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    Crosspoint City Church - Messages
    SEVEN: Week 5 | Sardis | Pastor James Griffin

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages

    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 50:27


    Have you ever wondered what the seven letters written to the seven different churches in Asia Minor in the book of Revelation mean for us today? Join us for this series called "Seven", where we will examine each of these letters to the seven churches, and how we can apply those to our lives over 2,000 years later!This message is from Seven Week 5: "Sardis"STAY CONNECTED:Twitter: https://bit.ly/2XTOD4rFacebook: https://bit.ly/3ja3TCqInstagram: https://bit.ly/3jeBFq2

    Saint of the Day
    Holy New Martyr Pachomius (1730)

    Saint of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 1:11


    Born in a village of Little Russia (now Belarus), he was kidnapped as a boy and sold to a Turkish tanner as a slave. He spent the next twenty-seven years in Usaki in Asia Minor, where he was forced to embrace Islam. After long years of servitude he escaped and, reclaiming his Christianity, went to the Holy Mountain, became a monk and lived for twelve years. Tormented by his former apostasy, he determined to suffer martyrdom for Christ. With the permission of his elder, Joseph, he returned to Usaki and showed himself to his former owner wearing his monastic habit. He was tortured, thrown into prison, and finally beheaded on on Ascension Day of 1730. His relics are buried on the island of Patmos in the Church of St John the Theologian, where they work many miracles.

    Saint of the Day
    Holy New Martyr Pachomius (1730)

    Saint of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 1:11


    Born in a village of Little Russia (now Belarus), he was kidnapped as a boy and sold to a Turkish tanner as a slave. He spent the next twenty-seven years in Usaki in Asia Minor, where he was forced to embrace Islam. After long years of servitude he escaped and, reclaiming his Christianity, went to the Holy Mountain, became a monk and lived for twelve years. Tormented by his former apostasy, he determined to suffer martyrdom for Christ. With the permission of his elder, Joseph, he returned to Usaki and showed himself to his former owner wearing his monastic habit. He was tortured, thrown into prison, and finally beheaded on on Ascension Day of 1730. His relics are buried on the island of Patmos in the Church of St John the Theologian, where they work many miracles.

    Sermons From My Heart
    Acts 16 verses 9-15 God's Plans For His People.

    Sermons From My Heart

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 12:30


    You have probably heard of the famous quote from the Scottish poet Robbie Burns that “the best laid plans of mice and men often go astray.” The evens in Acts 16:9-15 are a good example of this saying. The apostle Paul wanted to preach the Gospel in the Roman province of Asia, which extended to the coast of Greece. Paul was convinced that this was the next step in the strategy for reaching the Gentiles.The Holy Spirit prevented Paul and his companions from going there. Paul was sensitive enough to the Spirit of God that he could tell the difference between no and yes when it came to discerning God's will-and he was obedient enough to respond to both. This time, God directed Paul to leave Asia Minor and go into Europe.

    The Greek Current
    "I will not forget!": Commemorating the Pontian Genocide

    The Greek Current

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 11:44


    Greece's leaders commemorated the 103rd anniversary of the genocide of the Greeks of the Pontus region today, in which at least 353,000 Pontian Greeks perished. This was a major phase of a larger genocide of Christians in Turkey that also targeted Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks from Asia Minor and eastern Thrace. Professor Alexander Kitroeff, a Professor of History at Haverford College whose research focuses on identity in Greece and its diaspora, joins Thanos Davelis to commemorate the Pontian Genocide, discuss the efforts to achieve its international recognition, and explore how to overcome Turkey's continued denial of this crime.You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greek president calls for recognition of Pontian Genocide on 103rd anniversaryPM, FM pay tribute on anniversary of Pontian GenocideTurkey lashes out at Greek officials' ‘delusional statements' on Pontian genocide anniversaryGreece, UK to hold formal talks on return of Parthenon sculpturesBiden hails Sweden, Finland NATO bids as leaders visit USIn White House visit, Finland and Sweden's leaders talk Turkey

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages
    SEVEN: Week 4 | Thyatira | Pastor James Griffin

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 45:13


    Have you ever wondered what the seven letters written to the seven different churches in Asia Minor in the book of Revelation mean for us today? Join us for this series called "Seven", where we will examine each of these letters to the seven churches, and how we can apply those to our lives over 2,000 years later!This message is from Seven Week 4: "Thyatira"STAY CONNECTED:Twitter: https://bit.ly/2XTOD4rFacebook: https://bit.ly/3ja3TCqInstagram: https://bit.ly/3jeBFq2

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages
    Seven: Week 3 | Pergamum | Pastor Lane Vrooman

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 43:24


    Have you ever wondered what the seven letters written to the seven different churches in Asia Minor in the book of Revelation mean for us today? Join us for this series called "Seven", where we will examine each of these letters to the seven churches, and how we can apply those to our lives over 2,000 years later! This message is from Seven Week 3: "Pergamum"STAY CONNECTED: Twitter: https://bit.ly/2XTOD4rFacebook: https://bit.ly/3ja3TCqInstagram: https://bit.ly/3jeBFq2

    Mosaic Silver Spring
    The Victorious King

    Mosaic Silver Spring

    Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 29:04


    Revelation 1:1-20 -- John receives a vision of Jesus, who comes as the victorious Son of Man. Here he is commanded to send messages to seven churches of Asia Minor and encouraging them to pursue faithfulness.

    Geocaching Scripture
    Revelation 3: Lukewarm and Gross

    Geocaching Scripture

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 11:54


    Ummm....so I've been gone a bit, but I can't help myself. I'm back and our name is Geocaching Scripture again and there it shall stay. In this episode, we talk about the so-so water supply in Laodicea in Asia Minor, Daniel Day Lewis and how metaphors – even biblical ones – are best drawn from whatever's laying around. It's very, very good to be back, fellow cachers. Pax humana.

    Malcolm Cox
    S2 Ep256: “The Connection between the Spirit, Unity and Singing” Part 2 | Tuesday Teaching Tips | Episode 256

    Malcolm Cox

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 17:06


    Why do we sing? “Let the message of Christ dwell among you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom through psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit, singing to God with gratitude in your hearts.” Col 3:16 Background The church in Colossae was made up of house churches of around 30-50 people (Philemon 1:2). Many ‘gods' were worshipped in this part of Asia Minor and the Apostle Paul is concerned about syncretism (in this context the blending together of Christian and Pagan worship).  Therefore he centres the letter on the sufficiency of Christ and his unique nature. Read the chapters that come before this one to get a feel for that. Congregation or Individual? Are the instructions about singing aimed at the individual or the congregational? The context is the “therefore” of v12 where he is addressing the Colossians as a body.  The list of positive exhortations is to the congregational community rather than the solo worshipper.  Dwell richly What is the ‘message of Christ'? It is the message that centres on Christ. In other words their fellowship must derive its purpose and strength from him. The Scriptures help the community to centre themselves on Christ. For the message to “dwell richly” means it is ‘in their midst'. It is not a ‘thing' to be dissected, grasped, conceptualised, taught or simply understood, but to be a dynamic experience. See use of same word for ‘richly' in 1 Tim 6:17; Titus 3:6; 2 Peter 1:11.  Paul is urging them to let Christ be centred among them so that he makes a difference to the way they live - vv12-15: compassionate, kind, humble, gentle, patient, bearing, forgiving, loving to unity, peaceable, thankful. The command is to dwell richly (in Christ), so how does singing fit? It is not that we dwell by teaching, admonishing and singing. It is that we decide to dwell with Christ as central, and then we will sing as a result. The “as you” in the NIV is not the best translation. A more accurate reading is to see the singing as the channel through which the centralising of Christ could be expressed.  “Let the word of Christ richly dwell within you, with all wisdom teaching and admonishing one another with psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with thankfulness in your hearts to God.” NASB Teaching…admonishing: See Acts 20:31; 1 Cor 4:14; 1 Thess 5:12; 2 Thess 3:15; Titus 1:11 With psalms, hymns, spiritual songs How to instruct with a hymn is not clear, but it  fits with 1 Cor 14:26.   “When you assemble, each one has a psalm, has a teaching, has a revelation, has a tongue, has an interpretation. Let all things be done for edification.” However, if Paul emphasises teaching by singing it means he thought it important, and observed that it had been neglected (or done unhealthily) in Colossae. Psalm - psalmos NT: Luke 20:42; 24:44; Acts 1:20; 13:33; 1 Cor 14:26; Eph 5:19; Col 3:16. It looks like Paul was not talking about Psalms in a technical sense. Philo & Josephus (first century Jewish writers) saw Psalms in the category of ‘religious song'. Hymn As a noun this is found only in Ephesians & Colossians. As a verb it is in Matt 26:30 (ref to Psalm); Mk 14:26; Act 16:25; Heb 2:12 (Ps 22:22). Jesus and his disciples were ‘hymning”. Songs This word appears with the qualifier ‘spiritual' each time (Rev 5:9; Rev 14:3; 15:3). Perhaps these songs were written by the congregation, or made up on the spot. All the terms above are not sealed categories, but may express emphases.  Singing in your hearts to God Singing directly to God is added to the previous instruction to teach one another through music. We worship God and we instruct one another. With gratitude This Greek word would normally be translated ‘grace'. Thus the phrase could be "in the grace [of God]” or perhaps, “by the grace [of God]. In that case it would be reminding the Colossians of the grace in which they stand and which inspires the singing to come from the heart. Summary 1. Vertical and horizontal directions: Singing is for one another and for God 2. Teaching the faith to one another can and must be done through music 3. Church music should be primarily verbal: The message is more important than the media 4. Christological focus: How much of Christ is in view in our songs? 5. Active participation: Worship is something we do, not something done to us or for us. 6. Rich variety of songs: We need a variety of the old, the new and, especially, the local.  7. Sincerity and devotion: We worship because of who I am, because of who God is, and because of what's in my heart as a result. 8. Understanding God's Grace: As much we teach about music and singing, we must not neglect the teaching about the grace of God. Ideas and Questions for Reflection  Read the whole book of Colossians and reflect on why Paul thinks singing is so important for the Church. What do you think it means for you to ‘teach and admonish' in song? How can you ‘centre' your life on Christ in such a way that it inspires you to sing of God's grace? Please add your comments on this week's topic. We learn best when we learn in community.  Do you have a question about teaching the Bible? Is it theological, technical, practical? Send me your questions or suggestions. Here's the email: [malcolm@malcolmcox.org](mailto:malcolm@malcolmcox.org).  If you'd like a copy of my free eBook on spiritual disciplines, “How God grows His people”, sign up at my website: http://[www.malcolmcox.org](http://www.malcolmcox.org/).  Please pass the link on, subscribe, leave a review.  “Worship the LORD with gladness; come before him with joyful songs.” (Psalms 100:2 NIV11)  God bless, Malcolm

