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The Will Wonder Pod
The Will Wonder Pod - Episode 111

The Will Wonder Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 88:03


Catch Up - (0:00) NFL Conference Championship Talk - (4:46) NBA Talk W/ The Special Correspondent Sebastian - (12:32) Hip-Hop 50 - The Record Shop - 50 Cent's “Get Rich or Die Tryin” 20th Anniversary (1:11:08) Commercials - The Boogie Down Barbershop - https://boogiedownbarbershop.com/ Dre Rawka - Allrawk.com Links - The Will Wonder Pod Youtube SUBSCRIBE! - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfZVv6E5iyjfegEnFUDZjtw Jazz Nation Podcast - linktree.com/jazznationnews

The Next Chapter by Ellie Barker
S7 Ep6: From the local record shop to writer of Mamma Mia!: Catherine Johnson

The Next Chapter by Ellie Barker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 104:04


Mamma Mia! Here we go again! I'm so sorry - how can I resist this? But if you need a dose of Abba and to meet one of the kindest, most talented and humble women with her own Hollywood story then this is the conversation for you. Catherine discovered her love of writing when she was six years old. She wrote all the time, but little did she know that when she was working behind the counter in her local record shop, something she wrote then would help pave the way to her writing one of the biggest musicals and films of all time. Catherine won a competition and started writing plays before moving on to television, but it was when she met the producer Judy Craymer over a cup of tea, everything changed. Mamma Mia! the musical has been seen by over 65 million people all over the world. On its the release the film made history as the highest grossing movie of all time at the UK and Irish box office. What's even more special is the musical and the film were created by 3 women who formed a special and fabulous friendship. Catherine's work has received an Olivier award, a Tony award, a Golden Globe nomination, a Bafta, a National Film Award…among many, many others. But here is what's so special about Catherine, she is one of the most down-to-earth loveliest people, you could ever wish to meet. Catherine tells us what really happened when she met Bjorn and Benny, she talks about the moment she found out Meryl Streep was going to star in the film, and how friendships have seen her through all her Next Chapters. Catherine is a real superstar in every sense of the word and she gives some fabulous advice for all our Next Chapters.

Devalued
Up With People with Kurt Wagner and Mary Mancini

Devalued

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 67:26


Kurt Wagner (Lambchop) and Mary Mancini (Lucy's Record Shop) open up about the intersection of art and politics, why society should take care of its artists, and why it's important to spare your partner your creative process.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 156: “I Was Made to Love Her” by Stevie Wonder

