Podcasts about Record shop

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  • 62PODCASTS
  • 132EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 1MONTHLY NEW EPISODE
  • Sep 4, 2021LATEST
Record shop

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Best podcasts about Record shop

Latest podcast episodes about Record shop

Mack's World
Record Shop Freestyles | Harry Mack Behind The Bars 003

Mack's World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 11:01


JOIN  MY PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/harrymackSHOP MY MERCH: http://shop.harrymackofficial.com/ JOIN MY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8yXRxbF SUBSCRIBE TO HARRY MACK CLIPShttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcnAEyz9VnlBL1DiQqliJkQFOLLOW ME ON SOCIALS https://twitch.tv/harrymackofficial https://www.instagram.com/harrymack https://www.facebook.com/harrymack https://twitter.com/harrymack http://tiktok.com/@harrymackofficial

Music Tectonics
Unlock the Music Metaverse with Obie Fernandez from RCRDSHP

Music Tectonics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 43:26


Imagine using a digital Sharpie pack to autograph your limited edition digital collectibles for your top fans. In this week's episode, Obie Fernandez, founder and CEO of RCRDSHP, joins Tristra Newyear Yeager to explore how RCDSHP combines digital collectables, gamified elements, and a deep love of music culture to empower artists and enhance the fan experience. Discover how RCRDSHP (pronounced “Record Shop”)  is systemizing the success of crypto-savvy musicians to provide access to all artists. Find out how RCRDSHP is laying the foundation for the music metaverse. What would we unleash if artists earned more money from their art to invest in creativity? Find out on this week's episode.   The Music Tectonics podcast goes beneath the surface of the music industry to explore how technology is changing the way business gets done. Visit MusicTectonics.com to learn more, and find us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Let us know what you think!

Politics of Sound
Politics of Sound #30 Tom Mayhew, 'Working Class' Comedian

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 51:18


In the August edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes comedian and star of BBC Radio 4's Tom Mayhew is Benefit Scum, Tom Mayhew to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop. In a fascinating, revealing interview, he discusses the challenges of creating a career in comedy from a background beset with financial struggles, his experience of the benefit system, his love for his family, Christianity, his first stand-up gig, Radio 4, the pandemic and much more.Tom emerges from the Politics of Sound Record Shop with an eclectic selection of three albums by Spook School, Minnie Birch and Plan B and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand to provide their own reworking of tracks from her chosen albums.Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news and don't forget to hit the Subscribe button!All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.

Politics of Sound
Politics of Sound #29 Edwina Currie, Former Health Minister, Author and Media Personality

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 75:44


In the July edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes the former Conservative MP and Health Minister, Author and Media Personality Edwina Currie to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop. In an often personal and revealing interview, she discusses her upbringing within an Orthodox Jewish household in Liverpool and subsequent estrangement from her father, her political awakening, the struggles of being a woman MP in the 1980s and 90s, her political triumphs, the salmonella in eggs scandal and its legacy, her affair with John Major and the joyful musical experiences of her youth as an audience member at the Cavern Club in Liverpool in the 1960s.Edwina  emerges from the Politics of Sound Record Shop with an eclectic selection of three albums by The Beatles, Dolly Parton and Queen and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand to provide their own reworking of tracks from her chosen albums.Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news and don't forget to hit the Subscribe button!All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.

On The Rekord
Episode 20 - The DJ Dre Effect - June 1st, 2021

On The Rekord

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 118:32


Episode 21 - DJ Dre Interview - Disc Jockey History  - DJ Crie P x DJ Cram (@IamDJVS) x DJ Nawtee x DJ Xclusive x DJ Baby Choc (New Jersey Finest)  - DeeJay Intence DJing History  - DJ Dre Music History  - Promotional Only Records - DJ Dre Favorite Promotional Only Record EPMD x LL Cool J “Rampage” - Vinyl Record Store (Record City Passaic, New Jersey) & Record City Paterson, New Jersey) - Nas first Single (It Ain't Hard To Tell) in 1994  - DJ Dre first Club Go Go Bar in 1996 (Boris' Place) 1999 (La Cima, Tropical Night Club)  - Partying in 1990s verse partying in the 2020s  - Nao “Bad Blood”  - Fred Da Godson ft; Remo The Hitmaka (Monique's Room)  - Club Odyssey (Bloomfield, NJ)  - Club Sights (Lodi, NJ)  - Music Factory (Route 3 East Rutherford, NJ moved to Jersey City, NJ) Spring Valley, NY (or Rockland County, NY was traveling down there to party)  - Lawerence Taylor Old Restaurant  - Fatman Scoop x KRS-One Son x Queen Penn x DJ Enuff (Music Factory)  - Summer Jam 2 (1996)  - Club Flamingo (Paterson, NJ)  - House Music from the 1990s to House Music from 2020s. Deep Jersey House vs EDM  - Club Casino (Passaic, NJ) x The Palace (Passaic, NJ)  - Tropical Night Club (Passaic, NJ)  - Toby Love (New Jersey) x Avantura x DJ El Mentao (aka DJ Mentao) - DJ Crie P money Parties  - One Step Beyond (Elmwood Park, NJ) [DJ Havoc x DJ T-Damage]  - Latin Quarters (Manhattan, NY) DJ Dre Birthday Party 1999 with DJ TedSmooth (Lumidee Reference)  - Club Famingo (Manhattan, NY) show case with DJ Crie P, The Roots (Questlove x Black Thought w/o Scott Storch) w/ Razal, Common, DJ Kid Capri, Mos Def 1999  - Super Treat Entertainment (Promotional Team w/ DJ Dre). Promotional game from the 90s compared to now in the 2020. Digital Business Card vs Printed Business Card.  - Club Casino transitions from House Music to DanceHall Reggae with DJ Dre in 1999  - DJ Carl Blaze the Transition from Vinyl to Laptops  - DJ Sho (Rockland County, NY)  - Club Mantra (2008 - 2012) Paramus, NJ on Route 4  - DJ Nawtee (Passaic, NJ) - Cassandra Night Club (on Route 46 Lodi, NJ)  - The Gate House (West Orange, NJ)  - Tribecca (Fort Lee, NJ)  - Montclair University (Montclair, NJ) with a College Night with Oh La Soyo x Case  - Sean Paul Deport Them (on the Bookshelf Riddim) in 2000 invaded Club Casino  - How streaming services have saved Artist. Bootlegging Music from then compared to Now. Prime example Sizzla 2002 Album “Da Real Ting”  - Club Casino Joey Vargas x DJ Alex Sensation (from Passaic, NJ)  - Club Foxes (Jersey City, NJ)  - Cheetah Club (Paterson, NJ) with DJ Double G x DJ Big L (Fetty Wap DJ) x DJ Mig  - DJ S-Nice  - Frankie Reyes performs in Cheetah Nightclub  - DJ Collection  - DJ Tech Nine (Union City, NJ) x DJ City (Paterson, NJ)  - New Jersey x New York Connection for Club Life in New York  - Traxx Night Club (Lyndhurst, NJ) x The Dave Chapelle Show  - Boot Camp Clik ( Buckshot (of Black Moon), Smif-N-Wessun (Tek and Steele), Heltah Skeltah (Rock and Sean Price) and O.G.C. (Starang Wondah, Top Dog, and Louieville Sluggah) - Tribecca (Fort Lee, NJ) with DJ Nawtee  - Ed Lover x DJ Kut (Power 105.1) new Radio Station came into play 2002  - Hot97 vs Power105  - Comedy Club circuit within New Jersey with Mr. Jay @ MVPs  - Flamingo (South Hackensack, NJ) Comedy Nights with Open Mic Comic Set  - DJ P-Nut  - Numark TTXUsb vs Numark TTX-1 (@Numark)  - Pleasures in Manhattan, NY  - Wild Bull (Paterson, NJ) (The creation of PNP Entertainment with DJ Dre x DJ P-Nut)  - DJ Questflavor x DJ Goldfingers x CNC x QQ x Paterson, NJ  - Club Flight  - Special Thanks to Keanu for the Background Music (@keanugoinstoopid) & Stori aka @TheNeverEndingStori for her Single "Grey".

Politics of Sound
Politics of Sound #28 Mark Francois, Conservative Party, ERG

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 41:16


In the June edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes the Conservative MP for Rayleigh and Wickford and Chairman of the European Research Group,  Mark Francois to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop to discusses his formative years growing up in Essex,   his abiding affection for and pride in his parents, his years in student politics at Bristol University, the battle he fought in Parliament, both before and after the Brexit vote and the place that music plays within his life.Mark  emerges from the Politics of Sound Record Shop with an 80s Synth Pop selection of albums by Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark and Depeche Mode and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand to perform their own version of tracks from his album selections.Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news and don't forget to hit the Subscribe button!All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.

Politics of Sound
PoS #27 Max Fosh, YouTuber and London Mayoral Candidate

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 58:36


In the May edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes celebrated YouTube sensation and now candidate for the London Mayoral Election, Max Fosh to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop to discuss the whether the power of social media can defeat the power of vested interest and money; the processes that have to be followed to stand as a Mayoral Candidate; why Max is standing the first place; why he wants to beat fellow old Harrovian Laurence Fox and what happens if he actually wins...?Max  emerges from the Politics of Sound Record Shop with an eclectic selection of albums by ,  Ben Platt, Bear's Den and Busted, and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand to perform their own version of tracks from his album selections.Plus Max reveals his very particular musical skill...!Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news.All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.

Front Row
Testament, diversity in nature writing, festivals insurance update

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 28:50


Rapper and writer Testament discusses his new work Orpheus in the Record Shop which fuses spoken word and beatboxing with players from the Orchestra of Opera North in an new collaboration that gives the Greek myth of Orpheus a contemporary Yorkshire twist. Festivals this summer are still in doubt as organisers can't secure insurance commercially. Jamie Njoku-Goodwin, CEO of UK Music, discusses how likely it will be that the government will step in to provide an indemnity. British nature writing remains overwhelmingly white, despite its continuing popularity. With the recent establishment of new prizes and literary journals for diversity in nature writing things are starting to change - but slowly. John talks to two authors bucking the trend: Anita Sethi, author of a new memoir called I Belong Here about reclaiming the countryside for people of colour and Paul Mendez, who contributed an essay to the new collection, In the Garden, about the gardens of his Windrush grandparents. Presenter: John Wilson Producer: Sarah Johnson Studio Manager: Bob Nettles and Donald McDonald Main image: Testament in Orpheus in the Record Shop Image credit: Anthony Robling

Producer Life Podcast
PLP 066: Sean Giovanni on Helping Artists Create Lasting Art

Producer Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 69:38


Sean Giovanni is a producer, audio engineer, brand development coach, and owner of The Record Shop in Nashville, TN. During his career Gio, as he's known to his friends, has worked with big acts and labels to include: Alabama, John Legend, Lil Jon, Meatloaf, Sister Hazel, The Wallflowers, Sony Music, Warner Music Group, Universal, and many more. Gio also runs an artist development and coaching site called Mind Map Tribe which provides artists short videos, worksheets, and mentoring calls to help them achieve their dreams. In this broad ranging interview Gio talks about overcoming adversity and making his own path in Nashville, his multi-step process for working with clients at the Record Shop, how to differentiate yourself as a producer, and why a purpose statement is so powerful.

Politics of Sound
Politics of Sound #26: Dalia Gebrial, Journalist, Activist, Author, Novara Media

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 60:02


In the April edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes prominent journalist, author and regular contributor to Novara  Media,  Dalia Gebrial to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop for a deeply personal and reflective conversation about her life, activism, challenges and aspirations, while discovering her three all-time favourite albums.Dalia  emerges from the Politics of Sound Record Shop with an eclectic selection of albums by Yasmine Hamdan, Nina Simone and Amy Winehouse, and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand as ever to perform their own version of tracks from her album selections.This interview was recorded just before the death of the feminist, author and humanitarian, Nawal El Saadawi, whose influence on Dalia is discussed within the podcast.Don't forget to subscribe to the pod! Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news.All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.

Cartoon Casual
Cartoon Casual Ep. 217 Paul and Joe and Pete from Shady Grove Records

Cartoon Casual

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 113:36


Pete Jaramillo is a Kingman native who has opened what this town has needed for many years: A RECORD SHOP.  Pete has a love for music that he has turned into a powerhouse of music related accoutrements right on Route 66. Music: Jerry Garcia and David Grisman - Shady Grove Exec. Produced by Cyrus Poe

Politics of Sound
Politics of Sound #25 Laurence Fox, Reclaim Party

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2021 62:46


In the March edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes actor, musician and leader of the newly-formed Reclaim Party, Laurence Fox to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop to discuss the origins of his political thinking, his family, his schooling, his music, his acting career, his facing up to controversy, his relationship with Twitter and other social media, his determination to oppose 'cancel culture' - and much more.Laurence emerges from the Politics of Sound Record Shop with an eclectic selection of albums by Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Buckley and...Laurence Fox, and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand to perform their own version of tracks from his album selections.Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news.All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.Album track links:Laurence Fox - The Distance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0NrIEt8rrwBruce Springsteen - Born in the USA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPhWR4d3FJQJeff Buckley - Corpus Christi Carol https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxqwq9BnjT0

Politics of Sound
Politics of Sound #24 Jonathan Reynolds, Labour Party

Politics of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 59:26


In the February edition of the Politics of Sound, Iain Carnegie welcomes Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary, Jonathan Reynolds, Labour MP for Stalybridge and Hyde to the Politics of Sound virtual Record Shop to discuss his political career, his beloved Sunderland FC, Strictly Come Dancing, the direction of the Labour Party under Keir Starmer and of course, his three all-time favourite albums!Jonathan emerges from the Politics of Sound record shop with an eclectic selection of albums by Belle and Sebastian, Gomez and Taylor Swift, and the Politics of Sound House Band are on hand to perform their own version of tracks from his album selections.Follow us on Twitter: @politics_sound for all the latest news.All PoS episodes available now on Global Player.