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages
    Seven: Week 2 | Smyrna | Pastor James Griffin

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages

    Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 50:12


    Have you ever wondered what the seven letters written to the seven different churches in Asia Minor in the book of Revelation mean for us today? Join us for this series called "Seven", where we will examine each of these letters to the seven churches, and how we can apply those to our lives over 2,000 years later! This message is from Seven Week 2: "Smyrna"STAY CONNECTED: Twitter: https://bit.ly/2XTOD4rFacebook: https://bit.ly/3ja3TCqInstagram: https://bit.ly/3jeBFq2

    Digging Deeper with Brian Hale
    #519 - Can You Still Trust God? Day 4

    Digging Deeper with Brian Hale

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 4:42


    I have seen men and women emerge from far less strenuous circumstances than the apostle Paul's, full of anger and hostility. They were mad at God for what He did to them. But not Paul. Why? Because he recognized that what God allowed to be done to him was simply preparation for what He wanted to do for him. As Paul grew more and more dependent upon the Lord for strength, it became second nature to him. His faith in Christ grew to the point that he could say with all sincerity, “I am well content with weaknesses.”The whole idea of being content with weakness contradicts the messages society sends us. In an age characterized by so many striving for power and control, it is unusual for people to get very excited about living in a state of weakness. But upon examining the life of the apostle Paul, one hardly gets the impression that he was a weak man. On the contrary, he debated against Christ's apostles over the question of Gentile salvation, and he won! He spent his life preaching in the most hostile of circumstances. He planted churches throughout the major cities of Asia Minor and in the port cities along the Aegean Sea. Paul trained the first pastors and elders of these early congregations. And to top it all off, he wrote half of the New Testament!I don't know what you think, but that certainly doesn't sound like a weak man to me. If Paul had been a businessman, he would have been extremely successful. He knew how to set goals and accomplish them. He understood the principles involved in motivating people. He was a mover and a shaker.So how do we reconcile Paul's claim to weakness with his amazing accomplishments? Simple. The answer is in the phrase “when I am weak, then I am strong.” A paraphrase of his comment would go something like this: “When I, Paul, in and of my own strength, am weak, then I, Paul, relying on the power of Christ in me, become strong, capable of whatever the Lord requires of me, full of energy and zeal to accomplish His will.”

    Saint of the Day
    The Nine Martyrs at Cyzicus (3rd c.)

    Saint of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 0:58


    hese nine holy Martyrs were from various places, but when they refused to offer sacrifice to idols or to deny Christ, all were beheaded together in Cyzicus, a city in Asia Minor on the coast of the Sea of Marmara. Their names were Theognis, Rufus, Antipater, Theostoichus, Artemas, Magnus, Theodotus, Thaumasilas and Philemon. During the reign of the Emperor Constantine a church was built in Cyzicus in their honor, and their incorrupt relics were deposited there.   They are commemorated April 29 on the Slavic calendar.

    I CAN DO with Benjamin Lee
    135: The Dead Church

    I CAN DO with Benjamin Lee

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 29:57


    The messages Jesus gives to the seven churches in Asia Minor serve a s a reminder for us. Jesus knows who we are. He knows the good and bad. He sees all. What He sees really matters to Him. In this episode, we consider the church in Sardis. Who were they? What was their background? What did they needed to be reminded of? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/icdbenjaminlee/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/icdbenjaminlee/support

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages
    SEVEN: Week 1 | Ephesus | Pastor James Griffin

    Crosspoint City Church - Messages

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 50:12


    Have you ever wondered what the seven letters written to the seven different churches in Asia Minor in the book of Revelation mean for us today? Join us for this series called "Seven", where we will examine each of these letters to the seven churches, and how we can apply those to our lives over 2,000 years later! This message is from Seven Week 1: "Ephesus"STAY CONNECTED: Twitter: https://bit.ly/2XTOD4rFacebook: https://bit.ly/3ja3TCqInstagram: https://bit.ly/3jeBFq2

    CruxCasts
    EMX Royalty (EMX) - Talking Revenue Guidance & Franco Nevada Focus

    CruxCasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 32:55


    EMX Royalty Corporation is a Canada-based precious, base and battery metals royalty company. The Company operates as a royalty and prospect generator engaged in the exploring for, and generating royalties from, metals and minerals properties. The Company's royalty and exploration portfolio consists of properties in North America, Turkey, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and South America. It has a diversified portfolio of precious metals, base metals, and other royalty interests. Its royalties include: Leeville, Rawhide, NP Placers, Afgan, Maggie Creek, Antelope, Cathedral Well, Swift, Copper King, Goodpaster, Lucky 7, Jackson Manion, Kwai, Bruce Lake and Ophir, among others in the United States; Brestovac, Viscaria, Jasikovo, Gumsberg, Southern Gold Line, Trollberget, Bamble and Tomtebo, among others in Europe; Akarca, Balya, Sisorta, Alankoy and Trab-23 in Turkey, as well as Grand Bois and Koonenberry, among others in Asia Minor, Central and South America and Australia.

    Kid's Ministry Coffee Break | 5-Minutes of Spiritual Refreshment for Children's Ministry Leaders
    "EARS & EYES" Kids Ministry Coffee Break 19: Misunderstanding other people is a normal part of our lives. We can and should embrace diversity as an intentional part of God's plan for the church.

