Podcasts about LP

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 3,965PODCASTS
  • 10,939EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 21, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about LP

Show all podcasts related to lp

Latest podcast episodes about LP

Cobra Kai Kompanion
Interview with Luis-Pablo Garcia ”Freddy Fernandez”/The Karate Kid: The Musical

Cobra Kai Kompanion

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 36:39


We sat down with Luis-Pablo Garcia who plays the "Freddy Fernandez" in the upcoming The Karate Kid: The Musical! LP shares his backstory of moving to STL and how he landed two roles shortly after graduating high school! Twitter: @CobraKaiPod / Instagram: @CobraKaiKompanion Ph: (424) 262-7284 [424-COBRA-84] / Email: CobraKaiPod@gmail.com Cobra Kai Kompanion Website Merch store: ckkompanion.threadless.com www period Cobra Kai period C-O-M slash Kompanion Podcast Contenders Clothing Link: https://contendersclothing.com/?rfsn=5377037.325ffd  20% off Promo code: CKPODCAST

YuriyVR
Eyes Above

YuriyVR

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 3:43


Промо-трэк "Eyes Above" - второй из 12 трэков нового альбома LP "Быстрый Старт" / "Quick Start", написанного, сыгранного и записанного совместно с Leonard Rhyman. Сейчас мы работаем над альбомом в студии и финальная версия альбома будет опубликована в июле этого года. Мы будем публиковать промо-трэки еженедельно. The promo track "Eyes Above" is the second of 12 tracks on the new LP album "Quick Start", written, played and recorded with Leonard Rhyman. We are still working on the album and the final version of the album will be published in July this year. We will be posting promo tracks weekly. Idea and production of LP "Savage Desire" - Leonard Rhyman Composer - YuriyVR Musicians - YuriyVR & Leonard Rhyman Art - Leonard Rhyman Lyrics - YuriyVR & Leonard Rhyman

The XS Noize Podcast
#87. Ocean Colour Scene guitarist Steve Cradock on new solo project ‘A Soundtrack To An Imaginary Movie'

The XS Noize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:23


In episode #87 of The XS Noize Podcast, Mark Millar catches up with Ocean Colour Scene guitarist Steve Cradock to talk about his new solo project, ‘A Soundtrack To An Imaginary Movie'. Following the success of his three previous solo albums, ‘The Kundalini Target' (2009), ‘Peace City West' (2011) and ‘Travel Wild – Travel Free' (2013), Steve Cradock reveals a different side to his musical talents with a new instrumental LP drawing on jazz, folk, classical and film soundtrack influences. In this interview, Steve Cradock talks about making the album, his favourite soundtracks, Ocean Colour Scene, and lots more.

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever
JF2817: Building Momentum from House Hack to LP ft. Nicole Pendergrass

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 17:46


Nicole Pendergrass started her career in value-add commercial multifamily with a three-family house hack in the Bronx. Today, she is the founder of Noirvest Holdings, which focuses on value-add commercial multifamily with a mission to increase equity and net worth for communities of color. In this episode, Nicole shares how her first property helped her to become an LP investor, the hardest lesson she's learned so far, and how she plans to execute her mission. Nicole Pendergrass | Real Estate Background Founder of Noirvest Holdings, which focuses on value-add commercial multifamily. Their mission is to increase the equity/net worth of communities of color by providing access to investment opportunities. Portfolio: Owns three properties, totaling 14 units. Three are owned solely and 11 owned 50/50 as JV. LP of 96 units Full-time career is in health care administration. Based in: Bronx, NY Say hi to her at: noirvestholdings.com Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Best Ever Book: The Gap and The Gain: The High Achievers' Guide to Happiness, Confidence, and Success by Dan Sullivan Click here to know more about our sponsors:  Cash Flow Portal | Cornell Capital Holdings | PassiveInvesting.com 

This Is Hardcore Podcast
Episode 80 Six Shows in Seven Days in Philadelphia.

This Is Hardcore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 87:53


Episode 80 Six Shows in Seven Days in Philadelphia. (cover photo taken 5/14 by Greg Flack www.instagram.com/xgregflackx) Well sorry for the lack of an episode last week, but we got busy. Lots to talk about and a few rants and raves. But good news, 3 songs, not one to start off the Episode!! Sinister Feeling out of Baltimore Track 1 “pulled down” Track 2 “sinister feeling “ Available at Rebirth Records wwww.rebirthrecords.bigcartel.com Rebirth 008 DOWNFALL "Primitive Reality" off the upcoming debut LP "Behind The Curtain". Record comes out July 1st, preorders available June 10th via DAZE and Triple B records www.daze-style.com/

The #WhatsNext Podcast
Ep 181 - The nextAdvisory Post Budget Announcement

The #WhatsNext Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 59:14


Tune in to the nextAdvisory post-budget announcement with Luke and Phil. They discuss what was in the budget announcement on the 19th of May and how it will impact all of us. Find us here:https://nextadvisory.nz/#book-onlinehttps://www.instagram.com/nextadvisory.nz/Cheers,L&P

Punknews Podcast
594: #594- Stop talking about [redacted]!

Punknews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 68:56


Em, Hallie, and John talk the upcoming return of Punk Rock Bowling, the new dead Kennedys remix LP, Boots Riley's new film, QWAM, and much more! Also, John keeps bringing up [redacted] and everyone else gets very annoyed.

The #WhatsNext Podcast
180 - Increase Your Business Value With Data

The #WhatsNext Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 34:43


Let's look at the data... in today's episode Luke and Phil sit down to chat about data and how it can increase the value of your business. They also discuss why you should take advantage of the technology available and have your business automated so you don't waste your time doing things like dispersing reams of papers. Find us here:https://nextadvisory.nz/#book-onlinehttps://www.instagram.com/nextadvisory.nz/Cheers,L&P

T4
Que siga el baile 2x29: Entrevista a Manolo García (19/05/22)

T4

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:00


Hablar de Manolo García es hablar de la historia viva de nuestra música. El artista catalán sigue en plena batalla musical con dos nuevos discos que acaba de lanzar al mundo. 'Mi vida en Marte' y 'Desatinos desplumados' son sus nuevos trabajos de los que nos habla en 'Que siga el baile', con Sara Carbonero. A falta de uno son dos discos los que ha decidido publicar a la vez, dos LP muy diferentes entre sí: "Hay un eje en común en los dos discos que es mi voz pero en el resto son totalmente diferentes. 'Mi vida en Marte' es mucho más pop rock y 'Desatinos desplumados' tiene las guitarras españolas como eje central del disco. Pero además, también nos ha hablado de su próxima gira y de las sensaciones de volver a tocar delante de la gente: "Tocando me siento útil para mí y para los demás. Lo que hermana mucho es la trinchera y la batalla del concierto. Nuestra misión es muy bonita, que es emocionar a la gente". Hoy hemos conocido más detalles de un artista de leyenda. Detalles como que los días de concierto le gusta "descansar porque uno de los secretos para cantar es estar descansado". Además, también nos ha contado que "odia la rutina" e incluso nos ha confesado cómo asimiló todo el cambio de vida con el éxito de 'El último de la fila': "No estaba preparado para que me pararan por la calle. Yo era un músico anónimo y no asimilé demasiado todo lo que pasó". Tras 'El último de la fila' llegó su etapa en solitario, que dura hasta nuestros días pese a no tener todo el apoyo necesario en el comienzo: "Los primeros tiempos de mi periplo en solitario no fueron fáciles. Había gente de la industria musical que no confiaba en mí". No te pierdas todo lo que nos contó y el extracto que nos cantó en directo con guitarra en mano. Todo en esta entrevista fantástica en otro capítulo de 'Que siga el baile'. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Slam Radio
#SlamRadio - 494 - Sigvard

Slam Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 62:03


From veteran dj/producer Tom Hades comes his alias Sigvard, a project driving perfectly crafted techno in a diverse range of moods & tones. Over the past decades Tom Hades has released on labels such as Planet Rhythm, Pig & Dan's Elevate etc & now he presents ‘The Flowers Hundred' LP on Marco Bailey's Materia imprint which continues to be a worldwide summit for cutting edge techno producers. The album's ever evolving style is nurtured through expressive use of hardware, complex structures & a focused energy where Sigvard delivers club-ready, experimental dance music that is uncovered across fifteen delicately crafted tracks with soundscapes of ambient glowering above. The foundation of all tracks is married with the artist's desire to create, combine & discover. ‘The Flowers Hundred' is a bold and passionate release celebrating Hades' inspirations & innovations, a standout techno emblem Tracklist via -Spotify: http://bit.ly/SRonSpotify -Reddit: www.reddit.com/r/Slam_Radio/ -Facebook: bit.ly/SlamRadioGroup Archive on Mixcloud: www.mixcloud.com/slam/ Subscribe to our podcast on -iTunes: apple.co/2RQ1xdh -Amazon Music: amzn.to/2RPYnX3 -Google Podcasts: bit.ly/SRGooglePodcasts -Deezer: bit.ly/SlamRadioDeezer Keep up with SLAM: fanlink.to/Slam Keep up with Soma Records: fanlink.to/SomaRecords For syndication or radio queries: harry@somarecords.com & conor@glowcast.co.uk Slam Radio is produced at www.glowcast.co.uk

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
423: Reign Ventures with Monique Idlett