Flick Through
Soul Glo / Smarts

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2021 63:55


Kay & Erica dig into why Philadelphian punks Soul Glo wanted to make 'ugly' music and the story of Melbourne's prolific punk 'supergroup' Smarts.SOUL GLO - SONGS TO YEET AT THE SUNOrder: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/678455-soul-glo-songs-to-yeet-at-the-sun-12Listen: https://soulglophl.bandcamp.comLabel: http://secretvoice.org/siteResearch:Razorcake issue #118 https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/13015-razorcake-119-subscriptions-back-issueshttp://loudfastphilly.com/interviews/pierce-jordan-ruben-polo-soul-glo?fbclid=IwAR3PjdvWoALHNsUJtBCLlwzERXziPDQjLj8Hi_1L80T8RGIqpU_eVgi0ztwhttps://thekey.xpn.org/2017/08/10/speaking-truth-philly-punk-visionaries-soul-glo/https://thekey.xpn.org/2020/08/12/this-is-essential-pierce-jordan-gg-guerra-soul-glo/http://www.betteryetpod.com/episodes/2020/11/12/pierce-jordan-of-soul-glohttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/spinning-out-podcast/id1534264817-----SMARTS - WHO NEEDS SMARTS ANYWAY?Order: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/689299-smarts-who-needs-smarts-anyway-lpListen: https://smartsworld.bandcamp.comLabels: https://antifaderecords.bandcamp.com / https://www.feelitrecordshop.comSmarts Live: https://www.youtube.com/watch?ab_channel=ButtonPusher&v=eyc6-GlB9GkParsniphttps://youtu.be/d793e5N2YCoPublications:https://www.deafencounty.com/deafencounty/2020/9/23/premiere-smarts-deliver-intelligent-punk-pace-on-new-single-real-estate-agenthttp://www.ravensingstheblues.com/smarts-cling-wrap/https://www.juststepsideways.co.uk/reviews/smarts-who-needs-smarts-anyway-reviewhttps://gimmiezine.com/2020/11/16/smarts-interview/https://gimmiezine.com/2020/01/14/billy-gardner-of-anti-fade-records-i-feel-very-blessed-that-all-of-my-talented-friends-let-me-release-their-stuffSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

Flick Through
Sniffany & The Nits / Rosie Tucker

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2020 80:51


Erica & Kay dig into "Contingent Temporary Utopias" through Brighton's Sniffany & the Nits and gush about their love for Rosie Tucker!SNIFFANY & THE NITS - THE GREATEST NITSOrder: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/687027-sniffany-the-nits-the-greatest-nits-7Label: https://www.thrillingliving.com/Research:https://www.soundsfromtheothercity.com/sniffany-and-the-nits/https://daily.bandcamp.com/best-punk/the-best-punk-on-bandcamp-may-2020https://www.jmkeworld.com/https://openspace.sfmoma.org/2017/03/investing-in-the-underground/http://www.fvckthemedia.com/issue71/fan-clubhttp://magnetizer.altervista.org/theenthusiast/issue7.htmlhttps://www.mixcloud.com/gobnation/https://gobnation.bandcamp.com/-----ROSIE TUCKER - NEVER NOT NEVER NOT NEVER NOTOrder: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/639499-rosie-tucker-never-not-never-not-never-not-lpListen: https://rosietucker.bandcamp.com/Label: http://www.newprofessormusic.com/Research: Badass BandsCheekface Tonighthttps://www.thegreyestates.com/blog/interview-rosie-tuckerhttps://www.getalternative.com/interview-rosie-tucker/https://twostorymelody.com/the-story-of-rosie-tuckers-lauren/https://uproxx.com/music/rosie-tucker-never-not-never-not-never-not-interview/https://fortherabbits.net/2019/02/26/get-to-know-rosie-tucker/http://voyagela.com/interview/meet-greg-katz-slowdance-management-eastside/GypsumSing It right Back: Songs of Rosie Tucker compilationSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

Flick Through
Turbowolf & Rolo Tomassi

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 71:00


Erica and Kay dig into the 15 year history of independent label Hassle Records through two of their 15 special reissues celebrating the impressive mile-stone!HASSLE RECORDSWebsite: https://www.hasslerecords.comResearch:https://www.kerrang.com/features/an-oral-history-of-hassle-records/https://www.nme.com/features/hassle-records-indie-label-surviving-pandemic-brutus-petrol-girls-2792379https://mightymoonmedia.com/101-part-time-jobsTURBOWOLF - TURBOWOLFBuy the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/683978-turbowolf-s-t-lpListen: https://turbowolfuk.bandcamp.com/Research:https://www.upsetmagazine.com/features/turbowolf-2018-interviewhttps://www.icmp.ac.uk/blog/interview-turbowolf-bassist-lianna-daviesUp & Atom Music VidThat Just Happened Interview 2018Punktastic Interview 2011End of an Era - The Croft Documentary https://youtu.be/gIDTk3U3Cl4---ROLO TOMASSI - HYSTERICS & COSMOLOGYBuy the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/683974-rolo-tomassi-hysterics-and-cosmology-lpListen: https://rolotomassiuk.bandcamp.comResearch:Radar Radio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7OpT_rxTUoInterview from 12 years ago https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAlkph62yzsSubs Club https://www.rocksound.tv/news/read/rolo-tomassi-plan-7-seriesEpisode 78: http://www.allmyfriendsareinbarbands.com/episodesSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

Flick Through
Bartees Strange & Cinder Well

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2020 73:03


CW: This episode contains some discussion of racism, anti-Semitism.Kay & Erica dig into two very different albums which coincidently draw inspiration from traditional music in very different ways. They discuss having strategies to releasing music, and transcontinental musical projects which in moments like the global pandemic are reminders of the diaspora of the creators' ancestry.BARTEES STRANGE - LIVE FOREVEROrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/683655-bartees-strange-live-forever-lpListen: https://barteesstrange.bandcamp.comLabel: https://www.memory-music.netResearch:About Will Yip https://www.grammy.com/grammys/news/philly-producerengineer-will-yip-works-harder-youNo Cover podcast https://www.kosu.org/post/bartees-strange-opera-singer-football-player-genre-breakerBetter Yet Podcast http://www.betteryetpod.com/episodes/2020/10/22/bartees-strangehttps://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/bartees-strange-live-forever-interview-1071470/https://www.getalternative.com/interview-bartees-strange-fruitBartees & the Strange Fruit session---CINDER WELL - NO SUMMEROrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/674677-cinder-well-no-summer-lpListen: https://cinderwell.bandcamp.com/Label: https://freedirt.net/Research:https://americansongwriter.com/fallen-cinder-well-song-premiere/https://glidemagazine.com/246032/video-premiere-cinder-well-inadvertently-speaks-to-our-time-with-mournful-and-timely-folk-ballad-no-summer/http://www.hearthmusic.com/cw20https://superworldindietunes.com/2018/05/15/super-world-interview-time-cinder-well-will-have-your-goths-for-garters/https://antifascistneofolk.com/2020/03/23/unconscious-dreams-an-interview-with-cinder-well/https://daily.bandcamp.com/lists/new-dark-protest-folk-from-the-u-s-s-west-coast-draws-on-old-traditionsSangre De Muerdago - A Miña Burriña (Galician Trad) - Music Box RenditionSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

RecordReplay
Soho Radio Show - Oct 2020 with Ben Gomori

RecordReplay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2020 116:26


Featuring music from Frankie Knuckles, Darshan Jesrani, Tracey Thorn, Nu Shooz, Simple Minds, Imagination, Circulation, Bugz In The Attic and more... Second-hand vinyl bargain bin selections < £3 with @bengomori, with this month's show focused around a haul from Mike's Record Shop in Wood Street, London. www.sohoradiolondon.com

Flick Through
Bob Mould & Nervus

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 61:10


Erica & Kay look into the brand new album Blue Hearts by Bob Mould, and celebrate the first anniversary of Tough Crowd by Nervus.BOB MOULD - BLUE HEARTSOrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/679154-bob-mould-blue-hearts-lpListen: https://bobmould.bandcamp.comLabel: https://www.mergerecords.comResearch:Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records (the indie label that got big and stayed small)Merge Records: 25 Years in 24 MinutesCreative Mornings talk with Mac https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/sep/30/bob-mould-alt-rocks-gay-icon-takes-on-american-evil-my-heads-on-firehttps://www.loudersound.com/features/buyer-s-guide-sst-records2019 interview Lockdown interviewhttps://www.talkhouse.com/bob-mould-talks-with-alicia-bognanno-bully-on-the-talkhouse-podcast/Professional Rock and Roll book reportOur zine Band BasicsNERVUS - TOUGH CROWDOrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/648092-nervus-tough-crowd-lpWebsite: https://nervusmusic.com/Label: https://bsmrocks.com/Lucinda's projects: Ladyfuzz / Bloodflower DesignResearch:Nervus ‘The Way Back’ Music VideoEm at 2000 Screenshttps://www.loudersound.com/features/tough-crowd-inside-nervus-confrontational-third-albumhttps://mmhradio.co.uk/nervus-tough-crowdhttps://mightymoonmedia.com/101-part-time-jobshttps://www.upsetmagazine.com/features/heres-everything-you-need-to-know-about-nervuss-new-album-tough-crowd---IG @specialistubject / TWT @specialistsubSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

Old Time Radio Listener
The Thin Man - Murder in the Record Shop

Old Time Radio Listener

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2020 29:10


This episode of The Thin Man entitled Murder In The Record Shop was actually presented by the Mystery Playhouse. When Nick and Nora Charles discover a woman murdered in a record shop, of course Nora cannot mind her own business and they become involved in solving the case. Duration: 29:10 Starring: Claudia Morgan Broadcast Date: Not known

Success With Music | SWM
Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 2)

Success With Music | SWM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 37:01


Episode 63: Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 2)Today we conclude our 2-part interview with The Record Shop's Sean Giovanni.Sean Giovanni is the Producer, Engineer and Owner for Middle Tennessee’s own, The Record Shop (therecordshopnashville.com). A frequent NAMM show panelist, speaker at Belmont, MTSU, SAE, The Recording Academy, and countless community groups, Sean Giovanni is passionate about helping creatives build a sustainable business around their art and achieving their goals. He has appeared in interviews with the likes of Antelope Audio, Make it in Music, The Working Your Way Up Podcast, Recording Connection and many more to discuss topics such as How to Find a Music Producer, Reaching Goals and Building a Purpose-Driven Career, and Advice for Up-and-Coming Producers and Engineers. He has worked with clients in studio ranging from Tim McGraw, Big and Rich to Zakk Wylde, The Wallflowers, Juicy J, and Lil Jon. Other production clients include John Legend and Alabama Shakes.After moving to Nashville at 20 years old and unable to find a job, Sean set out to build his own brand with a focus on supporting artists in achieving their creative vision and offering a wide range of content creation services in addition to production. Beyond his work at The Record Shop, he is also the Co Founder of Mind Map, mindmaptribe.com, an online training course designed to help artists find their own unique intersection of art and commerce to fuel longevity in their career. His passion for teaching extends also to his time spent at Recording Connection, a mentorship based audio school with a one-on-one classroom environment. Hear all episodes: https://successwithmusic.com/episodes/

Success With Music | SWM
Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 2)

Success With Music | SWM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 37:01


Episode 63: Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 2)Today we conclude our 2-part interview with The Record Shop's Sean Giovanni.Sean Giovanni is the Producer, Engineer and Owner for Middle Tennessee’s own, The Record Shop (therecordshopnashville.com). A frequent NAMM show panelist, speaker at Belmont, MTSU, SAE, The Recording Academy, and countless community groups, Sean Giovanni is passionate about helping creatives build a sustainable business around their art and achieving their goals. He has appeared in interviews with the likes of Antelope Audio, Make it in Music, The Working Your Way Up Podcast, Recording Connection and many more to discuss topics such as How to Find a Music Producer, Reaching Goals and Building a Purpose-Driven Career, and Advice for Up-and-Coming Producers and Engineers. He has worked with clients in studio ranging from Tim McGraw, Big and Rich to Zakk Wylde, The Wallflowers, Juicy J, and Lil Jon. Other production clients include John Legend and Alabama Shakes.After moving to Nashville at 20 years old and unable to find a job, Sean set out to build his own brand with a focus on supporting artists in achieving their creative vision and offering a wide range of content creation services in addition to production. Beyond his work at The Record Shop, he is also the Co Founder of Mind Map, mindmaptribe.com, an online training course designed to help artists find their own unique intersection of art and commerce to fuel longevity in their career. His passion for teaching extends also to his time spent at Recording Connection, a mentorship based audio school with a one-on-one classroom environment. Hear all episodes: https://successwithmusic.com/episodes/