    Kid's Ministry Coffee Break | 5-Minutes of Spiritual Refreshment for Children's Ministry Leaders

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 6:26


    Do you ever have moments when your people don't seem to understand you or one another? Or maybe you don't understand them? Or maybe other ministers from other churches are doing/believing/practicing/preaching things that just don't make sense or connect with you. It can lead to all sorts of questions. It can be unsettling. It can even lead us to judgment and resentment and frustration among other things. Are you with me? Has this happened to you? You are not alone. The Apostle Paul dealt with this time and again. He traveled around Asia Minor and helped found churches among all sorts of people and cultures. He got to know a myriad of people with a myriad of perspectives. And he did this without a single Gospel narrative!! There was no Christian scripture at his disposal. He couldn't read from any of the 27 books we now read from regularly. I don't know how he did it, honestly, except by the Holy Spirit. Multiple times he wrote letters to groups who were struggling to understand one another. Multiple times he uses the image of the body to help people find peace with unity that was not uniform. (By the way…that's what we're after…unity…but not uniformity) —this is why I love that we have different denominations. People will connect with you church that wouldn't connect with the church across town…and vice versa. I turn to Paul's image of the body to help me. He says in 1 Corinthians 12 we are all different parts of the same body. This can be applied to a congregation… and it can be applied to congregations who are part of a denomination… and to denominations part of the whole worldwide upper case C, Church. He gives this funny account of an ear telling an eye they aren't part of the body because they aren't an ear. An entire body of ears couldn't do much, right? It would be excellent at hearing…assuming it had a brain to process the sound. A body of eyes would be great at seeing, right. But neither body holds a candle to a body with both an ear and an eye. The ear can't say to the eye, “You don't belong.” First off, without a mouth, the ear can't say anything. And, without ears of its own, the eye can't even hear what the ear is saying. In fact, if the ear and eye were able to have a conversation…could they even explain to the other what they do? How do you explain sight to an ear? How do you explain sound to an eye? So many times today, I wonder if various groups of Christians who are debating the things they debate are just like a group of ears and eyes trying to explain what is unexplainable. They have an entirely different sense of what is going on…and they expect the other group to understand. Sometimes…we can't. And that's ok! It's even good! This is what makes us diverse and far more able to accomplish our mission on this world than a bunch of churches that are all eyes or ears or hands or feet, etc. We need each other. And we need each other to be different for the sake of better serving the whole body. So…the next time you find yourself struggling with someone's point of view or understanding…just picture yourself as an eye and the other person as an ear…and know that, perhaps, you aren't even able to understand one another. But you can still praise God for the abilities you both are offering for the good of the body. You can trust the Spirit knows what its doing in bringing it all together. Message brought to you be Rev. Joseph Sanford of Sanford Curriculum (Student ministry resources available on The Sunday School Store written by he and Lauren Sanford). https://10bibleverses.com/scripture-quotes/10-bible-verses-for-encouragement/ https://sundayschool.store/collections/free-downloads

    Forge Church
    Armed For The Fight

    Forge Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 23:09


    Having taught the Ephesians concerning the House Law thatt Holy Spirit was implanting into the churches regarding husbands, wives, slaves, master, parents and children, Paul concludes his Epistle by introducing, by Holy Spirit, his cosmology, his knowledge of the demonic forces arrayed against the churches of Asia Minor. He urges the new believers to "arm up" to resist Satan and to stand, using the armor of God.

    Coram Deo Church — Bremerton, WA
    Sermon B-Sides - E69 - A Pentecost in Ephesus and a School Hall Church Plant - Acts 18:18–19:10

    Coram Deo Church — Bremerton, WA

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 29:49


    In this episode of Sermon B-Sides, Pastor Jon and Pastor Rusten look at the gospel ministry in Ephesus. Ephesus was a strategic location for the gospel. The gospel began to spread in Ephesus through the ministry of Apollos. Then, Paul spent over two years teaching there, resulting in all Asia Minor hearing the gospel.

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Laodicea

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 34:41


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. But the Spirit has preserved these words to speak to us still today!The final community addressed was the church in Laodicea. The common picture of a lukewarm church where Jesus stands knocking at the door is found in this letter. Yet, as we look deeper we may find this message cuts at our hearts even more than we assumed of it.

    Glen Allen Church of Christ Sermons
    Unfinished Business

    Glen Allen Church of Christ Sermons

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 32:10


    Acts 13-14 tell of Paul and Barnabas on their first Missionary Journey to Asia Minor. They had established several churches and won many converts, but there was still unfinished business to attend to.

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Philadelphia

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 28:01


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. But the Spirit has preserved these words to speak to us still today!The community of Jesus followers in Philadelphia was small and had little power. They had been displaced from their home by earthquakes and even when they were able to go back and rebuild, they were caught between two opposing powers; the Greco-Roman worship of gods and Caesar, and the Jewish synagogue who wouldn't let Jesus followers in. This small church is one of two out of the seven that Jesus had nothing to say against, but only words of encouragement, hope, and a promise for those who endure.

    BIBLE IN TEN
    Acts 6:9

    BIBLE IN TEN

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 9:21


    Thursday, 31 March 2022   Then there arose some from what is called the Synagogue of the Freedmen (Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and those from Cilicia and Asia), disputing with Stephen. Acts 6:9   The previous verse referred to the faith and power of Stephen as he did great wonders and signs among the people. Now, another group is introduced. Luke states, “Then there arose some.”   Because of the wording, one can assume they either have arisen to join, or to argue against, Stephen. Stephen is the main character of the narrative, and these now to be mentioned are brought in to define the narrative further. Those who have arisen are said to be “from what is called the Synagogue of the Freedmen.”   A short explanation of who these men are is given by Vincent's Word Studies –   “In Jerusalem, and probably in other large cities, the several synagogues were arranged according to nationalities, and even crafts. Thus we have in this verse mention of the synagogues of the Cyrenians, Alexandrians, Cilicians, and Asiatics. Libertines is a Latin word (libertini, freedmen), and means here Jews or their descendants who had been taken as slaves to Rome, and had there received their liberty; and who, in consequence of the decree of Tiberius, about 19 a.d., expelling them from Rome, had returned in great numbers to Jerusalem. They were likely to be the chief opponents of Stephen, because they supposed that by his preaching, their religion, for which they had suffered at Rome, was endangered in Jerusalem.”   However, Albert Barnes provides much more information on this designation –   ----------   The word is Latin, and means properly a ‘freedman,' a man who had been a slave and was set at liberty. Many have supposed that these persons were manumitted slaves of Roman origin, but who had become proselyted to the Jewish religion, and who had a synagogue in Jerusalem. This opinion is not very probable; though it is certain, from Tacitus (Ann., lib. 2:c. 85), that there were many persons of this description at Rome. He says that 4,000 Jewish proselytes of Roman slaves made free were sent at one time to Sardinia.   A second opinion is, that these persons were Jews by birth, and had been taken captives by the Romans, and then set at liberty, and were thus called ‘freedmen' or ‘liberties.' That there were many Jews of this description there can be no doubt. Pompey the Great, when he subjugated Judea, sent large numbers of the Jews to Rome (Philo, In Legat. a.d. Caium). These Jews were set at liberty at Rome, and assigned a place beyond the Tiber for a residence. See Introduction to the Epistle to the Romans. These persons are by Philo called "libertines," or ‘freedmen' (Kuinoel, in loco). Many Jews were also conveyed as captives by Ptolemy I. to Egypt, and obtained a residence in that country and the vicinity.   Another opinion is, that they took their name from some ‘place' which they occupied. This opinion is more probable from the fact that all the "other" persons mentioned here are named from the countries which they occupied. Suidas says that this is the name of a place. And in one of the fathers this passage occurs: ‘Victor, Bishop of the Catholic Church at Libertina, says, unity is there, etc.' from this passage it is plain that there was a place called ‘Libertina.' That place was in Africa, not far from ancient Carthage. See Dr. Pearce's Commentary on this place.   ----------   Whatever the exact meaning of the name, the group was comprised of “Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and those from Cilicia and Asia”   The Cyrenians are those who dwelt in Cyrene in Africa, a location west of Egypt. This is where Simon of Cyrene, who carried Jesus' cross in Matthew 27:32 was from.   Alexandrians are those who dwelt in Alexandria in Egypt. A great deal of Jews lived there inhabiting large sections of the city. This is the location where the Greek translation of the Bible, the Septuagint or LXX, came from.   Cilicia was in Asia Minor, a province on the seacoast, located at Cyprus' north. Its capital, Tarsus, is where the Apostle Paul came from – as is recorded in Acts 9:11 (and as is noted elsewhere). As such, it makes it appear likely that Paul attended this synagogue and participated in what will be said in this verse.   Finally, Asia is noted. This is not Asia as we think of it today. Rather, it is the same as was referred to in Acts 2:9. It is a term that may refer to a jurisdiction according to the layout of the provinces of Rome. Of this location, Vincent's Word Studies says –   “Not the Asiatic continent nor Asia Minor. In the time of the apostles the term was commonly understood of the proconsular province of Asia, principally of the kingdom of Pergamus left by Attalus III. to the Romans, and including Lydia, Mysia, Caria, and at times parts of Phrygia. The name Asia Minor did not come into use until the fourth century of our era.”   It is from this synagogue, filled with people from these various locations, that men arose “disputing with Stephen.”   The word translated as “disputing” essentially means “to examine together.” It is rendered as “question,” “debate,” “discuss,” “argue,” and so on. It does not necessarily indicate any animosity, but it can. Or it can be a debate that eventually leads to an argument. It is probable that Stephen voiced his words concerning Jesus and they came back against him in a debate that will eventually lead to the forming of a charge against him. It is to be noted again (as stated in the previous verse) that Stephen was “full of faith and power,” and he “did great wonders and signs among the people.”   This is a key thought that certainly set in motion the debate.   Life application: In Christianity, there are Calvinists, there are Free Grace proponents, there are Baptists, Presbyterians, and Episcopalians. In fact, there are so many sects and divisions within the church that it is almost impossible to know them all, much less what they all believe.   Because of this, there are obviously disagreements between them concerning valid points of doctrine. In the end, there can only be one completely correct idea about any particular point. Is Jesus God? Yes or No. Is salvation eternal? Yes or No. Does man have free will to choose Christ? Yes or No. And so on.   The Bible is the source of our knowledge of who Jesus is. It is where we are to build our doctrine from. Anything that is said about our theology and doctrine must find its source there or be in accord with what is said there. If it isn't, then it is something that came out of the head of man.   The more one knows the Bible, the less likely it is that he will be duped into believing something incorrect. It is still possible, but it is less likely. For those who do not know Scripture, the probability is that they will be more easily led astray from what is sound.   Read your Bible. Think about what you have read. Study theology after you know your Bible. And set your doctrine in accord with the Bible. It is important.   Glorious God Almighty, You have provided us with a source of knowledge in order for us to know You, to know what You are doing, and to know why You have done those things. How can we neglect such a great and precious treasure? Help us, Lord, to make Your word our priority all the days of our lives. Amen.