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 41:54


Monique Idlett is the Founder of Reign Ventures, a seed-stage investment firm, and previously the Co-Founder and CEO of Mosley Brands and Mosley Music Group, home to a multiplatinum roster of artists. Chad talks with Monique about how the music industry is like the startup venture capital industry, understanding that representation matters, having a data-forward approach, and appearing on the TV show Undercover Billionaire, where entrepreneurs are given 90-days and nothing but 100 dollars to go undercover and build a thriving million-dollar business for a small town in the US. Reign Ventures (https://www.reignvc.com/) Follow Reign Ventures on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ReignVc), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/reign_ventures/), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/reign-ventures/). Follow Monique on Twitter (https://twitter.com/Monique_Mosley_) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/monique-idlett-mosley-41353b15/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Monique Idlett, the Founder of Reign Ventures, a seed-stage investment firm, and previously the Co-Founder and CEO of Mosley Brands and Mosley Music Group, home to a multiplatinum roster of artists. Monique, thank you so much for joining me. Now, you left Mosley Music Group about three years ago to focus exclusively on Reign Ventures. How is the music industry like the startup venture capital industry? MONIQUE: There is no difference in the way I see a pipeline of amazing talented founders. We're truly looking for those exceptional founders that we can help develop, put up that bumper system. The end product in the music industry was the music we were consuming, the experiences through the live art form. And in the startup world, that end product is the success and the ability to scale a real solution that this company has solved with amazing, talented people. So to me, it was a nice, easy transition, and it made sense. CHAD: Are there ways in which it's different? MONIQUE: Oh my goodness, yes, lots of ways that it's different. The difference is that music is an art form. For me, music is the universal language. I believe that I've traveled the world. And I've been to places where there were language barriers, but when a song, a popular song, came on, the language barrier was gone. In the startup world, there may be several people trying to create and penetrate a problem area in a vertical or a category. And we may not have the ability in the startup world to have several of the same sounding things from a business model. They may not all work. And so you're dealing with the emotional capacity on the music side. And on the tech side of things you're truly dealing with, can you really solve this problem? We're solving problems, not just emotional connections from the music industry perspective. And also, it's a lot slower moving. We have a project in the music industry, and it may have a cycle. And now it's an even shorter cycle with technology. You may be able to create an entire project in just a couple of weeks. In the startup world, in the business side of things, you may not see the development for two to three years. So the patience is definitely...I've had to apply a lot more patience and understanding of being able to scale a business versus just a project-driven entity. So it's a little different, but the end result is all the same. Creating real great solutions for real problems, whether it's through an art form or whether it's through a business model, is all similar to me. CHAD: So, do you have a particular investment strategy or focus at Reign? MONIQUE: We do. Erica and I currently we are the largest two female Black-owned VC fund. So one of the things that we felt ten and a half years ago when we started investing together is investing has just been done...venture has been done wrong. There's a reason why less than 3% of funding collectively was...still to this day; it's about 3.2. But over ten years ago, when we started, only less than 3% of funding from VC was going to women, all women, and Black and Brown founders. And so literally, we were like, the problem is that we're not having enough investment or a lens on women and people of color. And we want to do it the way it should have always been done: investing inclusively. We are proud to say that we invest in all founders, all exceptional founders. And yes, we have a lens on women and people of color because they've been under-capitalized and under-resourced and under-everything. And so the reality is that we want to set the tone of how it should always look and the world is inclusive. Diversity is not an issue; the equity and inclusion side is an issue. And we want to keep being that example. CHAD: That's great. Do you feel like, or in your experience, have you found that these founders were already out there and they just were being passed over? Or were the problems so systemic that they weren't even getting the opportunity to even be out there? MONIQUE: I think there are always exceptional people out there; that's number one. And I think it's a two-prong problem: yes, the pipeline, the access. So there's the lack of access for these types of founders that has absolutely been an issue, the lack of resources, the lack of access. But the other side of it is that they have just been overlooked and not allowed into the rooms. There are exceptional people in this world that don't only look like one type of person. And the reality is that we have access to them. And so yes, both of those are an issue, okay. But the reality is that we have exceptional founders of all types of people. There are amazing people in this world. When you sit behind a computer, and you run an algorithm, and you only go to only your network of what looks like you and comfortable, then you are what we call missing out on a ton of opportunity. So Erica and I are founder-friendly. We go where the founders are. CHAD: I've come to learn and understand representation really matters. Being able to see yourself is really important. And it's something that because I look like what I look like, I had the privilege to not realize how important that is because there are so many people in power that look like me. I can imagine it's super refreshing to a lot of the founders that you work with to be talking with you and sitting across the table from you and seeing that and talking to someone that understands them. MONIQUE: Yes. I think that having someone to relate to on all levels, personal, professional is a very important concept. And I remember starting my career at USA Today; not only was I different in age because most of my colleagues were 40-plus, and I was in my young 20s, they were mostly male and definitely particularly only Caucasian. I was the first African American executive on the marketing and sales side. And I remember feeling very isolated and very lost and not knowing who I could turn to that would understand some of the things I was actually going through. And so yes, founders, it eases the founder's mind when they can talk to me and know that hey, I didn't always look like this from this perspective. I grew up in income-based housing in New Jersey. I understand where you come from. Yes, I understand what it's like to be a Black woman; I am one. But also the other side of it is that when we have founders who are Caucasian male. We like to have conversations of inclusion from the ground up with them. "Did you think about this consumer base? Do you know that you might have to message different?" These are things and conversations that people are not having if you're only talking to one type of person. And so, I think that what Reign Ventures is doing is allowing for comfortable conversation and then execution. CHAD: That's great. You started with a $25 million fund in Reign, and you're well beyond that now, right? MONIQUE: Yes, yes. So our current fund is a $50 million fund, and then our next fund will be...we're going for the stars and trying to raise $100 million. CHAD: Wow. I've talked to a few people who are either interested in starting VC or who have done it before. And what do you use to judge how much or how large of a fund you'll be building? MONIQUE: So we like to think of what we want the outcome to be. And so, the long-term goal of Reign Ventures is to have a billion-dollar under asset management. That has not been done by two Black females before. And so we understand if we do that, if we look at the long-term goal, if we do that and count backwards, here's what it will take to get to that billion dollars under asset management. So yes, the size of the fund will have to increase. But we also know that that means we're creating amazing companies and supporting amazing founders with Reign Ventures. And so we look at the size as our ability to have a larger stake and the ability to have follow-on capital for all of the companies that are doing amazing. I would tell anyone who is looking to start a venture fund that Erica and I (Erica is my business partner.) she and I started and wrote our thesis over ten years ago. And we actually deployed our personal capital for the first nine years so that we could create a data room and so that we could understand what it meant and felt like to have skin in the game so that we can learn truly where we sat well with a thesis. And it ended up being we do really well with consumer tech and SaaS, you know, B2B SaaS software. And so, I would say that it's not an easy journey to start a venture fund. Truly understand what you want your thesis to be. Truly understand that you're going to hear the word No way more than you will hear the word Yes. This is someone else's investment. This is accountability. And try it and understand it before you just start raising money. CHAD: You sort of alluded to this earlier; you said increasing the size of the fund is going to allow you to make bigger investments and follow-on investments. So do you also see you investing in more companies? MONIQUE: So we like to have a 20 to 25 cap strategy per fund. And what we do is we take 25% of the capital for the earliest investment, and then we save 75% of it for the follow-on round so that we maintain our equity stake. Because we're founder-friendly, so we always want to be in that board room. We always want to roll up our sleeves with the founders and so maintaining whichever early equity we have, which is usually the way the fund is structured, between around 10%. It allows us to not just do more companies; it actually allows us to really double down on the portfolio itself and make sure that we're staying and growing with the founders. CHAD: How involved are you? Are you personally involved? Do you split the portfolio up, and each person takes a few? Or how do you typically do it? MONIQUE: We truly, truly do take my 25-plus years in the music industry. We take that very bumper system approach of we're here to help develop the raw talent and, on the tech side of things, the actual founding team and the evolution of the company. And so I usually take the board seats. Erica, she comes from finance, and she's been doing finance banking for over 25 years. She's been doing early-stage investing for 16 of those years. And so, she helps with the finance cap strategies. How do we get you from your seed stage to your A in 12 months? How do we get you from your A to your B? So she's very, very involved with the financial models and running several of those and working with the founders on who's on your cap table? Okay, so intentionally and strategically, who's missing from your cap table? Let's work on that. And then I'm always the one working on taking the board seat. I'm the one working with the vision, the strategy. I'm an operator, so I have a most extensive network. And so I'm the one aligning them with our resources, our network. And you know, yeah, we're very, very involved. And I think that when you're dealing with seed-stage because that's the stage we're in, it's the riskiest. We try to de-risk the company, the founder, the founding team as much as possible. So we are as involved as the founder wants us to be. We do not make founders feel guilty for not having the largest team. We're like, "Okay, what do you need? Let's get you that." And that's where we like to play. We don't see ourselves going into anything past the seed stage. CHAD: Is there a limit to how many companies that you're able to personally work with? And how do you scale, Monique? MONIQUE: So the cool thing about our fund is that all of the companies are intentional. Half of our companies are consumer tech. So they mostly need pretty much the same type of things, even if they're in different verticals. The other half is SaaS. And so the reality is that they're in different stages. They're growing at different stages. And we, first and foremost, create a founder community that supports each other. That's number one. Then we have an LP community that supports not just Erica and I but our founder community. So we look at investing as from a holistic community. We drive community, and that is the way that we're able to actually still have a sustainable business model with Erica and I. And we have a team. We don't do anything by ourselves. We have an entire team dedicated to the growth of our portfolio companies. CHAD: Speaking of that team, what does that team look like now in terms of the different roles on it? And how big is it? MONIQUE: So currently, right now, we have about four full-time. And then, we have a couple of interns who work on the data science side. And then we also have in-house from just Monique from my particular business model side; we have an HR. We have financial operators, and then we have contractors and partners. And so, at the end of the day, there isn't anything that our founders need that we can't source for them internally or externally. CHAD: Who was the first person you brought onto the Reign team, and why? MONIQUE: Her name is Naya, and she actually has worked for me on my foundation side for a few years. She's was an engineering student at University of Miami. And once she graduated, she was now getting her Master's in Data Science. And we felt like being able to report properly on our founders, the companies that were applying that we actually could not invest in but were investable, we'd like to keep track of that. And so, we felt like having someone who could really handle the data side of Reign Ventures was one of the more important hires. And then, we also hired a full-time social media person who handles the content. We have a monthly podcast called The Series A. They oversee that so all communications on our portfolio companies and Reign Ventures as a whole. So those were the first two hires. And we're currently prepping to hire for the summer a full-time associate that will be out of the New York office. We have offices here in Miami, across from the University of Miami, and then we have offices in New York. CHAD: That's cool. The data aspect of that is super interesting to me because I think that I talk to a lot of people, and a modern VC firm is certainly doing that. But there are still ones out there that don't have that data-forward approach that it sounds like you do. MONIQUE: Well, we need to make sense of all of this. So we need to make sense of the idea of how many founders are applying? What is the demographic makeup of them? Who is this founder? Where are they coming from? What markets are they coming from? Because we do invest just only in the United States. And we pretty much invest in all markets here. We'd like to keep that data. And most importantly, we are over-communicators with our LPs. So we're sending them monthly updates. Carta is updated every, you know, they have access to that. So we'd like for them to understand what our day is looking like. How are we spending our time? What type of founders are coming to us? Hey, you all don't necessarily have access to these founders, here's why we do. And so all of this information is important. You have to make sense of who your audience is. And for us, our audience are the founders. Mid-Roll Ad: I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: You mentioned that you invest in people in some ways as much or more than you do the idea that they have and really work with them. How far along will people typically be with their product when you start working with them and investing in them? MONIQUE: The way that the investment cycle is, you know, your family and friends, then your angels, and then sometimes even your super angels will come in after that. Then you have your pre-seed, which is usually where you're testing product-market fit, et cetera. And then we step in at the seed stage, which is founder market fit, you know, product-market fit, a billion-dollar addressable market. You understand your operational strategy, where you're going to raise less than 50 million, and if you're not, you have that strategy of why? And definitely more than just an idea at that point. Now you just need to raise this round, to hire on more team, and then scale. So for us, that's how our due diligence works. And if you make it through that due diligence, then it becomes about who is this founding team? Will they be able to deal with adversity? Because you're going to have it. Are they coachable? What is their leadership style? Is it an inclusive environment? You can't be creating an equity company, and then all the team looks the same. So these are the things that we're looking at. What is your personality type? We like to spend time with our founders. How will you deal with the stress because the stress will come. Is your mindset the glass is half full or is it half empty? All of these things are important at the seed stage because it's not the growth stage where it's automatic it's happening. The seed stage boils down to can you deal with adversity? CHAD: I imagine you reject a lot of people. MONIQUE: Ooh, I would say that we use a different term. We are not dream killers. CHAD: Okay. [chuckles] MONIQUE: Here's what we say: we have an open-door policy with founders. We allow founders, even the ones that are not ready for investment