Flick Through
Ganser & Bad Moves

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2020 65:58


Kay & Erica look into the 2020 albums by Ganser & Bad Moves. Please note the audio quality is not as good as usual (thanks technology!)--GANSER - JUST LOOK AT THAT SKYOrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/675827-ganser-just-look-at-that-sky-lpWebsite: https://ganser.bandcamp.comPublications:https://www.angrygrrrlmusic.com/blog/black-artists-to-support-on-bandcamp-dayhttps://www.loudersound.com/features/confederate-flags-suspicious-cops-and-the-dangers-of-touring-america-when-blackFly on the Call episode #47: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/fly-on-the-call-candid-conversations-on-music/id1478513642https://redefinemag.net/2015/felte-records-label-feature-balance-give-take/https://www.independentvenueweek.com/2020/07/thebigjeffchat-with-alicia-gaines-of-ganser/--BAD MOVES - UNTENABLEOrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/665996-bad-moves-untenable-lp-cdBandcamp: https://badmoves.bandcamp.comPublications:https://www.angrygrrrlmusic.com/blog/forward-movement-with-bad-moveshttps://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/dc-punks-bad-moves-expand-their-sound-but-keep-their-focus-on-untenable/2020/06/18/0bc04fdc-afda-11ea-8f56-63f38c990077_story.htmlhttps://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/bad-moves-untenable-979433/Other bands mentioned:http://www.babyponyfood.com/https://saralautman.com/https://somniasomnia.bandcamp.com---IG @specialistubject / TWT @specialistsubSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

Punching Cardboard
Episode 182 -- Tuna Jerky for Everybody

Punching Cardboard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 161:24


It was a lovely evening away from the maddening crowd so we decided to do a show. Just like the 181 times before, we gathered with some microphones and chatted about board games and other things. Even our special guest, Chip, the cricket, seemed to approve. CHIRPS: 00:09:49 -- Celebrity Boardgame Deathmatch 00:12:47 -- The view from 30,000 feet 00:25:46 -- Cooper Island (in-depth first impression) 00:59:23 -- High Rise (in-depth first impression) 02:07:12 -- Clonakilty Bordeaux Cask Edition 02:13:21 -- Jim Goes to the Record Shop  

Success With Music | SWM
Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 1)

Success With Music | SWM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 26:54


Episode 62: Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 1)Sean Giovanni is the Producer, Engineer and Owner for Middle Tennessee’s own, The Record Shop (therecordshopnashville.com). A frequent NAMM show panelist, speaker at Belmont, MTSU, SAE, The Recording Academy, and countless community groups, Sean Giovanni is passionate about helping creatives build a sustainable business around their art and achieving their goals. He has appeared in interviews with the likes of Antelope Audio, Make it in Music, The Working Your Way Up Podcast, Recording Connection and many more to discuss topics such as How to Find a Music Producer, Reaching Goals and Building a Purpose-Driven Career, and Advice for Up-and-Coming Producers and Engineers. He has worked with clients in studio ranging from Tim McGraw, Big and Rich to Zakk Wylde, The Wallflowers, Juicy J, and Lil Jon. Other production clients include John Legend and Alabama Shakes.After moving to Nashville at 20 years old and unable to find a job, Sean set out to build his own brand with a focus on supporting artists in achieving their creative vision and offering a wide range of content creation services in addition to production. Beyond his work at The Record Shop, he is also the Co Founder of Mind Map, mindmaptribe.com, an online training course designed to help artists find their own unique intersection of art and commerce to fuel longevity in their career. His passion for teaching extends also to his time spent at Recording Connection, a mentorship based audio school with a one-on-one classroom environment. Hear all episodes: https://successwithmusic.com/episodes/

Success With Music | SWM
Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 1)

Success With Music | SWM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 26:54


Episode 62: Interview: Sean Giovanni - Growing Your Music Career (Part 1)Sean Giovanni is the Producer, Engineer and Owner for Middle Tennessee’s own, The Record Shop (therecordshopnashville.com). A frequent NAMM show panelist, speaker at Belmont, MTSU, SAE, The Recording Academy, and countless community groups, Sean Giovanni is passionate about helping creatives build a sustainable business around their art and achieving their goals. He has appeared in interviews with the likes of Antelope Audio, Make it in Music, The Working Your Way Up Podcast, Recording Connection and many more to discuss topics such as How to Find a Music Producer, Reaching Goals and Building a Purpose-Driven Career, and Advice for Up-and-Coming Producers and Engineers. He has worked with clients in studio ranging from Tim McGraw, Big and Rich to Zakk Wylde, The Wallflowers, Juicy J, and Lil Jon. Other production clients include John Legend and Alabama Shakes.After moving to Nashville at 20 years old and unable to find a job, Sean set out to build his own brand with a focus on supporting artists in achieving their creative vision and offering a wide range of content creation services in addition to production. Beyond his work at The Record Shop, he is also the Co Founder of Mind Map, mindmaptribe.com, an online training course designed to help artists find their own unique intersection of art and commerce to fuel longevity in their career. His passion for teaching extends also to his time spent at Recording Connection, a mentorship based audio school with a one-on-one classroom environment. Hear all episodes: https://successwithmusic.com/episodes/

Flick Through
The Lovely Eggs & Lithics

Flick Through

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020 64:59


Erica & Kay look into the 2020 albums by The Lovely Eggs & Lithics.--THE LOVELY EGGS - I AM MORON (RSD 2020 EDITION)Order the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/663700-the-lovely-eggs-i-am-moron-lp-rsd-2020Website: http://www.thelovelyeggs.co.uk/Stuff They Like:http://www.lancastermusiccoop.co.uk/Publications:http://www.gigslutz.co.uk/interview-the-lovely-eggs/https://www.indietracks.co.uk/indietracks-interview-14-the-lovely-eggs/http://www.undertheradarmag.com/reviews/the_lovely_eggs_i_am_moron/http://sonicpr.co.uk/artists/the-lovely-eggs/--LITHICS - TOWER OF AGEOrder the record: https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/675828-lithics-tower-of-age-lpLabel: http://www.troubleinmindrecs.com/Publications:Issue #4 Celluloid Lunch https://www.celluloidlunch.com/https://gimmiezine.com/2020/04/14/lithics-interview/https://www.kexp.org/read/2020/6/18/throwaway-style-lithics-build-tower-age-out-serrated-post-punk/2018 radio interview http://www.damagedgoodsradio.com/blog/damaged-goods-198-lithics-portland-or2017 KEXP Session https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwHmeFidLbEhttps://www.portlandmercury.com/music/2020/03/12/28130873/ema-alien-boy-and-other-local-artists-speak-on-how-bikini-kill-inspired-themhttp://lastdaydeaf.com/lithics/Red Lanterns Studios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9O3ucJdYH0Black Water Records https://blackwaterpdx.com/---Rory’s Shop Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7AF9eIVfMD8aP7qJ4q5gus?si=XvEhR8ZjQOK_nBcu38KkjwCreeper Podcast: https://mightymoonmedia.com/creeperLindy West: https://www.thisamericanlife.org/545/if-you-dont-have-anything-nice-to-say-say-it-in-all-caps/act-one---IG @specialistubject / TWT @specialistsubSupport the show (https://shop.specialistsubjectrecords.co.uk/products/673192)

Music Business Dreams
063: Sean Giovanni Talks Storytelling, Livestreaming, and Creativity Under Quarantine

Music Business Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2020 78:40


Sean Giovanni is the owner of The Record Shop, a recording studio and creative facility in Nashville, TN. He is a sonic storyteller who is passionate about helping musicians unlock their creativity and use it to make timeless art.We cover a lot in this interview including:Should You go to school for Music Business or Audio?How to create opportunity when there is none.How Sean set himself apart from other Producers and Studio OwnersWhy storytelling is SO important in music.How to get the best Livestream performances.And much much more...Resources Mentioned:Audio MoversDPA D-ViceThis episode is brought to you by The Next Steps, our 8 module group coaching program that teaches you how to market your music the right way.  You'll learn how to make sure your music can compete in the market, how to register to get all your royalties, and advanced marketing and networking strategies to grow your audience, convert listeners to fans and fans into customers. Plus you'll get monthly live coaching calls with me!All this for less than $100! You can get started in the program for as little as $24 down by clicking here.

Bombers and Sleeves: BombCast
Sean Giovanni- Record Producer, Audio Engineer, Educator, and Owner of The Record Shop Recording Studios (Episode 26)

Bombers and Sleeves: BombCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 88:52


In this episode, we are honored to have Record Producer, Audio Engineer, Educator, and Owner of the Record Shop Recording Studios, Sean Giovanni. Sean is a sonic storyteller who is passionate about helping artists achieve their unique creative vision. Sean has worked in a wide range of genres and has had the privilege to work with artists such as John Legend and Juicy Jay, Tim McGraw, Zakk Wylde, Big and Rich, and The Wallflowers.

Music Production Podcast
#176: Sean Giovanni

Music Production Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2020 96:27


Sean Giovanni is a Producer, Engineer and the Owner of The Record Shop recording studio. Sean moved to Nashville to pursue his career in music at age 20. He has since worked with some of the biggest names in the industry, including John Legend, Meatloaf, Tim McGraw, and The Wallflowers. Following his passion to help artists realize their creative potential, Sean co-founded Mind Map. Sean shared his thoughts on developing a clear artistic vision, finding inspiration in tough times, and developing routines to progress in his career. There's a lot of helpful and practical tips here. I left the conversation feeling inspired to make music! Listen on iTunes or Stitcher or Google Play or Spotify; watch on YouTube Show Notes: The Record Shop - Giovanni's Nashville Recording Studio. Mind Map - Program co-founded by Giovanni to support artists as they navigate the music industry. For Everyone - Poetic inspiration by Jason Reynolds. Think and Grow Rich - Napoleon Hill's 1937 classic entrepreneurship book. Why Music is Important - Music Production Podcast episode about finding meaning in music during difficult times. ---- Get FrostBite 2 by AudioThing - FrostBite 2 is the July 2020 download for the Music Production Club. Dream Keys Ableton Live Pack - Sounds used for the melody in the intro music. Save 25% on Ableton Live Packs at My Store with the code: PODCAST Thank you for listening. Please consider giving the Music Production Podcast a review on your favorite podcast provider. And don’t forget to visit my site BrianFunk.com for music production tutorials, videos, and sound packs. Brian Funk

When Life Hands You Lennons
Content creation, live streaming, and making a living during COVID-19 with Sean Giovanni of The Record Shop

When Life Hands You Lennons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2020 93:58


Sean Giovanni is a sonic storyteller and owner of The Record Shop, a multimedia production company and recording studio in Nashville, Tennessee. To date, he’s worked with artists like Lil Jon, Big & Rich, Tim McGraw, Juicy J, and many others. In addition, he’s been a speaker at the NAMM show, Grammy Camp, SAE, Belmont University, MTSU, and a number of other industry organizations. Sean is a multi-talented individual with a wealth of music industry knowledge that he shares.In this episode, we talk about how major commercial studios have changed as well as the best practices for content creation in the age of coronavirus. We also dig into the importance of live streaming on platforms like Facebook and YouTube. He even talks about a simple setup that anyone can use to get started!--Connect with Lennon: Website: https://www.lennoncihak.comPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/lennoncihakMailing List: http://eepurl.com/dlYpxTInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lennoncihak/Twitter: https://twitter.com/LennonCihakLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lennoncihak/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5eX_uxAUIwBC0gyKwCbqtwGuest Request: https://goo.gl/forms/8zs61IYiIXMLjFpX2Connect with Sean Giovanni:Website: http://www.therecordshopnashville.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/nashvillerecordingstudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/therecordshopstudios/Email: therecordshop1@gmail.com

Make More Music
Episode 26: Defining your Prosperity Plan with Sean Giovanni [The Record Shop, Nashville]

Make More Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 77:01


Welcome back to Make More Music, the podcast that connects people to music & one another. On this episode we chat with Sean Giovanni of The Record Shop recording & multi-media production company in Nashville, TN. He shares his musical backstory, experience as a producer, engineer, manager, educator, and productivity coach behind the Mind Map Tribe. You don't wanna miss this one! Check out The Record Shop studios (https://therecordshopnashville.com/) The Record Shop on instagram (https://www.instagram.com/therecordshopstudios/) The Record Shop on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/nashvillerecordingstudio/) Check out The MindMap Tribe (https://mindmaptribe.com/) Support the show: For free: It helps a ton if you leave a rating and review on your podcast player! Also, text this episode to a friend/family member/coworker/stranger/etc. Donate to directly support the show (https://www.paypal.me/makemoremusic) Get your MMM Merch (https://teespring.com/stores/makemoremusic) Follow us on instagram @make.more.music (https://www.instagram.com/make.more.music/) Subscribe here (https://makemoremusic.fireside.fm/subscribe) & join the mailing list (https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSemWoDjnTSjvceuNbJd5A8r4QMvlloc-s54k7-qedbSr0WxUA/viewform) Email us makemoremusicpodcast@gmail.com & nominate a guest here (https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeTLLEN_4d6vqq1poWgyzbA-0ar9jKRSpCFYkT-77K5TUwFHw/viewform) Give more grace. Share more love. Make. More. Music. More about Sean Giovanni: Sean Giovanni is a sonic storyteller who is passionate about helping artists achieve their unique creative vision. He achieves this mission as a Record Producer, Audio Engineer, Project Manager, Educator, and the owner of The Record Shop, a recording studio and multi-media production company in Nashville, TN. Sean enjoys working in a wide range of genres, and has had the privilege to work with artists ranging from John Legend and Juicy J to Big & Rich and Tim McGraw to Zakk Wylde and The Wallflowers. He is also the a co-owner of a music industry focused mindset development platform called Mind Map which is intended to help creatives achieve artistic prosperity through mental conditioning and emotional fitness. Sean believes in using his life to create art that will outlast him, and is passionate about helping others achieve that same fulfillment.