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “I Was Made to Love Her", the early career of Stevie Wonder, and the Detroit riots of 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "Groovin'" by the Young Rascals. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, I've put together a Mixcloud playlist of all the recordings excerpted in this episode. The best value way to get all of Stevie Wonder's early singles is this MP3 collection, which has the original mono single mixes of fifty-five tracks for a very reasonable price. For those who prefer physical media, this is a decent single-CD collection of his early work at a very low price indeed. As well as the general Motown information listed below, I've also referred to Signed, Sealed, and Delivered: The Soulful Journey of Stevie Wonder by Mark Ribowsky, which rather astonishingly is the only full-length biography of Wonder, to Higher Ground: Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and the Rise and Fall of American Soul by Craig Werner, and to Detroit 67: The Year That Changed Soul by Stuart Cosgrove. For Motown-related information in this and other Motown episodes, I've used the following resources: Where Did Our Love Go? The Rise and Fall of the Motown Sound by Nelson George is an excellent popular history of the various companies that became Motown. To Be Loved by Berry Gordy is Gordy's own, understandably one-sided, but relatively well-written, autobiography. Women of Motown: An Oral History by Susan Whitall is a collection of interviews with women involved in Motown. I Hear a Symphony: Motown and Crossover R&B by J. Andrew Flory is an academic look at Motown. The Motown Encyclopaedia by Graham Betts is an exhaustive look at the people and records involved in Motown's thirty-year history. How Sweet It Is by Lamont Dozier and Scott B. Bomar is Dozier's autobiography, while Come and Get These Memories by Brian and Eddie Holland and Dave Thompson is the Holland brothers'. Standing in the Shadows of Motown: The Life and Music of Legendary Bassist James Jamerson by "Dr Licks" is a mixture of a short biography of the great bass player, and tablature of his most impressive bass parts. And Motown Junkies is an infrequently-updated blog looking at (so far) the first 694 tracks released on Motown singles. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I begin -- this episode deals with disability and racism, and also deals from the very beginning with sex work and domestic violence. It also has some discussion of police violence and sexual assault. As always I will try to deal with those subjects as non-judgementally and sensitively as possible, but if you worry that anything about those subjects might disturb you, please check the transcript. Calvin Judkins was not a good man. Lula Mae Hardaway thought at first he might be, when he took her in, with her infant son whose father had left before the boy was born. He was someone who seemed, when he played the piano, to be deeply sensitive and emotional, and he even did the decent thing and married her when he got her pregnant. She thought she could save him, even though he was a street hustler and not even very good at it, and thirty years older than her -- she was only nineteen, he was nearly fifty. But she soon discovered that he wasn't interested in being saved, and instead he was interested in hurting her. He became physically and financially abusive, and started pimping her out. Lula would eventually realise that Calvin Judkins was no good, but not until she got pregnant again, shortly after the birth of her second son. Her third son was born premature -- different sources give different numbers for how premature, with some saying four months and others six weeks -- and while he apparently went by Stevland Judkins throughout his early childhood, the name on his birth certificate was apparently Stevland Morris, Lula having decided not to give another child the surname of her abuser, though nobody has ever properly explained where she got the surname "Morris" from. Little Stevland was put in an incubator with an oxygen mask, which saved the tiny child's life but destroyed his sight, giving him a condition called retinopathy of prematurity -- a condition which nowadays can be prevented and cured, but in 1951 was just an unavoidable consequence for some portion of premature babies. Shortly after the family moved from Saginaw to Detroit, Lula kicked Calvin out, and he would remain only a peripheral figure in his children's lives, but one thing he did do was notice young Stevland's interest in music, and on his increasingly infrequent visits to his wife and kids -- visits that usually ended with violence -- he would bring along toy instruments for the young child to play, like a harmonica and a set of bongos. Stevie was a real prodigy, and by the time he was nine he had a collection of real musical instruments, because everyone could see that the kid was something special. A neighbour who owned a piano gave it to Stevie when she moved out and couldn't take it with her. A local Lions Club gave him a drum kit at a party they organised for local blind children, and a barber gave him a chromatic harmonica after seeing him play his toy one. Stevie gave his first professional performance when he was eight. His mother had taken him to a picnic in the park, and there was a band playing, and the little boy got as close to the stage as he could and started dancing wildly. The MC of the show asked the child who he was, and he said "My name is Stevie, and I can sing and play drums", so of course they got the cute kid up on stage behind the drum kit while the band played Johnny Ace's "Pledging My Love": [Excerpt: Johnny Ace, "Pledging My Love"] He did well enough that they paid him seventy-five cents -- an enormous amount for a small child at that time -- though he was disappointed afterwards that they hadn't played something faster that would really allow him to show off his drumming skills. After that he would perform semi-regularly at small events, and always ask to be paid in quarters rather than paper money, because he liked the sound of the coins -- one of his party tricks was to be able to tell one coin from another by the sound of them hitting a table. Soon he formed a duo with a neighbourhood friend, John Glover, who was a couple of years older and could play guitar while Stevie sang and played harmonica and bongos. The two were friends, and both accomplished musicians for their age, but that wasn't the only reason Stevie latched on to Glover. Even as young as he was, he knew that Motown was soon going to be the place to be in Detroit if you were a musician, and Glover had an in -- his cousin was Ronnie White of the Miracles. Stevie and John performed as a duo everywhere they could and honed their act, performing particularly at the talent shows which were such an incubator of Black musical talent at the time, and they also at this point seem to have got the attention of Clarence Paul, but it was White who brought the duo to Motown. Stevie and John first played for White and Bobby Rodgers, another of the Miracles, then when they were impressed they took them through the several layers of Motown people who would have to sign off on signing a new act. First they were taken to see Brian Holland, who was a rising star within Motown as "Please Mr. Postman" was just entering the charts. They impressed him with a performance of the Miracles song "Bad Girl": [Excerpt: The Miracles, "Bad Girl"] After that, Stevie and John went to see Mickey Stevenson, who was at first sceptical, thinking that a kid so young -- Stevie was only eleven at the time -- must be some kind of novelty act rather than a serious musician. He said later "It was like, what's next, the singing mouse?" But Stevenson was won over by the child's talent. Normally, Stevenson had the power to sign whoever he liked to the label, but given the extra legal complications involved in signing someone under-age, he had to get Berry Gordy's permission. Gordy didn't even like signing teenagers because of all the extra paperwork that would be involved, and he certainly wasn't interested in signing pre-teens. But he came down to the studio to see what Stevie could do, and was amazed, not by his singing -- Gordy didn't think much of that -- but by his instrumental ability. First Stevie played harmonica and bongos as proficiently as an adult professional, and then he made his way around the studio playing on every other instrument in the place -- often only a few notes, but competent on them all. Gordy decided to sign the duo -- and the initial contract was for an act named "Steve and John" -- but it was soon decided to separate them. Glover would be allowed to hang around Motown while he was finishing school, and there would be a place for him when he finished -- he later became a staff songwriter, working on tracks for the Four Tops and the Miracles among others, and he would even later write a number one hit, "You Don't Have to be a Star (to be in My Show)" for Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr -- but they were going to make Stevie a star right now. The man put in charge of that was Clarence Paul. Paul, under his birth name of Clarence Pauling, had started his career in the "5" Royales, a vocal group he formed with his brother Lowman Pauling that had been signed to Apollo Records by Ralph Bass, and later to King Records. Paul seems to have been on at least some of the earliest recordings by the group, so is likely on their first single, "Give Me One More Chance": [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Give Me One More Chance"] But Paul was drafted to go and fight in the Korean War, and so wasn't part of the group's string of hit singles, mostly written by his brother Lowman, like "Think", which later became better known in James Brown's cover version, or "Dedicated to the One I Love", later covered by the Shirelles, but in its original version dominated by Lowman's stinging guitar playing: [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Dedicated to the One I Love"] After being discharged, Clarence had shortened his name to Clarence Paul, and had started recording for all the usual R&B labels like Roulette and Federal, with little success: [Excerpt: Clarence Paul, "I'm Gonna Love You, Love You Til I Die"] He'd also co-written "I Need Your Lovin'", which had been an R&B hit for Roy Hamilton: [Excerpt: Roy Hamilton, "I Need Your Lovin'"] Paul had recently come to work for Motown – one of the things Berry Gordy did to try to make his label more attractive was to hire the relatives of R&B stars on other labels, in the hopes of getting them to switch to Motown – and he was the new man on the team, not given any of the important work to do. He was working with acts like Henry Lumpkin and the Valladiers, and had also been the producer of "Mind Over Matter", the single the Temptations had released as The Pirates in a desperate attempt to get a hit: [Excerpt: The Pirates, "Mind Over Matter"] Paul was the person you turned to when no-one else was interested, and who would come up with bizarre ideas. A year or so after the time period we're talking about, it was him who produced an album of country music for the Supremes, before they'd had a hit, and came up with "The Man With the Rock and Roll Banjo Band" for them: [Excerpt: The Supremes, "The Man With The Rock and Roll Banjo Band"] So, Paul was the perfect person to give a child -- by this time twelve years old -- who had the triple novelties of being a multi-instrumentalist, a child, and blind. Stevie started spending all his time around the Motown studios, partly because he was eager to learn everything about making records and partly because his home life wasn't particularly great and he wanted to be somewhere else. He earned the affection and irritation, in equal measure, of people at Motown both for his habit of wandering into the middle of sessions because he couldn't see the light that showed that the studio was in use, and for his practical joking. He was a great mimic, and would do things like phoning one of the engineers and imitating Berry Gordy's voice, telling the engineer that Stevie would be coming down, and to give him studio equipment to take home. He'd also astonish women by complimenting them, in detail, on their dresses, having been told in advance what they looked like by an accomplice. But other "jokes" were less welcome -- he would regularly sexually assault women working at Motown, grabbing their breasts or buttocks and then claiming it was an accident because he couldn't see what he was doing. Most of the women he molested still speak of him fondly, and say everybody loved him, and this may even be the case -- and certainly I don't think any of us should be judged too harshly for what we did when we were twelve -- but this kind of thing led to a certain amount of pressure to make Stevie's career worth the extra effort he was causing everyone at Motown. Because Berry Gordy was not impressed with Stevie's vocals, the decision was made to promote him as a jazz instrumentalist, and so Clarence Paul insisted that his first release be an album, rather than doing what everyone would normally do and only put out an album after a hit single. Paul reasoned that there was no way on Earth they were going to be able to get a hit single with a jazz instrumental by a twelve-year-old kid, and eventually persuaded Gordy of the wisdom of this idea. So they started work on The Jazz Soul of Little Stevie, released under his new stagename of Little Stevie Wonder, supposedly a name given to him after Berry Gordy said "That kid's a wonder!", though Mickey Stevenson always said that the name came from a brainstorming session between him and Clarence Paul. The album featured Stevie on harmonica, piano, and organ on different tracks, but on the opening track, "Fingertips", he's playing the bongos that give the track its name: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (studio version)"] The composition of that track is credited to Paul and the arranger Hank Cosby, but Beans Bowles, who played flute on the track, always claimed that he came up with the melody, and it seems quite likely to me that most of the tracks on the album were created more or less as jam sessions -- though Wonder's contributions were all overdubbed later. The album sat in the can for several months -- Berry Gordy was not at all sure of its commercial potential. Instead, he told Paul to go in another direction -- focusing on Wonder's blindness, he decided that what they needed to do was create an association in listeners' minds with Ray Charles, who at this point was at the peak of his commercial power. So back into the studio went Wonder and Paul, to record an album made up almost entirely of Ray Charles covers, titled Tribute to Uncle Ray. (Some sources have the Ray Charles tribute album recorded first -- and given Motown's lax record-keeping at this time it may be impossible to know for sure -- but this is the way round that Mark Ribowsky's biography of Wonder has it). But at Motown's regular quality control meeting it was decided that there wasn't a single on the album, and you didn't release an album like that without having a hit single first. By this point, Clarence Paul was convinced that Berry Gordy was just looking for excuses not to do anything with Wonder -- and there may have been a grain of truth to that. There's some evidence that Gordy was worried that the kid wouldn't be able to sing once his voice broke, and was scared of having another Frankie Lymon on his hands. But the decision was made that rather than put out either of those albums, they would put out a single. The A-side was a song called "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1", which very much played on Wonder's image as a loveable naive kid: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1"] The B-side, meanwhile, was part two -- a slowed-down, near instrumental, version of the song, reframed as an actual blues, and as a showcase for Wonder's harmonica playing rather than his vocals. The single wasn't a hit, but it made number 101 on the Billboard charts, just missing the Hot One Hundred, which for the debut single of a new artist wasn't too bad, especially for Motown at this point in time, when most of its releases were flopping. That was good enough that Gordy authorised the release of the two albums that they had in the can. The next single, "Little Water Boy", was a rather baffling duet with Clarence Paul, which did nothing at all on the charts. [Excerpt: Clarence Paul and Little Stevie Wonder, "Little Water Boy"] After this came another flop single, written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Janie Bradford, before the record that finally broke Little Stevie Wonder out into the mainstream in a big way. While Wonder hadn't had a hit yet, he was sent out on the first Motortown Revue tour, along with almost every other act on the label. Because he hadn't had a hit, he was supposed to only play one song per show, but nobody had told him how long that song should be. He had quickly become a great live performer, and the audiences were excited to watch him, so when he went into extended harmonica solos rather than quickly finishing the song, the audience would be with him. Clarence Paul, who came along on the tour, would have to motion to the onstage bandleader to stop the music, but the bandleader would know that the audiences were with Stevie, and so would just keep the song going as long as Stevie was playing. Often Paul would have to go on to the stage and shout in Wonder's ear to stop playing -- and often Wonder would ignore him, and have to be physically dragged off stage by Paul, still playing, causing the audience to boo Paul for stopping him from playing. Wonder would complain off-stage that the audience had been enjoying it, and didn't seem to get it into his head that he wasn't the star of the show, that the audiences *were* enjoying him, but were *there* to see the Miracles and Mary Wells and the Marvelettes and Marvin Gaye. This made all the acts who had to go on after him, and who were running late as a result, furious at him -- especially since one aspect of Wonder's blindness was that his circadian rhythms weren't regulated by sunlight in the same way that the sighted members of the tour's were. He would often wake up the entire tour bus by playing his harmonica at two or three in the morning, while they were all trying to sleep. Soon Berry Gordy insisted that Clarence Paul be on stage with Wonder throughout his performance, ready to drag him off stage, so that he wouldn't have to come out onto the stage to do it. But one of the first times he had done this had been on one of the very first Motortown Revue shows, before any of his records had come out. There he'd done a performance of "Fingertips", playing the flute part on harmonica rather than only playing bongos throughout as he had on the studio version -- leaving the percussion to Marvin Gaye, who was playing drums for Wonder's set: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] But he'd extended the song with a little bit of call-and-response vocalising: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] After the long performance ended, Clarence Paul dragged Wonder off-stage and the MC asked the audience to give him a round of applause -- but then Stevie came running back on and carried on playing: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] By this point, though, the musicians had started to change over -- Mary Wells, who was on after Wonder, was using different musicians from his, and some of her players were already on stage. You can hear Joe Swift, who was playing bass for Wells, asking what key he was meant to be playing in: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] Eventually, after six and a half minutes, they got Wonder off stage, but that performance became the two sides of Wonder's next single, with "Fingertips Part 2", the part with the ad lib singing and the false