or that we've actually had to pass on investment. And the thing is that we can only do 20 companies. That is where we'd like to sit, 20 companies per fund. And if for some reason, it's not a company that we invest in, we still give them access to our resources. We still give them access to our network. We still will spend…I mean, every Friday is our Founder Friday, and it fills up very quickly. Erica and I get on with founders who are not in our portfolio because just because they weren't a good fit for Reign Ventures or it was something that we could not do, maybe it did not fit the fund's structure; we also try to align them with investors that might fit them more properly. And so I don't feel like we reject; we just redirect. CHAD: So given that then, I imagine that you are often pretty open with the companies that you're not able to invest in the reasons why and hopefully, it helps them. MONIQUE: Oh, absolutely. We get founders all the time that say, "Listen, this was the best thing. Prior to coming to you all, we weren't able to raise $1. You didn't invest in us, but you taught us how to be investable, and now we've raised money." That's what we want to hear. None of us win if there's really a great company with a great solution that can really have some traction if they never get up and running. CHAD: That's great. And maybe you get the opportunity to invest in them later, right? MONIQUE: Yep. Absolutely. Absolutely. There are a couple of companies that that has happened. And one of them is now back in our due diligence and probably will make it through. CHAD: Yeah. Are there any companies in your portfolio that you particularly want to give a shout-out to? MONIQUE: Oh, we love all of our portfolio companies. CHAD: [laughs] MONIQUE: You know, Sharebite, Dormify, SoLo Funds. SoLo Funds is one of my favorite companies from the perspective of dealing and disrupting predatory lending. As a person who grew up in a neighborhood that liquor stores and cash checking were like every other block, if not on the same block, we truly do know the long-term effect it has on those communities, right? The underserved communities get so taken advantage of. If you don't have $200 and then you go to a predatory lender, and you're paying them $2,000, how do you ever advance? And so SoLo Funds really, really the only Black-owned B Corp in the United States. CHAD: That's awesome. MONIQUE: This narrative is so important, Chad. CHAD: Yeah. And, you know, not only is it important from a social perspective, but that is a huge business. It's a huge market opportunity for the right company with the right values to come in and be able to have a significant business, too, right? MONIQUE: Listen, they're making the whole ecosystem better. For the lenders, listen; they feel good. They're having a positive social impact. And oh, by the way, I'm getting a return. For the borrowers, they are getting financial literacy. They are getting higher social credit scores, which is then impacting their personal credit score. I mean, listen, by the way, when this company was created, over 76% of Americans, if they were hit with a $200 bill, they were not going to be able to pay it. So this is not just about one type of community. This is about the American concept. CHAD: So when you work with a company like that, were they a B Corp when you started working with them? MONIQUE: No. True story, I was literally personally the second investor in and then the third before there was ever even...So Rodney Williams is the Co-Founder of SoLo Funds. And I'm on his board for LISNR. We were one of the first investors in LISNR, which is the data over audio company. And he shared this idea with me, and I loved it because we all come from a neighborhood where we know and we were the ones who quote, unquote, "were doing better" in our families. So we were always getting the daily calls like, "Oh, my car broke down. Oh, this." And when he said this to me, I'm like, "Oh my goodness, this makes so much sense. I'm in." And see, this is where investing in people comes to play. Rodney had proved his ability as a founder with LISNR. So the trust was there, the relationship was there. Travis comes from banking, super, super intellectual, really quality guy, and not only is he the co-founder, but he's the CEO. And he's doing an amazing job. So no, it was not a B Corp; it is now one. And they will be the largest neobank for this community. And so growing and seeing the cycle of it is what, for me, personally, is what makes me happy. All of our companies in our fund have a social impact perspective. CHAD: Had you been involved in a B Corp before? It's something that I'm really interested in, but I have not been directly involved in one before. And I'm actually really interested in it for thoughtbot too. MONIQUE: No, I had not. No. CHAD: Is it difficult? [laughs] MONIQUE: So was it difficult for them? Absolutely. But they made it through. They made it through. And I think that we now have two men who are great human beings who happen to be Black men, but they are just great human beings who went through the process and can now help educate and share that experience with other people that look like them and are trying to do the same thing as them, create great companies with a great social impact to just have a better world. CHAD: From an investor perspective, when your portfolio companies want to embark on something like becoming a B Corp, which, you know, some investors might look at and say, "That might be a distraction from what you need to do now," how do you look at those things? MONIQUE: I mean, listen, if you want to become a B Corp, you actually are trying to have more of an impact, and I wish more companies were. When we actually are only focusing on the dollar side, the stakeholders of the dollar side, how are we truly making sure that we're impacting the world in a positive way? There's a lot of conflict usually. So we encourage that type of behavior; we encourage founders to think beyond their dollar sign and their stakeholders' dollar sign. The good thing is that they had an amazing team supporting them. They had an amazing A series lead investor, ACME, that really drove it with them. And so they did this. We didn't do this. They did it. This was their mission, and they did it. CHAD: That's great. And it's definitely something that's on my list to dig into more, like I said, for thoughtbot as well. So was it 2021 that you were on Undercover Billionaire? Was it last year? MONIQUE: Oh my goodness. CHAD: Or was it the end of 2020? MONIQUE: So it was the end of 2020, yes. [laughs] Tacoma, Washington. CHAD: Yeah. So for folks who don't know, Undercover Billionaire is a TV show where you give up all of your resources, and you're planted in a city, and you start a business from scratch. And you have what? Ninety days to bring it to a million-dollar business? MONIQUE: Yes. So technically, the premise of the show is you literally get a new identity. And you do not know where you're being dropped literally until you're dropped there. And so, I had no idea I would be dropped into Tacoma, Washington. And one, they give you $100, literally, a phone with no contacts in it, and a used vehicle, and you have 90 days to turn that into a million-dollar valuation. CHAD: It must have been a wild experience. MONIQUE: I have to tell you, the emotional connection that has to happen and then also by the way you're lying to everyone, it was a very intense thing. And most of the time, 99% of time, you're running on adrenaline. And to be completely honest, when I first got there, you're focused on the goal. The goal is can you make this valuation? The goal is I can't be the example that didn't make it right. Then when you get there, it becomes less and less about the goal. You actually get to a point where you don't even care if you make the goal. You care about the community that you've been dropped into. And you just want to see them win, and you want to see them become better. And Tacoma, Washington, everything from the mayor, down to now to one T'wina Nobles, who is now the Senator, the youngest senator in the state of Washington, these amazing people were a part of my journey. So it became all about, wow, at the end of that experience, that last show, and I look at the room of all those people, it was the most inclusive experience naturally. That's what the win was for me personally. And I also got to learn about myself. But I will tell you that it was one of the hardest things I've ever done in life outside of having children and raising them to be healthy adults. [laughter] CHAD: Not only to build the business, you mean, but that experience of -- MONIQUE: Just the entire experience. CHAD: I watched the episode where you told everybody who you really were. MONIQUE: Yes. CHAD: And I could see that it had really affected you. MONIQUE: I was lying to people every single day. And these people were so amazing. They donated their time, their resources, their ability to me because that company could not happen without them and without the community. And so, what we all walked away with was a shared experience of how powerful community actually is. And that even when you don't know how to figure something out, if you use your voice, someone will actually help you and you end up all helping each other. For me, that's what was so beautiful about the experience. CHAD: I imagine it's pretty intense. How quickly did you force yourself to settle on the business you were actually going to build? MONIQUE: It's so interesting because I have been asked like, "Did you create the concept before you went?" And I said, "Actually, no," literally, I went into it with a blank mind of wherever I end up, I want to see what they need, and we'll create a business model around that. So I think it was like day four of being in Tacoma. And I was in an area that was a food desert for the most part. And I'm like, listen, I'm talking to people, and they're like, "Oh yeah, we have to order juice shots. They have to get shipped. Or we get the ones that are, you know, sitting in the grocery store, and that's not a lot of options." And I'm like, wow, this is a problem. And I'm like, let's reimagine the ice cream truck. Everyone would like to think that the wealth gap...that if you make money, you care about your health, if you don't make money, you don't care about your health, actually, no. [laughs] I grew up in a natural home, and we lived in income-based housing growing up. And so the reality is that everyone wants to be healthy. People need more access to healthier options at an affordable rate, and people will buy it. So the question was, oh, Monique, you can't sell juice shots for $5. Yes, we can. You think a community just because they're underserved won't pay for their health? They absolutely will if you give them the option to. We always sold out in the communities that they said would never sell. CHAD: So up against a ticking clock, what did you do to sort of validate the idea and really run with it, or did you just know? MONIQUE: No, you don't just know, right? CHAD: Yeah. [chuckles] MONIQUE: You're literally working on adrenaline. Listen, there was nothing normal. We all know this as business owners; there's nothing normal about this concept. You can't create a successful business in 90 days. So you're literally in overdrive: no sleep, multitasking, doing all types of things. Here was the thing; first of all, I talked to the community. I asked them what did they need? What were they missing? If they had access to something, would they utilize it? That was number one. Number two was testing it. So I started making samples. And I went out to the community again and started testing it. Three was of the test that did good; let's run with that and package that up. And you have to understand, Chad, it was the height of the pandemic. Everything was shut down. You know, I live in Florida, so we weren't like that. But going to Tacoma, Washington, nothing was open. So I had to think, how do I get to people because they're not coming and cannot come to a brick and mortar? So the only thing that was pretty much open was the farmers' market. So that's what I did. I'm like, let's get to the farmers market. And also, let's see how we become mobile, oh, the ice cream truck treats. Let's teach people that healthy treats are actually what they crave. CHAD: I think even though it was accelerated, intense, the things you're talking about doing in terms of validating the idea, actually talking to customers, testing things out, those are things I think people want to do in any situation. MONIQUE: It is absolutely true. We talk to founders all the time, and it's the I, I, I. And we tell them, "Well, have you talked to your customer?" Sometimes we're so close to our ideas because we hold them, and we're trying to solve a problem maybe that we experience. That's step one. But step two is, is it something that other people want and need? So you definitely have to go out there and do market research. CHAD: Are there other things that you counsel founders on doing? Particularly with the seed stage, you know, on the verge of significant growth and scaling, what are some things that are maybe common plays or common pitfalls of companies at that stage? MONIQUE: So some of the things that we see, especially with solo founders, is them having this idea that only they can do everything and not understanding that you actually have to have a founding team. And that does require you to give some equity. We see founders wanting to hold on to everything. And then it becomes do you want 100% of something that's very restricted, or do you want to share it and make it something really special and a part of a billion-dollar concept? So that's one. Two would be founders in need happen to take money without understanding that it is a debt that even if it's fundraising and you're raising institutional capital, these are your investors. These are your partners. And is it a good partnership? We have seen a lot of founders in contractual and legal documents because they went and took money from the wrong type of investor. We see that -- CHAD: And they did that because they were desperate at the time? MONIQUE: They were desperate. They were desperate. They were desperate and for just really crazy, contractual things. They don't have attorneys look at the paperwork. We see a lot of these mistakes. And so we tell founders you have to have a step back from your business. You have to look at all types of options. Have you applied for grants and particular grants in areas of the problem that you're solving? Have you tried for Small Business Association grants? Have you tried to get a credit line versus an investor who's now going to have equity? These are all the things. And if you do need investors, don't take all the same types of investors. If every investor in your cap table is a bean counter and the numbers aren't playing out well for them, what type of board meeting is that going to be? So make sure you have an operator who's on your board. Make sure you have a financial person, investor on your board. You have to be very strategic and intentional. And if you're in a desperate moment, I can guarantee that is not when you want to take the money that you actually need to do a deeper dive and step back from the company to really see what the company needs. CHAD: Monique, I feel like that's great advice. The level of experience and passion that you have for the work is obvious in listening to you. It makes me want to work with you. [laughs] MONIQUE: Oh, thank you, Chad. Yes, I'm very impressed with what you have built. And I'm very impressed with you understanding the ability to give access to information to your audience. Here's the thing, we are products of an environment of capitalism. And there's nothing wrong with capitalism, but it just needs to be a lot more conscious. And it needs to have a much better impact for all. The problem with from our childhood age of education is we've been taught that there's only one, there can only be one winner. There's only one first place. We have to take that mindset back and really step into the power and the power that we truly have, which is abundance. There's enough for us all. We just have to give that power back to it. And the reality is that we all need each other, and we all need to build together. And people just need access to information. Most founders tell us, "I was embarrassed to ask that. I was made to feel like I was supposed to know this, so I just went ahead and pretended like I knew it." It's okay that we don't know everything. In fact, I like to sit in that space of student and say, "You know what? I like to be in the room that I actually don't know anything because then that means I'm learning, and it's okay. We better keep learning." One of my favorite quotes is, "We delight in the beauty of the butterfly but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty." And Maya Angelou wrote that, and she understood the human spirit needs to understand that no matter what career path we're on, Founder, CEO, employee, employer, no matter what that is, it is a constant evolution of self. And sometimes we'll feel like a butterfly, and sometimes we will have to be in that learning and growth and uncomfortable stage. But the beauty of uncomfort means you're growing, and we have to make more people feel comfortable with that. CHAD: That's beautiful. Monique, thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing with all of us. MONIQUE: No, thank you, Chad, for having me. CHAD: If folks want to get in touch with you or find out more about Reign, where are all the different places that they can do that? MONIQUE: So if they want to contact me, they can email me at monique@reignvc.com, which is R-E-I-G-N-V-C.com. We're on LinkedIn; we're on Twitter; we're on Instagram. And if they want to learn more about Reign VC, they could just go to reignvc.com. And if they have any questions, they can submit it, and we'll get back to them. CHAD: Wonderful. And you can subscribe to the show and find notes and a full transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm, and you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Monique Idlett.

