own body. 19 Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, 20 for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body. Footnotes [1] 6:8 Or brothers and sisters [2] 6:9 Or wrongdoers [3] 6:9 The two Greek terms translated by this phrase refer to the passive and active partners in consensual homosexual acts [4] 6:16 Or who holds fast (compare Genesis 2:24 and Deuteronomy 10:20); also verse 17 [5] 6:18 Or Every sin (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 2 Psalm 2 (Listen) The Reign of the Lord's Anointed 2   Why do the nations rage1    and the peoples plot in vain?2   The kings of the earth set themselves,    and the rulers take counsel together,    against the LORD and against his Anointed, saying,3   “Let us burst their bonds apart    and cast away their cords from us.” 4   He who sits in the heavens laughs;    the Lord holds them in derision.5   Then he will speak to them in his wrath,    and terrify them in his fury, saying,6   “As for me, I have set my King    on Zion, my holy hill.” 7   I will tell of the decree:  The LORD said to me, “You are my Son;    today I have begotten you.8   Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage,    and the ends of the earth your possession.9   You shall break2 them with a rod of iron    and dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel.” 10   Now therefore, O kings, be wise;    be warned, O rulers of the earth.11   Serve the LORD with fear,    and rejoice with trembling.12   Kiss the Son,    lest he be angry, and you perish in the way,    for his wrath is quickly kindled.  Blessed are all who take refuge in him. Footnotes [1] 2:1 Or nations noisily assemble [2] 2:9 Revocalization yields (compare Septuagint) You shall rule (ESV) Proverb: Proverbs 18:17–18 Proverbs 18:17–18 (Listen) 17   The one who states his case first seems right,    until the other comes and examines him.18   The lot puts an end to quarrels    and decides between powerful contenders. (ESV)