ending, rather than the instrumental part one, being labelled as the side the DJs should play. When it was released, the song started a slow climb up the charts, and by August 1963, three months after it came out, it was at number one -- only the second ever Motown number one, and the first ever live single to get there. Not only that, but Motown released a live album -- Recorded Live, the Twelve-Year-Old Genius (though as many people point out he was thirteen when it was released -- he was twelve when it was recorded though) and that made number one on the albums chart, becoming the first Motown album ever to do so. They followed up "Fingertips" with a similar sounding track, "Workout, Stevie, Workout", which made number thirty-three. After that, his albums -- though not yet his singles -- started to be released as by "Stevie Wonder" with no "Little" -- he'd had a bit of a growth spurt and his voice was breaking, and so marketing him as a child prodigy was not going to work much longer and they needed to transition him into a star with adult potential. In the Motown of 1963 that meant cutting an album of standards, because the belief at the time in Motown was that the future for their entertainers was doing show tunes at the Copacabana. But for some reason the audience who had wanted an R&B harmonica instrumental with call-and-response improvised gospel-influenced yelling was not in the mood for a thirteen year old singing "Put on a Happy Face" and "When You Wish Upon a Star", and especially not when the instrumental tracks were recorded in a key that suited him at age twelve but not thirteen, so he was clearly straining. "Fingertips" being a massive hit also meant Stevie was now near the top of the bill on the Motortown Revue when it went on its second tour. But this actually put him in a precarious position. When he had been down at the bottom of the bill and unknown, nobody expected anything from him, and he was following other minor acts, so when he was surprisingly good the audiences went wild. Now, near the top of the bill, he had to go on after Marvin Gaye, and he was not nearly so impressive in that context. The audiences were polite enough, but not in the raptures he was used to. Although Stevie could still beat Gaye in some circumstances. At Motown staff parties, Berry Gordy would always have a contest where he'd pit two artists against each other to see who could win the crowd over, something he thought instilled a fun and useful competitive spirit in his artists. They'd alternate songs, two songs each, and Gordy would decide on the winner based on audience response. For the 1963 Motown Christmas party, it was Stevie versus Marvin. Wonder went first, with "Workout, Stevie, Workout", and was apparently impressive, but then Gaye topped him with a version of "Hitch-Hike". So Stevie had to top that, and apparently did, with a hugely extended version of "I Call it Pretty Music", reworked in the Ray Charles style he'd used for "Fingertips". So Marvin Gaye had to top that with the final song of the contest, and he did, performing "Stubborn Kind of Fellow": [Excerpt: Marvin Gaye, "Stubborn Kind of Fellow"] And he was great. So great, it turned the crowd against him. They started booing, and someone in the audience shouted "Marvin, you should be ashamed of yourself, taking advantage of a little blind kid!" The crowd got so hostile Berry Gordy had to stop the performance and end the party early. He never had another contest like that again. There were other problems, as well. Wonder had been assigned a tutor, a young man named Ted Hull, who began to take serious control over his life. Hull was legally blind, so could teach Wonder using Braille, but unlike Wonder had some sight -- enough that he was even able to get a drivers' license and a co-pilot license for planes. Hull was put in loco parentis on most of Stevie's tours, and soon became basically inseparable from him, but this caused a lot of problems, not least because Hull was a conservative white man, while almost everyone else at Motown was Black, and Stevie was socially liberal and on the side of the civil rights and anti-Vietnam movements. Hull started to collaborate on songwriting with Wonder, which most people at Motown were OK with but which now seems like a serious conflict of interest, and he also started calling himself Stevie's "manager" -- which did *not* impress the people at Motown, who had their own conflict of interest because with Stevie, like with all their artists, they were his management company and agents as well as his record label and publishers. Motown grudgingly tolerated Hull, though, mostly because he was someone they could pass Lula Mae Hardaway to to deal with her complaints. Stevie's mother was not very impressed with the way that Motown were handling her son, and would make her opinion known to anyone who would listen. Hull and Hardaway did not get on at all, but he could be relied on to save the Gordy family members from having to deal with her. Wonder was sent over to Europe for Christmas 1963, to perform shows at the Paris Olympia and do some British media appearances. But both his mother and Hull had come along, and their clear dislike for each other was making him stressed. He started to get pains in his throat whenever he sang -- pains which everyone assumed were a stress reaction to the unhealthy atmosphere that happened whenever Hull and his mother were in the same room together, but which later turned out to be throat nodules that required surgery. Because of this, his singing was generally not up to standard, which meant he was moved to a less prominent place on the bill, which in turn led to his mother accusing the Gordy family of being against him and trying to stop him becoming a star. Wonder started to take her side and believe that Motown were conspiring against him, and at one point he even "accidentally" dropped a bottle of wine on Ted Hull's foot, breaking one of his toes, because he saw Hull as part of the enemy that was Motown. Before leaving for those shows, he had recorded the album he later considered the worst of his career. While he was now just plain Stevie on albums, he wasn't for his single releases, or in his first film appearance, where he was still Little Stevie Wonder. Berry Gordy was already trying to get a foot in the door in Hollywood -- by the end of the decade Motown would be moving from Detroit to LA -- and his first real connections there were with American International Pictures, the low-budget film-makers who have come up a lot in connection with the LA scene. AIP were the producers of the successful low-budget series of beach party films, which combined appearances by teen heartthrobs Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello in swimsuits with cameo appearances by old film stars fallen on hard times, and with musical performances by bands like the Bobby Fuller Four. There would be a couple of Motown connections to these films -- most notably, the Supremes would do the theme tune for Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine -- but Muscle Beach Party was to be the first. Most of the music for Muscle Beach Party was written by Brian Wilson, Roger Christian, and Gary Usher, as one might expect for a film about surfing, and was performed by Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, the film's major musical guests, with Annette, Frankie, and Donna Loren [pron Lorren] adding vocals, on songs like "Muscle Bustle": [Excerpt: Donna Loren with Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, "Muscle Bustle"] The film followed the formula in every way -- it also had a cameo appearance by Peter Lorre, his last film appearance before his death, and it featured Little Stevie Wonder playing one of the few songs not written by the surf and car writers, a piece of nothing called "Happy Street". Stevie also featured in the follow-up, Bikini Beach, which came out a little under four months later, again doing a single number, "Happy Feelin'". To cash in on his appearances in these films, and having tried releasing albums of Little Stevie as jazz multi-instrumentalist, Ray Charles tribute act, live soulman and Andy Williams-style crooner, they now decided to see if they could sell him as a surf singer. Or at least, as Motown's idea of a surf singer, which meant a lot of songs about the beach and the sea -- mostly old standards like "Red Sails in the Sunset" and "Ebb Tide" -- backed by rather schlocky Wrecking Crew arrangements. And this is as good a place as any to take on one of the bits of disinformation that goes around about Motown. I've addressed this before, but it's worth repeating here in slightly more detail. Carol Kaye, one of the go-to Wrecking Crew bass players, is a known credit thief, and claims to have played on hundreds of records she didn't -- claims which too many people take seriously because she is a genuine pioneer and was for a long time undercredited on many records she *did* play on. In particular, she claims to have played on almost all the classic Motown hits that James Jamerson of the Funk Brothers played on, like the title track for this episode, and she claims this despite evidence including notarised statements from everyone involved in the records, the release of session recordings that show producers talking to the Funk Brothers, and most importantly the evidence of the recordings themselves, which have all the characteristics of the Detroit studio and sound like the Funk Brothers playing, and have absolutely nothing in common, sonically, with the records the Wrecking Crew played on at Gold Star, Western, and other LA studios. The Wrecking Crew *did* play on a lot of Motown records, but with a handful of exceptions, mostly by Brenda Holloway, the records they played on were quickie knock-off album tracks and potboiler albums made to tie in with film or TV work -- soundtracks to TV specials the acts did, and that kind of thing. And in this case, the Wrecking Crew played on the entire Stevie at the Beach album, including the last single to be released as by "Little Stevie Wonder", "Castles in the Sand", which was arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Castles in the Sand"] Apparently the idea of surfin' Stevie didn't catch on any more than that of swingin' Stevie had earlier. Indeed, throughout 1964 and 65 Motown seem to have had less than no idea what they were doing with Stevie Wonder, and he himself refers to all his recordings from this period as an embarrassment, saving particular scorn for the second single from Stevie at the Beach, "Hey Harmonica Man", possibly because that, unlike most of his other singles around this point, was a minor hit, reaching number twenty-nine on the charts. Motown were still pushing Wonder hard -- he even got an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in May 1964, only the second Motown act to appear on it after the Marvelettes -- but Wonder was getting more and more unhappy with the decisions they were making. He loathed the Stevie at the Beach album -- the records he'd made earlier, while patchy and not things he'd chosen, were at least in some way related to his musical interests. He *did* love jazz, and he *did* love Ray Charles, and he *did* love old standards, and the records were made by his friend Clarence Paul and with the studio musicians he'd grown to know in Detroit. But Stevie at the Beach was something that was imposed on Clarence Paul from above, it was cut with unfamiliar musicians, Stevie thought the films he was appearing in were embarrassing, and he wasn't even having much commercial success, which was the whole point of these compromises. He started to get more rebellious against Paul in the studio, though many of these decisions weren't made by Paul, and he would complain to anyone who would listen that if he was just allowed to do the music he wanted to sing, the way he wanted to sing it, he would have more hits. But for nine months he did basically no singing other than that Ed Sullivan Show appearance -- he had to recover from the operation to remove the throat nodules. When he did return to the studio, the first single he cut remained unreleased, and while some stuff from the archives was released between the start of 1964 and March 1965, the first single he recorded and released after the throat nodules, "Kiss Me Baby", which came out in March, was a complete flop. That single was released to coincide with the first Motown tour of Europe, which we looked at in the episode on "Stop! In the Name of Love", and which was mostly set up to promote the Supremes, but which also featured Martha and the Vandellas, the Miracles, and the Temptations. Even though Stevie had not had a major hit in eighteen months by this point, he was still brought along on the tour, the only solo artist to be included -- at this point Gordy thought that solo artists looked outdated compared to vocal groups, in a world dominated by bands, and so other solo artists like Marvin Gaye weren't invited. This was a sign that Gordy was happier with Stevie than his recent lack of chart success might suggest. One of the main reasons that Gordy had been in two minds about him was that he'd had no idea if Wonder would still be able to sing well after his voice broke. But now, as he was about to turn fifteen, his adult voice had more or less stabilised, and Gordy knew that he was capable of having a long career, if they just gave him the proper material. But for now his job on the tour was to do his couple of hits, smile, and be on the lower rungs of the ladder. But even that was still a prominent place to be given the scaled-down nature of this bill compared to the Motortown Revues. While the tour was in England, for example, Dusty Springfield presented a TV special focusing on all the acts on the tour, and while the Supremes were the main stars, Stevie got to do two songs, and also took part in the finale, a version of "Mickey's Monkey" led by Smokey Robinson but with all the performers joining in, with Wonder getting a harmonica solo: [Excerpt: Smokey Robinson and the Motown acts, "Mickey's Monkey"] Sadly, there was one aspect of the trip to the UK that was extremely upsetting for Wonder. Almost all the media attention he got -- which was relatively little, as he wasn't a Supreme -- was about his blindness, and one reporter in particular convinced him that there was an operation he could have to restore his sight, but that Motown were preventing him from finding out about it in order to keep his gimmick going. He was devastated about this, and then further devastated when Ted Hull finally convinced him that it wasn't true, and that he'd been lied to. Meanwhile other newspapers were reporting that he *could* see, and that he was just feigning blindness to boost his record sales. After the tour, a live recording of Wonder singing the blues standard "High Heeled Sneakers" was released as a single, and barely made the R&B top thirty, and didn't hit the top forty on the pop charts. Stevie's initial contract with Motown was going to expire in the middle of 1966, so there was a year to get him back to a point where he was having the kind of hits that other Motown acts were regularly getting at this point. Otherwise, it looked like his career might end by the time he was sixteen. The B-side to "High Heeled Sneakers" was another duet with Clarence Paul, who dominates the vocal sound for much of it -- a version of Willie Nelson's country classic "Funny How Time Slips Away": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Funny How Time Slips Away"] There are a few of these duet records scattered through Wonder's early career -- we'll hear another one a little later -- and they're mostly dismissed as Paul trying to muscle his way into a revival of his own recording career as an artist, and there may be some truth in that. But they're also a natural extension of the way the two of them worked in the studio. Motown didn't have the facilities to give Wonder Braille lyric sheets, and Paul didn't trust him to be able to remember the lyrics, so often when they made a record, Paul would be just off-mic, reciting the lyrics to Wonder fractionally ahead of him singing them. So it was more or less natural that this dynamic would leak out onto records, but not everyone saw it that way. But at the same time, there has been some suggestion that Paul was among those manoeuvring to get rid of Wonder from Motown as soon as his contract was finished -- despite the fact that Wonder was the only act Paul had worked on any big hits for. Either way, Paul and Wonder were starting to chafe at working with each other in the studio, and while Paul remained his on-stage musical director, the opportunity to work on Wonder's singles for what would surely be his last few months at Motown was given to Hank Cosby and Sylvia Moy. Cosby was a saxophone player and staff songwriter who had been working with Wonder and Paul for years -- he'd co-written "Fingertips" and several other tracks -- while Moy was a staff songwriter who was working as an apprentice to Cosby. Basically, at this point, nobody else wanted the job of writing for Wonder, and as Moy was having no luck getting songs cut by any other artists and her career was looking about as dead as Wonder's, they started working together. Wonder was, at this point, full of musical ideas but with absolutely no discipline. He's said in interviews that at this point he was writing a hundred and fifty songs a month, but these were often not full songs -- they were fragments, hooks, or a single verse, or a few lines, which he would pass on to Moy, who would turn his ideas into structured songs that fit the Motown hit template, usually with the assistance of Cosby. Then Cosby would come up with an arrangement, and would co-produce with Mickey Stevenson. The first song they came up with in this manner was a sign of how Wonder was looking outside the world of Motown to the rock music that was starting to dominate the US charts -- but which was itself inspired by Motown music. We heard in the last episode on the Rolling Stones how "Nowhere to Run" by the Vandellas: [Excerpt: Martha and the Vandellas, "Nowhere to Run"] had inspired the Stones' "Satisfaction": [Excerpt: The Rolling Stones, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"] And Wonder in turn was inspired by "Satisfaction" to come up with his own song -- though again, much of the work making it into an actual finished song was done by Sylvia Moy. They took the four-on-the-floor beat and basic melody of "Satisfaction" and brought it back to Motown, where those things had originated -- though they hadn't originated with Stevie, and this was his first record to sound like a Motown record in the way we think of those things. As a sign of how, despite the way these stories are usually told, the histories of rock and soul were completely and complexly intertwined, that four-on-the-floor beat itself was a conscious attempt by Holland, Dozier, and Holland to appeal to white listeners -- on the grounds that while Black people generally clapped on the backbeat, white people didn't, and so having a four-on-the-floor beat wouldn't throw them off. So Cosby, Moy, and Wonder, in trying to come up with a "Satisfaction" soundalike were Black Motown writers trying to copy a white rock band trying to copy Black Motown writers trying to appeal to a white rock audience. Wonder came up with the basic chorus hook, which was based around a lot of current slang terms he was fond of: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] Then Moy, with some assistance from Cosby, filled it out into a full song. Lyrically, it was as close to social comment as Motown had come at this point -- Wonder was, like many of his peers in soul music, interested in the power of popular music to make political statements, and he would become a much more political artist in the next few years, but at this point it's still couched in the acceptable boy-meets-girl romantic love song that Motown specialised in. But in 1965 a story about a boy from the wrong side of the tracks dating a rich girl inevitably raised the idea that the boy and girl might be of different races -- a subject that was very, very, controversial in the mid-sixties. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] "Uptight" made number three on the pop charts and number one on the R&B charts, and saved Stevie Wonder's career. And this is where, for all that I've criticised Motown in this episode, their strategy paid off. Mickey Stevenson talked a lot about how in the early sixties Motown didn't give up on artists -- if someone had potential but was not yet having hits or finding the right approach, they would keep putting out singles in a holding pattern, trying different things and seeing what would work, rather than toss them aside. It had already worked for the Temptations and the Supremes, and now it had worked for Stevie Wonder. He would be the last beneficiary of this policy -- soon things would change, and Motown would become increasingly focused on trying to get the maximum returns out of a small number of stars, rather than building careers for a range of artists -- but it paid off brilliantly for Wonder. "Uptight" was such a reinvention of Wonder's career, sound, and image that many of his fans consider it the real start of his career -- everything before it only counting as prologue. The follow-up, "Nothing's Too Good For My Baby", was an "Uptight" soundalike, and as with Motown soundalike follow-ups in general, it didn't do quite as well, but it still made the top twenty on the pop chart and got to number four on the R&B chart. Stevie Wonder was now safe at Motown, and so he was going to do something no other Motown act had ever done before -- he was going to record a protest song and release it as a single. For about a year he'd been ending his shows with a version of Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind", sung as a duet with Clarence Paul, who was still his on stage bandleader even though the two weren't working together in the studio as much. Wonder brought that into the studio, and recorded it with Paul back as the producer, and as his duet partner. Berry Gordy wasn't happy with the choice of single, but Wonder pushed, and Gordy knew that Wonder was on a winning streak and gave in, and so "Blowin' in the Wind" became Stevie Wonder's next single: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Blowin' in the Wind"] "Blowin' in the Wind" made the top ten, and number one on the R&B charts, and convinced Gordy that there was some commercial potential in going after the socially aware market, and over the next few years Motown would start putting out more and more political records. Because Motown convention was to have the producer of a hit record produce the next hit for that artist, and keep doing so until they had a flop, Paul was given the opportunity to produce the next single. "A Place in the Sun" was another ambiguously socially-aware song, co-written by the only white writer on Motown staff, Ron Miller, who happened to live in the same building as Stevie's tutor-cum-manager Ted Hull. "A Place in the Sun" was a pleasant enough song, inspired by "A Change is Gonna Come", but with a more watered-down, generic, message of hope, but the record was lifted by Stevie's voice, and again made the top ten. This meant that Paul and Miller, and Miller's writing partner Bryan Mills, got to work on his next  two singles -- his 1966 Christmas song "Someday at Christmas", which made number twenty-four, and the ballad "Travellin' Man" which made thirty-two. The downward trajectory with Paul meant that Wonder was soon working with other producers again. Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol cut another Miller and Mills song with him, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday"] But that was left in the can, as not good enough to release, and Stevie was soon back working with Cosby. The two of them had come up with an instrumental together in late 1966, but had not been able to come up with any words for it, so they played it for Smokey Robinson, who said their instrumental sounded like circus music, and wrote lyrics about a clown: [Excerpt: The Miracles, "The Tears of a Clown"] The Miracles cut that as album filler, but it was released three years later as a single and became the Miracles' only number one hit with Smokey Robinson as lead singer. So Wonder and Cosby definitely still had their commercial touch, even if their renewed collaboration with Moy, who they started working with again, took a while to find a hit. To start with, Wonder returned to the idea of taking inspiration from a hit by a white British group, as he had with "Uptight". This time it was the Beatles, and the track "Michelle", from the Rubber Soul album: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Michelle"] Wonder took the idea of a song with some French lyrics, and a melody with some similarities to the Beatles song, and came up with "My Cherie Amour", which Cosby and Moy finished off. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "My Cherie Amour"] Gordy wouldn't allow that to be released, saying it was too close to "Michelle" and people would think it was a rip-off, and it stayed in the vaults for several years. Cosby also produced a version of a song Ron Miller had written with Orlando Murden, "For Once in My Life", which pretty much every other Motown act was recording versions of -- the Four Tops, the Temptations, Billy Eckstine, Martha and the Vandellas and Barbra McNair all cut versions of it in 1967, and Gordy wouldn't let Wonder's version be put out either. So they had to return to the drawing board. But in truth, Stevie Wonder was not the biggest thing worrying Berry Gordy at this point. He was dealing with problems in the Supremes, which we'll look at in a future episode -- they were about to get rid of Florence Ballard, and thus possibly destroy one of the biggest acts in the world, but Gordy thought that if they *didn't* get rid of her they would be destroying themselves even more certainly. Not only that, but Gordy was in the midst of a secret affair with Diana Ross, Holland, Dozier, and Holland were getting restless about their contracts, and his producers kept bringing him unlistenable garbage that would never be a hit. Like Norman Whitfield, insisting that this track he'd cut with Marvin Gaye, "I Heard it Through the Grapevine", should be a single. Gordy had put his foot down about that one too, just like he had about "My Cherie Amour", and wouldn't allow it to be released. Meanwhile, many of the smaller acts on the label were starting to feel like they were being ignored by Gordy, and had formed what amounted to a union, having regular meetings at Clarence Paul's house to discuss how they could pressure the label to put the same effort into their careers as into those of the big stars. And the Funk Brothers, the musicians who played on all of Motown's hits, were also getting restless -- they contributed to the arrangements, and they did more for the sound of the records than half the credited producers; why weren't they getting production credits and royalties? Harvey Fuqua had divorced Gordy's sister Gwen, and so became persona non grata at the label and was in the process of leaving Motown, and so was Mickey Stevenson, Gordy's second in command, because Gordy wouldn't give him any stock in the company. And Detroit itself was on edge. The crime rate in the city had started to go up, but even worse, the *perception* of crime was going up. The Detroit News had been running a campaign to whip up fear, which it called its Secret Witness campaign, and running constant headlines about rapes, murders, and muggings. These in turn had led to increased calls for more funds for the police, calls which inevitably contained a strong racial element and at least implicitly linked the perceived rise in crime to the ongoing Civil Rights movement. At this point the police in Detroit were ninety-three percent white, even though Detroit's population was over thirty percent Black. The Mayor and Police Commissioner were trying to bring in some modest reforms, but they weren't going anywhere near fast enough for the Black population who felt harassed and attacked by the police, but were still going too fast for the white people who were being whipped up into a state of terror about supposedly soft-on-crime policies, and for the police who felt under siege and betrayed by the politicians. And this wasn't the only problem affecting the city, and especially affecting Black people. Redlining and underfunded housing projects meant that the large Black population was being crammed into smaller and smaller spaces with fewer local amenities. A few Black people who were lucky enough to become rich -- many of them associated with Motown -- were able to move into majority-white areas, but that was just leading to white flight, and to an increase in racial tensions. The police were on edge after the murder of George Overman Jr, the son of a policeman, and though they arrested the killers that was just another sign that they weren't being shown enough respect. They started organising "blu flu"s -- the police weren't allowed to strike, so they'd claim en masse that they were off sick, as a protest against the supposed soft-on-crime administration. Meanwhile John Sinclair was organising "love-ins", gatherings of hippies at which new bands like the MC5 played, which were being invaded by gangs of bikers who were there to beat up the hippies. And the Detroit auto industry was on its knees -- working conditions had got bad enough that the mostly Black workforce organised a series of wildcat strikes. All in all, Detroit was looking less and less like somewhere that Berry Gordy wanted to stay, and the small LA subsidiary of Motown was rapidly becoming, in his head if nowhere else, the more important part of the company, and its future. He was starting to think that maybe he should leave all these ungrateful people behind in their dangerous city, and move the parts of the operation that actually mattered out to Hollywood. Stevie Wonder was, of course, one of the parts that mattered, but the pressure was on in 1967 to come up with a hit as big as his records from 1965 and early 66, before he'd been sidetracked down the ballad route. The song that was eventually released was one on which Stevie's mother, Lula Mae Hardaway, had a co-writing credit: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] "I Was Made to Love Her" was inspired by Wonder's first love, a girl from the same housing projects as him, and he talked about the song being special to him because it was true, saying it "kind of speaks of my first love to a girl named Angie, who was a very beautiful woman... Actually, she was my third girlfriend but my first love. I used to call Angie up and, like, we would talk and say, 'I love you, I love you,' and we'd talk and we'd both go to sleep on the phone. And this was like from Detroit to California, right? You know, mother said, 'Boy, what you doing - get off the phone!' Boy, I tell you, it was ridiculous." But while it was inspired by her, like with many of the songs from this period, much of the lyric came from Moy -- her mother grew up in Arkansas, and that's why the lyric started "I was born in Little Rock", as *her* inspiration came from stories told by her parents. But truth be told, the lyrics weren't particularly detailed or impressive, just a standard story of young love. Rather what mattered in the record was the music. The song was structured differently from many Motown records, including most of Wonder's earlier ones. Most Motown records had a huge amount of dynamic variation, and a clear demarcation between verse and chorus. Even a record like "Dancing in the Street", which took most of its power from the tension and release caused by spending most of the track on one chord, had the release that came with the line "All we need is music", and could be clearly subdivided into different sections. "I Was Made to Love Her" wasn't like that. There was a tiny section which functioned as a middle eight -- and which cover versions like the one by the Beach Boys later that year tend to cut out, because it disrupts the song's flow: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] But other than that, the song has no verse or chorus, no distinct sections, it's just a series of lyrical couplets over the same four chords, repeating over and over, an incessant groove that could really go on indefinitely: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This is as close as Motown had come at this point to the new genre of funk, of records that were just staying with one groove throughout. It wasn't a funk record, not yet -- it was still a pop-soul record, But what made it extraordinary was the bass line, and this is why I had to emphasise earlier that this was a record by the Funk Brothers, not the Wrecking Crew, no matter how much some Crew members may claim otherwise. As on most of Cosby's sessions, James Jamerson was given free reign to come up with his own part with little guidance, and what he came up with is extraordinary. This was at a time when rock and pop basslines were becoming a little more mobile, thanks to the influence of Jamerson in Detroit, Brian Wilson in LA, and Paul McCartney in London.  But for the most part, even those bass parts had been fairly straightforward technically -- often inventive, but usually just crotchets and quavers, still keeping rhythm along with the drums rather than in dialogue with them, roaming free rhythmically. Jamerson had started to change his approach, inspired by the change in studio equipment. Motown had upgraded to eight-track recording in 1965, and once he'd become aware of the possibilities, and of the greater prominence that his bass parts could have if they were recorded on their own track, Jamerson had become a much busier player. Jamerson was a jazz musician by inclination, and so would have been very aware of John Coltrane's legendary "sheets of sound", in which Coltrane would play fast arpeggios and scales, in clusters of five and seven notes, usually in semiquaver runs (though sometimes in even smaller fractions -- his solo in Miles Davis' "Straight, No Chaser" is mostly semiquavers but has a short passage in hemidemisemiquavers): [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Straight, No Chaser"] Jamerson started to adapt the "sheets of sound" style to bass playing, treating the bass almost as a jazz solo instrument -- though unlike Coltrane he was also very, very concerned with creating something that people could tap their feet to. Much like James Brown, Jamerson was taking jazz techniques and repurposing them for dance music. The most notable example of that up to this point had been in the Four Tops' "Bernadette", where there are a few scuffling semiquaver runs thrown in, and which is a much more fluid part than most of his playing previously: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "Bernadette"] But on "Bernadette", Jamerson had been limited by Holland, Dozier, and Holland, who liked him to improvise but around a framework they created. Cosby, on the other hand, because he had been a Funk Brother himself, was much more aware of the musicians' improvisational abilities, and would largely give them a free hand. This led to a truly remarkable bass part on "I Was Made to Love Her", which is somewhat buried in the single mix, but Marcus Miller did an isolated recreation of the part for the accompanying CD to a book on Jamerson, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, and listening to that you can hear just how inventive it is: [Excerpt: Marcus Miller, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This was exciting stuff -- though much less so for the touring musicians who went on the road with the Motown revues while Jamerson largely stayed in Detroit recording. Jamerson's family would later talk about him coming home grumbling because complaints from the touring musicians had been brought to him, and he'd been asked to play less difficult parts so they'd find it easier to replicate them on stage. "I Was Made to Love Her" wouldn't exist without Stevie Wonder, Hank Cosby, Sylvia Moy, or Lula Mae Hardaway, but it's James Jamerson's record through and through: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] It went to number two on the charts, sat between "Light My Fire" at number one, and "All You Need is Love" at number three, with the Beatles song soon to overtake it and make number one itself. But within a few weeks of "I Was Made to Love Her" reaching its chart peak, things in Detroit would change irrevocably. On the 23rd of July, the police busted an illegal drinking den. They thought they were only going to get about twenty-five people there, but there turned out to be a big party on. They tried to arrest seventy-four people, but their wagon wouldn't fit them all in so they had to call reinforcements and make the arrestees wait around til more wagons arrived. A crowd of hundreds gathered while they were waiting. Someone threw a brick at a squad car window, a rumour went round that the police had bayonetted someone, and soon the city was in flames. Riots lasted for days, with people burning down and looting businesses, but what really made the situation bad was the police's overreaction. They basically started shooting at young Black men, using them as target practice, and later claiming they were snipers, arsonists, and looters -- but there were cases like the Algiers Motel incident, where the police raided a motel where several Black men, including the members of the soul group The Dramatics, were hiding out along with a few white women. The police sexually assaulted the women, and then killed three of the men for associating with white women, in what was described as a "lynching with bullets". The policemen in question were later acquitted of all charges. The National Guard were called in, as were Federal troops -- the 82nd Airborne Division, and the 101st Airborne from Clarksville, the division in which Jimi Hendrix had recently served. After four days of rioting, one of the bloodiest riots in US history was at an end, with forty-three people dead (of whom thirty-three were Black and only one was a policeman). Official counts had 1,189 people injured, and over 7,200 arrests, almost all of them of Black people. A lot of the histories written later say that Black-owned businesses were spared during the riots, but that wasn't really the case. For example, Joe's Record Shop, owned by Joe Von Battle, who had put out the first records by C.L. Franklin and his daughter Aretha, was burned down, destroying not only the stock of records for sale but the master tapes of hundreds of recordings of Black artists, many of them unreleased and so now lost forever. John Lee Hooker, one of the artists whose music Von Battle had released, soon put out a song, "The Motor City is Burning", about the events: [Excerpt: John Lee Hooker, "The Motor City is Burning"] But one business that did remain unburned was Motown, with the Hitsville studio going untouched by flames and unlooted. Motown legend has this being down to the rioters showing respect for the studio that had done so much for Detroit, but it seems likely to have just been luck. Although Motown wasn't completely unscathed -- a National Guard tank fired a shell through the building, leaving a gigantic hole, which Berry Gordy saw as soon as he got back from a business trip he'd been on during the rioting. That was what made Berry Gordy decide once and for all that things needed to change. Motown owned a whole row of houses near the studio, which they used as additional office space and for everything other than the core business of making records. Gordy immediately started to sell them, and move the admin work into temporary rented space. He hadn't announced it yet, and it would be a few years before the move was complete, but from that moment on, the die was cast. Motown was going to leave Detroit and move to Hollywood.