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.05.12 Sampled & AMPED with Dan Lloyd

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 121:54


As broadcast May 12, 2022 with plenty of new cuts to taste test for your streaming palette.  Lots of new tunes to go through in hour 1 along with a highlight of Jazzanova's new remixes compilation featuring the sounds selected by DJ Amir's Strata Records The Sound of Detroit compilation to start.  Beyond that, new joints out from Swatkins, Kutiman, Bobby Oroza, Monster Rally, and a slew of others as well to cover the first half of the show.  Dan Lloyd joins us once again after a very busy weekend of album releases, most notably Sharon Van Etten, The Smile, and Rammstein.  We also had some major beef getting dropped via Twitter by The Lemonheads directed at Jawbreaker, which we discussed somewhat at length before closing the show with Belle and Sebastian from their new LP.#feelthegravityTracklisting:Part I (00:00)DJ Amir w/Jazzanova & Sean Haefeli – Introduction & Lost My LoveSwatkins – Until I Get BackTanika Charles – Hold Me (Like A Grudge)Ennio Morricone – Passporto per l'allegriaKutiman – Tears of One HundredEx-poets – Bay of Pigs Part II (30:53)Bobby Oroza feat Cold Diamond & Mink – Through These TearsDojo Cuts feat Carlton Jumel Smith – Here We Are (inst.)Monster Rally – Golden ShoresAdrian Quesada feat Gabriel Garzon-Montano – El ParaguasThe Diasonics – BalanceJean Carne feat Jazz Is Dead – The SummertimeEmanative feat Liz Elensky & Ben Hadwen – Fall In To Me Part III (58:37)Rammstein – AngstBlack midi – Welcome to HellThe Smile – Thin ThingThe Chats – 6L GTRRolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – My EchoStarcrawler – Roadkill Part IV (90:10)RKL – Scab on My Brain (Live)U2 – Sunday Bloody SundaySharon van Etten – HeadspaceJawbreaker – BoxcarThe Lemonheads – It's a Shame About RayBelle and Sebastian – Talk to Me, Talk to Me 

Voice Is
NICE with Fran Hauser: Building better relationships at work and niceness as a superpower

Voice Is

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 60:00


Julie and Casey chat with author, speaker, and angel investor Fran Hauser (author of Embrace the Work, Love Your Career and Audible's Best Business Book of 2018, The Myth of the Nice Girl) about building relationships, rejecting the idea that being nice makes you weak, how to stand up for yourself, the difference between "nice" and "people pleaser", and why founders need to take care of themselves.   Thank you to our Season 3 sponsor, Armoire! If you're ready to try a new look, Armoire's high-end clothing rental service (full of amazing women-owned brands) will hook you up! For 50% off your first month's rental + a free item, go to http://armoire.style/voiceis and use VOICEIS in the referral box!   TOP TAKEAWAYS: Being successful in business is all about relationships You don't have to choose between being nice and being strong. If you're a founder/entrepreneur, are you jumping ahead to business model, marketing, partnerships, etc. before making sure you have an awesome product that consumers are delighted by?  You're skipping the most important step. Taking a breath, taking the time and energy to care for yourself and others makes the WORK better.  Compassion for ourselves and for other people makes us more productive, not less, and we need to bring more of it into our professional lives. You don't need to be the smartest kid in fifth grade (i.e. have all the answers all by yourself).  Build out your community and your network. Nice is a superpower - its "evil twin" is people-pleasing. Know the difference, and know when to stand up for yourself. Mini-Lesson: How to embrace your "toos". Articles referenced: On the culture of over-work, and how it holds both women and men back - https://hbr.org/2020/03/whats-really-holding-women-back Gender bias in performance reviews - https://hbr.org/2017/04/how-gender-bias-corrupts-performance-reviews-and-what-to-do-about-it Vague vs specific feedback - https://hbr.org/2016/04/research-vague-feedback-is-holding-women-back   Fran Hauser is an author, keynote speaker and startup investor at the intersection of women's empowerment, career fulfillment, and collective wellbeing. As a long-time media executive, Fran has always championed the power of content in shaping culture, educating the public, and driving awareness of important issues.  She is the best-selling author of The Myth of the Nice Girl: Achieving a Career You Love Without Becoming a Person You Hate which has been translated into six languages and was named “Best Business Book of the Year, 2018” by Audible. Fran's new book, Embrace the Work, Love Your Career, is quickly becoming the go-to for women seeking more joy and fulfillment in their career. Fran regularly speaks at conferences and organizations to help women build careers they love while staying true to themselves Fran has invested in over 30 female-founded companies across CPG, media & publishing, and wellness. She also serves as an LP in the Female Founders Fund. Her writing, speaking and investing is informed by 15 years spent in media, from startups where she played an integral role in the $525mm sale of Moviefone to AOL, to ultimately rising the ranks at Time Inc. to President of Digital where she led innovation, acquisitions and digital expansion for powerhouse media brands People, InStyle, Entertainment Weekly, Essence, and People en Espanol. Fran has been the recipient of the Fairy Godmother Award from Girl Be Heard, the W Award from the YWCA of the City of New York and has been included in lists from Business Insider's "30 Women In VC to Watch" to Refinery29's “Six Most Powerful Women in New York City's Tech Scene”. She has been featured on TODAY, CNBC, Fortune, TIME, Fast Company, Forbes, Vogue.com, Ad Age, Oprah.com and more.  In 2020 Fran channeled her lifelong love of books into an Instagram platform @FransBookshelf focused on the joy of reading -- both the escapism and the celebration of diverse ideas that can change the world.  Fran serves on the board of directors of the Foundation for Bedford Central Schools and is an advisor to Helpusadopt.org and LiveGirl. Fran is a summa cum laude graduate of Pace University. She resides just outside of NYC with her husband and two sons.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20Growth: Five Signs of Top Growth Talent and How to Detect Them, How to Structure and Conduct the Most Efficient Customer Discovery Process & The Framework to Determine Your North Star and When To Change it with Darius Contractor, Former VP Growth @

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:33


Darius Contractor is one of the pre-eminent growth leaders of the last decade. As a growth OG, he has been VP Growth @ Airtable, where he led the growth, engineering, and product teams. Before Airtable, Darius was Head of Product Growth @ Facebook Messenger and finally, before Facebook, Darius spent 4 years as Head of Growth Engineering at Dropbox; here, Darius helped drive Dropbox to $100M in net new revenue through Dropbox Business. If that was not enough, Darius is also an active angel and fund investor with a portfolio including Calm, Airtable, Clubhouse, Census and LP checks in Maven Ventures and Long Journey Ventures. In Today's Episode with Darius Contractor You Will Learn: 1.) Darius Contractor: Entry into Growth: How did Darius make his way into the world of growth? What was that first entry position? What are 1-2 of the biggest takeaways for Darius from his time at Airtable, Dropbox and Facebook? What 1-2 pieces of advice would Darius give to a growth leader starting a new role today? 2.) When is the Right Time: What does the term"growth" really mean to Darius? How do so many confuse it? When is the right time to make your first growth hire as a startup? Should this hire be a junior growth person or a growth leader? Should this initial growth team be placed inside an existing team or as a standalone team? Where do so many startups make mistakes when making this first hire? 3.) Who To Hire: How does one structure the process for your first growth hire? What are the stages? What are the qualities that we are looking to uncover in these first hires? What are the 4 interview stages to go through to test for these qualities? How should founders use case studies and practicals as a way to test for these qualities? 4.) Onboarding and Integration: What does the optimal onboarding process for new growth hires look like? What do the best growth hires do in the first 30/60/90 days? What are some early red flags that a new hire is a mis-hire? How can leaders encourage cross-functional communication between growth and the rest of the org?

Mixology: The Mono/Stereo Mix Differences Podcast
Nancy & Lee by Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood

Mixology: The Mono/Stereo Mix Differences Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 33:34


Hello Friends! Today on the show we're taking another trip out with Nancy Sinatra, and her album of duets with Lee Hazlewood, Nancy & Lee from 1968. An album that for many years was seen as an underground classic, over the last few years it has risen to greater prominence in the music community, and today I want to take a look at that original 1968 stereo mix, the original mono single and LP releases of the 5 tracks released prior to the album, the Bill Inglot remix issued on CD in 1989, and the tracks remixed for the digital only release in 2006. It's time to put all these differences to rest, as we celebrate Light in the Attic's reissue of this album next week, including a couple of wonderful bonus tracks too!   Happy Listening,   Frederick   Support the show and get hours of extra content at: https://www.patreon.com/backtomono   Email the show at: backtomonoradio@gmail.com   Listen to companion podcast Back to Mono: https://www.mixcloud.com/backtomonoradio/playlists/back-to-mono-complete/   Find me on Instagram @hypnoticfred   Join the Facebook Community here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/backtomono

The Nick Huber Show
EP 49: Finding true market rent and how to drive huge revenue

The Nick Huber Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:59


I share my strategy on how I find true market rent and what's the best qualities for a real estate operator to succeed in this business!   Let's have a talk! Call and ask me some questions using Callin app. Follow me @sweatystartup.   Timestamp: 01:05-02:00 personal life update 02:00-14:00 finding true market rent 14:00-19:20 What bolt storage is good at - Revenue Management 19:20-23:03 How to spot your first deal 23:03-26:40 Should you be 100% occupied in Self Storage? 26:40-29:22 What are the best operators do? 29:22-40:54 1st caller - How to be a good LP investor?   Read the full show notes here: https://sweatystartup.com/the-nick-huber-show/   Special thanks to the sponsor: https://junipersquare.com Join the Real Estate community here: https://sweatystartup.com/rec Twitter Growth Mastery Course: https://sweatystartup.com/twitter Want to hire me as a consultant? Click here: https://sweatystartup.com/storage

The Guitar Channel - Passion Amplifier
Cem Ocek from Ocek Guitars interview with a Turkish builder with some cool new shapes

The Guitar Channel - Passion Amplifier

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 30:35


Cem Ocek (ocekguitars.com) is a Turkish luthier based in Germany who offers very original guitar shapes. Here he is in Zoom interview to present his Synapse and Puduhepa models. He has a very original approach to guitar design. The results are some cool instrument shapes very far from the usual LP or S style shapes