Celtfather Music & Travel
Mazz O'Flaherty Interview in Dingle Record Shop

Celtfather Music & Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 21:14


Mazz O'Flaherty owns the smallest record shop in Ireland. It's in Dingle, Ireland. It is a place you don't want to miss. It's walls are lined with music from Irish musicians, especially those in the County Kerry. In 2019, I took my Celtic Invasion Vacations to Dingle, Ireland. Ten years after my last trip. Mazz was as delightful a person to talk to as ever. Show #264

Waking Up From Work
Where Business & Creative Collides: How Bad Do YOU Want It & Why W/ Sean Giovanni of The Record Shop

Waking Up From Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 82:28


E61:   Welcome back to the podcast! This week Dave connects with sonic story teller Sean Giovanni aka Giovanni aka Gio. Sean is the founder of The Record Shop in Nashville, TN and has worked with artists like John Legend, Big & Rich, Tim McGraw, Zakk Wylde, The Wallflowers, and Juicy J. If you aren’t an audio nerd like Dave no problem. The guys go deep into the intersection of business and creative and how to manage it.   Sean brings great info on managing a schedule, getting clear on your why and putting steps in to place to do it. We discuss not distracting while not ruling out opportunity and some of the goods and bads behind being a creative and how to make them work for you.   In This Episode We Cover Making a living writing and recording music Making decisions young The process The value of a relationship over just a network Bring value, support each other If there aren’t extra positions, it doesn’t mean there isn’t opportunity Creatives Can do a lot, but SHOULD they do it all? Don’t diversify just because you can How bad do you want to be successful?      Quotes   “ The really great opportunities started to come when I was able to clearly articulate what it was that I intended for my career, what I was going after, and what my skill sets were. Initially when I was starting to apply for internships or jobs one of the big reasons why I didn’t get a lot of responses back was because I sent the same email to that studio manager that dozens did everyday.” - Sean Giovanni   “ We’re not supposed to be the person that’s just willing to do everything even though YOU SHOULD be willing to do everything, you don’t want to lead with that.” - Sean Giovanni   “Don’t follow the money and do things that are a revenue stream that you see opportunity for money in. Anyone in that headspace of an entrepreneur or creative has that ability to create new ways thats what we are good at but if you do it and follow it you may find yourself in a spot where it’s really hard to do the right things because your heart isn’t in it. If you go all in on what you love in a smart way there is a way to make money there and you will stay your authentic self in the space.” - Host Dave Swillum   Sean Giovanni & The Record Shop Links & Resources   Sean’s Links www.therecordshopnashville.com   IG @therecordshop   FB @therecordshopstudios   Business Creative Help From Sean www.mindmaptribe.com   Seans Recommended Resources For Everyone By Jason Reynolds https://amzn.to/3f5ohQi The War of Art https://amzn.to/3dOK66u   Think and Grow Rich By Napoleon Hill https://amzn.to/2AecujC   Fearless Motivation Spotify Playlist https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6EF56fuiUgN2GOMVZIiXpq   Speakers Sean Loves! Eric Thomas https://etinspires.com/home     Les Brown https://lesbrown.com/   Waking Up From Work Podcast Links   Website www.wakingupfromwork.com   Patreon (If you want to support the show check out our sweet offers for you) https://www.patreon.com/wakingupfromwork   Instagram/Twitter/Tik Tok @davewakeup   Facebook Community to connect to creatives https://www.facebook.com/groups/wakingupfromwork/about/   Email wakeupfromworkpodcast@gmail.com   Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJeddF25VuWn8Eg3Fhy13fQ?view_as=subscriber   For audio advice and more in depth music content from Dave www.crawlspaceaudio.com   Dave’s Indie Rock Band Broadwing www.broadwingband.bandcamp.com  

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Goldmine: Record Store Recon - Ernest Tubb Record Shop

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2020 19:04


Country music legend Ernest Tubb started his own record store in 1947 and it has become a landmark in Nashville, Tennessee. Goldmine's anonymous recon agent, Dr. Disc, reviews the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and tells Goldmine Podcast listeners what makes it so unique. This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Goldmine Magazine
Record Store Recon: Ernest Tubb Record Shop

Goldmine Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2020 18:26


Country music legend Ernest Tubb started his own record store in 1947 and it has become a landmark in Nashville, Tennessee. Goldmine's anonymous recon agent, Dr. Disc, reviews the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and tells Goldmine Podcast listeners what makes it so unique. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tales from a virtual record shop
Tales from a virtual record shop (Trailer)

Tales from a virtual record shop

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2020 0:35


Wildman Steve's Record Shop
Wildman Steve's Record Shop Episode 24 - Kelly's Lot

Wildman Steve's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2020 36:54


Kelly's Lot was formed in 1994 by Kelly Zirbes, a folk singer/songwriter with a heart for the blues. With 14 CDs and lots of touring in the USA and Europe, the band will celebrate 25 years since the first night the band hit the stage at the Roxy in Hollywood. Kelly Z met soundman, Perry Robertson, in 1996 who soon produced their ‘Live at the Troubadour’ CD. Within a year he joined the band, started writing songs with Kelly Z and added the Southern Rock and Texas influences that have shaped their sound. As a duo or band, they have played coffee shops, theaters, festivals, clubs, house concerts and a variety of events. In the last 15 years they have created an 5-8 piece Blues band that is well respected in the American Blues Scene. Some of the larger festivals they have played are Waterfront Blues, Simi Valley Cajun and Blues Festival, Ventura County Blues Festival, Lavaudieu Music Festival. Their songs have been heard in movies and television and covered by other artists. Kelly Z is currently working on songs for a couple film projects while still grabbing some inspiration from her fans on facebook. Challenging them to look in their hearts and share just one word, she then challenges herself to choose a word and write a song in two hours. Perry Robertson, who shares the band leader title with Kelly Z, has recorded and produced most of the band’s music including the recently released 'Can't Take My Soul’. the new CD features AmericanA, Blues, Folk and Roots/Rock creations . It’s a journey of messages, inspirations and some toe tapping rhythms. Mostly featuring a 4 piece of guitar, bass, drums and vocals, the CD also offers some accordion, harmonica, keys and even a Kelly Z whistle. As a duo, a 4 piece or a full 8 piece band they always pack a lot of energy while still getting to the heart of the listener.Check out Kelly's Lot at their website, kellyslot.com Support the show (http://www.wildmansteve.com/MEMBERS.html)

Wildman Steve's Record Shop
Wildman Steve's Record Shop Episode 23 - Martha's Trouble

Wildman Steve's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2020 29:23


Founding band/soul mates Jen and Rob Slocumb met in 1996 with a twist of fate inside a Houston, Texas, coffee shop where Jen worked booking bands. Rob was home to see his parents after a music venture fizzled. It started as a simple bond over music. Time led them to realize it was something much more. The two fell in love and were married. They continued to write and play music, building up enough of a repertoire to start producing albums and touring around the country and the world.Their work has not gone unnoticed. Some of the most influential and well-respected music critics of our time have paid tribute to the duo. They have been listed and featured in Billboard Magazine, USA Today, AOL Music, XM Satellite Radio and Performing Songwriter. Their songs have received awards and have been featured in made-for-TV movies shown to national audiencesIn 2016, Jen and Rob bought a historical home (built in 1907) in Downtown Opelika, Alabama and converted it into The Sound Wall, a multi-purpose creative space featuring a state of the art recording studio, a chefs kitchen, and artist residence. In 2019, the pair launched the first annual Opelika Songwriter Festival, which brought many fine artists to the area, and have announced the lineup for 2020. We caught up with them last year during the festival.Keep up with Martha's Trouble at their website, marthastrouble.com. The 2nd Annual Opelika Songwriter's Festival begins March 27th and lasts through the 29th. Check it out at opelikasongwritersfestival.com Thanks for listening to Wildman Steve's Record Shop, tune in next time for more fun and thrills galore!Support the show (http://www.wildmansteve.com/MEMBERS.html)

Noisy Neighbors Podcast
Cornered In A Record Shop

Noisy Neighbors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 76:18


With no football on the horizon, Mulv and guest host Howard Hockin discuss the evolution of their musical tastes. Best gigs, guilty pleasures, most overrated bands, the lot.

Wildman Steve's Record Shop
Wildman Steve's Record Shop Episode 22 - Noah Zacharin

Wildman Steve's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 39:21


Noah Zacharin is a widely acclaimed guitar master, multi-genre songwriter, and dynamic performer. He was given his first guitar at age 9, worte his first song at 13, and began performing at 14. In December 2015, Noah became a full-time recording and touring musician, and is more thrilled than ever to be doing what he has always done. Born in Montreal, Zacharin splits his time between Toronto, the road , and an off-grid cabin on the Canadian Shield. Noah is also an award-winning poet and translator, having won McGill's Chester-Macnaghten poetry prize and Matrix Magazine's translation prize. He's published hundreds of poems, translations, and review, in periodicals and anthologies worldwide, and is currently at work on his first full-length manuscript of poems.Support the show (http://www.wildmansteve.com/MEMBERS.html)

Podcast Raleigh
Adam Lindstaedt, The Pour House Music Hall and Record Shop

Podcast Raleigh

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2020 68:23


When Adam and Lacie Lindstaedt set out on a tour of potential cities to set up their dream business--a music venue--the first place they went when visiting Raleigh was The Pour House, downtown on Blount Street. As fate would have it, The Pour House became their music venue, and last year it officially became The Pour House Music Hall and Record Shop, as the couple added a retail record store to the upstairs of the music hall.We talked to Adam about the challenges and fulfillment of operating live music--a dream he first had as a kid in Chicago--the Raleigh music scene, and how the record store has aided in the continuing evolution of one of Raleigh's most well known spots for live music.Ashton and Hayes also chat about new cranes, a big shout-out for some local artists, and what they've been up to around the city this week. They also share their Raleigh-related resolutions for 2020.Special thanks to our sponsor, Steele Residential--check them out for buying, selling or renting!Subscribe/rate Podcast Raleigh on your favorite podcast sites:Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/podcast-raleigh/id1458907220Google: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Inzk5woxrsjwf3zhd5vv3av4yeiStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/podcast-raleighSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6b3dVvLJfO0EqvDGQaFTAP?si=QrcfEq8WSE2h3aEZSGV0pQ

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 63: “Susie Q”, by Dale Hawkins