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Recording Studio Rockstars
RSR370 - Sean Giovanni - Helping Artists Reach Music Goals at The Record Shop Nashville

Recording Studio Rockstars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 138:58


My guest today is Sean Giovanni a Producer, Engineer and Owner of The Record Shop in Nashville, TN. Gio has worked with artists such as, John Legend, Big and Rich, Zakk Wylde, Tim McGraw, The Wallflowers, Juicy J, and Lil Jon.  After moving to Nashville at 20 years old and unable to land an internship, Gio set out to build his own path in the recording industry, with a focus on supporting artists in achieving their creative vision and offering a wide range of content creation services in addition to production.  A frequent NAMM show panelist, speaker at Belmont, MTSU, SAE, The Recording Academy, Sean has also appeared in interviews with the likes of Adam Audio, Antelope Audio, Make it in Music, The Working Your Way Up Podcast, Recording Connection and many more to discuss topics such as entrepreneurship, time management, building a brand , leading with purpose, overcoming adversity, and much more. Thanks also to Paul from DPA Microphones for originally introducing us.    Get access to FREE mixing mini-course: http://MixMasterBundle.com THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS! https://samplyaudio.com Use code RSR20 to get 20% off for the first 3 months https://www.Spectra1964.com https://MacSales.com/Rockstars https://iZotope.com/Rockstars use code ROCK10 for 10% off https://apiaudio.com/ https://www.adam-audio.com https://RecordingStudioRockstars.com/Academy Use code ROCKSTAR to get 10% off https://www.thetoyboxstudio.com/ http://UltimateMixingMasterclass.com Hear guests discography on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2j8g9M4ONDnUrYbP9t1Zpp?si=ce754722b53d4ebf If you love the podcast, then please leave a review: https://RSRockstars.com/Review CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE SHOW NOTES AT: http://RSRockstars.com/370

Lucy's Record Shop
The Vinylist Feat. Doyle Davis

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 61:10


Doyle Davis' business cards read “Vinylist,” which is so perfect since he's been a champion of vinyl as a music delivery system his whole life - as a kid picking through his parents' collection, as a used record buyer at The Great Escape, as a Lucy's Record Shop customer buying every Guided By Voices record he could get his hands on, and as the co-owner of Grimey's New and Preloved Music, a Nashville institution he helped build from the ground up. In this episode Doyle talks about what it's like to run a record store, seeing Rodan play a house show, Yo La Tengo soundcheck, and other tales from the live indie rock scene of the 90s, the records he bought at Lucy's that he'll never ever sell, and how he's been able to build a successful community-oriented record store from the ground up. Doyle has seen a lot of changes in the industry and he's managed to weather them with creativity, humor, and a wonderfully infectious positive attitude, all while making vinyl the star of the show. Instagram: @thedoyledavis / @grimeys Facebook: @doyle.davis.75 / @GrimeysRecords Twitter: @thedoyledavis / @grimeys Episode Music Lambchop with Yo La Tengo (excerpt - Autumn Sweater) Pavement - Summer Babe (Live Brixton Academy, London, December 14, 1992) The Pretty Things - The Journey Follow us / Say hello Instagram: @lucysrecordshop Twitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is brought to you by Give Forty the Finger Productions and part We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

We Own This Town: Music
315: Everything but Skronky Jazz with Mary Mancini

We Own This Town: Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 98:29


Mary Mancini of Lucy's Record Shop chats about the 30th anniversary and we trade off song selections. Delightful.

Lucy's Record Shop
Chance Encounters (Feat. John Rogers)

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 49:26


John Rogers, who first stepped into Lucy's Record Shop when he was just 14-years-old, is an accomplished writer and photographer who uses his camera to document both the jazz scene and the streets of New York City. In this episode you'll hear how growing up in Nashville -  from seeing live music at Lucy's and playing in his own bands to drinking coffee at Bongo Java and collecting records from The Great Escape - influenced his life and art. You'll also hear about the numerous inexplicable and mysterious coincidences that manifest in his life and bring him closer to the people, scene, and city he loves and admires. -- John Rogers started traveling to New York City from his hometown of Nashville, Tenn., when he was 18 years old. The camera helped him consider the complexity of his personal devotion, as a fan, to the brightness and subtle glances that carry performances. He slept in cheap hotels or parks, heard a different show every night, and soaked up stories from musicians. Rogers moved to New York in 2003 knowing only a handful of players on New York's avant-garde downtown scene, but eventually became close to figures like Yusef Lateef, Ornette Coleman, Paul Motian, Bill Frisell, Chris Potter and Fred Hersch. He established himself as a preeminent photographer and documentor of the city's jazz ecosystem. John has a way of catching his subjects mid-move, at the moment when energy is being activated. If a singer smiles, he gets them in the act of raising their eyebrows; when a drummer swipes for a tom drum, Rogers catches them gathering the conviction to render the blow. Check out the book of his work, Old & New Dreams, with introduction by Dawoud Bey. – Episode Music Lambchop - So I Hear You're Moving Wally Pleasant - Sons of Bob Dylan Low - Hey Chicago Bill Frisell, Ron Carter, Paul Motian - On the Street Where You Live Versus - Be-9 Photo of John Rogers courtesy of Rowan Renee. Follow us / Say hello Instagram: @lucysrecordshop Twitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

I Wish I Knew THAT About Songwriting

Today Jamie chats to the founder of Perfect Vocals Academy, John Burke. John started his own recording studio in Northeast Ohio called Vibe Recording Studios, which was a home to many bands and solo artists for 7 years. In 2018 he closed the studio and moved to Nashville, TN and worked alongside Sean Giovanni at The Record Shop as well as operated a remote mixing and mastering service from home. Since 2020, John has relocated back to Northeast Ohio and still operates his remote mixing and mastering business from home. Perfect Vocals Academy: WebsiteYouTube InstagramFacebookDo you want free constructive feedback on your songs? If so, send us an mp3 or SoundCloud link to iwishiknewthatpod@gmail.com and we'll be sure to give your song a listen and send you our thoughts!We love hearing your suggestions for the show or send us a question about songwriting to @iwishiknewthatpod on Facebook or Instagram. Be well, write well. J & C

Lucy's Record Shop
Buckley's Record Shop (feat. Randy Fox)

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 43:32


In 2019, music writer Randy Fox discovered a long-forgotten nugget of info - sixteen years before Lucy's opened its doors at 1707 Church Street in Nashville it was home to another record store called Buckley's. Randy has an insatiable curiosity and an unbridled enthusiasm for music and history, so this story has lots of twists and turns. It starts in Kentucky and his discovery of the Sex Pistols and the Ramones in college, zigs into the history of mid-20th century radio and record shops, and zags to the use of urban planning as a tool for white supremacy. Chock full. Enjoy! Randy Fox grew up in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky and now lives in Nashville, Tennessee. Currently managing editor of The Madisonian and an Editor-at-Large for The East Nashvillian, his writing has also appeared in Vintage Rock, Country Music, Record Collector, Journal of Country Music, Nashville Scene and many other publications. He is the author of Shake Your Hips: The Excello Records Story, a history of the renowned Nashville-based blues, soul and gospel record label. He is also a co-founder, President, and Program Director of independent, freeform radio station WXNA 101.5 FM in Nashville, where he hosts the weekly programs, Randy's Record Shop and the Hipbilly Jamboree. Episode Music: Lambchop - So I Hear You're Moving (Intro) Deford Bailey - Davidson County Blues Slim Harpo - Shake Your Hips Etta James - Seven Day Fool (Live at the New Era Club I'm Going to Sit at the Welcome Table / "We Shall Not Be Moved" - The Nashville Sit-in Story: Songs and Scenes of Nashville Lunch Counter Desegregation (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings) Additional Mentions/Links: Shake  Your Hips: The Excello Records Story by Randy Fox “The Emperor of Grooves,” by Randy Fox, The East Nashvillian “Love at 33 1/3: Reflections on a Year of Writing About Record Stores,” by Randy Fox, The Nashville Scene Rock 'n' Roll High School (1979) movie review - Sneak Previews with Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel WXNAfm.org One Mile North by Campbell Haynes (Belmont Law Review, Volume 8, Issue 1: 2020) The Highway to Segregation by Sabre J. Rucker (Masters Thesis, Vanderbilt University, 2016) “Racist planning shaped our city; conscientious planning can help undo its mistakes,” By Adrien Weibgen, New York Daily News Harvey's Nashville Sells 39¢ Singles, Billboard, May, 5, 1962 Randy's Record Shop. Ernie's Record Mart. Dot Records DJ Gene Nobels  The Children by David Halberstam JeffersonStreetSound.com Fisk University, Meharry Medical College, Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State University (now Tennessee State University) Diane Nash, Rev.James Lawson, Congressman John Lewis, Bernard Lafayette, C.T. Vivian, Rip Patton Night train to Nashville: Music City Rhythm and Blues 1945–1970, Country Music Hall of Fame, Michael Gray & Daniel Cooper, curators. Cover Photo of Randy Fox, Scott Greenwalt Photography PLAYLISTS & RADIO SHOWS The Best of Excello Records The Excello Story, Vol. II (1955 - 1957) The Excello Records Story, Vol. I (1952 - 1955) Randy's Record Shop (Randy's Radio Show) - Mondays, 7:00am–9:00am CT, Archive and Live on WXNAFM.org Hipbilly Jamboree! (Randy's Radio Show) - Sunday 3 - 5 PM Archive and live on WXNAfm.org Follow us / Say helloInstagram: @lucysrecordshopTwitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

Free Samples Podcast
Support Your Local Record Shop

Free Samples Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 23:04


First recording on 'the dream turntables' made possible by Grand Avenue Records! They repaired a shipping incident and had these gems in the bins. Thank you! Set List: 1. Dan Portch - 'Enter Tribal' 2. Tony Thomas - 'Ooya' 3. Peace Division - 'Beatz 'n Peacez' 4. Mike Monday - 'Get Down - D. Ramirez remix' 5. Basement Jaxx / Banana Kru - 'Give Peace a Chance' All rights reserved by their owners.