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Sardis

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 31:21


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. But the Spirit has preserved these words to speak to us still today!Sardis was a well guarded city positioned against rocky mountain terrain. Because of this, there is only a history of them being attacked two times — both times were because their watchmen fell asleep at their post, taking their security for granted. Jesus writes to the church in Sardis to say they are doing the same. They are not staying alert to the threats of the world around them — threats against their faith. They are spiritually asleep, or dead even, to the realities of the warfare happening in their midst. Jesus calls them to wake up! To stay alert and remember the good news they had received. To hold onto that and turn away from the things that have lulled them to sleep.

    Forge Church
    House Law #2

    Forge Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 21:23


    Pau; laid out the "House Law" for husbands an wives, and now turns to Parents and children, and masters and slaves. All the above were in the house churches scattered throughout Asia Minor. Children were to obey their parents, an honor them, while Fathers took responsibility for them. Slaves were to relate to Masters even as they trusted Christ. Masters, likewise, were to trust Christ, give up threatening, an be godly owners.

    North Valley Baptist Church
    Stand Firm: Living As Strangers In a Hostile World

    North Valley Baptist Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 43:54


    The Apostle Peter calls for the churches in Asia Minor to live as strangers in a world that is hostile against them. As strangers he calls for them to abstain from the fleshy passions that war against their souls and live in such a way that is honorable, or attractive, before a watching, unbelieving, world. This is so, even though unbelievers may slander Christians as evildoers, God may use the lives of His people to save unbelievers and cause them to glorify God on the day of visitation. After this Peter gets into how believers are to live that God may use them in this way. The first way he points out is for Christians to be submissive to the human authorities that are over them.

    Quotomania
    Quotomania 177: Herodotus

    Quotomania

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 1:31


    Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Herodotus , (born 484?, Helicarnassus, Asia Minor—died 430/420 BC), was a Greek historian. He resided in Athens and then in Thurii in southern Italy. His travels covered a large part of the Persian empire. He is the author of the first great narrative history produced in the ancient world, the History of the Persian Wars. It is a unified artistic masterpiece, with many illuminating digressions and anecdotes skillfully worked into the narrative. Despite many inaccuracies, it remains the leading source of original information about Greece between 550 and 479 BC, as well as that of much of western Asia and Egypt.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Herodotus-Greek-historian. For more information about Herodotus:“The Persian Wars”: https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674991309“The Histories by Herodotus”: https://www.college.columbia.edu/core/node/1747“Herodotus, the Histories”: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:tlg,0016,001:8

    Forge Church
    Husbands and Wives

    Forge Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 28:33


    Paul chose to set the controlling verb of this section in v. 21 "be being in submission to one another, in the fear of Christ." That pours over into his teaching to husbands and wives. The order is the reverse, but the weight of instruction falls mostly on husbands. Paul has changed his outlook on marriage from 9 years previous in 1 Cor. 7, to the point where he must apostically address the exploding churches in Asia Minor regarding God's "house law."

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Thyatira

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 37:11


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. But the Spirit has preserved these words to speak to us still today!Jesus' first words to Thyatira sound almost as if they are an ideal church, living with faithfulness, love, service, and endurance. Yet, they are caught up in the same traps Pergamum was — giving their bodies over to sin for temporary pleasure. A completely different group of people in a different context, enticed and lured away by the same desires. Isn't this true of many of us today? How can we overcome wicked desires and find those desires satisfied in Christ alone?

    BIBLE IN TEN
    Acts 6:1

    BIBLE IN TEN

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 10:18


    Wednesday, 23 March 2022   Now in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplying, there arose a complaint against the Hebrews by the Hellenists, because their widows were neglected in the daily distribution. Acts 6:1   Chapter 6 begins with a thought that is most probably tied in with what is said earlier in the previous chapter. It opens by saying, “Now in those days.” This could be speaking of the previously cited arrest of the apostles as a continuing narrative, or it could be referring to what was said before that short account. This is because the next words say, “when the number of the disciples was multiplying.”   That seems to more logically be connected to Acts 5:14 –   “And believers were increasingly added to the Lord, multitudes of both men and women...”   The account of the arrest of the apostles is occurring at this same time. This is important because what is said in this chapter begins with continued problems for the apostles that need to be rectified as well as continued persecution for the believers by the council. In this latter event, the enmity between the truth of God in Christ and the active fighting against it by the leaders of Israel continues to be highlighted.   This is logically necessary to show why Israel's destruction and exile came about. Hence, these undertones that are provided are not unlike the book of Jeremiah which carefully details the reasons why the Lord destroyed the nation and exiled them to Babylon.   God did not just arbitrarily punish Israel in the Roman exile, but rather, the book of Acts stands as a witness against them for having failed to accept the One sent by God to fulfill the law and reconcile the people to Himself. As such, He turned to the Gentiles –   “They have provoked Me to jealousy by what is not God; They have moved Me to anger by their foolish idols. But I will provoke them to jealousy by those who are not a nation; I will move them to anger by a foolish nation.” Deuteronomy 32:21   For now, it is during the time of the multiplying of the disciples that “there arose a complaint against the Hebrews by the Hellenists.” The word translated as “complaint” is goggusmos. It is an onomatopoeia. The sound of the word matches the sound of the grumbling. The word “Hellenists” refers to Grecian Jews. They are Jews who only speak Greek and not the language of those in Judea (Hebrew or Aramaic).   The meaning of the words is that a division had arisen between the Hebrew (or Aramaic) speaking Jews and the Greek-speaking Jews. One can imagine the Greek-speaking Jews muttering under their breath at what is taking place. Because they were of the Diaspora and returned to the land not speaking the native language, they were considered as second-class citizens.   To understand the situation and the reference to other key points that will be seen in Acts, Vincent's Word Studies provides background information into the matter –   “The word Hellenists denotes Jews, not Greeks, but Jews who spoke Greek. The contact of Jews with Greeks was first effected by the conquests of Alexander. He settled eight thousand Jews in the Thebais, and the Jews formed a third of the population of his new city of Alexandria. From Egypt they gradually spread along the whole Mediterranean coast of Africa. They were removed by Seleucus Nicator from Babylonia, by thousands, to Antioch and Seleucia, and under the persecutions of Antiochus Epiphanes scattered themselves through Asia Minor, Greece, Macedonia, and the Aegean islands. The vast majority of them adopted the Greek language, and forgot the Aramaic dialect which had been their language since the Captivity. The word is used but twice in the New Testament - here and Acts 9:29 - and, in both cases, of Jews who had embraced Christianity, but who spoke Greek and used the Septuagint version of the Bible instead of the original Hebrew or the Chaldaic targum or paraphrase. The word Ἕλλην [Hellén], Greek, which is very common in the New Testament, is used in antithesis, either to ‘Barbarians' or to ‘Jews.' In the former case it means all nations which spoke the Greek language (see Acts 18:17; Romans 1:14; 1 Corinthians 1:22, 1 Corinthians 1:23). In the latter it is equivalent to Gentiles (see Romans 1:16; Romans 2:9; 1 Corinthians 10:32; Galatians 2:3). Hence, in either case, it is wholly different from Hellenist.”   With this understood, the actual reason for the division is next explained, saying, “because their widows were neglected.”   The word translated as “neglected” is in the imperfect tense. It means that this was something ongoing. Being overlooked would not be unexpected in such a situation. A person who didn't speak the language and who was alone and without anyone to speak for her would have a difficult time going forward and being listened to. Those with an understandable voice would naturally receive attention without any difficulty and the others would be overlooked.   However, the problem wasn't that they were overlooked in getting their hair cut at the local salon. It was a much more pressing need. They were missing out “in the daily distribution.”   In other words, the money that was raised was to be distributed as needs arose. The Hebrew widows were coming forward and were receiving what they needed, but the Greek-speaking widows were being overlooked, and that habitually. As such, they were truly alone, with no support, and even the distribution by the church – which they depended on to simply survive – was not being fair towards them.   Life application: It is always easy to take the path of least resistance. When someone speaks another language or has a different way of doing things than we do, it is easier to overlook them and sidle up to those we are more comfortable with. In and of itself, there is nothing wrong with this, but when it causes a division in the church, it needs to be addressed.   People come into a local church to be a part of it. If they don't receive any care or attention, it will be perceived as if their needs are less important than the others.  But needs are needs, not wants. It is important to identify what true needs are and then address them in all of those we fellowship with.   It is right to be attentive to all, even those we may not want to be especially close to. Endeavor to look around you and see who is being left out of close and personal contact and be sure to make an extra effort to be attentive to them as well.   Heavenly Father, give us the wisdom to identify needs in others and to respond to them, even when they may have a different culture, color, or way of doing things. Help us to give of ourselves to everyone and not just isolate ourselves with those we feel most comfortable with. Help us in this, O Lord. Amen.  