Everything Went Black Podcast
EWB 251 MURDERBAIT

Everything Went Black Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:27


It seems like a lifetime has passed since Ralph and I did an episode together.  It was great to catch up and talk about a great band that needs more hype. A while back, Ralph turned me on to Murderbait from Portland. At the time, their EP “When the Sun Goes Down, It Goes Down Forever” was out.  You have to love that title.  Immediately, I was drawn into their web or darkness and intensity, bringing to mind some of my favorite bands such as Fields of the Nephilim, Bauhaus but with a distinctly original vibe. Murderbait have a brand new LP out called “Nostalgia Like Cancer” (yet again another great title).   Intro:     "All the Dark Things" - Mike Hill Outro:    "Lost" - Murderbait

Kreative Kontrol
Ep. #687: Weird Nightmare

Kreative Kontrol

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 60:55


Alex Edkins discusses his solo project Weird Nightmare and their self-titled debut LP for Sub Pop, what distinguishes it from his work in METZ, collaborating with Wintersleep's Loel Campbell, Bully's Alicia Bognanno, and Chad VanGaalen, loving indie-rock but playing post-hardcore, future plans, and more. Supported by you on Patreon, Blackbyrd Myoozik, Pizza Trokadero, the Bookshelf, Planet Bean Coffee, and Grandad's Donuts. Support Y.E.S.S. and Black Women United YEG. Follow vish online.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/kreative-kontrol. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Defeat the [DC Sports] Curse
Commanders Offseason; Caps Lose; NBA Playoffs

Defeat the [DC Sports] Curse

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 52:59


FP and LP are back at it, talking Commanders, Caps, Wizards, NBA and NHL playoffs. Catch up on the offseason for all 3 DC teams and what they can do to go deeper into the playoffs. 

Desperately Seeking Paul : Paul Weller Fan Podcast
EP95 - Phil Veacock - Brass Arranger & Sax Player... ”When I hear that sound, it goes to my heart, straight to my soul...”!

Desperately Seeking Paul : Paul Weller Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 49:44


In this episode of The Paul Weller Fan Podcast, I'm joined by Phil Veacock - best-known as the main arranger, musical director and tenor saxophonist of Jools Holland's Rhythm and Blues Orchestra. Phil has multiple connections and credits with Paul Weller with arrangements and performances on every Weller album since 2017's A Kind Revolution, right through to 2021's number one LP, Fat Pop (Volume 1). They'd actually played together before then with Paul's multiple appearances on Jools Holland's TV Shows - Later... and Hootenanny. Plus in 2012, in honour of Sir Paul McCartney turning 70, Paul covered 'Birthday' by The Beatles and made it available to download for one day only - as you'll hear in our chat Phil played on that version of the song. And we shouldn't forget the stunning cover of September in the Rain for a Jools Holland album in the same year, for which Phil led on arrangements working closely with Paul Weller throughout. A huge fan of soul music - Phil has worked with THE greatest names in the genre. Legends like: Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, Smokey Robinson, Al Green, Pops & Mavis Staples, Booker T, Candi Staton, Chaka Khan, George Benson, Solomon Burke, Barry White, Sam Moore, Edwin Starr and Eddie Floyd. Thanks for listening - make sure that you subscribe / follow and leave a review - and if you want to support the podcast financially, you can buy me a virtual coffee or our new official merchandise at paulwellerfanpodcast.com/store  

Discoteca Básica Podcast
T04E02: Acabou Chorare - Novos Baianos (1972)

Discoteca Básica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 85:12


A HORA DESSA GENTE BRONZEADA MOSTRAR SEU VALOR. Juntando música brasileira com a música universal, melodia e contracultura, os Novos Baianos fizeram o segundo maior álbum brasileiro da história, segundo a eleição promovida pelo “Discoteca Básica”. Convidado do episódio: Nando Reis.   Assinante do Clube Discoteca Básica tem conteúdo exclusivo. Nesta semana, preparamos um especial a respeito do incrível ano de 1972 na música brasileira, com álbuns e singles que definiram aquele ano mágico. Assine agora e aproveite a degustação grátis de 30 dias: https://podcastdiscotecabasica.com/clube/      Apoie a campanha de financiamento coletivo do livro “Os 500 Maiores Álbuns Brasileiros de Todos os Tempos”. Garanta seu exemplar e receba recompensas exclusivas (até 09/07): http://podcastdiscotecabasica.com/livro    A MusicDot acredita que os próximos 500 maiores álbuns brasileiros estão na mente de muita gente que está estudando um instrumento hoje. Numa escola de música online, com professores de verdade, você estuda no seu ritmo, tira todas as dúvidas e tem acesso a todos os cursos – incluindo o curso de línguas da Alura. E ouvinte Discoteca Básica ainda tem 10% de desconto. Acesse: https://musicdot.com.br/promoção/discotecabasica     Em seu segundo LP, os Novos Baianos esquentam seus pandeiros e ressurgem com uma proposta de psicodelia mulata eletro-acústica no álbum que é a maior e melhor síntese da fusão de rock e música brasileira.   Dica de artista novo: Jadsa   Discoteca Básica é uma co-produção da Parasol Storytelling e Tudo Certo Produções. Apresentação: Ricardo Alexandre Roteiro e Pesquisa: Ricardo Alexandre e Sérgio Jomori Redação final: Ricardo Alexandre Direção: Ricardo Alexandre Edição: Roberto Oksman de Aragão Produção Executiva: Guga Mafra Produção Executiva: Ricardo Alexandre   Saiba mais em: http://podcastdiscotecabasica.com  Support the show: https://clubediscotecabasica.com/assine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. Support the show: https://clubediscotecabasica.com/assine

The Adamantium Podcast
E139 Grandson #2

The Adamantium Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:12


Our friend, Grandson, joins us again on this episode of The Adamantium Podcast. We discuss his debut LP, Death Of An Optimist, the persona he created for the album, and his latest single, “KULT.” We also talk about his experience working on new music with Tom Morello, as well as the soundtrack for The Suicide Squad movie. Grandson describes how growing up in both the US & Canada has influenced his music and outlook, and how our high school played a role in encouraging his career path.

1001 Album Club
447 Fleetwood Mac - Tusk

1001 Album Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 36:26


In October of 1979 Fleetwood Mac released their 12th studio album. Following the colossal success of Rumors the band opted to build their own studio to record the next album. A ten month cocaine binge and 20 songs later, the band released what was at the time the most expensive album ever made. The double LP had a sticker shock price of $16.00 (which in 2022 monies equates to $63.72), only spent nine months on the Billboard charts, and was considered a failure by Warner Bros. Let's talks Fleetwood Mac, Tusk!

Dirty Disco - Electronic Music Podcast
18 New Vinyl EP & LP’s – House Music Selection – The Dirty Disco Show 458.

Dirty Disco - Electronic Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 121:09


Welcome to a new music blog post and podcast. If you are into that good old fashioned plastic fantastic, this is going to be a real treat for you. For this week's music selection I included 26 new releases with 18 new vinyl EP's and LP's. A real treat if [...] The post 18 New Vinyl EP & LP's – House Music Selection – The Dirty Disco Show 458. appeared first on Dirty Disco.

FRSHOUT
Episode 89 | "Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers"

FRSHOUT

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 130:43


We had to give you guys a full album reaction episode of Kendrick Lamar's latest LP, “Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/frshoutshow/message

Notorious Mass Effect
"FUTURE - I NEVER LIKED YOU"

Notorious Mass Effect

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 41:21


Future Sends All 16 Songs From ‘I Never Liked You' Onto Billboard Hot 100 Future charts all 16 from the standard edition of his new album I Never Liked You on the Billboard Hot 100 (dated May 14). The set soars in atop the Billboard 200 with 222,000 equivalent album units earned, according to Luminate, the biggest one-week total for an album this year. The LP earns Future his eighth leader on the list. On the Hot 100, the album's “Wait for U,” featuring Drake and Tems, leads Future's haul as it blasts in at No. 1. Here's a recap of Future's entries on the latest Hot 100 (all debuts except where noted). Overall, he charts 18 titles; the songs at Nos. 68 and 76 are not from the new set. Rank, Title No. 1, “Wait for U,” feat. Drake & Tems No. 4, “Puffin on Zootiez” No. 8, “712PM” No. 10, “I'm Dat N***a” No. 11, “I'm on One,” feat. Drake No. 12, “Love You Better” No. 15, “Keep It Burnin,” feat. Ye No. 20, “Massaging Me” No. 24, “For a Nut,” feat. Gunna & Young Thug No. 26, “Chickens,” feat. EST Gee No. 29, “Gold Stacks” No. 39, “Voodoo,” feat. Kodak Black No. 45, “We Jus Wanna Get High” No. 46, “Holy Ghost” No. 58, “Back to the Basics” No. 60, “The Way Things Going” No. 68, “Pushin P,” with Gunna & feat. Young Thug (down from No. 53; peaked at No. 7) No. 76, “Me or Sum,” with Nardo Wick & Lil Baby (down from No. 66; peaked at No. 58) source: https://www.billboard.com/music/chart-beat/future-all-16-songs-i-never-liked-you-billboard-hot-100-1235068835/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/masseffect/support

Slimming Stories
Episode 102 - For Mental Health Awareness Week I explain how it's possible to remove emotional pain from a memory.

Slimming Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 21:17


  Before mental health awareness week passes us by, I wanted to jump on and record an episode to support you in any struggles that you're feeling right now. I want anyone that is listening to this episode to know that regardless of where they are at right now with their mental health, you are not broken and unfixable. If you have tried C.B.T, N.LP, Counselling, E.M.D.R…..and have felt beyond the point of therapy this episode is especially for you. I am giving you the chance for me to help you with a painful memory and the best part is that this is content-free, I do not need to know the details of the memory. In this episode, you will hear how I explain that with the best will in the world if you are struggling with a painful memory from the past that a weight loss journey can feel like an uphill struggle. I'm inviting you to offload the pain and while you will still remember the event the emotional pain will no longer be attached. I'm offering this to show you that there is hope and I'm offering this for free. Listen as I read a testimonial from a lady who had spent years in therapy and how I helped her using this exact technique in just 10 minutes. I know EXACTLY how this sounds! Honestly, even if you're skeptical I urge you to give this a try and break free from emotional pain. **There are some people who may not benefit from hypnosis and once you register you will receive this information. Register your interest by reaching out to me on my email address: claireoldhamwest@gmail.com   Slimming Stories Facebook Group. https://bit.ly/3H2RRns YouTube Channel  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx4JqpRnPwmP6MvAf6ieYYw    

SBS Armenian - SBS Հայերէն
Who is Labor's leader? - Ով՞ է Լէյպըրի ղեկավարը

SBS Armenian - SBS Հայերէն

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 2:47


The man campaigning to become Australia's next prime minister has spent the past 26 years as a Labor M-P representing a seat in Sydney's inner west. After more than a quarter of a century as the Member for Grayndler, the Federal Opposition leader, Anthony Albanese, is campaigning to lead the A-L-P to victory in next month's federal election (May 21). - Անձը որ ընտրապայքարի կը մասնակցի դառնալու համար Աւստրալիոյ յաջորդ վարչապետը, անցած 26 տարիները անցուցած է որպէս Աշխատաւորական Լէյպըր երեսփոխան ներկայացնելով Սիտնիի արեւմտեան շրջանը:

Musiques du monde
Session Live Joon Moon & entrevue avec le groupe breton Startijenn