Lucy's Record Shop
Book Your Own F*ckin' Life (feat. bert)

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 40:20


They played in a trailer in the middle of some scary woods, slept on the nasty floor of a club, and blew up snack cakes on a dusty back road with Steve Albini. This was life in the 90s for Montgomery, Alabama, noise-punk band bert. Guided by the mighty Book Your Own F*ckin' Life ‘zine, bert had all the resources they needed to put out their own records, connect with people who loved music as much as they did, and play tons of shows throughout the South and Southeastern U.S.. Mark Coleman (original bass player), Glenn Grant (drums) and Jeff McLeod (guitar and vocals) got together for the first time in a long time to hang out with Mary and talk about life in the studio and on the road, confronting racism and sexism in punk, and one of their absolute favorite places to play: Lucy's Record Shop! In addition to touring, bert self-released two cassettes and two split 7"s, before Nashville's House O' Pain put out their 7" Ambient Doug. They went on to record with Steve Albini for two releases (1993's Quiet Positive Pump and 1997's Big Box Schwing) for Austin, TX's Chicken Ranch Records, who also released two limited recordings after the band broke up, and another for a one-off reunion show in 2008.  Episode Music Lambchop - So I Hear You're Moving The Dead Kennedys - Your Emotions bert - Schizoweirdnik bert - Dog Dark Nufux (bert) - The Smoldering Turd Additional Mentions/Links Maximum RockNRoll Boobyhatch Impetuous Doom Little Monkey on a Stick Deadwood (Pensacola) Craw (Cleveland, OH) Art Chantry Chicken Ranch  Steve Albini bert Nufux Jeff McLeod Bert - 1993-1998 shtwrlds The Subversive Workshop Jeffmcleod.bandcamp.com Follow us / Say hello Instagram: @lucysrecordshop Twitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

The Feed The Official Libsyn Podcast
221 Apple Podcasts Search and YouTube For Podcasts FAQs

The Feed The Official Libsyn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 66:33


Search in Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music contest follow up! Best practices for podcasters in YouTube, stopping podcasts from downloading onto you computer, from reluctant listener to podcast fan, Podcast focused newsletters? We got you! Best practices for taking the summer off as a podcaster and stats, geographic and user agent. MAKE SURE YOU SIGN UP FOR PODCAST AUDIO EDITING WITH BRIAN! Audience feedback drives the show. We'd love for you to contact us and keep the conversation going! Email thefeed@libsyn.com, call 412-573-1934 or leave us a message on Speakpipe! We'd love to hear from you! SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER HERE! Quick Episode Summary :13 Intro :26 Sign up for our live audio editing event! 2:27 PROMO 1: Tangentially Speaking 2:57 Rob and Elsie conversation 4:40 Search and Apple Podcasts, how it works The author tag is searchable in Apple Podcasts 10:57 Update on the Amazon Music contest! 17:45 The Obamas are headed over to Audible 19:22 FAQs for podcasters about YouTube aka optimizing your podcast for YouTube 32:20 How to stop podcasts from downloading from Apple Podcasts to their computer 35:45 Listening to podcasts as a reluctant listener 48:18 Setting up a channel on Apple Podcasts 44:40 Shout-out to Podknows and Making Conversations Count! 46:03 We have snippets on Libsyn to help you keep all your sponsor info right within the UI 47:37 Podcast focused newsletters and their contact info 48:18 2000 episodes in the Apple Podcasts and all the rest of them when you follow/subscribe to the show 51:01 What to do when you want to take the summer off from publishing your podcast 57:56 PROMO 2: Lucy's Record Shop 58:56 Stats, geographic and user agent 1:01:45 Where have we been? Where are we going? Featured Podcast Promo + Audio PROMO 1: Tangentially Speaking PROMO 2: Lucy's Record Shop Thank you to Nick from MicMe for our awesome intro! Podcasting Articles and Links mentioned by Rob and Elsie Leave us voice feedback! How Search works on Apple Podcasts - Apple Podcasts for Creators Twitter search for the #gems617 hashtag Obamas Sign Audible First-Look Deal After Ending Spotify Pact - Variety Podcasting on YouTube? Frequently asked Questions & Best Practices from a Strategic Partner Manager! - YouTube How Do I Stop Podcasts Automatically Downloading to My MacBook? Create a channel - Apple Podcasts for Creators Nominations 2022 — British Podcast Awards Listeners' Choice Award — British Podcast Awards Speed up Your Episode Description Writing with Snippets – Libsyn 5 Speed Up Your Podcast Workflow With Text Snippets w/ Dave Jackson - YouTube Newsletter Database — Tink* Facebook is shutting down its podcast platform after less than a year - The Verge Unapologetic: Being Black & Queer in Podcasting - YouTube Podcast Audio Editing Made Easy with Libsyn's Brian Cottington - YouTube She Podcasts LIVE 2022 • She Podcasts How to Make Real Money Podcasting • Virtual Event - July 19th & 20th HELP US SPREAD THE WORD! We'd love it if you could please share The Feed with your Twitter followers. Click here to post a tweet! If you dug this episode, head over to Podchaser and kindly leave us a review and follow the show! Follow The Feed wherever you listen to audio! → Follow via Apple Podcasts → Follow via Google Podcasts → Follow via Spotify → Here's our RSS feed! FEEDBACK AND PROMOTION ON THE SHOW You can ask your questions, make comments and create a segment about podcasting for podcasters! Let your voice be heard. Download The Feed App for iOS and Android Call 412-573-1934 Email thefeed@libsyn.com Use our Speakpipe Page

Conversations
Richie Ramone and the record shop

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 52:28


No, he's not 'that' Richie Ramone, but this Richie Ramone's passion for punk is just as fierce.

Lucy's Record Shop
Unlocking Memories

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 30:11


Dr. James Noble is a BFD neurologist at Columbia in New York City. But as a college student in the 90's, Jamie Noble hung out at Lucy's Record Shop to feed the love of live music that's clearly part of his DNA. Jamie remembers a lot about Lucy's -  the bands he saw (Bugskull, Low, Blonde Redhead, Crop Circle Hoax, etc.), the 7” records he bought, the time everybody got kicked out and had to watch Doo Rag play their show on the sidewalk, and the one time he played a show there with his band, Lepus. Music and the arts have informed a lot of what Jamie does. He's been taping shows since 1998 and his recordings are housed at the University of Georgia in the archives of Henry Owings of Chunklet. With his colleague, Dr. Olajide Williams, he started what has become the Hip Hop Public Health fleet of programs, working closely with Sesame Street animators, producer Artie Green, and musicians like Doug E. Fresh, Easy A.D. of the Cold Crush Brothers, DMC, and Chuck D. He also founded a non-profit organization, Arts & Minds, which promotes well-being for dementia patients and their caregivers via art-centered, museum-based programs and experiences in upper Manhattan. As a neurologist, Dr.Noble specializes in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and has just released a book, “Navigating Life with Dementia” (part of the Brain & Life series, Oxford University Press/American Academy of Neurology). It's a joy to listen to Jamie talk about his time at Lucy's and his love of music. SHOW NOTES So She Says - http://soshesays.net (Jamie's HS band archive) “Skin Deep,” featuring Louis Bellson on the Duke Ellington band's Hi-Fi Ellington Uptown Album Bob Nastonovich & Pavement - Unfair Brown Towel - Laura Moore Live at Lucy's Crop Circle Hoax - Warm Up Set Doo Rag - Hog Tied Lambchop - Soaky in the Pooper Henry Owings - Chunklet Hip Hop Public Health Hip Hop Stroke  Paul Burch - Wanna Jump (Let's Move) Arts and Minds Follow us / Say hello Instagram: @lucysrecordshop Twitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

Lucy's Record Shop
Lucy Barks!

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 3:00


Lucy Barks! is a documentary about Lucy's Record Shop that was made by Stacy Goldate in the mid-90s when she was a student at Vanderbilt University. It's one of only a few physical recordings of the shop and it really captures the look, feel and spirit of the place with footage from inside as well as outside on the front sidewalk (an important part of the community). It features the kids who went there and interviews and performances from bands like the Fun Girls From Mt. Pilot, Brown Towel, Crop Circle Hoax, Lois, Lambchop, Fecal Matter, Brainiac, the Frothy Shakes, Bikini Kill, Wally Pleasant, and Little Monkey on a Stick. Thanks to Stacy and Michael Eades, Lucy Barks! is now available to rent or buy with proceeds going to Oasis Center and Nashville Launch Pad, two youth focused non-profits that embody the Lucy's guiding statement of "No racist, sexist or homophobic shit tolerated.” So, hop on over to lucybarks.vhx.tv to take a look and help out two wonderful organizations. Lucy Barks! Synopsis: “In the mid-90s, Nashville's music scene sustained under the weight of country, singer-songwriter, and Christian contemporary music with very few options for anyone under 21 who preferred punk, grunge, and indie rock. That was, until a little record shop with the mantra “no racist, sexist, or homophobic shit tolerated” appeared on the scene. Lucy Barks! chronicles the heyday of Lucy's Record Shop, the all-ages music venue that put Nashville on the touring map for bands like Bikini Kill, Cat Power, and Brainiac and became a flashpoint for a growing alternative music and art scene of its own.”

Petersfield Community Radio
Why 'Vinyl Matters' with local record shop owner Steve McGuinness

Petersfield Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 8:28


Our roving reporter Jo Gray & local researcher Doug Newbigging popped in to local record shop Vinyl Matters to meet owner Steve McGuinness. We find out more about records & linking with the Platinum Jubilee hear about the importance of 50s music. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Old Codger with Courtney T. Edison | WFMU
He's an evolutionary dead end. from May 31, 2022

Old Codger with Courtney T. Edison | WFMU

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022


Dodo Marmarosa Trio - "Trade Winds" Don Byas - "I Don't Know Why" [0:02:58] Euneeda Bodenheim - "Euneeda This" [0:10:13] Herm "Sonny" Blount - "Old Man River" [0:12:25] Vaughn De Leath - "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" [0:15:23] Slim Gaillard Quartette - "Jumpin' at the Record Shop" [0:18:59] Marion Abernathy - "Ja-Hoosey Baby" [0:22:04] Jack McVea & His Door Openers - "Richard Gets Hitched" [0:24:42] Gus Bodenheim - "Gus — Betrayed!" [0:32:32] Vaughn de Leath - "Bridgeport by the Sea" [0:37:12] George Formby - "It's a Grand and Healthy Life" [0:39:00] Louis Jordan & His Tympany 5 - "Look Out" [0:45:02] Viviane Greene - "He's the Man (He's Tall & Cool)" [0:47:33] The Brox Sisters - "I'm Lonely Without You" [0:50:14] Henry Burr - "After the Ball" [0:53:13] https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/116169

Lucy's Record Shop

‘Zines are self-written, designed, and published non-commercial print-works. Along with punk music, they were the main tools of activism for Riot Grrrl, the fierce, outspoken, and unapologetically loud feminist movement born in the early ‘90s. In this episode host Mary Mancini sits down with Christine Doza who published her first ‘zine, Upslut, in 1993 to distribute to her classmates and out a predatory male teacher. After hearing from Christine it won't shock you to know that her essays have been taught in universities or that the Riot Grrrl-inspired Upslut, which she also sold at Lucy's Record Shop and distributed around the world, is in the permanent collection of both the Seattle Public and Columbia University Libraries. Christine found herself in unexpected places over the last thirty years as a student, a writer, a stripper, a teacher, and as a member of the electroclash girl group, Whatever it Takes (W.I.T.). But it was that first issue of Upslut that launched her as a feminist writer and thought-leader. Episode Music Heavens to Betsy - Calculated Whatever It Takes - Hold Me, Touch me The Muslims - IDGAF Follow us / Say hello Instagram: @lucysrecordshop Twitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is brought to you by Give Forty the Finger Porductions and We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

John On The Rhondda
The Record Shop

John On The Rhondda

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:52


Do you remember the very first LP you bought? And where you bought it? John Geraint Roberts owes his musical education to a very special retail outlet in a very special place: Tonypandy Square.

Lucy's Record Shop
Schtucket! Schtucket! Schtucket!