    Quotomania
    Quotomania 170: Philostratus

    Quotomania

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 1:31


    Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Flavius Philostratus, (born AD 170—died c.245), Greek writer of Roman imperial times who studied at Athens and some time after AD 202 entered the circle of the philosophical Syrian empress of Rome, Julia Domna. On her death he settled in Tyre.Philostratus's works include Gymnastikos, a treatise dealing with athletic training; Ērōïkos (“Hero”), a dialogue on the significance of various heroes of the Trojan War; Epistolai erōtikai (“Erotic Epistles”), one of which was the inspiration for the English poet Ben Jonson's To Celia (“Drink to me only with thine eyes”); and two sets of descriptions (ekphraseis) of paintings of mythological scenes, attributed to two men named Philostratus, possibly the well-known figure and his grandson. Flavius Philostratus's Bioi sophistōn (Lives of the Sophists) treats both the Sophists of the 5th century BC and the later philosophers and rhetoricians of the Second Sophistic, a name coined by Philostratus to describe the art of declamation in Greek as practiced in the Roman Empire from the time of Nero (AD 54–68) to Philostratus's own day.Philostratus's work on the life of the Pythagorean philosopher Apollonius of Tyana (1st century AD), which was commissioned by Julia Domna, is revealing of religious attitudes in a transitional period. His idealized portrait of Apollonius as an ascetic miracle worker was taken up with enthusiasm by the pagan elites of the next centuries—when Christianity had become of political significance—as a counter figure to the Christian Jesus. In Philostratus's moderately Atticizing prose (i.e., aspiring to the Classical style of 5th-century-BC Athens and opposed to the florid and bombastic style of Greek associated especially with Asia Minor), formal elegance was a way to give new significance and validity to the traditional cultural heritage of the pagan Greek world.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Flavius-Philostratus. For more information about Philostratus:Lives of the Sophists: https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674991491“The Sophist Aelian”: https://sententiaeantiquae.com/2018/03/11/the-sophist-aelian-bachelor-homebody-and-cowardly-wit/

    Sermons
    What Jesus Thinks of the Church

    Sermons

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022


    Jesus' words to the seven churches of Asia Minor offers wisdom in shaping a church.

    Discover the Book Ministries
    WHAT ARE THE DANGER SIGNS OF A SPIRITUAL HEART ATTACK? JESUS WARNS OF DISTRACTIONS & OBSESSIONS

    Discover the Book Ministries

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 4:42


    NREV 02a 210811AM Short Clip The first stop on Jesus' medical inspection tour is Ephesus. And it doesn't take long for Him to find a serious spiritual heart condition. But you wouldn't know it to look at them. Ephesus appeared to be thriving. It was easily the largest church in Asia Minor. Paul had pastored [...] The post WHAT ARE THE DANGER SIGNS OF A SPIRITUAL HEART ATTACK? JESUS WARNS OF DISTRACTIONS & OBSESSIONS appeared first on Discover the Book Ministries.

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Pergamum

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 35:12


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. But the Spirit has preserved these words to speak to us still today!His message to Pergamum begins with encouragement for continuing to proclaim the name of Jesus as Lord faithfully in a city hostile to their faith. Yet, they have mixed in idolatrous practices of those around them. Jesus has serious words of warning for that!

    Forge Church
    Walk in Light and Wisdom

    Forge Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 21:30


    Paul is concluding his teaching to the churches of Asia Minor by way of his circular Epistle to the Ephesians. He urges them to Walk in Light and not partner with darkness. Further, he turns to teaching them about wisdom, not folly, as they follow Jesus as Lord. He concludes with commands concerning drunkenness vs. being filled with Holy Spirit, the singing of psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to one another as evidence of that filling, and the giving of thanks.

    Offenbart Podcast
    S2F76: Von Paulus in Makedonien

    Offenbart Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022


    Paulus sieht einen Mann in einer Vision und trifft sich mit Frauen in Makedonien. Absicht? Glück? Gottes Plan? Du willst uns unterstützen? Hier geht’s übrigens zu Steady. Deinen Audio-Kommentar kannst du uns hier hinterlassen: https://offenbartcast.de/audiokommentar. Bildnachweis: „Staffel 2 Folge 76“ by Simon Mallow CC-BY-SA 2.0. Lies mit uns: Apg 16,9-13 Folge vorbei – was nun? … S2F76: Von Paulus in Makedonien weiterlesen →

    Offenbart Podcast
    S2F75: Was hat der liebe Gott denn gegen Asien?

    Offenbart Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022


    Für alle unsere Charismatiker:innen – und alle anderen auch Simons Handy stirbt, Lukas telefoniert mit den Essenern und Paulus ist auf der Suche nach dem richtigen Empfang. Wie immer also. ShownotesKarte der Regionen Kleinasiens (Putzger)Karte der Provinzen des römischen Reichs Du willst uns unterstützen? Hier geht’s übrigens zu Steady. Deinen Audio-Kommentar kannst du uns hier … S2F75: Was hat der liebe Gott denn gegen Asien? weiterlesen →

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Smyrna

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 29:16


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. But the Spirit has preserved these words to speak to us still today!Jesus' message to the church in Smyrna was one of hope. They were a small, destitute church living in poverty and under oppression — for the sake of the Gospel! Jesus reassured them that he knew them well and he knew their suffering well. In fact, Jesus had endured everything they were going through already; and he overcame. His promise to them is that if they continued to remain faithful, they too would overcome death and receive the eternal crown of life.

    Saint of the Day
    St Theophylactus, bishop of Nicomedia (845)

    Saint of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 1:47


    "Theophylact was from the east; his native city is unknown. In Constantinople he became a close friend of Tarasius, who afterwards became Patriarch of Constantinople (see Feb. 25). Theophylact was made Bishop of Nicomedia. After the death of Saint Tarasius, his successor Nicephorus (see June 2) called together a number of Bishops to help him in fighting the iconoclasm of Emperor Leo the Armenian, who reigned from 813 to 820. Among them was Euthymius, Bishop of Sardis (celebrated Dec. 26), who had attended the holy Seventh Ecumenical Council in 787 — he was exiled three times for the sake of the holy icons, and for defying the Emperor Theophilus' command to renounce the veneration of the icons, was scourged from head to foot until his whole body was one great wound, from which he died eight days later, about the year 830; Joseph of Thessalonica (see July 14); Michael of Synnada (see May 23); Emilian, Bishop of Cyzicus (see Aug. 8); and Saint Theophylact, who boldly rebuked Leo to his face, telling him that because he despised the long-suffering of God, utter destruction was about to overtake him, and there would be none to deliver him. For this, Theophylact was exiled to the fortress of Strobilus in Karia of Asia Minor, where after 30 years of imprisonment and hardship, he gave up his holy soul about the year 845. Leo the Armenian, according to the Saint's prophecy, was slain in church on the eve of our Lord's Nativity, in 820." (Great Horologion)

    North Valley Baptist Church
    Stand Firm: Be Holy

    North Valley Baptist Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 44:29


    Sometimes we can be tempted to allow our circumstances causes us to be tempted to indulge our flesh, and be sinful. But our circumstances, even our pain, is never an excuse to disobey God. In 1 Peter the Apostle Peter is writing to Christians, scattered throughout Asia Minor, who were facing persecution and various trials. As Peter has been pointing them to their living hope, the great salvation provided for them in Jesus Christ, Peter tells his readers, who are in the midst of suffering, that the God who called them demands they be holy as God is holy. He goes on to explain that, since they call on God as Father who judges impartially according to each one's deeds, they were to live with fear of Him while they remained in this world, where they are strangers.