Musiques du monde

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 48:30


Joon Moon revient avec Chrysalis (Label: LDDC / Musique Sauvage) un 2ème LP, avec la voix prodigieuse de Liv Warfield (découverte par Prince et chanteuse dans son groupe le New Power Generation). Un univers musical emprunt des grandes heures de la musique soul, métissé d'orchestrations classiques et réarrangé aux couleurs de la pop et des productions d'aujourd'hui. Car Joon Moon n'est pas celle que vous croyez. Derrière ce personnage romanesque, on retrouve Julien Decoret, musicien français aux multiples facettes, auteur-compositeur, producteur et globe-trotter…   Avec Joon Moon, Julien Decoret traverse l'Atlantique et voyage dans le temps : il compose un univers musical emprunt des grandes heures de la musique soul, métissé d'orchestrations classiques et teinté aux sons de la pop et des productions d'aujourd'hui. Grâce à une collection de plus de 100 instruments provenant des 4 coins du monde, il assemble les styles et les sonorités pour donner à chaque chanson une couleur bien à elle. Chaîne Youtube de Joon Moon.   - Time Live RFI - Bill Let Us March, extrait de l'album Chrysalis - Young Live RFI voir le clip.    Musiciens - Julien Decoret, piano - Liv Warfield, chant Son : Benoît Letirant, Mathias Taylor.     Puis nous recevons Youenn Roué, le leader du groupe breton Startijenn pour la sortie du nouvel album Talm Ur Galon (Paker Prod). Groupe emblématique du dancefloor version breizh, Startijenn, "énergie" en langue bretonne, fait résonner sa musique enthousiasmante en complicité avec le public aux Vieilles Charrues,  sur l'île de Bornéo,  à Aberdeen, à Shanghaï... le 20 mai 2022 à Ploemeur dans le Morbihan, et le 21 mai sur la scène de l'Ermitage à Paris, où leur musique se dévoilera dans un mix trad, rock & folk. Un line-up solide alliant instruments traditionnels: bombarde, binioù, uilleann-pipes, accordéon diatonique, et base rythmique musclée: basse et guitare à l'énergie rock appuyées sur quatre titres par un set de batterie. Sous une apparente simplicité, les cinq musiciens s'affranchissent des codes et brouillent les pistes, poussent les limites de leurs instruments avec des sonorités inattendues, multiplient les références et mixent les influences : électro, dub down tempo, rap, rock , folk, rythm and soul... Parfois une voix chuchote, scande, explose, dans une langue percutante, vivante et créative.   Titres diffusés, extraits de l'album Talm Ur Galon - Talm Ur Galon  - Skilfou An Noz  voir le clip - Lady L  - Typhaine

Kyle Meredith With...
Ray LaMontagne on Work-Life Balance: "I'm Such a Creature of Habit"

Kyle Meredith With...

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 25:52


Ray LaMontagne catches up with Kyle Meredith to talk about Monovision, his 2020 LP that is finally getting its supporting tour. (Get tickets to that "The Monovision Tour" here!) The singer-songwriter talks about re-recording “I Was Made to Love You” with Sierra Ferrell, being a creature of habit, and his work-life balance. LaMontagne also gives us a story about being complimented on his harmonica playing by Willie Nelson's harmonica player, Mickey Raphael. Listen to Ray LaMontagne discuss Monovision, getting back on the road, and more above. Then, make sure to like and subscribe to Kyle Meredith With… wherever you get your podcasts, and you can also follow the Consequence Podcast Network for updates on all our shows. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Notorious Mass Effect
"KENDRICK LAMAR - MR. MORALE & THE BIG STEPPERS"

Notorious Mass Effect

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:27


Since his 2017 album, “DAMN.,” the California rapper has won seven Grammys and the Pulitzer Prize for music. “Mr. Morale,” his fifth LP, is expected to make a big splash on the charts. The five-year wait for a new album by Kendrick Lamar — the Pulitzer-anointed, voice-of-a-generation rapper — is finally over. “Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers,” Lamar's fifth studio LP and one of the most ardently anticipated new albums in years, was released overnight on digital services, with big hopes from fans and big questions looming about his next career steps. After years of growing anticipation, the Compton rapper has returned with Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers—his first full-length project since 2017's Damn. Kendrick confirmed its official release in mid-April under his Oklama moniker. The drop date was shared on letterhead for pgLang, the “at service company” he co-founded with longtime friend and business partner Dave Free. “The following statement was released today by Oklama through his company pgLang at 11 a.m. PT in Los Angeles CA,” the memo began. “Album: ‘Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers.' Release date: 5/13/2022. All factual information for this release will come directly from this source only.” source: https://www.complex.com/music/kendrick-lamar-mr-morale-and-the-big-steppers-album-stream --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/masseffect/support

This Was The Scene Podcast
Ep. 176: Blount w/ Jack Wesley

This Was The Scene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 110:00


Blount were a skate punk band from Pensacola, Fl. They had splits with Shocking Truth, Strung Out, and put out their only LP on Fearless records in 96.  Thank you Josh Marsh for your intro to Jack who I got on the Skype and this is what we chat about: Replacing the first singer Playing a show with Rancid on their first tour Hanging with Lagwagon Opening for Rancid Signing to Fearless Working with Jim Cherry One decision changing the whole band's history  The photo on Discogs Brian Fallon And a ton more Check out my new book The Couples' Checklist for my webcomic dailyBred. It's a great gift for Valentine's Day. I also have an Instagram for it. If you market aggressively on Instagram Stories and want custom stickers then go here to get custom stickers or just email mike@drive80.com and I can send you samples. These are great for B2C companies and Realtors. Feel free to support the podcast for as little as $1 a month through Patreon Or go to thiswasthescene.com to possibly buy some merch.

Seriously…
We're All Living in OK Computer Now...

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 58:02


On the 25th anniversary of Radiohead's breakthrough album, admirers from literature, music, science and politics examine the album's prophetic qualities. Did OK Computer actually shape and predict the future? In June 1997, an also-ran band in the Britpop wars put out a third LP. Moving clear of their musical peers, who were engaged in 60s nostalgia, this was a sonically and psychologically sophisticated record. Released in the first days of the New Labour government, it subverted the era's idealism and “things can only get better”, and lit a flare at the dawn of a new age of postmodern anxiety. Recently, OK Computer was voted the “ultimate 90s album” on BBC Radio 2. But this was more than just a 90s record. Much more. OK Computer is rock music as science fiction. A musical version of George Orwell or JG Ballard. Each song yields a vivid premonition of life as it is lived now, a quarter of a century on. It speaks directly to the major events of our time, from Trump to the climate emergency, big data and surveillance. Author, Booker-nominee, and Radiohead superfan Sarah Hall speaks to contributors including: Lauren Beukes, sci-fi author Daphne A Brooks, academic Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester John Harris, journalist Steve Hyden, rock critic Conor O'Brien, Villagers musician Musa Okwonga, musician and broadcaster Dr Adam Rutherford, scientist Producer: Jack Howson Additional Production: Tess Davidson Executive Producer: Sarah Cuddon Sound Mix: Mike Woolley A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4 With special thanks to Tom Gatti and Bloomsbury Publishing, whose book 'Long Players' inspired this programme.

iHeartRadio Presents: The Filter
Holly Humberstone on Touring with Olivia Rodrigo, Collaborating with Matt Healy, Working on her Full Length LP!

iHeartRadio Presents: The Filter

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 10:11


The wonderful Holly Humberstone sits down with Shannon Burns to talk about opening for Olivia Rodrigo, and making new fans along the way! Holly tells Shannon about how she connected with Olivia, and her collaboration with Matt Healy! Holly tells Shannon about the process about putting together a full length LP and how she always feels like she has more to write!

The Nick Huber Show
EP 48: Interest rates, Real Estate and Tax Q&A

The Nick Huber Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:07


As the interest rates go up, we will never know what comes next. Join me as I answer questions about real estate, small business, how to handle tax & more in this exciting episode.   Let's have a talk! Call and ask me some questions using Callin app. Follow me @sweatystartup.   Timestamp: 00:00-00:59 Life Update 00:59-03:59 Q#1 What are you making sure that it's included in the contract when you're getting a loan from the bank? 03:59-09:53 Q#2 How do you navigate in this uncertain situation in real estate? 09:53-11:38 Q#3 Should I follow your strategy and build a private equity shop? 11:38-14:05 Q#4 What to look for a CPA? 14:05-18:42 Q#5 What to focus on as an LP? 18:42-21:04 Q#6 What kind of small business that is good to acquire right now? 21:04-25:57 Q#7 Is Landscape business good?   Read the full show notes here: https://sweatystartup.com/the-nick-huber-show/   Special thanks to the sponsor: https://junipersquare.com Join the Real Estate community here: https://sweatystartup.com/rec Twitter Growth Mastery Course: https://sweatystartup.com/twitter Want to hire me as a consultant? Click here: https://sweatystartup.com/storage

Soundcheck
Bette Smith: Muscular Soul at a Fever Pitch (Archives)

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:49


Bette Smith was born and raised in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn – but on her debut LP called Jetlagger she draws on the gospel she sang in the church and the soul music she heard on the block on hot summer nights music growing up on the corner of Nostrand and Fulton. On the 2018 record Jetlagger, the tunes range from originals to covers of Staples Singers and Isaac Hayes classics, showcasing Smith's deep, confident, and powerful voice. Amidst rugged, muscular arrangements that hearken to the timeless sounds of Mississippi and Memphis soul and funk, Bette Smith barely contains a New York aggressiveness and passion, and piles on the sexy. Smith and her band play some of these songs, in-studio. (From the Archives, 2018.)

Commercial Real Estate Investing From A-Z
How to Invest in Retail & Grow Through Syndications

Commercial Real Estate Investing From A-Z

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:41


How to grow your retail portfolio and syndications? We will review the career of Aaron Zucker, founder and principal of Zucker Investment Group, they purchased 22 deals in the last 40 months through syndications. What does he look for when purchasing a retail property? What are some of the lessons learned so far? You can read this entire interview here: bit.ly/3w5RwO2 How did you scale so fast? Let's go over your journey in the retail space and break it down to about every two months since you decided to start your company. In the beginning I moved into my parents basement with a six month old. That was interesting to say the least, with no portfolio and not much of a plan. There was a plan, it was just notes on an iPad. We bought our first property as a covered land play in Irving, Texas, we still own that property today. It's on the border, on a great location, and we are planning to monetize that property in some way shape or form over time. Until then we're enjoying the cash flow. I'm about to break out in hives thinking about that experience, I had $50,000 of my saved money non-refundable without all the equity figured out. I was raising $1.8 million, which I definitely didn't have, from anybody and everybody who told me they would be interested in buying real estate. It was a good litmus test to see who was actually going to be a real LP in that company and who was just talking, or maybe wasn't interested in that type of deal. It worked itself out, we got the equity resolved and bought a deal. Then some time went by and people were still feeling out whether or not Zig was real. I'm sure that's still certainly the case, we're still trying to build a reasonable reputation. But we were able to source a couple more opportunities pretty much exclusively through the brokerage community, off market. That's a testament to the quality of relationships that I had and still have and I'm always building upon which we couldn't be any more bullish on leveraging the brokerage community, and getting them excited about the fact that we not only allow but encourage them to invest in deals with us, and they appreciate the fact that we move extremely quickly. We're young and nimble and are certainly aggressively growing. The mantra about our organization is that we're super aggressive, and we are, but when we look in the microcosm of a specific acquisition, it's usually pretty conservative. I'm a one man band at this point, I continue doing my thing, posting on social media saying we're looking for deals, hitting the phones hard, following up with the brokerage community, calling sellers, whatever it takes to procure something. Then one day, we acquired a sexy site, which was a Lululemon, single tenant. It was a Lululemon condo, and a joint venture with a group called Konover South based out of South Florida. Months thereafter, we were able to unlock an off market Chipotle deal, at an aggressive cap rate in a great market in Orlando, we executed on a blend and extend with the tenant and then flipped out of it. We sold that property in March of 2020 before the pandemic was hitting, and there were a few other acquisitions that were a little bit more boring. Between the time that we bought and sold that Chipotle, and the disposition of that, was what put Zig 1.0 on the map and gave us some some credibility that our group was looking for, and then more most importantly, executing on value add retail deals with great tenants, Chipotle, Lululemon in very good markets like Cincinnati and Orlando. Aaron Zucker instagram.com/aaron.zucker www.zuckerinvestmentgroup.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/best-commercial-retail-real-estate-investing-advice-ever/support