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 51:56


When they first met at a suburban Junior High just outside of Nashville some thirty years ago, Mike Shepherd was the rule-following new kid with a stash of X-Men comics under his chair and Jereme Frey was the black and white checkered Skidz-overalls wearing local with a stash of X-Men comics under his chair. They sat next to each other in band, and for the most part, followed the rules. Then they heard that damn Nirvana record, scooched their trombone and tenor sax over just a little to make room for a bass guitar and a drum kit, and Schtucket was born. A few short months later, Mike (Bass, Vocals), Jereme (Drums, Vocals), and their other bestie, Ryan Shogren (Guitar, Vocals), recorded a demo on a boombox / karaoke dual cassette tape machine to take down to Lucy's to see if maybe, just maybe, they could get a show. Spoiler alert: they did. On the regular. Thirty years later, "Nashville's happy-go-lucky musical tricksters” are members of Tower Defense, and they're still cranking out their unique version of loud, high-powered punk, making records, and playing live shows to packed houses. Jereme Frey and Mike Shepherd have played rock music together for nearly 30 years, beginning with "Nashville's happy-go-lucky trio of musical tricksters," Schtucket. Schtucket was together from 1993-1998, and their run included ten appearances at Lucy's Record Shop between 1994 and 1997. Following Schtucket's dissolution, they went on to play together in The Shakedown Cruise, Shiboleth, Gentleman Divers, Partytown Hospital, and early-aughts loud-rock legends Apollo Up! For the last ten years, they've collaborated in Tower Defense, alongside Mike's wife Sarah Shepherd on bass and Currey May on guitar. In The City, the latest LP from Tower Defense, was released in 2020 on Nashville's YK Records.  Episode MusicSchtucket - Skirts (1994)Tower Defense - In the City (2020)Lambchop - “So I Hear You're Moving” Additional Mentions/LinksSchtucket - Discography 1994​-​1998 Apollo Up! Tower Defense - Jereme Frey - drums, vocals; Currey May - guitar, vocals; Mike Shepherd - tenor bass, vocals; Sarah Shepherd - bass, vocalsGentleman Divers Partytown Hospital The Drmls with Mike SeymourStone Deep Fun Girls From Mt. Pilot - Hi Doll 7” Fun Girls From Mt. Pilot - “Hold A Grudge” Troy Pigue - bass; Chris Fox - Drums; Donnie Kendall - Guitar, Vocals; Cat - vocalsDion and The Belmonts - Teenager in Love Nirvana - Tourettes Pixies - UMass Daphne's Operation (Murfreesboro, TN)Logic BombUncle DaddyBrazen YouthHammerheadHoover Brainiac - Bonzai Superstar Dallas Thomas (Fingerhutt)Murdered MinorityJon Sewell TMBG Forget Cassettes YK Records Drkmttr Southern Rock & Roll Girls Camp Follow us / Say helloInstagram: @lucysrecordshopTwitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

Empress Hour
Becoming a music artist and social entrepreneur, WondrWomn is true to her name

Empress Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 59:50


In this episode, Alex welcomes rapper and social entrepreneur Mary Otumahana, aka WondRWomN to the studio. Her unique style that she has coined as ‘Grit Pop' has built a strong following in the UK hip-hop scene and an increasing fanbase in Spain and Portugal, where she has performed and collaborated with artists such as SFDK and Torm K. WondRWomN is true to her name and also runs ‘The Record Shop', a social enterprise based in Tottenham, supporting young people from low-income households to get into the music industry and connect with their community through music. Catch us having a chat and a cute listening party for three of WondRWomN's epic tracks, Money's not real, Table 4 1, and We B in the club. Host - Alex Vella Bartholomew @a.vella.bartho Guest - Mary Otumahana @wxndrwxmn Founder of The Record Shop @the_recshop and record label @prodigiesofnature Aired live on Riverside Radio @thisisriverside 7pm-8pm 02/05/22 Follow Empress Hour and our future guests on insta @empresshour and get in touch with your thoughts/ comments/ questions/ suggestions :)

Nashville Demystified
Lucy’s Legacy: Talking Lucy’s Record Shop with Mary Mancini

Nashville Demystified

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 49:32


Talking with Mary Mancini about about the legacy of Lucy's Record Shop, the punk and “alternative” music venue of 90's Nashville.

Lucy's Record Shop
House O' Pain

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 49:01 Very Popular


This is the Lucy's origin story. Host and shop owner Mary Mancini sits down with Don and April Kendall of House O' Pain, also known as the other two “tolerant, accessible adult role model[s]” who ran the place, to talk about how, with a whole lot of love, luck, and perseverance, they turned a small, independent record shop into a safe harbor and an essential destination for local and touring punk and indie bands. In the summer of 1992 Donnie and April had already been booking all-ages punk shows for a couple of years and had built a loyal following of teenagers hungry for live music and a place to just “be.” Mary had just opened Lucy's Record Shop to sell 12” vinyl for club djs and LPs from independent bands to customers hungry for music you couldn't find anywhere else in town. A few months later the two worlds would collide when Donnie and April accidentally stumbled onto Lucy's. Call it fate, call it destiny, call it whatever you want, when the Kendalls walked into that small shop on Church Street, something in the universe clicked into place and forever changed the trajectory of Nashville's underground music scene - and many, many lives. Don and April Kendall booked shows, published a ‘zine, and ran a record label all under the umbrella of House O' Pain. Don played guitar in legendary Nashville punk bands Rednecks In Pain, Fun Girls from Mt. Pilot, and Booby Hatch. Together they own the Nashville-based, Development Management Group, and are the proud parents of Samantha, a certified athletic trainer, and Griffin, a member of The United States Marine Corps. --  Follow us / Say helloInstagram: @lucysrecordshopTwitter: @lucysrecordshopFacebook: /lucysrecordshop Music“So I Hear You're Moving” - Lambchop “Hold A Grudge” - Fun Girls From Mt. Pilot“Jenny's Little Crisis” - Rednecks In Pain“Tour Song” - Jawbreaker“Link” - Boobyhatch Additional LinksBrad Talbott Jim Ridley “A Dog's Life: The Times of Lucy's Record Shop,” by Jim Ridley, Nashville Scene, January 29, 1998 This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

Lucy's Record Shop
Introducing: Lucy's Record Shop

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 1:26


Hosted by native-New Yorker, Tennessee transplant, and shop owner Mary Mancini, the Lucy's Record Shop podcast premieres on Record Store Day, April 23, 2022. Each episode will feature an interview with the people who made Lucy's so special and whose DIY ethic and unfettered creativity left a lasting mark on the Nashville underground music scene.  “The first official Lucy's show was held on Dec. 3, 1992. In many ways, it was a perfect time capsule of early '90s punk. Band names such as Impetuous Doom, Vomit Spots, Hemophilia, and Utter Contempt for Society…as word spread about the Sunday-afternoon matinees, something exciting and strange began to happen at Lucy's. With nowhere else to go, teens started hanging out there on weekends…Lucy's became the place every band had to play.” - Jim Ridley, Nashville Scene, January 29, 1998

Red Carpet - Voice of America
Red Carpet - Episode 152 | Record Shop, Oyekale Segun Art, Grammy Awards Recap - April 08, 2022

Red Carpet - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 15:00


On this episode of Red Carpet, we visit a Record Shop in Brooklyn, a Nigerian artist speaks to us about his journey into the art world, and a recap of the Grammy Awards in Las Vegas.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
Famed Ernest Tubb Record Shop in Nashville up for sale

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 1:56


The downtown Nashville, Tennessee record store that was opened by Opry legend Ernest Tubb in 1947 and has been a landmark in country music for decades will close as the building is being put up for sale. The owners of the Ernest Tubb Record Shop said in a statement on Friday they were heartbroken that the store, which has been in its current location on Broadway since 1951, will close in the spring. The building and store is owned by the Honky Tonk Circus, LLC and the David McCormick Company, Inc. “Our goal has always been to protect, promote and preserve the great history of the record shop and building. That desire remains as strong today as ever,” the owners said in a statement. “However, due to changes in circumstances out of our control, it's now clear the best way forward is to sell the business and the real estate.” The record store was the original home of the Midnite Jamboree, a late-night radio show that aired after the Grand Ole Opry radio broadcast and would feature artists who crossed the street from the Ryman Auditorium to the record shop to keep playing in front of a live audience. It often featured up-and-coming new artists showcasing their songs and the shop was well-known for stocking a wide variety of country records. The store, which is next to several of Nashville's famed honky-tonk clubs, was an institution often photographed, with its huge guitar hanging out front with the neck pointed upward and a revolving sign. In its heyday, the store had 100,000 mail-order customers and even expanded to multiple stores in other cities. But the city's historic downtown area has drastically changed in recent years with many buildings being replaced with celebrity-themed bars, restaurants and other tourist-centered attractions. This article was provided by The Associated Press.

You Should Check It Out
#136 - Musicians for Ukraine | “Bangers & Mashups” Round 5 | Ernest Tubb Record Shop

You Should Check It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 55:21


Nick pulled together a list of music news articles detailing the various types of responses artists, and the companies that represent them, have had to the Russian Invasion of Ukraine. It's not heavy on discussion, nor is it a topic we usually discuss, but Nick felt like it was too important not to acknowledge...even for a music podcast.Song: Tigran Hamasyan- “De-Dah”Greg has uncovered 3 undiscussed DJ Cummerbund gems and that means it's time for “Bangers & Mashups” Round 5! We listen to three increasingly complicated mashups that Greg (we all) believe are genuinely impressive works of art. Anyone that believes “Black Hole Sun” & “Kiss From A Rose” fit together is an interesting character to follow!Songs:DJ Cumberbund - “It's Not Unusual Dammit”DJ Cumberbund - “Get Away”DJ Cumberbund - “Kiss From A Sun”Jay was saddened to read that the Ernest Tubb Record Shop has been sold, along with the building that it's occupied since 1951. First opened in 1947 by Ernest Tubb, it helped spread country music by offering a catalog version mailed for record collectors across the country. Ultimately the new ownership, which took over in 2020, couldn't find a way to keep the store afloat while sitting in a greatly appreciated building on Music Row in Nashville. We discuss where things stands and why this store is such an important piece of American music history.Song: David Bromberg - “Sharon”

Music Production Podcast
#255: Sean Giovanni - The Record Shop

Music Production Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 60:25


Sean Giovanni is a Producer, Engineer, and Owner of The Record Shop recording studio in Nashville, Tennessee. Sean moved to Nashville to pursue his career in music at age 20. He has since worked with some of the biggest names in the industry, including John Legend, Meatloaf, Tim McGraw, and The Wallflowers. Sean spoke about the importance of having a guiding vision to his work and how that can help in both music and life.  Listen on iTunes or Stitcher or Google Play or Spotify; watch on YouTube Show Notes: The Record Shop - https://therecordshopnashville.com Sean's first appearance on the podcast - https://brianfunk.com/blog/sean-giovanni Brian Funk Links: Website - https://brianfunk.com Intro Music Made with 16-Bit Ableton Live Pack - https://brianfunk.com/blog/16-bit Five Minute Music Producer - https://brianfunk.com/blog/5minute Music Production Club - https://brianfunk.com/mpc Music Production Podcast - https://brianfunk.com/podcast Save 25% on Ableton Live Packs at my store with the code: PODCAST - https://brianfunk.com/store Thank you for listening.  Please review the Music Production Podcast on your favorite podcast provider! And don't forget to visit my site https://BrianFunk.com for music production tutorials, videos, and sound packs. Brian Funk

Goldmine Magazine
Record Store Recon: SmartPunk Record Shop

Goldmine Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 17:35


The Goldmine Podcast's latest Record Store Recon episode looks at SmartPunk Record Shop in Orlando, Florida — complete with a giveaway from the store! Listen to the episode to learn more about this unique shop in the heart of Florida, and if you listen carefully enough, you might be able to win a giveaway from the store!

Goldmine Magazine
Record Store Recon: SmartPunk Record Shop

Goldmine Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 18:35


The Goldmine Podcast's latest Record Store Recon episode looks at SmartPunk Record Shop in Orlando, Florida — complete with a giveaway from the store! Listen to the episode to learn more about this unique shop in the heart of Florida, and if you listen carefully enough, you might be able to win a giveaway from the store! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Producer Life Podcast
PLP 095: Sean Giovanni on Storytelling in Songwriting

Producer Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 63:25


Today we welcome back Sean Giovanni. Gio is an audio engineer, producer and the multitalented owner of The Record Shop in Nashville, Tennessee. During his career Gio has worked with big acts and labels to include: Alabama, John Legend, Lil Jon, Meatloaf, Sister Hazel, The Wallflowers, Sony Music, Warner Music Group, Universal, and many more.