    Thinking on Scripture with Dr. Steven R. Cook
    Deuteronomy 21:1-9 - And Individual and Corporate Responsibility

    Thinking on Scripture with Dr. Steven R. Cook

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 61:23


         In our current section on case laws (Deut 19:1—26:19), we are considering how the nation of ancient Israel was to practice righteous living after they entered the land of Canaan (Deut 16:20), and how righteousness was measured by conformity to God's laws (Deut 6:24-25). In the previous section, Moses provided instruction concerning war with cities outside Canaan (Deut 20:10-15), and cities inside Canaan (Deut 20:16-20). In this pericope, Moses set forth a law concerning an unsolved murder, and then addressed the responsibilities God placed on the leaders of a nearby city to pronounce their innocence before the Lord (Deut 21:1-9). By following this law, the leaders of the city—elders, judges, and priests—were taking responsibility for what happened in their communities. Even though the city leaders were not personally responsible for the sinful act, it was still their problem as it fell under their jurisdiction, and God expected them to handle it in a specific way that satisfied His holiness, and this because He dwelt among His people.      Our current section opens with a scenario in which a murdered person is found lying in a field and the murderer is not known. Moses wrote, “If a slain person is found lying in the open country in the land which the LORD your God gives you to possess, and it is not known who has struck him, 2 then your elders and your judges shall go out and measure the distance to the cities which are around the slain one” (Deut 21:1-2). As stated on previous occasions, Moses described the land as that “which the LORD your God gives you to possess” (Deut 21:1a; cf., Deut 5:16; 17:14; 18:9; 19:1, 10, 14; 21:23; 24:4; 25:15, 19; 26:1-2; 27:2-3; 28:8). God owned the land (Lev 25:23), and He was granting it to His people as He'd promised to Abraham (Gen 12:7; 15:18), Isaac (Gen 26:3), and Jacob (Gen 28:13), but with the condition that they obey Him for blessing (Deut 28:1-14).      When the murderer could not be found, God instructed the elders and judges to investigate the matter and to “go out and measure the distance to the cities which are around the slain one” (Deut 21:2b). These would not be the judges and elders in the nearby city (Deut 16:18; 19:12), but those who served at the central sanctuary and served as a higher court (Deut 17:8-9). Warren Wiersbe states: "The “elders and judges” mentioned in Deuteronomy 21:2 are probably the “sanctuary court” mentioned in 17:8–13, and this would include the priests (21:5). This was the highest tribunal in the land and murder was a heinous crime. Furthermore, nobody had yet measured to see which city was nearest, so the elders and judges couldn't have come from that city. Once the nearest city had been determined, the elders of that city participated in the assigned ritual. We assume that the elders and judges investigated the case thoroughly before they took the steps outlined in these verses."[1]      God owned the land the Israelites would possess (Lev 25:23), and it was the place where He dwelt among His people. The Lord had said, “You shall not defile the land in which you live, in the midst of which I dwell; for I the LORD am dwelling in the midst of the sons of Israel” (Num 35:34). The land itself was to be treated as holy, as God Himself resided in it, among His people. When innocent people were murdered, God declared that “blood pollutes the land” (Num 35:33a). This was true when Cain killed his brother Abel, and God said to Cain, “The voice of your brother's blood is crying to Me from the ground” (Gen 4:10). Concerning murder, the Lord also said, “no expiation can be made for the land for the blood that is shed on it, except by the blood of him who shed it” (Num 35:33). That is, there was no atonement for the murderer that would acquit him of the punishment for his crime. The murderer was to bear the punishment for his crime, and this by the local government (Gen 9:5-6). However, in the current situation, the murderer could not be found to pay for his crime, yet God's holiness needed to be addressed. Some method of justice needed to be followed in order to remove the corporate guilt of the community.      Though the murdered person was not the fault of anyone living in the nearby city, it was still their problem, and God expected them to deal with it in a righteous manner. Corporate responsibility was common to ancient cultures. For example, in the ancient law Code of Hammurabi, if a person was murdered, and the murderer could not be found, then “the city and governor shall pay one mina [500 grams] of silver to his people.”[2] This payment was given to the family of the victim, and this by the governor of the city. Thomas Constable states, “Cities were responsible for murders committed within their jurisdictions. This indicates that there is corporate guilt in God's government. The ritual prescribed removed the pollution caused by bloodshed.”[3] Earl Kalland adds, “When the perpetrator of the crime cannot be detected, some method of removal of the guilt that then falls on the land and people must be secured…The procedure given in this section of Deuteronomy provides the means for satisfying the Lord's justice by the removal of corporate guilt.”[4]      The people of the city were to understand that all that happened in their community had an impact on God Himself. The city nearest the slain person would be required to take responsibility and follow the required actions to remove the guilt of their community. Specifically, it was the elders of the city who were to act, as they represented the community as a whole. Concerning the city elders, Moses said, “It shall be that the city which is nearest to the slain man, that is, the elders of that city, shall take a heifer of the herd, which has not been worked and which has not pulled in a yoke; 4 and the elders of that city shall bring the heifer down to a valley with running water, which has not been plowed or sown, and shall break the heifer's neck there in the valley” (Deut 21:3-4). The actions included taking a heifer that had never been worked, bring it to a valley with running water, which valley had never been plowed or sown, and there break the animal's neck. The unworked heifer, the clean running water, and the unplowed valley seem to provide a picture of purity. To be clear, this was not a sacrifice, for the animal was not offered by a priest on an altar. Rather, killing the heifer appears to be a symbolic act of what the officials—and the community—would do to the murderer if he were in their hands. In this way, they demonstrated to all that they were willing to take responsibility for their community and adhere to God's high standards of justice.      After the elders of the city performed this act, God then called for the priests, saying, “Then the priests, the sons of Levi, shall come near, for the LORD your God has chosen them to serve Him and to bless in the name of the LORD; and every dispute and every assault shall be settled by them” (Deut 21:5). Though the city elders were mainly responsible for adjudicating the matter—for they represented their community—God also required the Levitical priests to be present, as they represented the people to God. Here we see both a horizontal and vertical aspect of righteousness within a community. The function of the priests seems to picture a final absolution of the matter. Furthermore, we see in this situation a shared responsibility between the religious and the judicial.      After the priests had performed their duty, Moses then states, “All the elders of that city which is nearest to the slain man shall wash their hands over the heifer whose neck was broken in the valley, and they shall answer and say, ‘Our hands did not shed this blood, nor did our eyes see it'” (Deut 21:6-7). Here, the elders of the city who followed this act were then to wash their hands over the dead body of the heifer and pronounce their innocence concerning the murder, that they neither had any part in the heinous act, nor knew who the murderer was. Earl Radmacher states, “The elders of the city bore the responsibility for the murder, even though they were not personally guilty. It was up to them to seek atonement for the murder.”[5] Peter Craigie adds: "The elders of the city that accepted responsibility for the dead man washed their hands over the broken-necked heifer. The symbolism of the various actions now becomes clear: the crime deserved to be punished, as the broken neck of the heifer indicated, but the hand-washing of the elders showed that, although they accepted responsibility for what had happened, they were nevertheless free from the guilt attached to the crime."[6]      Then the elders of the city were to say, ‘“Forgive Your people Israel whom You have redeemed, O LORD, and do not place the guilt of innocent blood in the midst of Your people Israel.' And the bloodguiltiness shall be forgiven them” (Deut 21:8). Forgiveness followed the action of the elders who followed the Lord's instructions. The word forgive, which appears twice in this verse, translates the Hebrew verb כָּפַר kaphar, which commonly means “to appease someone…to make amends…to make atonement.”[7] The word is often connected with the atonement that comes when a priest sheds an animal's blood on the altar (Lev 17:11). Here, however, the word connotes an appeasement for justice. Though the elders of the city were innocent, they accepted responsibility for the horrendous crime committed nearest to their community, and sought to balance the scales of justice by means of killing a heifer (as though he were the murderer), washing their hands (a picture of innocence), and by prayer to God (who is the offended Person). Their request to God was, “Forgive Your people Israel whom You have redeemed, O LORD” (Deut 21:8a). The language recalled God's redemptive work for all Israel, when He redeemed His people from Egypt and called them out to be a special people who represented Him to others. Here was a corporate mindset in which the elders of the community took responsibility for those under their care. If they followed these procedures as prescribed, then “the bloodguiltiness shall be forgiven them” (Deut 21:8b).      