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2019


  Episode sixty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Susie Q” by Dale Hawkins, and at the difference between rockabilly and electric blues. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Shake a Hand” by Faye Adams.  —-more—- Errata I pronounce presage incorrectly in the episode, and the song “Do it Again a Little Bit Slower” doesn’t have the word “just” in the title. Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This time, for reasons to do with Mixcloud’s terms of service, it’s broken into two parts. Part one, part two. There are no books that I know of on Hawkins, but I relied heavily on three books with chapters on him — Hepcats and Rockabilly Boys by Robert Reynolds, Dig That Beat! Interviews with Musicians at the Root of Rock and Roll by Sheree Homer,  and Shreveport Sounds in Black and White edited by Kip Lornell and Tracy E.W. Laird. This compilation of Hawkins’ early singles is as good a set as any to start with, though the liner notes are perfunctory at best.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript We’re pretty much at the end of the true rockabilly era already — all the major figures to come out of Sun studios have done so, and while 1957 saw several country-influenced white rock and rollers show up, like Buddy Holly and the Everly Brothers, and those singers will often get referred to as “rockabilly”, they don’t tend to get counted by aficionados of the subgenre, who think they don’t sound enough like the music from Sun to count. But there are still a few exceptions. And one of those is Dale Hawkins, the man whose recordings were to spark a whole new subgenre, the style of music that would later become known as “swamp rock”. [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”] Dale Hawkins never liked being called a rockabilly, though that’s the description that most people now use of him. We’ll look later in the episode at how accurate that description actually is, but for the moment the important thing is that he thought of himself as a bluesman. When he was living in Shreveport, Louisiana, he lived in a shack in the black part of town, and inside the shack there was only a folding camp bed, a record player, and thousands of 78RPM blues records. Nothing else at all. It’s not that he didn’t like country music, of course — as a kid, he and his brother hitch-hiked to a nearby town to go to a Flatt and Scruggs gig, and he also loved Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers — but it was the blues that called to him more, and so he never thought of himself as having the country elements that would normally be necessary for someone to call themselves a rockabilly. While he didn’t have much direct country influence, he did come from a country music family. His father, Delmar Hawkins senior, was a country musician who was according to some sources one of the original members of the Sons of the Pioneers, the group that launched the career of Roy Rogers: [Excerpt: Sons of the Pioneers, “Tumbling Tumbleweeds”] While Hawkins Sr.’s name isn’t in any of the official lists of group members, he might well have performed with them at some point in the early years of the group. And whether he did or didn’t, he was definitely a bass player in many other hillbilly bands. However, it’s unlikely that Delmar Hawkins Sr. had much influence on his son, as he left the family when Delmar Jr was three, and didn’t reconnect until after “Susie Q” became a hit. Delmar Sr. wasn’t the only family member to be a musician, either — Dale’s younger brother Jerry was a rockabilly who made a few singles in the fifties: [Excerpt: Jerry Hawkins, “Swing Daddy Swing”] Another family member, Ronnie Hawkins, would later have his own musical career, which would intersect with several of the artists we’re going to be looking at later in this series. Del Hawkins, as he was originally called, did a variety of jobs, including a short stint as a sailor, after dropping out of school, but he soon got the idea of becoming a musician, and started performing with Sonny Jones, a local guitarist whose sister was Hank Williams’ widow. Jones had a lot of contacts in the local music industry, and helped Hawkins pull together the first lineup of his band, when he was nineteen. While Hawkins thought of himself as a blues musician, for a white singer in Shreveport, there was only one option open if you wanted to be a star, and that was performing on the Louisiana Hayride, the country show where Elvis, among many others, had made his name. And Jones had many contacts on the show, and performed on it himself. But Hawkins’ first job at the Louisiana Hayride wasn’t as a performer, but working in the car park. He and his brother would go up to drivers heading into the car park for the show, and charge them fifty cents to park their cars for them — when the car park filled up, they’d just park the cars on the street outside. What they didn’t tell the drivers was that the car park was actually free to the public. At the same time he was starting out as a musician, Del was working in a record shop, Stan’s Record Shop, run by a man named Stan Lewis. Hawkins had been a regular customer for several years before working up the courage to ask for a job there, and by the time he got the job, he was familiar with almost every blues or R&B record that was available at the time. Customers would come into the shop, sing a snatch of a song they’d heard, and young Del would be able to tell them the title and the artist. It was through doing this job that Hawkins became friendly with customers like B.B. King, who would remain a lifelong friend. It was also while working at Stan’s Record Shop that Hawkins became better acquainted with its owner. Stan Lewis was, among other things, both a talent scout for Chess records and one of the biggest customers of the label — if he got behind a record, Chess knew it would sell, at least in Louisiana, and so they would listen to him. Indeed, Lewis was one of the biggest record distributors, as well as a record shop owner, and he distributed records all across the region, to many other stores. Lewis also worked as a record producer — the first record he ever produced was one of the biggest blues hits of all time, Lowell Fulson’s “Reconsider Baby”, which was released on the Chess subsidiary Checker: [Excerpt: Lowell Fulson, “Reconsider Baby”] Lewis took an interest in his young employee’s music career, and introduced Hawkins to his cousin, D.J. Fontana, another musician who played on the Louisiana Hayride. Fontana played with Hawkins for a while before taking on a better-paid job with Elvis Presley. At Lewis’ instigation, Hawkins went into the studio in 1956 with engineer Merle Kilgore (who would later become famous in his own right as a country songwriter, co-writing songs like “Ring of Fire”), his new guitarist James Burton, and several other musicians, to record a demo of what would become Hawkins’ most famous song, “Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”, demo version] Listening to that, it’s clear that they already had all the elements of the finished record nearly in place — the main difference between that and the finished version that they cut later is that the demo has a saxophone solo, and that James Burton hasn’t fully worked out his guitar part, although it’s close to the final version. At the time he cut that track, Hawkins intended it as a potential first single, but Stan Lewis had other ideas. While Chess records put out almost solely tracks by black artists, their subsidiary Checker *had* recently released a single by a white artist — a song by Bobby Charles called “Later, Alligator”, which a short while later had become a hit for Bill Haley, under the longer title “See You Later, Alligator”: [Excerpt: Bobby Charles, “Later Alligator”] Lewis thought that given that precedent, Checker might be willing to put out another record by a white act, if that record was an answer record to Bobby Charles’. So he persuaded Hawkins to write a soundalike song, which Hawkins and his band quickly demoed — “See You Soon, Baboon”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “See You Soon, Baboon”] Lewis sent that off to Checker, who released Hawkins’ demo, although they did make three small changes. The first was to add a Tarzan-style yodelling call at the beginning and end of the record: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “See You Soon, Baboon”] The second, which would have long-lasting consequences, was that they misspelled Hawkins’ first name — Leonard Chess misheard “Del Hawkins” over the phone, and the record came out as by “Dale Hawkins”, which would be his name from that point on. The last change was to remove Hawkins’ songwriting credit, and give it instead to Stan Lewis and Eleanor Broadwater. Broadwater was the wife of Gene Nobles, a DJ to whom the Chess brothers owed money. Nobles is also the one who supplied the Tarzan cry. Both Lewis and Broadwater would also get credited for Hawkins’ follow-up single, a new version of “Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”] On that, at least, Hawkins was credited as one of the writers along with Lewis and Broadwater. But according to Hawkins, not only did the credit get split with the wrong people, but he didn’t receive any of the royalties to which he was entitled until as late as 1985. And crucially, the other people who did cowrite the song — notably James Burton — didn’t get any credit at all. In general, there seems to be a great deal of disagreement about who contributed what to the song — I’ve seen various other putative co-authors listed — but everyone seems agreed that Hawkins came up with the lyrics, while Burton came up with the guitar riff. Presumably the song evolved from a jam session by the musicians — it’s the kind of song that musicians come up with when they’re jamming together, and that would explain the discrepancies in the stories as to who wrote it. Well, that and the record company ripping the writers off. The song came from a myriad musical sources. The most obvious influence for its overall sound — both the melody and the way the melody interacts with the guitar riff — is “Baby Please Don’t Go” by Muddy Waters: [Excerpt: Muddy Waters, “Baby Please Don’t Go”] But the principal influence on the melody was, rather than Waters’ song, a record by the Clovers which had a very similar melody — “I’ve Got My Eyes on You”: [Excerpt: The Clovers, “I’ve Got My Eyes On You”] Hawkins and Burton took those melodic and arrangement ideas and coupled them with a riff inspired by Howlin’ Wolf — I’ve seen some people claim that the song was “ripped off” from Wolf. I don’t believe, myself, that that is the case. Wolf certainly had several records with similar riffs, like “Smokestack Lightnin'”: [Excerpt: Howlin’ Wolf, “Smokestack Lightnin'”] And “Spoonful”: [Excerpt: Howlin’ Wolf, “Spoonful”] But nothing with the exact same riff, and certainly nothing with the same melody. Some have also claimed that Wolf provided lyrical inspiration — that Hawkins was inspired by seeing Wolf drop to his knees on stage yelling something about “Suzy”. There are also claims that the song was named after Stan Lewis’ daughter Suzie — and notably Stan Lewis himself bolstered his claim to a co-writing credit for the song by pointing out that not only did he have a daughter named Susan, so did Leonard Chess. He claimed that he had mentioned this to Hawkins and suggested that the two of them write a song together with the name in it, because it would appeal to Chess. Both of those tales of the song’s lyrical inspiration may well be true, but I suspect that a more likely explanation is that the song is named after a dance move. We talked way back in episode four about the Lindy Hop, the popular dance from the late 1930s and forties. That dance was never a formalised dance, and one of its major characteristics was that it would incorporate dance moves from any other dance around. And one of the dances it incorporated into itself was one called the Suzie Q, which at the height of its popularity was promoted by a song performed by the pianist Lilian Hardin, who is now best known for having been the wife of Louis Armstrong, whose career she managed in its early years, but who at the time was a respected jazz musician in her own right: [Excerpt: Lil Hardin Armstrong, “Doin’ the Suzie Q”] The dance that that song was about was a simple dance step, involving crossing one’s feet, swivelling. and stepping to one side. It got incorporated into the more complex Lindy Hop, but was still remembered as a step in itself. So, it’s likely that Hawkins was at least as inspired by that as he was by any of the other alleged inspirations for the song. Certainly at least one other Checker records artist thought so — Jimmy McCracklin, in his song “The Walk”, released the next year, starts his list of dances by singing “I know you’ve heard of the Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Jimmy McCracklin, “The Walk”] According to the engineer on the session, Bob Sullivan, who was more used to recording Jim Reeves and Slim Whitman than raw rock and roll music, “Susie Q” was recorded in four takes, and Hawkins had the final choice of which take to use, but in Sullivan’s opinion he chose the wrong one. The take chosen for release was an early take of the song, when Sullivan was still trying to get a balance, and he didn’t notice at first that Hawkins was starting to sing, and had to quickly raise the volume on Hawkins’ vocal just as he started. You can hear this if you listen to the finished recording: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”] This new version of “Susie Q” was stripped right down — it was just guitar, bass, and drums — none of the saxophone that was present on the early version. But it kept the crucial ingredients of the earlier version — that biting guitar riff played by James Burton, and the drum part, with its ear-catching cowbell. That drum part was played by Stan Lewis’ fifteen-year-old brother Ronnie on the new version, but he’s closely copying the part that A.J. Tuminello played on the demo — Tuminello couldn’t make the session, so Lewis just copied the part, which came about when Hawkins had heard Tuminello playing his drum and cowbell simultaneously during a soundcheck. Now that we’ve put the song in context, there’s an interesting point we can make. As we discussed in the beginning, people usually refer to “Susie Q” as a rockabilly song. But there are a few criteria that generally apply to rockabilly but not to “Susie Q”. And one of the most important of these ties back to something we were talking about last week — the electric bass. The demo version of “Susie Q” had, like almost all rock and roll records of the time, featured a double bass, played in the slapback style, and as we talked about back in the episodes on Bill Haley several months back, slapback bass is one of the defining features of the rockabilly genre. For this new recording, though, Sonny Trammell, a country player who played with Jim Reeves, played electric bass, as he was the only person in Shreveport who owned one. This was a deliberate choice by Hawkins, who wanted to imitate the sound of electric blues records, rather than using the double bass, which he associated with country music — though as it turns out, he would probably have been better off using a double bass if he wanted that sound, as Willie Dixon, who played bass on all the Chess blues records, actually didn’t play an electric bass. Rather, he got a sound similar to an electric bass by actually placing the microphone inside the bottom of the bass’ tailpiece. But that points to something that “Susie Q” was doing that we’ve not seen before. One of the things people have asked me a few times is why I’ve not looked very much at the music that we now think of as “the blues”, though at the time it was only a small part of the blues — the guitar playing male solo artists who made up the Chicago sound, and the Delta bluesmen who inspired them. And that’s because the common narrative, that rock and roll came from that kind of blues, is false — as I hope the last year and a bit of podcasts have shown. Rock and roll came from a lot of different musics — primarily Western swing, jump bands, and vocal group R&B — and had relatively little influence in its early years from that branch of blues. But over the next few years we will see a lot of musicians, primarily but not exclusively white British men, inspired by the first wave of rock and rollers to pick up a guitar, but rejecting the country music that inspired those early rock and rollers, and turning instead to Muddy Waters, Little Walter, and Howlin’ Wolf. There’s never a first anything, and that’s especially the case here where we’re talking about musical ideas crossing racial lines, but one can make an argument that Dale Hawkins was the first white rock and roller to be inspired by people like Waters and Wolf, and for “Susie Q” as the record, more than any other, that presaged the white rock acts of the sixties, with its electric bass, Chess-style guitar riffs, and country-inflected vocals. Acts like the Rolling Stones or the Animals or Canned Heat were all following in Hawkins’ footsteps, as you can hear in, for example, the Stones’ own version of the song: [Excerpt: the Rolling Stones, “Susie Q”] What’s surprising is how reluctant Chess were to release the single. The master was sent to Chess for release, but they kept hold of it for ten months without getting round to releasing it. Eventually, Hawkins became so frustrated that he sent a copy of the recording to Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records. Wexler got excited, and told Leonard Chess that if Chess weren’t going to put out the single, Atlantic would release it instead. At that point, Chess realised that he might have something commercial on his hands, and decided to put the record out on Checker as it was originally intended. The song went to number seven on the R&B charts, and number twenty-seven on the pop charts. Between the recording and release of the single, James Burton quit the band. He moved on first to work with another Louisiana musician, Bob Luman: [Excerpt: Bob Luman, “All Night Long”] Burton then went on to work first with Ricky Nelson and then as a session player with everyone from the Monkees to Elvis. Hawkins had an ear for good guitarists, and after Burton went on to be one of the most important guitarists in rock music, Hawkins would continue to play with many other superb players, such as Roy Buchanan, who played on Hawkins’ cover version of Little Walter’s “My Babe”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “My Babe”] And then there was the guitarist on the closest he came to a follow-up hit, “La-Do-Dada”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Lo-Do-Dada”] That guitarist was another young player, Joe Osborn, who would soon follow James Burton to LA and to the pool of session players that became known as the Wrecking Crew, though Osborn would switch his guitar for bass. However, none of Hawkins’ follow-ups had anything more than very minor commercial success, and he would increasingly find himself chasing trends and trying to catch up with other people’s styles, rather than continuing with the raw rock and roll sound he had found on “Susie Q”. By the early sixties he was recording novelty live albums of twist songs, to try to cash in on the twist fad: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Do the Twist”] After his brief run of hits dried up, he used his connection with Dick Clark, the TV presenter whose American Bandstand had helped to break “Susie Q” on the national market, to get his own TV show, The Dale Hawkins Show, which ran for eighteen months and was a similar format to Bandstand. Once that show was over, he turned to record production. There he once again worked for Stan Lewis, who by that point had started his own record labels. There seems to be some dispute as to which records Hawkins produced in his second career. I’ve seen claims, for example, that he produced “Hey Baby” by Bruce Channel: [Excerpt: Bruce Channel, “Hey Baby”] But Hawkins is not the credited producer on that, or on “Judy In Disguise With Glasses” by John Fred and the Playboy Band, another record he’s often credited with. On the other hand, he *is* the credited producer on the big hit “Do it Again Just a Little Bit Slower” by Jon and Robin: [Excerpt: Jon and Robin, “Do it Again A Little Bit Slower”] Towards the end of the sixties, he had a brief second attempt at a recording career for himself. Creedence Clearwater Revival had a hit in 1968 with their version of “Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Creedence Clearwater Revival, “Susie Q”] And that was enough to draw Hawkins back into the studio, working once again with James Burton on guitar and Joe Osborn on bass, along with a few newer blues musicians like Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder, on an album full of the swamp-rock style he had created in the fifties, “LA, Memphis, and Tyler, Texas”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins: “LA, Memphis, Tyler, Texas”] When that wasn’t a success, he moved on to RCA Records to become head of A&R for their West Coast rock department — a job he was apparently put forward for by Joe Osborn. But after a successful few years, he spent much of the seventies suffering from an amphetamine addiction, having started taking speed back in the fifties. He finally got clean in the early eighties, and started touring the rockabilly revival circuit — as well as finally getting his master’s degree, which for a high school dropout was a major achievement, and something to be as proud of as any hit. In 1998, he recorded his first album in thirty years, Wildcat Tamer: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Wildcat Tamer”] That got some of the best reviews of his career, but his next album took nearly a decade to come out, and by that time he had been diagnosed with the colon cancer that eventually killed him in 2010. Hawkins is in many ways a paradoxical figure — he was someone who pointed the way to the future of rock and roll, but the future he pointed to was one of white men taking the ideas of black blues musicians and only slightly altering them. He was a byword for untutored, raw, instinctive rock and roll, and yet his biggest hit is carefully constructed out of bits of other people’s records, melded together with a great deal of thought. At the end of it all, what survives is that one glorious hit record — a guitar, a bass, drums, a cowbell, and a teenage boy singing of how he loves Susie Q.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 63: "Susie Q", by Dale Hawkins