DJ Escape Podcast
Live @ Plastik Record Shop 16.01.2022

DJ Escape Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 58:21


Live @ Plastik Record Shop 16.01.2022 by MENTAL SYSTEM / ESCAPE

DJ Escape Podcast
Live @ Plastik Record Shop 26.12.2021

DJ Escape Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 64:54


Live @ Plastik Record Shop 26.12.2021 by MENTAL SYSTEM / ESCAPE

Light on Leeds
Episode 47: Testament (aka Homecut)

Light on Leeds

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 72:27


Where to begin?! Testament is a rapper, a spoken word poet, a world record holding beatboxer, a writer, a theatre maker, a workshop facilitator, a husband and a father...We spoke about his perfomance for Desmond Tutu, how he came to write Orpheus in the Record Shop and performed it with seven members of the Opera North orchestra, how his First Word record label was voted Label of the Year and how he had to keep Idris Elba off the stage at an event.It's a brilliant conversation that traverses many things!The featured track is the DJ Vadim remix of “I Don't Even Know” by Homecut ft Corinne Bailey Rae & Soweto Kinch (Homecut being another alter-ego of Testament's) - it's a fantastic track and I am sure you will love it...https://www.testamenthomecut.com/https://twitter.com/testamentonlinehttps://www.facebook.com/testamenthomecut/https://www.instagram.com/testamenthomecut/?hl=enhttps://www.operanorth.co.uk/whats-on/orpheus-in-the-record-shop/https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000vbtxhttp://www.firstwordrecords.com/

DJ Escape Podcast
Live @ Plastik Record Shop 28.11.2021

DJ Escape Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 55:01


Live @ Plastik Record Shop 28.11.2021 by MENTAL SYSTEM / ESCAPE

What‘s Happalachenin‘?: An Appalachian Podcast

For nearly 2 months, social media platforms have had some buzz asking why Disney has yet to create an animated movie based in the Appalachian region. Considering its diverse history and vast collection of folklore and legend, this is a very valid question. We dive into this topic and discuss the importance of the hypothetical creators' responsibility to properly represent the folks of Appalachia rather than take the easy route of exploiting  cheap stereotypes.    Mind Your Business: Appalachian Sandwich Co. 1861 Public House Oscar's Breakfast, Burgers, & Brew The Corner Hoagies & Hops Orbit's Record Shop

Spot Lyte On...
Scott Register head of A&R at ThinkIndie talks about record shops, distribution and his life in broadcasting

Spot Lyte On...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 49:46


Scott Register is head of A&R at ThinkIndie, a distribution company that was founded by the Coalition of Independent Music Stores in 1999. They are also a proud partner of Record Store Day (and have been from the very beginning). Their mission is the same one today as it was the day they started the company: to bring great special releases to independent music stores all over. They are working all day, every day to do our part to accomplish this mission as well as continue to connect great artists and great record shops with great releases. Their end goal is to keep bringing true music lovers to the stores that truly make a difference.Besides sharing the avid fan's passion and enthusiasm for music, Think Indie stores are equipped with a unique catalogue of exclusive releases, live shows and limited-edition goodies from a variety of well-known artists – the kind of stuff that makes cool record stores even cooler.So, find an independent record store near you, and remember what it's like to shop in a store where the only appliances are in the break room.Learn more about Lyte.

The Ghost In The Machine Music Hour
The Ghost in The Machine Music Hour - Episode 25 : Mom & Pops Record Shop Act II

The Ghost In The Machine Music Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 59:50


Mom & Pops Record Shop Act IIListe des pistes 00:00 Mattic01:00 Danger! She's A Stranger By The Five Stairsteps 02:37 Places And Spaces By Donald Byrd04:23 The Star Of A Story By Heatwave06:47 Along Came Betty By Quincy Jones09:10 As Long As I Got You By The Charmels10:29 Harlem River Drive By Bobbi Humphrey 13:50 Memory Band By Rotary Connection15:19 Undecided By Hubert Laws16:35 Before The Dawn By Patrice Rushen 22:14 Ginseng Woman By Eric Gale26:18 Tell Me A Bedtime Story By Quincy Jones30:34 Cyclops By Eddie Henderson33:02 Clair By The Singers Unlimited 35:34 Storm King By Bob James38:35 Mucho Chupar By David Axelrod40:48 Phase By Phase By Peter Baumann 42:43 Tidal Wave By Ronnie Laws45:08 Music Is The Key By Weldon Irvine48:20 Love To The World By LTD50:36 Smiling Billy Suite Part 2 By The Heath Brothers52:32 We've Only Just Begun By O'Donel Levy53:44 Killing Me Softly With His Song By The Singers Unlimited 55:49 Misdemeanour By Ahmad Jamal57:10 Mystic Brew By Ronnie Foster

Wildly Uninteresting Podcast
New Year, Same You. A Full REVOLUTION Around The Sun Is MEANINGLESS - Wildly Uninteresting #134

Wildly Uninteresting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 83:57


This week on the Wildly Uninteresting Podcast Episode #134:- Why do we celebrate the new year, and is it meaningless?- A revolution around the sun doesn't signify that things will be better on the next go round. It is just the nature of our solar system.- Science V. The Spiritual Realm.- Does Deja Vu indicate that you are on the right path or that there are multiple timelines that are crossing each others path?- If a customer of yours says the N-Word or any other form of hate speech, what would be the most moral response? Would you continue the job to completion, would you continue the job to completion and tax them more, or would you walk away from the job no matter what you have invested?- Are there different levels of hate or is all hate viewed as equal?- Why do we put labels on people, why can't we just use neutral words like Human, or Person instead of words that categorize someones race, sex, and religion?- The DOD has contracts with every major film production company in Hollywood and they review movies before they come out to insure that the military is viewed in a positive light.- We wish that there would be a rise in the Record Shop industry, specifically EarXtacy!!!https://www.facebook.com/wildlyuninterestingpodcasthttps://www.instagram.com/wildlyuninterestingpodcasthttps://twitter.com/WildlyPodcasthttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE_56LWVINgLRDKDgPDHJrw

My First Band Podcast
Episode 147 – Adam Bartlett (Gilead Media, Eroding Winds Record Shop)

My First Band Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 102:28


Adam Bartlett has been on a few different sides of the music industry. As the founder, owner and operator of Gilead Media, he's released dozens upon dozens of albums from bands all over the world during the last 12 years. As the founder, owner and operator of Eroding Winds Record Shop, he's sold records to customers in and around Oshkosh, Wisconsin, for the past five years. And before both of those ventures, Bartlett worked for a music distributor, he played in bands, he booked shows, and he worked at another independent record store. Through his extensive and eclectic record-related background, Bartlett has witnessed a great deal of change in the way people listen to and release music through the years, and he's seen the vinyl boom firsthand. Recently, My First Band host Tyler Maas stopped by Eroding Winds to do some holiday shopping and to talk to Bartlett about all aspects of his diverse musical background. Over the course of the conversation, Bartlett talked about being a regular-turned-employee at The Exclusive Company in downtown Oshkosh in his teens and early 20s, moving to Ohio to work for a music distributor, starting Gilead Media without any expectations and quickly finding unexpected success releasing vinyl in the early 2000s, the start of Eroding Winds, and why he doesn't blame Adele for the pressing delays currently plaguing smaller artists/labels. Along the way, Bartlett talked about his time as a metalcore vocalist and Maas reminisced about his years in Oshkosh. My First Band is sponsored by Mystery Room Mastering and Lakefront Brewery. The show is edited by Jared Blohm. You can listen to My First Band on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify and wherever else you get podcasts. You can also listen to rebroadcasts of previous My First Band episodes on WMSE every Wednesday from noon to 12:30 p.m. CST. Music used in this episode comes courtesy of Devils Teeth ("The Junction Street Eight Tigers").

KZradio הקצה
Return To The Last Days W. Ishai Adar: The Old City‘s Record Shop // 7.11.21

KZradio הקצה

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 119:57


International Anthem Podcast
jaimie branch - FLY or DIE LIVE

International Anthem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 39:19


Ayana has an in-person conversation with composer/trumpeter jaimie branch at IARCHQ in Chicago. In between jaimie's trumpetourettes they talk about FLY or DIE, their new LIVE album, their previous albums I and II, plus capitalist letters, chameleons, the making of visual scores, the perks of getting older, and "The Music." This episode supported is in part by The Record Shop in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

Groove Lab
#15 - Sonic Storytelling : Sean Giovanni

Groove Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 57:37


On this weeks episode of Groove Lab, Lauren Alexander talks with Sean Giovanni, record producer, audio engineer, educator, and and owner of The Record Shop, a recording studio and multi-media company in Nashville, TN. He's worked with artists like John Legend, Juicy J, Big & Rich, Tim McGraw, and The Wallflowers, just to name a few. He talks about getting creative during challenging times, staying inspired, and gives his tips on reaching and maintaining your goals. https://therecordshopnashville.com https://mindmaptribe.com therecordshop1@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/groovelab/support

BreaknBread
Play by Play Record Shop

BreaknBread

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2020 38:57


Let the music play. Covid-19 has slowed the best of many Americans. But for one business owner, the beat goes on. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The 99% Local Podcast
#34 - Sean Giovanni from The Record Shop

The 99% Local Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 44:53


Sean Giovanni is a Record Producer, Audio Engineer, Project Manager, Educator, and the owner of The Record Shop, a recording studio and multi-media production company in Nashville, TN. After working as a freelance engineer and producer for several years, Sean decided it was time to open his own facility with a goal to create a relaxed, creative environment that focused on the artistic vision of his clients. Sean enjoys working in a wide range of genres, and has had the privilege to work with artists ranging from John Legend and Juicy J to Big & Rich and Tim McGraw to Zakk Wylde and The Wallflowers. Web: https://therecordshopnashville.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nashvillerecordingstudio/ Instagram: @therecordshopstudios The 99% Local Podcast Web: https://www.99percentlocalpod.com Instagram: @99percentlocalpod Email: 99percentlocalpod@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by Your CBD Store in Columbia, TN. Getting you back to being you. https://www.yourcbdtn.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/99percentlocalpod/message

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Goldmine: Record Store Recon - Ernest Tubb Record Shop

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2020 18:19


Country music legend Ernest Tubb started his own record store in 1947 and it has become a landmark in Nashville, Tennessee. Goldmine's anonymous recon agent, Dr. Disc, reviews the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and tells Goldmine Podcast listeners what makes it so unique.This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Goldmine Magazine
Record Store Recon: Ernest Tubb Record Shop

Goldmine Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2020 17:26


Country music legend Ernest Tubb started his own record store in 1947 and it has become a landmark in Nashville, Tennessee. Goldmine's anonymous recon agent, Dr. Disc, reviews the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and tells Goldmine Podcast listeners what makes it so unique.

The Jalapeño
Live Music -- A Nave Espacial, CF Watkins, and Hannah Read

The Jalapeño

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2019 71:25


Not an interview ... live music! Recorded Live from 360 Record Shop in Brooklyn's Red Hook on April 13 2019. A Nave Espacial: Beginning -- 16:47 CF Watkins: 16:47 -- 46:46 Hannah Read: 46:47 -- End

The Detroit History Podcast
Season 2 Episode 5- John Lee Hooker And The Blues On Hastings Street

The Detroit History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2019 22:20


Bluesman John Lee Hooker's recording career spanned more than 40 years -- from his hit record, Boogie Chillen', which was recorded in a Detroit basement in 1948, to his Grammy Award-winning LP The Healer. Hooker is a total product of Detroit's Black Bottom, the city's African-American neighborhood. We track his career, with help from John Lee Hooker's son, John Lee Hooker Jr.; to Marsha Music, whose father, Joe von Battle, owned Joe's Record Shop, one of Hooker's hangouts. Detroit musician R.J. Spangler places Hooker in this country's blues galaxy. Stick around after the credits for a preview of John Lee Hooker Jr.'s new song: Testify.