The act of the elders did not forgive the murderer of his crime. The blood of the animal was not shed. Furthermore, the act was performed by the elders of the city as the priests watched. The place where the animal was killed was an unworked field, not at an altar. There was no removal of sin for the murderer, only the elimination of any suspected guilt on the part of the elders of the city and the community as a whole.      Moses closed this pericope, saying, “So you shall remove the guilt of innocent blood from your midst, when you do what is right in the eyes of the LORD” (Deut 21:9). Murder is bad business, as it stains the community where it occurs. The stain was washed away when the elders and priests of the city accepted responsibility for the matter and followed the Lord's instruction for cleansing. The elders and priests were not admitting guilt for the crime, for they were innocent. Rather, by following the Lord's instructions, they were publicly testifying concerning what they would do to the murderer if he were in their hands, and in this way, showed their sense of righteousness agreed with the righteousness of God. In this way, God's justice was emphasized and upheld.      In the grand scheme of life, no one gets away with murder. God sees all that happens. ‘“Can a man hide himself in hiding places So I do not see him?' declares the LORD. ‘Do I not fill the heavens and the earth?' declares the LORD'” (Jer 23:24). Though the murderer was not found and judged by human courts, God Himself sees what happens in His world, and He will eventually execute justice in His time and way. For God is “the Judge of all the earth” (Gen 18:25), and He “is a righteous judge, and a God who has indignation every day” (Psa 7:11). No one escapes God's final judgment. Present Application      The Bible teaches both individual and corporate responsibility. God holds each person accountable for what they think, say, and do. However, individual actions can impact the lives of others, both in the moment as well as in the future. For example, when Adam sinned, we all sinned with him (Rom 5:12), and so we are spiritually dead (Eph 2:1-2). Here is corporate guilt. On the other hand, Christ died for sinners (Rom 5:8), and when we trust in Jesus as Savior (John 3:16), we share in His life and righteousness (John 10:28; Phil 3:9). We are all born in Adam at physical birth, and are born again spiritually at the moment of faith in Christ. All humanity is either in Adam or in Christ (1 Cor 15:21-21).      Individual actions have consequences that impact the lives of others. Abraham's disobedience in going to Egypt caused problems both for him and Sarah (Gen 12:10-20). David's disobedience to God in taking an unauthorized census led to the death of 70,000 Israelites (1 Chron 21:1-14). Of course, God disciplined David because of his affair with Bathsheba as well as the murder of her husband, Uriah, and God's judgment impacted David's family in the years that followed (2 Sam 12:5-15; cf. 2 Sam 13:1—18:33). Jonah's disobedience nearly killed his fellow travelers (Jonah 1:12). When Joshua and the army of Israel came against the city of Ai, Israel was soundly defeated and 36 soldiers died (Josh 7:1-5). When Joshua cried out to the Lord and asked why they were defeated (Josh 7:6-10), the Lord said, “Israel has sinned, and they have also transgressed My covenant which I commanded them. And they have even taken some of the things under the ban and have both stolen and deceived. Moreover, they have also put them among their own things” (Josh 7:11). When investigated further (Josh 7:12-19), it was found that one man, Achan (likely with the knowledge of his wife and family), was responsible for the sin. Achan said, “I have sinned against the LORD, the God of Israel” (Josh 7:20).      Addressing individual responsibility, God said to Ezekiel, “Behold, all souls are Mine; the soul of the father as well as the soul of the son is Mine. The soul who sins will die” (Ezek 18:4). And, “The person who sins will die. The son will not bear the punishment for the father's iniquity, nor will the father bear the punishment for the son's iniquity; the righteousness of the righteous will be upon himself, and the wickedness of the wicked will be upon himself” (Ezek 18:20). There is suffering that can come from God, and there is suffering that can come from our connection to others. Children may bear the consequences of their parents' sins, but only as the consequences fall naturally into the lap of the child because of their relationship with their parents. But children do not suffer by the hand of God for the sins their parents commit. John Barry affirms, saying, “Corporate responsibility for sin does not mean succeeding generations are punished for the sins of earlier generations. But, the consequences of the sins of earlier generations may affect later generations.”[8]Walter Kaiser states: "Ezekiel 18 focuses on the responsibility of the individual for individual guilt. That is one side of the coin. But the Bible also recognizes the reality of the concept of corporate responsibility when it comes to accounting for the effect of some individual sins. The case of Achan in Joshua 7:1–26 is the best example of corporate solidarity, for when Achan sinned, it was said that all Israel had sinned as well. We can understand how one traitor can sell a whole army into major trouble, but we forget how the effects of some sins fall on whole communities, nations or assemblies of persons. In the case in Ezekiel 21, the sword would cut both the righteous and the wicked. That is because in war often both the good and the bad fall. But that was not to say that everyone was individually guilty; no, it was the effect that reached and impacted all."[9]      Corporately, Israelite communities were organic, with each part touching and impacting the other, such that no one operated in complete isolation, nor in a completely neutral manner. Like two sides of a coin, individual actions impact a community, for better or worse; and the communities' overall health affects its individual members, either in positive or negative ways. William Raccah states, “Ancient Israelite culture was therefore organic in that each of its parts was interdependent on the others, yet at the same time retained its independence in certain aspects”[10]      It should be noted that God sometimes allows His innocent people to be swept up in the judgment He brings upon a nation, and this because He plans to use them to serve as His representatives. God permitted Hananiah, Azariah, Mishael, and Ezekiel to go into Babylonian captivity, though they had not personally been disobedient to the Lord. God then worked through these men to demonstrate to others how a godly life could be maintained in the midst of a hostile pagan culture. Their trials provided an opportunity for them to grow spiritually and to shine in a dark place.      Just as God was seen to be in the midst of His people, Israel (Num 35:34), so today, in the church age, Jesus walks in the midst of His churches and evaluates us. In Revelation chapters 2 and 3, the seven churches in Asia Minor were referred to as lampstands, and Jesus is seen “in the middle of the lampstands” (Rev 1:13) as “the One who walks among the seven golden lampstands” (Rev 2:1). Each home-church was under constant review by the Lord Jesus Christ. Out of the seven churches, Jesus gave praise only for two (Smyrna and Philadelphia), both praise and rebuke to four (Ephesus, Pergamum, Thyatira, and Sardis), and rebuke only for one (Laodicea). And Jesus also gave instructions for each church, to continue what was right, or to correct what was wrong.      Though individual in nature, each church was part of the “body of Christ” (Eph 4:12; cf. Eph 1:23) which makes up the universal church. Paul wrote, for “you are Christ's body, and individually members of it” (1 Co 12:27), and, “if one member suffers, all the members suffer with it; if one member is honored, all the members rejoice with it” (1 Cor 12:26). As Christians, we must think in terms of individual and corporate responsibility, realizing our actions not only impact us, but the lives of others with whom we are in regular contact. It is essential to our spiritual development that we accept responsibility for the things we do as well as the things that come into our lives, even though we may not be the cause. And we can pray for God to remove difficulties, but what He does not remove, He intends for us to deal with, and this for our spiritual development and witness to others.   [1] Warren W. Wiersbe, Be Equipped, “Be” Commentary Series (Colorado Springs, CO: Chariot Victor Pub., 1999), 139–140. [2] James Bennett Pritchard, ed., The Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament , 3rd ed. with Supplement. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1969), 167. [3] Tom Constable, Tom Constable's Expository Notes on the Bible (Galaxie Software, 2003), Dt 21:1. [4] Earl S. Kalland, “Deuteronomy,” in The Expositor's Bible Commentary: Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 & 2 Samuel, ed. Frank E. Gaebelein, vol. 3 (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1992), 130. [5] Earl D. Radmacher, Ronald Barclay Allen, and H. Wayne House, Nelson's New Illustrated Bible Commentary (Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers, 1999), 255–256. [6] Peter C. Craigie, The Book of Deuteronomy, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1976), 279–280. [7] Ludwig Koehler et al., The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1994–2000), 494. [8] John D. Barry et al., Faithlife Study Bible (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012, 2016), Dt 24:16. [9] Walter C. Kaiser Jr. et al., Hard Sayings of the Bible (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1996), 315. [10] William Raccah, “Sociology and the Old Testament,” ed. John D. Barry et al., The Lexham Bible Dictionary (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2016).