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2019 38:55


  Episode sixty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Susie Q" by Dale Hawkins, and at the difference between rockabilly and electric blues. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Shake a Hand" by Faye Adams.  ----more---- Errata I pronounce presage incorrectly in the episode, and the song "Do it Again a Little Bit Slower" doesn't have the word "just" in the title. Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This time, for reasons to do with Mixcloud's terms of service, it's broken into two parts. Part one, part two. There are no books that I know of on Hawkins, but I relied heavily on three books with chapters on him -- Hepcats and Rockabilly Boys by Robert Reynolds, Dig That Beat! Interviews with Musicians at the Root of Rock and Roll by Sheree Homer,  and Shreveport Sounds in Black and White edited by Kip Lornell and Tracy E.W. Laird. This compilation of Hawkins' early singles is as good a set as any to start with, though the liner notes are perfunctory at best.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript We're pretty much at the end of the true rockabilly era already -- all the major figures to come out of Sun studios have done so, and while 1957 saw several country-influenced white rock and rollers show up, like Buddy Holly and the Everly Brothers, and those singers will often get referred to as "rockabilly", they don't tend to get counted by aficionados of the subgenre, who think they don't sound enough like the music from Sun to count. But there are still a few exceptions. And one of those is Dale Hawkins, the man whose recordings were to spark a whole new subgenre, the style of music that would later become known as "swamp rock". [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Susie Q"] Dale Hawkins never liked being called a rockabilly, though that's the description that most people now use of him. We'll look later in the episode at how accurate that description actually is, but for the moment the important thing is that he thought of himself as a bluesman. When he was living in Shreveport, Louisiana, he lived in a shack in the black part of town, and inside the shack there was only a folding camp bed, a record player, and thousands of 78RPM blues records. Nothing else at all. It's not that he didn't like country music, of course -- as a kid, he and his brother hitch-hiked to a nearby town to go to a Flatt and Scruggs gig, and he also loved Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers -- but it was the blues that called to him more, and so he never thought of himself as having the country elements that would normally be necessary for someone to call themselves a rockabilly. While he didn't have much direct country influence, he did come from a country music family. His father, Delmar Hawkins senior, was a country musician who was according to some sources one of the original members of the Sons of the Pioneers, the group that launched the career of Roy Rogers: [Excerpt: Sons of the Pioneers, "Tumbling Tumbleweeds"] While Hawkins Sr.'s name isn't in any of the official lists of group members, he might well have performed with them at some point in the early years of the group. And whether he did or didn't, he was definitely a bass player in many other hillbilly bands. However, it's unlikely that Delmar Hawkins Sr. had much influence on his son, as he left the family when Delmar Jr was three, and didn't reconnect until after “Susie Q” became a hit. Delmar Sr. wasn't the only family member to be a musician, either -- Dale's younger brother Jerry was a rockabilly who made a few singles in the fifties: [Excerpt: Jerry Hawkins, "Swing Daddy Swing"] Another family member, Ronnie Hawkins, would later have his own musical career, which would intersect with several of the artists we're going to be looking at later in this series. Del Hawkins, as he was originally called, did a variety of jobs, including a short stint as a sailor, after dropping out of school, but he soon got the idea of becoming a musician, and started performing with Sonny Jones, a local guitarist whose sister was Hank Williams' widow. Jones had a lot of contacts in the local music industry, and helped Hawkins pull together the first lineup of his band, when he was nineteen. While Hawkins thought of himself as a blues musician, for a white singer in Shreveport, there was only one option open if you wanted to be a star, and that was performing on the Louisiana Hayride, the country show where Elvis, among many others, had made his name. And Jones had many contacts on the show, and performed on it himself. But Hawkins' first job at the Louisiana Hayride wasn't as a performer, but working in the car park. He and his brother would go up to drivers heading into the car park for the show, and charge them fifty cents to park their cars for them -- when the car park filled up, they'd just park the cars on the street outside. What they didn't tell the drivers was that the car park was actually free to the public. At the same time he was starting out as a musician, Del was working in a record shop, Stan's Record Shop, run by a man named Stan Lewis. Hawkins had been a regular customer for several years before working up the courage to ask for a job there, and by the time he got the job, he was familiar with almost every blues or R&B record that was available at the time. Customers would come into the shop, sing a snatch of a song they'd heard, and young Del would be able to tell them the title and the artist. It was through doing this job that Hawkins became friendly with customers like B.B. King, who would remain a lifelong friend. It was also while working at Stan's Record Shop that Hawkins became better acquainted with its owner. Stan Lewis was, among other things, both a talent scout for Chess records and one of the biggest customers of the label -- if he got behind a record, Chess knew it would sell, at least in Louisiana, and so they would listen to him. Indeed, Lewis was one of the biggest record distributors, as well as a record shop owner, and he distributed records all across the region, to many other stores. Lewis also worked as a record producer -- the first record he ever produced was one of the biggest blues hits of all time, Lowell Fulson's "Reconsider Baby", which was released on the Chess subsidiary Checker: [Excerpt: Lowell Fulson, "Reconsider Baby"] Lewis took an interest in his young employee's music career, and introduced Hawkins to his cousin, D.J. Fontana, another musician who played on the Louisiana Hayride. Fontana played with Hawkins for a while before taking on a better-paid job with Elvis Presley. At Lewis' instigation, Hawkins went into the studio in 1956 with engineer Merle Kilgore (who would later become famous in his own right as a country songwriter, co-writing songs like "Ring of Fire"), his new guitarist James Burton, and several other musicians, to record a demo of what would become Hawkins' most famous song, "Susie Q": [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Susie Q", demo version] Listening to that, it's clear that they already had all the elements of the finished record nearly in place -- the main difference between that and the finished version that they cut later is that the demo has a saxophone solo, and that James Burton hasn't fully worked out his guitar part, although it's close to the final version. At the time he cut that track, Hawkins intended it as a potential first single, but Stan Lewis had other ideas. While Chess records put out almost solely tracks by black artists, their subsidiary Checker *had* recently released a single by a white artist -- a song by Bobby Charles called "Later, Alligator", which a short while later had become a hit for Bill Haley, under the longer title "See You Later, Alligator": [Excerpt: Bobby Charles, "Later Alligator"] Lewis thought that given that precedent, Checker might be willing to put out another record by a white act, if that record was an answer record to Bobby Charles'. So he persuaded Hawkins to write a soundalike song, which Hawkins and his band quickly demoed -- "See You Soon, Baboon": [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "See You Soon, Baboon"] Lewis sent that off to Checker, who released Hawkins' demo, although they did make three small changes. The first was to add a Tarzan-style yodelling call at the beginning and end of the record: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "See You Soon, Baboon"] The second, which would have long-lasting consequences, was that they misspelled Hawkins' first name -- Leonard Chess misheard "Del Hawkins" over the phone, and the record came out as by "Dale Hawkins", which would be his name from that point on. The last change was to remove Hawkins' songwriting credit, and give it instead to Stan Lewis and Eleanor Broadwater. Broadwater was the wife of Gene Nobles, a DJ to whom the Chess brothers owed money. Nobles is also the one who supplied the Tarzan cry. Both Lewis and Broadwater would also get credited for Hawkins' follow-up single, a new version of "Susie Q": [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Susie Q"] On that, at least, Hawkins was credited as one of the writers along with Lewis and Broadwater. But according to Hawkins, not only did the credit get split with the wrong people, but he didn't receive any of the royalties to which he was entitled until as late as 1985. And crucially, the other people who did cowrite the song -- notably James Burton -- didn't get any credit at all. In general, there seems to be a great deal of disagreement about who contributed what to the song -- I've seen various other putative co-authors listed -- but everyone seems agreed that Hawkins came up with the lyrics, while Burton came up with the guitar riff. Presumably the song evolved from a jam session by the musicians -- it's the kind of song that musicians come up with when they're jamming together, and that would explain the discrepancies in the stories as to who wrote it. Well, that and the record company ripping the writers off. The song came from a myriad musical sources. The most obvious influence for its overall sound -- both the melody and the way the melody interacts with the guitar riff -- is "Baby Please Don't Go" by Muddy Waters: [Excerpt: Muddy Waters, "Baby Please Don't Go"] But the principal influence on the melody was, rather than Waters' song, a record by the Clovers which had a very similar melody -- "I've Got My Eyes on You": [Excerpt: The Clovers, "I've Got My Eyes On You"] Hawkins and Burton took those melodic and arrangement ideas and coupled them with a riff inspired by Howlin' Wolf -- I've seen some people claim that the song was "ripped off" from Wolf. I don't believe, myself, that that is the case. Wolf certainly had several records with similar riffs, like "Smokestack Lightnin'": [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] And "Spoonful": [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Spoonful"] But nothing with the exact same riff, and certainly nothing with the same melody. Some have also claimed that Wolf provided lyrical inspiration -- that Hawkins was inspired by seeing Wolf drop to his knees on stage yelling something about "Suzy". There are also claims that the song was named after Stan Lewis' daughter Suzie -- and notably Stan Lewis himself bolstered his claim to a co-writing credit for the song by pointing out that not only did he have a daughter named Susan, so did Leonard Chess. He claimed that he had mentioned this to Hawkins and suggested that the two of them write a song together with the name in it, because it would appeal to Chess. Both of those tales of the song's lyrical inspiration may well be true, but I suspect that a more likely explanation is that the song is named after a dance move. We talked way back in episode four about the Lindy Hop, the popular dance from the late 1930s and forties. That dance was never a formalised dance, and one of its major characteristics was that it would incorporate dance moves from any other dance around. And one of the dances it incorporated into itself was one called the Suzie Q, which at the height of its popularity was promoted by a song performed by the pianist Lilian Hardin, who is now best known for having been the wife of Louis Armstrong, whose career she managed in its early years, but who at the time was a respected jazz musician in her own right: [Excerpt: Lil Hardin Armstrong, "Doin' the Suzie Q"] The dance that that song was about was a simple dance step, involving crossing one's feet, swivelling. and stepping to one side. It got incorporated into the more complex Lindy Hop, but was still remembered as a step in itself. So, it's likely that Hawkins was at least as inspired by that as he was by any of the other alleged inspirations for the song. Certainly at least one other Checker records artist thought so -- Jimmy McCracklin, in his song "The Walk", released the next year, starts his list of dances by singing "I know you've heard of the Susie Q": [Excerpt: Jimmy McCracklin, "The Walk"] According to the engineer on the session, Bob Sullivan, who was more used to recording Jim Reeves and Slim Whitman than raw rock and roll music, "Susie Q" was recorded in four takes, and Hawkins had the final choice of which take to use, but in Sullivan's opinion he chose the wrong one. The take chosen for release was an early take of the song, when Sullivan was still trying to get a balance, and he didn't notice at first that Hawkins was starting to sing, and had to quickly raise the volume on Hawkins' vocal just as he started. You can hear this if you listen to the finished recording: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Susie Q"] This new version of "Susie Q" was stripped right down -- it was just guitar, bass, and drums -- none of the saxophone that was present on the early version. But it kept the crucial ingredients of the earlier version -- that biting guitar riff played by James Burton, and the drum part, with its ear-catching cowbell. That drum part was played by Stan Lewis' fifteen-year-old brother Ronnie on the new version, but he's closely copying the part that A.J. Tuminello played on the demo -- Tuminello couldn't make the session, so Lewis just copied the part, which came about when Hawkins had heard Tuminello playing his drum and cowbell simultaneously during a soundcheck. Now that we've put the song in context, there's an interesting point we can make. As we discussed in the beginning, people usually refer to "Susie Q" as a rockabilly song. But there are a few criteria that generally apply to rockabilly but not to "Susie Q". And one of the most important of these ties back to something we were talking about last week -- the electric bass. The demo version of "Susie Q" had, like almost all rock and roll records of the time, featured a double bass, played in the slapback style, and as we talked about back in the episodes on Bill Haley several months back, slapback bass is one of the defining features of the rockabilly genre. For this new recording, though, Sonny Trammell, a country player who played with Jim Reeves, played electric bass, as he was the only person in Shreveport who owned one. This was a deliberate choice by Hawkins, who wanted to imitate the sound of electric blues records, rather than using the double bass, which he associated with country music -- though as it turns out, he would probably have been better off using a double bass if he wanted that sound, as Willie Dixon, who played bass on all the Chess blues records, actually didn't play an electric bass. Rather, he got a sound similar to an electric bass by actually placing the microphone inside the bottom of the bass' tailpiece. But that points to something that "Susie Q" was doing that we've not seen before. One of the things people have asked me a few times is why I've not looked very much at the music that we now think of as "the blues", though at the time it was only a small part of the blues -- the guitar playing male solo artists who made up the Chicago sound, and the Delta bluesmen who inspired them. And that's because the common narrative, that rock and roll came from that kind of blues, is false -- as I hope the last year and a bit of podcasts have shown. Rock and roll came from a lot of different musics -- primarily Western swing, jump bands, and vocal group R&B -- and had relatively little influence in its early years from that branch of blues. But over the next few years we will see a lot of musicians, primarily but not exclusively white British men, inspired by the first wave of rock and rollers to pick up a guitar, but rejecting the country music that inspired those early rock and rollers, and turning instead to Muddy Waters, Little Walter, and Howlin' Wolf. There's never a first anything, and that's especially the case here where we're talking about musical ideas crossing racial lines, but one can make an argument that Dale Hawkins was the first white rock and roller to be inspired by people like Waters and Wolf, and for "Susie Q" as the record, more than any other, that presaged the white rock acts of the sixties, with its electric bass, Chess-style guitar riffs, and country-inflected vocals. Acts like the Rolling Stones or the Animals or Canned Heat were all following in Hawkins' footsteps, as you can hear in, for example, the Stones' own version of the song: [Excerpt: the Rolling Stones, “Susie Q”] What's surprising is how reluctant Chess were to release the single. The master was sent to Chess for release, but they kept hold of it for ten months without getting round to releasing it. Eventually, Hawkins became so frustrated that he sent a copy of the recording to Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records. Wexler got excited, and told Leonard Chess that if Chess weren't going to put out the single, Atlantic would release it instead. At that point, Chess realised that he might have something commercial on his hands, and decided to put the record out on Checker as it was originally intended. The song went to number seven on the R&B charts, and number twenty-seven on the pop charts. Between the recording and release of the single, James Burton quit the band. He moved on first to work with another Louisiana musician, Bob Luman: [Excerpt: Bob Luman, "All Night Long"] Burton then went on to work first with Ricky Nelson and then as a session player with everyone from the Monkees to Elvis. Hawkins had an ear for good guitarists, and after Burton went on to be one of the most important guitarists in rock music, Hawkins would continue to play with many other superb players, such as Roy Buchanan, who played on Hawkins' cover version of Little Walter's "My Babe": [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "My Babe"] And then there was the guitarist on the closest he came to a follow-up hit, “La-Do-Dada”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Lo-Do-Dada"] That guitarist was another young player, Joe Osborn, who would soon follow James Burton to LA and to the pool of session players that became known as the Wrecking Crew, though Osborn would switch his guitar for bass. However, none of Hawkins' follow-ups had anything more than very minor commercial success, and he would increasingly find himself chasing trends and trying to catch up with other people's styles, rather than continuing with the raw rock and roll sound he had found on "Susie Q". By the early sixties he was recording novelty live albums of twist songs, to try to cash in on the twist fad: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Do the Twist"] After his brief run of hits dried up, he used his connection with Dick Clark, the TV presenter whose American Bandstand had helped to break "Susie Q" on the national market, to get his own TV show, The Dale Hawkins Show, which ran for eighteen months and was a similar format to Bandstand. Once that show was over, he turned to record production. There he once again worked for Stan Lewis, who by that point had started his own record labels. There seems to be some dispute as to which records Hawkins produced in his second career. I've seen claims, for example, that he produced "Hey Baby" by Bruce Channel: [Excerpt: Bruce Channel, "Hey Baby"] But Hawkins is not the credited producer on that, or on "Judy In Disguise With Glasses" by John Fred and the Playboy Band, another record he's often credited with. On the other hand, he *is* the credited producer on the big hit "Do it Again Just a Little Bit Slower" by Jon and Robin: [Excerpt: Jon and Robin, "Do it Again A Little Bit Slower"] Towards the end of the sixties, he had a brief second attempt at a recording career for himself. Creedence Clearwater Revival had a hit in 1968 with their version of "Susie Q": [Excerpt: Creedence Clearwater Revival, "Susie Q"] And that was enough to draw Hawkins back into the studio, working once again with James Burton on guitar and Joe Osborn on bass, along with a few newer blues musicians like Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder, on an album full of the swamp-rock style he had created in the fifties, "LA, Memphis, and Tyler, Texas": [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins: "LA, Memphis, Tyler, Texas"] When that wasn't a success, he moved on to RCA Records to become head of A&R for their West Coast rock department -- a job he was apparently put forward for by Joe Osborn. But after a successful few years, he spent much of the seventies suffering from an amphetamine addiction, having started taking speed back in the fifties. He finally got clean in the early eighties, and started touring the rockabilly revival circuit -- as well as finally getting his master's degree, which for a high school dropout was a major achievement, and something to be as proud of as any hit. In 1998, he recorded his first album in thirty years, Wildcat Tamer: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, "Wildcat Tamer"] That got some of the best reviews of his career, but his next album took nearly a decade to come out, and by that time he had been diagnosed with the colon cancer that eventually killed him in 2010. Hawkins is in many ways a paradoxical figure -- he was someone who pointed the way to the future of rock and roll, but the future he pointed to was one of white men taking the ideas of black blues musicians and only slightly altering them. He was a byword for untutored, raw, instinctive rock and roll, and yet his biggest hit is carefully constructed out of bits of other people's records, melded together with a great deal of thought. At the end of it all, what survives is that one glorious hit record -- a guitar, a bass, drums, a cowbell, and a teenage boy singing of how he loves Susie Q.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 63: “Susie Q”, by Dale Hawkins

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2019


  Episode sixty-three of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Susie Q” by Dale Hawkins, and at the difference between rockabilly and electric blues. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Shake a Hand” by Faye Adams.  —-more—- Errata I pronounce presage incorrectly in the episode, and the song “Do it Again a Little Bit Slower” doesn’t have the word “just” in the title. Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This time, for reasons to do with Mixcloud’s terms of service, it’s broken into two parts. Part one, part two. There are no books that I know of on Hawkins, but I relied heavily on three books with chapters on him — Hepcats and Rockabilly Boys by Robert Reynolds, Dig That Beat! Interviews with Musicians at the Root of Rock and Roll by Sheree Homer,  and Shreveport Sounds in Black and White edited by Kip Lornell and Tracy E.W. Laird. This compilation of Hawkins’ early singles is as good a set as any to start with, though the liner notes are perfunctory at best.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript We’re pretty much at the end of the true rockabilly era already — all the major figures to come out of Sun studios have done so, and while 1957 saw several country-influenced white rock and rollers show up, like Buddy Holly and the Everly Brothers, and those singers will often get referred to as “rockabilly”, they don’t tend to get counted by aficionados of the subgenre, who think they don’t sound enough like the music from Sun to count. But there are still a few exceptions. And one of those is Dale Hawkins, the man whose recordings were to spark a whole new subgenre, the style of music that would later become known as “swamp rock”. [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”] Dale Hawkins never liked being called a rockabilly, though that’s the description that most people now use of him. We’ll look later in the episode at how accurate that description actually is, but for the moment the important thing is that he thought of himself as a bluesman. When he was living in Shreveport, Louisiana, he lived in a shack in the black part of town, and inside the shack there was only a folding camp bed, a record player, and thousands of 78RPM blues records. Nothing else at all. It’s not that he didn’t like country music, of course — as a kid, he and his brother hitch-hiked to a nearby town to go to a Flatt and Scruggs gig, and he also loved Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers — but it was the blues that called to him more, and so he never thought of himself as having the country elements that would normally be necessary for someone to call themselves a rockabilly. While he didn’t have much direct country influence, he did come from a country music family. His father, Delmar Hawkins senior, was a country musician who was according to some sources one of the original members of the Sons of the Pioneers, the group that launched the career of Roy Rogers: [Excerpt: Sons of the Pioneers, “Tumbling Tumbleweeds”] While Hawkins Sr.’s name isn’t in any of the official lists of group members, he might well have performed with them at some point in the early years of the group. And whether he did or didn’t, he was definitely a bass player in many other hillbilly bands. However, it’s unlikely that Delmar Hawkins Sr. had much influence on his son, as he left the family when Delmar Jr was three, and didn’t reconnect until after “Susie Q” became a hit. Delmar Sr. wasn’t the only family member to be a musician, either — Dale’s younger brother Jerry was a rockabilly who made a few singles in the fifties: [Excerpt: Jerry Hawkins, “Swing Daddy Swing”] Another family member, Ronnie Hawkins, would later have his own musical career, which would intersect with several of the artists we’re going to be looking at later in this series. Del Hawkins, as he was originally called, did a variety of jobs, including a short stint as a sailor, after dropping out of school, but he soon got the idea of becoming a musician, and started performing with Sonny Jones, a local guitarist whose sister was Hank Williams’ widow. Jones had a lot of contacts in the local music industry, and helped Hawkins pull together the first lineup of his band, when he was nineteen. While Hawkins thought of himself as a blues musician, for a white singer in Shreveport, there was only one option open if you wanted to be a star, and that was performing on the Louisiana Hayride, the country show where Elvis, among many others, had made his name. And Jones had many contacts on the show, and performed on it himself. But Hawkins’ first job at the Louisiana Hayride wasn’t as a performer, but working in the car park. He and his brother would go up to drivers heading into the car park for the show, and charge them fifty cents to park their cars for them — when the car park filled up, they’d just park the cars on the street outside. What they didn’t tell the drivers was that the car park was actually free to the public. At the same time he was starting out as a musician, Del was working in a record shop, Stan’s Record Shop, run by a man named Stan Lewis. Hawkins had been a regular customer for several years before working up the courage to ask for a job there, and by the time he got the job, he was familiar with almost every blues or R&B record that was available at the time. Customers would come into the shop, sing a snatch of a song they’d heard, and young Del would be able to tell them the title and the artist. It was through doing this job that Hawkins became friendly with customers like B.B. King, who would remain a lifelong friend. It was also while working at Stan’s Record Shop that Hawkins became better acquainted with its owner. Stan Lewis was, among other things, both a talent scout for Chess records and one of the biggest customers of the label — if he got behind a record, Chess knew it would sell, at least in Louisiana, and so they would listen to him. Indeed, Lewis was one of the biggest record distributors, as well as a record shop owner, and he distributed records all across the region, to many other stores. Lewis also worked as a record producer — the first record he ever produced was one of the biggest blues hits of all time, Lowell Fulson’s “Reconsider Baby”, which was released on the Chess subsidiary Checker: [Excerpt: Lowell Fulson, “Reconsider Baby”] Lewis took an interest in his young employee’s music career, and introduced Hawkins to his cousin, D.J. Fontana, another musician who played on the Louisiana Hayride. Fontana played with Hawkins for a while before taking on a better-paid job with Elvis Presley. At Lewis’ instigation, Hawkins went into the studio in 1956 with engineer Merle Kilgore (who would later become famous in his own right as a country songwriter, co-writing songs like “Ring of Fire”), his new guitarist James Burton, and several other musicians, to record a demo of what would become Hawkins’ most famous song, “Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”, demo version] Listening to that, it’s clear that they already had all the elements of the finished record nearly in place — the main difference between that and the finished version that they cut later is that the demo has a saxophone solo, and that James Burton hasn’t fully worked out his guitar part, although it’s close to the final version. At the time he cut that track, Hawkins intended it as a potential first single, but Stan Lewis had other ideas. While Chess records put out almost solely tracks by black artists, their subsidiary Checker *had* recently released a single by a white artist — a song by Bobby Charles called “Later, Alligator”, which a short while later had become a hit for Bill Haley, under the longer title “See You Later, Alligator”: [Excerpt: Bobby Charles, “Later Alligator”] Lewis thought that given that precedent, Checker might be willing to put out another record by a white act, if that record was an answer record to Bobby Charles’. So he persuaded Hawkins to write a soundalike song, which Hawkins and his band quickly demoed — “See You Soon, Baboon”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “See You Soon, Baboon”] Lewis sent that off to Checker, who released Hawkins’ demo, although they did make three small changes. The first was to add a Tarzan-style yodelling call at the beginning and end of the record: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “See You Soon, Baboon”] The second, which would have long-lasting consequences, was that they misspelled Hawkins’ first name — Leonard Chess misheard “Del Hawkins” over the phone, and the record came out as by “Dale Hawkins”, which would be his name from that point on. The last change was to remove Hawkins’ songwriting credit, and give it instead to Stan Lewis and Eleanor Broadwater. Broadwater was the wife of Gene Nobles, a DJ to whom the Chess brothers owed money. Nobles is also the one who supplied the Tarzan cry. Both Lewis and Broadwater would also get credited for Hawkins’ follow-up single, a new version of “Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”] On that, at least, Hawkins was credited as one of the writers along with Lewis and Broadwater. But according to Hawkins, not only did the credit get split with the wrong people, but he didn’t receive any of the royalties to which he was entitled until as late as 1985. And crucially, the other people who did cowrite the song — notably James Burton — didn’t get any credit at all. In general, there seems to be a great deal of disagreement about who contributed what to the song — I’ve seen various other putative co-authors listed — but everyone seems agreed that Hawkins came up with the lyrics, while Burton came up with the guitar riff. Presumably the song evolved from a jam session by the musicians — it’s the kind of song that musicians come up with when they’re jamming together, and that would explain the discrepancies in the stories as to who wrote it. Well, that and the record company ripping the writers off. The song came from a myriad musical sources. The most obvious influence for its overall sound — both the melody and the way the melody interacts with the guitar riff — is “Baby Please Don’t Go” by Muddy Waters: [Excerpt: Muddy Waters, “Baby Please Don’t Go”] But the principal influence on the melody was, rather than Waters’ song, a record by the Clovers which had a very similar melody — “I’ve Got My Eyes on You”: [Excerpt: The Clovers, “I’ve Got My Eyes On You”] Hawkins and Burton took those melodic and arrangement ideas and coupled them with a riff inspired by Howlin’ Wolf — I’ve seen some people claim that the song was “ripped off” from Wolf. I don’t believe, myself, that that is the case. Wolf certainly had several records with similar riffs, like “Smokestack Lightnin'”: [Excerpt: Howlin’ Wolf, “Smokestack Lightnin'”] And “Spoonful”: [Excerpt: Howlin’ Wolf, “Spoonful”] But nothing with the exact same riff, and certainly nothing with the same melody. Some have also claimed that Wolf provided lyrical inspiration — that Hawkins was inspired by seeing Wolf drop to his knees on stage yelling something about “Suzy”. There are also claims that the song was named after Stan Lewis’ daughter Suzie — and notably Stan Lewis himself bolstered his claim to a co-writing credit for the song by pointing out that not only did he have a daughter named Susan, so did Leonard Chess. He claimed that he had mentioned this to Hawkins and suggested that the two of them write a song together with the name in it, because it would appeal to Chess. Both of those tales of the song’s lyrical inspiration may well be true, but I suspect that a more likely explanation is that the song is named after a dance move. We talked way back in episode four about the Lindy Hop, the popular dance from the late 1930s and forties. That dance was never a formalised dance, and one of its major characteristics was that it would incorporate dance moves from any other dance around. And one of the dances it incorporated into itself was one called the Suzie Q, which at the height of its popularity was promoted by a song performed by the pianist Lilian Hardin, who is now best known for having been the wife of Louis Armstrong, whose career she managed in its early years, but who at the time was a respected jazz musician in her own right: [Excerpt: Lil Hardin Armstrong, “Doin’ the Suzie Q”] The dance that that song was about was a simple dance step, involving crossing one’s feet, swivelling. and stepping to one side. It got incorporated into the more complex Lindy Hop, but was still remembered as a step in itself. So, it’s likely that Hawkins was at least as inspired by that as he was by any of the other alleged inspirations