    BibleAsk LIVE
    BibleAsk LIVE - Episode 3.19

    BibleAsk LIVE

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 74:13


    Join Tina, Wendy and Jay answering this weeks questions which include: I am currently researching some words that are defined a little different in some of the newer versions. But as I was doing this, I looked at the 1599 Geneva Bible in Isaiah 13:21 and it included the word “lim” as an animal. I cannot find any information on this; maybe you won't either, but I am asking the question: “Do you know what a ‘lim' is? But nothing is known about Prochorus, and Nicanor, and Timon, and Parmenas" is stated on your website, but what about the tradition that says Prochorous was bishop of Nicomedia appointed by S. John and was also his scribe. What is the source for this tradition. Similarly there is a tradition about Parmenas; he preached in Asia Minor and was bishop of Soli (a city either in Cilicia, or Cyprus). I am interested in knowing the source of these traditions and their authenticity; would appreciate it if you could help. Thnx. What does it mean to take God's name in vain? A pastor on YouTube said that saying G..D.. means that you are asking God to curse something or someone. Is that true, and if so, would He? If He did what would that look like? Aren't we protected by God from our enemies? It seems to me that certain words were not said by Christians when I was growing up, but now are seen as just meaningless words. I'm sorry if this is a lot. Thanks. How can I change and be sure I am saved for years I have been asking the Lord into my heart and also been water Baptized many times but keep going back to my old ways what is wrong with me!!!! Why can't I change be filled with the Holly Spirit!!!In spite of what happened in the garden of Eden, have Adam and Eve been saved and are they in heaven now?

    Missio Dei: Peoria
    To Ephesus

    Missio Dei: Peoria

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 48:42


    In the book of Revelation, we find we are reading someone else's mail. Jesus sent a message through John to specific churches in Asia Minor. Ephesus was the first stop. They were standing strong in the truth in the midst of an idolatrous culture. But they had neglected to walk in actionable love for one another. Jesus wanted to call them back, in his love, by his grace.

    Redeemer Church of Waterford
    The Letter to the Church at Ephesus

    Redeemer Church of Waterford

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2022 40:29


    Each of the seven letters to the seven church of Asia Minor in Revelation 2 and 3 contain characteristics, and warnings, and encouragements which apply to every church since the ascension of Christ more than 2,000 years ago. Listen as we examine the first of these letters.

    Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
    Brahmin Kings of Arabia and Hussaini Brahmins

    Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2022 9:34


    Arabia,, in the earlier days, was a part of Mesopotamia /Sumeria and these were ruled by Sumerians. One can find , among the Kings of Sumeria, in the Kings List of Sumeria, the names of Lord Rama, his father Dasaratha and Bharatha. And there is the Tamil connection of Arabia with the unique practice patronizing Poets in Tamil style by offering Gifts to them in return for their praising the Kings. Sapthapathi was practiced in Arabia and Navagraha Idols were found in Mecca. Not to forget that Mecca was /is a Shiva temple. Chandra Gupta Maurya ruled over Arabia and his inscription is found in Mecca. Prophet's Uncle composed a Poem on Lord Shiva and the hereditary rights of maintaining the Shiva temple was entrusted to Brahmin Families who settled there. There are reports that Seramaan Perumaal Nayanaar, a Shiva Bhaktha and King of present Kerala having met prophet and became a follower of Islam. The evidence about Seramaan Perumaal becoming a follower of Islam is not strong. Now to the Brahmins and Brahmin Kings of Arabia.According to “vide Bandobast Report of Gujarat” by Mirza Azam Beg page 422 and widely famous folk songs, “Later on, when umvies and abbasies let loose an orgy of vendetta on Ahl e Bayet (A.S), Shias and Datts, then Datts returned to their motherland around 700 AD and settled at Dina Nagar, District Sialkot and some drifted to as far as the holy Pushkar in Rajasthan. Starting from Harya Bandar (modern Basra on the bank of river Tigris) with swords in hand and beating durms, they forced their way through Syria and Asia Minor and marching onwards captured Ghazni, Balkh and Bukhara. After annexing Kandhar, they converged on Sindh and crossing the Sindh at Attock they entered the Punjab”. An ancestor of Rahab named Sidh Viyog Datt assumed the title of Sultan and made Arabia (old Iraq) his home. He was a tough and tenacious fighter. He was also known as Mir Sidhani. He was a worshipper of Brahma. He was the son of the stalwart Sidh Jhoja (Vaj) who was a savant and saint and lived in Arabia (Iraq) around 600 AD. The supporters of imam Hassan (A.S) and imam Hussain (A.S) honored the Datts with the title of “Hussaini Brahmin” and treated them with great reverence in grateful recognition of the supreme sacrifices made by them in the war of Karbala. According to Jang Nama, written by Ahmed Punjabi, pages 175-176, “At the time to the Karbala, fourteen hundred Hussaini Brahmins lived in Baghdad alone” According to the “encyclopedia of Indian casts” page 579 “Hussaini Brahmins are a group bringing harmony and brotherhood between Muslim and Hindu religions. They are greatly influenced by martydom of Imam Hussain (A.S), grandson of ProphetMuhammad(peace be upon him and on his children), at Karbala in 680 AD. It is also claimed that their ancestors were fought with imam hussain and martyred during the war of karbala. When the holy month of Muharram starts these Brahmins starts lamenting the death of Imam Hussain (A.S) in Lucknow with the muslims. Brahmins are the highest caste in Hindu hierarchy”The Hussaini Brahmin sect, located mostly in Indian Punjab, also known as Dutts or Mohyals. Unlike other Brahmin clans, the Hussaini Brahmins have had a long martial tradition, which they trace back to the event of Karbala. More at https://ramanisblog.in/2016/07/23/brahmin-king-of-arabia-descendants-of-aswathama/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

    The Lechem Panim Podcast
    Lechem Panim #189 “Salvation Comes To Lydia” (Acts 16:6-15) Pastor Cameron Ury

    The Lechem Panim Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2022 17:24


    Hello and welcome to the show today. Last week we saw how Timothy has now joined Paul and Silas on their second missionary journey. And, leaving his mother Eunice and Grandmother Lois in Lystra, it says in… Acts 16:6 (ESV)— 6 And they went through the region of Phrygia and Galatia, having been forbidden by the Holy Spirit to speak the word in Asia. Other Plans— Now we don't know why God prevented them from entering Asia. Yet later there would be some very important churches that would be founded there; [churches in such cities as Ephesus, Smyrna, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Colossae, Sardis, Pergamum, and Thyatira.] But for now, God had other plans for them and communicated to them through the Holy Spirit that for now Asia was off limits. And that was no doubt very discouraging for Paul. And it can be discouraging to us too when God says no to something that (at the time) might seem like the right thing. But what we have to remember is that God knows what is needed and when those things are needed and can be used most. And we have to trust His timing. Don't Fight The Air Currents— Sometimes my kids watch a movie I used to watch as a kid called The Sword In The Stone; a story about King Arthur coming under the magical teachings of Merlin, whose talking owl Archimedes also helps to instruct the boy. And one day Merlin turns Arthur into a bird and Archimedes (a bird himself) is trying to teach Arthur to fly. But he is struggling against the air currents and can't get lift. And Archimedes says, “Don't fight the air currents! Use them!” And Arthur does, and suddenly (for the first time) really begins to fly. And you know, the same is true of the Holy Spirit, the Ruach, the Wind of God. If we can keep in step with the Spirit (Gal. 5:25), which is another way of saying “move our wings in accordance with how He is moving” we will soar. And so while God's saying no may be discouraging, we must do what Paul did and allow that “no” to propel us into the better thing God has for us. And so they turned to Mysia, which is the region north of Asia. But it says in… Acts 16:7-8 (ESV)— 7 And when they had come up to Mysia, they attempted to go into Bithynia {(which is farther north)}, but the Spirit of Jesus did not allow them. {So again they are repelled.} 8 So,