for the song. Certainly at least one other Checker records artist thought so — Jimmy McCracklin, in his song “The Walk”, released the next year, starts his list of dances by singing “I know you’ve heard of the Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Jimmy McCracklin, “The Walk”] According to the engineer on the session, Bob Sullivan, who was more used to recording Jim Reeves and Slim Whitman than raw rock and roll music, “Susie Q” was recorded in four takes, and Hawkins had the final choice of which take to use, but in Sullivan’s opinion he chose the wrong one. The take chosen for release was an early take of the song, when Sullivan was still trying to get a balance, and he didn’t notice at first that Hawkins was starting to sing, and had to quickly raise the volume on Hawkins’ vocal just as he started. You can hear this if you listen to the finished recording: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Susie Q”] This new version of “Susie Q” was stripped right down — it was just guitar, bass, and drums — none of the saxophone that was present on the early version. But it kept the crucial ingredients of the earlier version — that biting guitar riff played by James Burton, and the drum part, with its ear-catching cowbell. That drum part was played by Stan Lewis’ fifteen-year-old brother Ronnie on the new version, but he’s closely copying the part that A.J. Tuminello played on the demo — Tuminello couldn’t make the session, so Lewis just copied the part, which came about when Hawkins had heard Tuminello playing his drum and cowbell simultaneously during a soundcheck. Now that we’ve put the song in context, there’s an interesting point we can make. As we discussed in the beginning, people usually refer to “Susie Q” as a rockabilly song. But there are a few criteria that generally apply to rockabilly but not to “Susie Q”. And one of the most important of these ties back to something we were talking about last week — the electric bass. The demo version of “Susie Q” had, like almost all rock and roll records of the time, featured a double bass, played in the slapback style, and as we talked about back in the episodes on Bill Haley several months back, slapback bass is one of the defining features of the rockabilly genre. For this new recording, though, Sonny Trammell, a country player who played with Jim Reeves, played electric bass, as he was the only person in Shreveport who owned one. This was a deliberate choice by Hawkins, who wanted to imitate the sound of electric blues records, rather than using the double bass, which he associated with country music — though as it turns out, he would probably have been better off using a double bass if he wanted that sound, as Willie Dixon, who played bass on all the Chess blues records, actually didn’t play an electric bass. Rather, he got a sound similar to an electric bass by actually placing the microphone inside the bottom of the bass’ tailpiece. But that points to something that “Susie Q” was doing that we’ve not seen before. One of the things people have asked me a few times is why I’ve not looked very much at the music that we now think of as “the blues”, though at the time it was only a small part of the blues — the guitar playing male solo artists who made up the Chicago sound, and the Delta bluesmen who inspired them. And that’s because the common narrative, that rock and roll came from that kind of blues, is false — as I hope the last year and a bit of podcasts have shown. Rock and roll came from a lot of different musics — primarily Western swing, jump bands, and vocal group R&B — and had relatively little influence in its early years from that branch of blues. But over the next few years we will see a lot of musicians, primarily but not exclusively white British men, inspired by the first wave of rock and rollers to pick up a guitar, but rejecting the country music that inspired those early rock and rollers, and turning instead to Muddy Waters, Little Walter, and Howlin’ Wolf. There’s never a first anything, and that’s especially the case here where we’re talking about musical ideas crossing racial lines, but one can make an argument that Dale Hawkins was the first white rock and roller to be inspired by people like Waters and Wolf, and for “Susie Q” as the record, more than any other, that presaged the white rock acts of the sixties, with its electric bass, Chess-style guitar riffs, and country-inflected vocals. Acts like the Rolling Stones or the Animals or Canned Heat were all following in Hawkins’ footsteps, as you can hear in, for example, the Stones’ own version of the song: [Excerpt: the Rolling Stones, “Susie Q”] What’s surprising is how reluctant Chess were to release the single. The master was sent to Chess for release, but they kept hold of it for ten months without getting round to releasing it. Eventually, Hawkins became so frustrated that he sent a copy of the recording to Jerry Wexler at Atlantic Records. Wexler got excited, and told Leonard Chess that if Chess weren’t going to put out the single, Atlantic would release it instead. At that point, Chess realised that he might have something commercial on his hands, and decided to put the record out on Checker as it was originally intended. The song went to number seven on the R&B charts, and number twenty-seven on the pop charts. Between the recording and release of the single, James Burton quit the band. He moved on first to work with another Louisiana musician, Bob Luman: [Excerpt: Bob Luman, “All Night Long”] Burton then went on to work first with Ricky Nelson and then as a session player with everyone from the Monkees to Elvis. Hawkins had an ear for good guitarists, and after Burton went on to be one of the most important guitarists in rock music, Hawkins would continue to play with many other superb players, such as Roy Buchanan, who played on Hawkins’ cover version of Little Walter’s “My Babe”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “My Babe”] And then there was the guitarist on the closest he came to a follow-up hit, “La-Do-Dada”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Lo-Do-Dada”] That guitarist was another young player, Joe Osborn, who would soon follow James Burton to LA and to the pool of session players that became known as the Wrecking Crew, though Osborn would switch his guitar for bass. However, none of Hawkins’ follow-ups had anything more than very minor commercial success, and he would increasingly find himself chasing trends and trying to catch up with other people’s styles, rather than continuing with the raw rock and roll sound he had found on “Susie Q”. By the early sixties he was recording novelty live albums of twist songs, to try to cash in on the twist fad: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Do the Twist”] After his brief run of hits dried up, he used his connection with Dick Clark, the TV presenter whose American Bandstand had helped to break “Susie Q” on the national market, to get his own TV show, The Dale Hawkins Show, which ran for eighteen months and was a similar format to Bandstand. Once that show was over, he turned to record production. There he once again worked for Stan Lewis, who by that point had started his own record labels. There seems to be some dispute as to which records Hawkins produced in his second career. I’ve seen claims, for example, that he produced “Hey Baby” by Bruce Channel: [Excerpt: Bruce Channel, “Hey Baby”] But Hawkins is not the credited producer on that, or on “Judy In Disguise With Glasses” by John Fred and the Playboy Band, another record he’s often credited with. On the other hand, he *is* the credited producer on the big hit “Do it Again Just a Little Bit Slower” by Jon and Robin: [Excerpt: Jon and Robin, “Do it Again A Little Bit Slower”] Towards the end of the sixties, he had a brief second attempt at a recording career for himself. Creedence Clearwater Revival had a hit in 1968 with their version of “Susie Q”: [Excerpt: Creedence Clearwater Revival, “Susie Q”] And that was enough to draw Hawkins back into the studio, working once again with James Burton on guitar and Joe Osborn on bass, along with a few newer blues musicians like Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder, on an album full of the swamp-rock style he had created in the fifties, “LA, Memphis, and Tyler, Texas”: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins: “LA, Memphis, Tyler, Texas”] When that wasn’t a success, he moved on to RCA Records to become head of A&R for their West Coast rock department — a job he was apparently put forward for by Joe Osborn. But after a successful few years, he spent much of the seventies suffering from an amphetamine addiction, having started taking speed back in the fifties. He finally got clean in the early eighties, and started touring the rockabilly revival circuit — as well as finally getting his master’s degree, which for a high school dropout was a major achievement, and something to be as proud of as any hit. In 1998, he recorded his first album in thirty years, Wildcat Tamer: [Excerpt: Dale Hawkins, “Wildcat Tamer”] That got some of the best reviews of his career, but his next album took nearly a decade to come out, and by that time he had been diagnosed with the colon cancer that eventually killed him in 2010. Hawkins is in many ways a paradoxical figure — he was someone who pointed the way to the future of rock and roll, but the future he pointed to was one of white men taking the ideas of black blues musicians and only slightly altering them. He was a byword for untutored, raw, instinctive rock and roll, and yet his biggest hit is carefully constructed out of bits of other people’s records, melded together with a great deal of thought. At the end of it all, what survives is that one glorious hit record — a guitar, a bass, drums, a cowbell, and a teenage boy singing of how he loves Susie Q.

Records Revisited
Episode 63 - Tyler Bancroft of Said the Whale Discussing The Shins

Records Revisited

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 98:40


The guys are joined by Tyler Bancroft of Said the Whale to discuss The Shins' "Chutes Too Narrow." Plenty of other discussion about Canadian music, the making of the video for "Record Shop," fatherhood, being a creative type, fighting the sack, James Mercer as a lyricist, and of course Ben and Wayne over analyze a few songs. Catch Tyler and all of Said the Whale at: saidthewhale.com Check out other episodes at RecordsRevisitedPodcast.com, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Castbox, iHeartMedia, and we're now on Google Podcasts and Spotify. Additional content is found at: Facebook.com/recordsrevisitedpodcast or twitter @podcastrecords

Fastline Fast Track
Ep. 25: Sunbelt Ag Expo 2, music of Scott Southworth from the Ernest Tubb Record Shop

Fastline Fast Track

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2019 32:52


Episode 25 of Fastline Fast Track features more interviews from Sunbelt Ag Expo 2019, held Oct. 15-17 in Moultrie, Georgia. Featured are Adam Verner from Elite Ag, Greg Spooner from Specialty Sales, Michael Sosebee from Chandler Manufacturing Co., Scott Black with Cadman Power Equipment and Billy Black with High Tech Equipment Sales. The episode also features an interview with Woody Woodell of Anna, Ohio-based Fertilizer Dealer Supply, and revisits the music of honky-tonk hero Scott Southworth, from the Ernest Tubb Record Shop in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Atheist in the Trailer Park
Episode 252: Randy's Racist Record Shop

The Atheist in the Trailer Park

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2019 65:54


Sorry for the delay folks, but I had some computer issues.  Show notes can be found here: https://tparkatheist.blogspot.com/2019/07/episode-252-randys-racist-record-shop.html

Colorado Matters
Colorado U.S. Attorney Jason Dunn On The Record; Inside The Historic Wax Trax Record Shop

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2019 31:01


U.S. Attorney Jason Dunn has to strike the balance between Colorado's drug laws, Denver's more liberal stance, and the federal policies that still criminalize those substances. Then, we revisit our story about the historic Denver record store Wax Trax as a documentary about the shop hits digital platforms.

On Hold with Siara
On Hold with Sean Giovanni

On Hold with Siara

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2019 78:56


This week, I am so excited to share Sean Giovanni’s story with you. He is the owner of The Record Shop, a recording studio and production company here in Nashville, TN. Sean “Gio” graciously allowed me to shadow him in the studio for various sessions when I first moved to Nashville. Our paths continued crossing […]