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
422: Verge HealthTech Fund with Joseph Mocanu

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:52


Joseph Mocanu is Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Chad talks with Joseph about the healthcare landscape in different places of the world, funding criteria for companies, and how the pandemic has changed prospects for the fund and the market in general. Verge HealthTech Fund (https://www.vergehc.com/) Follow Verge HealthTech Fund on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/verge-healthtech-fund-i/). Follow Joseph on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jmocanu) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jmocanu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me today is Joseph Mocanu, Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Joseph, thank you for joining me. JOSEPH: Thanks so much, Chad, for having me. CHAD: So you have been focused on emerging Asia healthtech for a little while both at Verge HealthTech Fund, and prior to that, how did you get involved in this space? JOSEPH: I wish I had a really cool, deliberate story that made it sound like it was a smooth transition from point A to point B. But I simply have to owe it to an opportunity to transfer to the region through my old employer which is Oliver Wyman, a global management consultancy. So I joined this consultancy in 2011 after doing my Ph.D. and MBA really to understand how to be a better investor, which, again, sounds a little bit backwards. But I had worked at a hedge fund in China just after my MBA, and I learned that they use management consulting techniques to add value to their portfolio companies. And I thought that's a great skill to learn. And it'd be great to even learn it in English and doing it in healthcare 100% of the time. So I had joined Oliver Wyman in 2011 in Toronto office back home, where I spent a lot of my life. And they asked me one day if I wanted to transfer to the Singapore office to help start healthcare over there. And when I went to Singapore, of course, it's this futuristic city, really well planned. It's got a lot of fine names and a reputation globally of being a modern cosmopolitan place to do business. Some people refer to it as Asia-lite. But the surrounding areas have a lot of issues when it comes to their health systems. I knew this from an academic perspective, having studied about the region before moving to Singapore but seeing it firsthand was a completely different experience. At the time, I was working for primarily pharmaceutical clients, helping them with market access and other commercially relevant activities. And they were faced with a fundamental challenge of trying to sell their product, which was usually placed in the premium category to markets that had difficulty affording this. And not only did it have difficulty affording this, it had difficulty in delivering it as well as in using the product appropriately, making sure it gets to the patients when it's needed at the right time, at the right dose. And so they were looking for partners. They were looking for partners on the ground that could assist with this delivery education, the technology, and the financing around it as well. Now, there was a real shortage of said partners on the ground. At the same time, there were also insurance companies that wanted to expand their business. They also realized that the policies tended to be a bit simple, and they tended to resemble one another across competitors. And also, to manage increasing claims, they had a tendency to increase the premium that they charged. This was not possible to do indefinitely. And at some point, they needed to actually manage the medical conditions, which you're probably seeing more and more of in the U.S. and in Western markets, less so of in this part of the world. And then lastly, you had conglomerates and investors who said, "Hey, we hear healthcare is going to be a pretty hot field. How do we get started? How do we invest?" And all of this basically set me on a mission of target hunting. And during the course of this, well, I met a lot of interesting companies, a lot of them really, really early in their journey and really too small for any of my clients to find a meaningful way to engage with them. And unfortunately, they couldn't get to the point where they are relevant and large enough to engage with without a lot of capital. This is where, you know, you'd have a nice investment ecosystem coming in to fill in the gaps. This, unfortunately, did not really exist at the time. And I had the hubris of thinking that I could do something about it by being an angel investor and starting to support these founders directly, which, thankfully, seemed to work to a certain degree. It worked to the point where one day, I woke up, and I realized I had 13 angel investments, 9 of which were in healthcare technology, and not a lot of money left in my bank account to do other things with. CHAD: Uh-oh. [laughs] JOSEPH: Yeah. And at the same time, I also realized that the work that those founders are doing is a whole lot more impactful than me sitting up until 3:00 o'clock in the morning every night writing PowerPoint slides or begging analysts to write the PowerPoint slides that would more or less sit and collect dust on my clients' shelves for various reasons. So I came to the realization that I need to do this full time. I didn't have, you know, $10 million in my pocket as reference to spending all my money on angel investments. So I realized that I have to use other people's money, and the way to do that is to join a fund. Now, the problem with that idea is that there weren't any funds that were doing this, like really, really early investing in healthtech companies in the region that was really geared to helping solve some of these really big access challenges. So then I realized I had to start a VC fund that did this and only this. So that's really kind of a long-winded introduction as to how I got started with this. CHAD: Yeah, I want to come back to the process of actually starting a VC fund in a bit. But I'm curious, were the companies that you were doing angel investment in and now doing seed-stage investment in do they tend to be local companies, or do they tend to be international companies that are planning to solve a problem locally? JOSEPH: It's funny you ask that. At the beginning, they were local. Well, actually, if I really were to take a step back, the very first angel investment I made was for a mentee, and she was based in Toronto. But I'd say that the first true angel investment I made, you know, it was in Singapore, first and foremost, because I was there. And then I started branching out. I started making investments in the Philippines. I started looking at companies in Taiwan and other parts. And actually, that opened my eyes to the fact that there may be other companies around the world that are trying to solve a problem that may not necessarily be in my own backyard. So I started to, you know, cheekily, I sent my wife to tech conferences around the world. And she herself is an entrepreneur from the tech industry; hardware was her specialty. And we started identifying companies from all over the world. And the second angel investment where I was the very first investor was actually from a company in South Africa with similar challenges. So the things that we saw as major health system deficiencies or maybe shortages in infrastructure and human capital were very much true not just in Southeast Asia but in a lot of parts of the world. And we noticed that while there were different reasons for why they ended up in that position, the outcome was similar. CHAD: I'm not sure that everyone listening has a good sense of what the healthcare landscape actually looks like in these different places of the world. So let's take insurance, for example; what is the insurance landscape, generally speaking, in Southeast Asian countries? JOSEPH: So, in Southeast Asia, we do have insurers. I mean, private insurance is certainly there. But it's just not -- CHAD: Do most companies have public insurance, too, like universal healthcare? JOSEPH: That depends on which country you're in. Now, the one interesting thing about our entire region is that they've all committed to universal healthcare coverage. I would say that the implementation thereof has been heterogeneous; let's put it that way. Out of Southeast Asian countries that are not Singapore, I'd say that Thailand probably has the strongest public healthcare system. And in fact, they even do health technology assessments, which is really looking at the true cost-effectiveness of a new intervention versus what's currently done in practice to make decisions as to whether they're going to pay for it. And they cover a pretty high percentage of their population with this. And then there are other places where the financing mechanisms are in place, but you don't necessarily have the doctors or the hospitals where they need to be to address the needs of the population. Still, we are dealing with places that are not fully urbanized. And in fact, a good deal of the population is still working on the pharm, basically. One of the other complexities of our region is that just between the Philippines and Indonesia, which together has a combined population of 380 million at least, maybe it's 390 now, you've got 25,000 islands, and not all of those islands tend to hold major tier-one cities, even though they can hold a lot of people. And if there is one thing about healthcare that seems to be a universal truth is that highly skilled workers like to live in the rich cities. CHAD: And so what I'm hearing is that on an individual island, if there's not a major city there, the access to the actual healthcare might be really limited. JOSEPH: That is exactly it. CHAD: In these economies in these countries, it's typical to have private insurance layered on top. But the pharmas probably aren't doing that, right? JOSEPH: Oh, no, no, unfortunately not. There are some pilots of trying to do co-ops or collective insurance or micro-insurance policies. But again, when you look at the amount of premium that they could pay in, the kind of coverage they get is pretty basic. CHAD: So, how does that landscape influence the solutions that startups are creating? JOSEPH: Well, first and foremost, you've got to try to get some sort of mechanism by which you can seek care without having to travel too much. And I think that concept is extremely familiar to all of us thanks to the global pandemic that I hope we're coming out of right now, although there's always a new strain surprising us. The idea of basic telemedicine is one that can have a great deal of impact in these populations. But even before that, just understanding the importance of healthcare, like, what the concept of healthcare is, what the concept of the modern medical system is, is something that a fair number of people never really had awareness of. And I'll call out an example country, and I try not to call out too many examples. But Indonesia did a really good job of educating people about the concept of healthcare when they promoted their universal healthcare coverage. Even if they didn't have the ability to deliver it as well as they wanted to or as widespread as they wanted to, at least they got people paying attention to this concept called health. So awareness is really the first step. The second challenge is all right, so you know health exists. When do you know when you need it? Where are you going to find a doctor? How do you know if a doctor is even good? And how do you know that the products that you're going to get are appropriate? So there are so many challenges that you have to face when you are in a lack of access situation. CHAD: I assume you're getting pitched on a lot of ideas coming to your fund, a lot of startups. Correct me if that's wrong. [laughs] JOSEPH: No, no, that's absolutely true. So one of the blessings and curses of being one of the very few super early-stage healthtech venture funds out there is that there aren't many of us out there. And when we started...let's just put it this way, if I could find a fund that was doing what I wanted to do, I would have sent my CV in, and I couldn't. And starting a fund was basically the last thing I wanted to do, having never worked at a VC before or ever raised money in my life before. So I still think that we are the only truly global impact-oriented seed - I hate the term pre-seed, but I'll use it because of the audience's familiarity with it- investment fund out there right now for healthtech. So by virtue of that, we do see a lot of companies. CHAD: So what are some of the criteria? JOSEPH: So I'd say some of the criteria that we look for is number one, are you solving a real problem? And we define a real problem by the breadth of the problem, like, how many people are suffering from it or how systemic is this problem if it's an infrastructural one? And depth being how severe is this problem: is it life or death, or is it a minor inconvenience? So first and foremost, it's got to be solving a real problem. Second, it's really around the team. You need a lot of clinical, technical, and commercial experience in order to pull off a healthtech startup successfully. And even before that, we want to understand why are you doing this? Because this is not easy. I'd say on a scale of 1 to 10, doing a startup is like an eight, and then doing a healthtech startup is like an 11. It's slow; it's technical, it's regulated, it's super risky. And health systems are very pathway-dependent in the intent to not have many things in common with one another. So it is really, really hard. So we want to know the motivation. Are you going to stick through the thick and thin, or are you doing this healthtech startup because you think healthtech is cool or hot this particular period in the market cycle? So that's another criterion. Another criterion is, well, what's your edge? I mean, okay, you can have a great team, and I think that is definitely a prerequisite. You can solve a problem. But do you have something that could make sure that you are going to be competitive and remain competitive? CHAD: Given the barriers to market entry that you just outlined, do most of the companies that you're investing in have any sort of traction already in the market, or where are they in the product development or business development cycle? JOSEPH: I'm going to give the ultimate cop-out answer of it depends. CHAD: [laughs] Yeah. JOSEPH: But I will qualify that by saying it depends on whether it's hardware or software, and it depends whether it's regulated or non-regulated. So if you are a software company that's unregulated so, what does this mean? It could be like a marketplace. It could be health education. It could be some telemedicine in a loosely regulated market. We'd really like to see user traction. We'd really like to see revenue even. However, if you're a device company and you need to get FDA before you can earn a single dollar, we're okay with it being a science experiment or a prototype on the table as long as the science part of it has been de-risked. So if we know that the fundamental scientific principles are sound, then we're willing to take the productization and regulatory risk because we've been through this journey ourselves. CHAD: And also, you said a team is really important, so if it's a team that has never gone through that before, that's less attractive than a team that has done it before, I assume. JOSEPH: Yeah, absolutely. However, one of the challenges is that outside of the U.S., certain European markets in Israel, it's really difficult to find a team that's gone through the entire medical device development process before. So you are going to rely heavily on your professional service providers, consultants, advisors, other investors who've done this before. And as long as you have at least a path to getting to a point where you can unlock and utilize that expertise, that's okay. But if you don't, then that's a really, really big risk. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: Earlier, you said FDA. FDA is a United States thing. Do most countries in Southeast Asia have a local regulatory agency like the FDA that things need to be approved through? JOSEPH: Yep, every single one. The question is, what's the process to go through that? Generally speaking, the FDA, as well as the European equivalent, which is the CE Mark, are used as predicates in order to kind of shortcut the process, make it go a little bit faster. Because then you don't have to create a bunch of new work or get the local regulator to really try to do things that they're unfamiliar with. CHAD: You said it's fairly rare for teams to have concrete experience doing that in the local market. Does that mean that most of these markets have been served by, I don't know, large companies previously? JOSEPH: Yeah, and still are. A fair number of emerging markets don't even have the manufacturing capability to even do local production, so they require a lot of importation. I'd say that this is a different case when it comes to generic pharmaceuticals and maybe vaccines and some consumables. But complex devices and biologics are generally manufactured in more developed markets or larger economies. CHAD: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the pandemic, and I'm curious how the pandemic has changed either your prospects for the fund but also the market in general. JOSEPH: I would say, again, it's both a blessing and a curse. So during the start of the pandemic, there was a great deal of societal and economic uncertainty around where are we going to be as a species in six months? And I remember early 2020; it was kind of these Hollywood movies that would paint this kind of semi-apocalyptic picture of where we're going to end up. And as a consequence, people really puckered up and stopped investing in things. I would say that the other side of it is now much of the world understands what it's like to not have access to quality healthcare or even access to healthcare. You see people not going to the hospital for things that they ought to and then suffering the consequences at home, like, let's say, not going for that heart checkup, and then you having a heart attack at home and passing when you otherwise wouldn't have. Or even cancer patients having to delay their therapy because the hospital is just too full. So this concept of telemedicine which has always been resisted by both the payers and providers for being infeasible, or inaccurate, or impossible to fund properly, suddenly had to be done. And the concept of telemedicine is fairly old. I mean, how else would you treat your astronauts in space in the '60s if they got sick? So this is something that NASA thought of and invented and implemented, you know, decades and decades ago. And finally, this came forward. And I was pleasantly surprised to see...and again, I'll quote the U.S. here where The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services or CMS actually reimbursed a bunch of remote procedure codes, which is pretty amazing. And I think that was opening Pandora's Box. There's no going back from that. So I think telemedicine is absolutely here to stay. And the real challenge now is really how to make it more user-friendly, how to improve it, how to improve the decisions that come from it. I really don't think it's going back. And as a consequence of this, it's really benefited a lot of our startups that were trying to build this remote-connected future anyway. CHAD: Has there also been an influx of those kinds of startups? JOSEPH: Absolutely. I would say that there has been a veritable Cambrian explosion of startups where everyone and their uncle is starting a healthtech startup as well as a healthtech fund. I see a lot of new funds coming up promising to invest in this space. So I think it's good in that there's going to be a lot of really new ideas, and hopefully, it's going to improve the standard of care for everyone around the world. But at the same time, it is creating a lot of noise, and it's becoming increasingly difficult to filter through that. CHAD: Do the solutions tend to be local? I guess the nature of my question was, you know, like messaging apps. [laughs] Different countries have different popular messaging apps. What do you see as the penetration of different telemedicine solutions in the different countries? Do you think it's going to be, oh, you know, this is popular in this country? Or do you think it's possible for one company to come in and really have a significant impact in the market across multiple markets? JOSEPH: Yeah, I think it's eventually going to be the latter. So at the start, you do see that you have your national champions. And like instant messaging apps, it's kind of like a 90-10 rule where the number 1 player takes 90% of the market, number 2 takes most of what's left, and then number 3 player caters to some niche or another. And I see two competing forces here; one is, yes, there may be a big player like Babylon or Crew who comes in and rolls up everything backed by heaps of capital. But the other thing could also be that all the health systems start saying, "You know what? Why are we working with an external company? Why don't we just develop all these capabilities ourselves and then keep the patient captive?" And you are starting to see middleware providers who are basically providing that telemedicine layer, white-labeling it, or giving API access to the providers themselves, the legacy providers themselves, and then allowing them to do that. And I actually saw this statistic...I don't know how accurate it was, but I saw a chart in the U.S. that white-labeled or internal telemedicine consults exceeded the number of Teladoc consultations, which is the largest platform in the U.S., at some point last year. CHAD: I'm wondering, do you know if Teladoc uses Twilio? JOSEPH: I really should know the answer to that question, but unfortunately, I do not. CHAD: Because my sense is the real winner in this game might be companies like Twilio because I think everyone is using them. [laughs] JOSEPH: That makes a ton of sense. So when we do look at some investments, we actually want to invest in middleware because why duke it out to be the platform when you're the utility provider? CHAD: So let's turn our attention to the actual creation of the fund. And I know you just opened your second fund last month, right? JOSEPH: Actually, this month. I mean, last month was the paperwork, but it takes time for stuff to get approved. CHAD: Yeah, fair enough. So you already said actually starting a fund was, I think you said, the last thing on earth that you wanted to do. Why was that the last thing you wanted to do? JOSEPH: Frankly, it was a whole lot more uncertainty than I was prepared to handle at the time. And I was either blessed or cursed with this momentary clarity of purpose where I knew with all my being that this is what I wanted to do with myself for, if not the rest of my life, a very long time. And the only alternative, or rather the only choice to pursue this at the time, was really starting a fund. So that's what I had to do, right? CHAD: And how large was the first fund? JOSEPH: It was pretty small; it was $7.6 million, which in local currency equates to a nice number of just above 10 million sings. CHAD: And where did you...I'm going to ask where that ended up coming from. But in terms of the mechanics of actually starting a fund, what did that look like? JOSEPH: Well, it depends on each market. But typically, what happens is you need to first have permission from the regulator in order to actually start and run a fund. So in Singapore, you need to apply for a venture capital fund management license from the Monetary Authority of Singapore. That's what had to be done first, and we got that approved in a pretty good time, actually. I think we might have captured a lull period because now, with all the funds coming out, I've heard the queue is months long in some cases. And then came the business of incorporating the fund itself and then starting to draft all the legal paperwork, the conditions, the private memorandum or prospectus, depending on which geography and how regulated you are, that you show around to investors once they've expressed interest in learning substantially more details about your fund beyond what a simple PowerPoint deck or a casual coffee conversation can yield. And then you start collecting commitments, and then you start collecting the money. And at some point, you have enough money to say, all right, we'll do a close or first close, and that then gives you permission to start deploying that money into investments. And some funds they'll only do one close, some funds will do a first close, and then a final close when they get the rest of the money in or some money committed and then calling the rest of it to come in. Or some will do multiple closes just so that they have the ability to keep deploying continuously while they're doing this fundraising process. And in our case, we were doing rolling closes. So we would close every few months, and we'd continue to deploy. And by the time we finished fundraising, we actually already had nine companies out of the 15 that we have in our portfolio done. So it really depends on all sorts of different factors, which we probably don't have that much time to get into. And I risk perhaps putting my foot in my mouth and misspeaking if I give too many examples. CHAD: [laughs] When it comes to starting a fund, how cookie-cutter is it? Or do you find yourself having to create everything from scratch, all the legal documents, whatever platform you might be...or access you might be giving to the people who are contributing to the fund? JOSEPH: I'd say, again, it depends where you are. I think in the U.S. and especially with the advent of great service providers platforms like AngelList and Assure, it is super cookie-cutter. In our part of the world, I still think it's somewhat cookie-cutter, but we got a little too cute. CHAD: [chuckles] JOSEPH: We thought, okay, it's our first time doing a fund. I've been an LP in other funds. What did I wish I had as an LP? And as a consequence, we introduced some hurdle rates of tiered carry, and even zero carry if we don't hit a certain return. And all that really did was just create more questions from the investors. So we should have probably done it as cookie-cutter as possible in hindsight. CHAD: So I often hear from founders who talk about how it's important to have a VC fund behind you that you agree with, and want to work with, and are excited about, and that can be value additive. Do you need, as someone raising a fund, do you need to consider things like that or other things when it comes to the people you're taking money from the fund? JOSEPH: Absolutely. Maybe knock on wood here, but our relative inexperience when starting a fund probably selected out all the folks who might not have gotten along with us anyway. And the fact that we're pretty straightforward and direct with what we want to do in our objectives probably helped with that selection process as well on the positive side. But I absolutely, absolutely can recommend having that alignment of values and mission with those who are on the journey with you for a good decade. It's like getting married, right? CHAD: Yeah. Well, so when you're planning a fund and thinking about time horizons, is a decade what you're thinking about? JOSEPH: Yeah, all things considered. So our fund lifetime was eight years from final close. But still, it takes time to raise the fund and plan the fund, and you have people that are on board even before the fund begins. So it is a decade-long relationship, at least. And then some of the larger funds because they want to have a longer investment period, will push that out even further where they're going to be a 10-year fund from final close. And if you have enough of your portfolio that hasn't exited yet but still has some value to be uncovered, you may ask your investors to extend the fund life even further. So this is a supremely long relationship that you have. And aside from evergreen funds that don't have a fund lifetime, I think this is about as long as it gets, although I have seen some people float the idea of a 20-year fund or a 50-year fund, but that's really not widely practiced. I think five years is the fastest I've seen, and ten seems to be the average. CHAD: Where did that first fund come from? How did you drum up the interest and decide who would be a part of it? JOSEPH: It's really the folks who have known me the longest or worked with me. So you know how they say when you're raising money for a startup, you get it from the three F's, Friends, Family, and Fools? For funds and for first-time fund managers, I think it's a pretty analogous group of people, although I don't think we have any fools. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And, unfortunately, don't have family either. So it's really all friends, old co-workers, old clients, and then the people that they introduced us to. There were some serendipitous moments where people liked what I said at a conference, or we asked a tough question. And people asked, "Well, how can you ask such a tough question?" Then they got to know us and then decide to invest from there. But majority of it was just introductions, warm introductions. We never did any cold emails. CHAD: Have there been any exits in the first fund? JOSEPH: Not just yet. We do come in as either the first or second investor in these companies. So there is quite a long journey that we expect before we, you know, see some exits. There may be some this year. But if I look back at my angel investments, there was only real serious talk of an exit at the six-year mark for one of the companies that's doing really well. And even that exit turned out to be just another, you know, the investor changed their mind, and instead of buying the company, they decided to just invest more money into it. So this is a long journey. CHAD: Yeah, definitely. Did that make putting together the second fund any harder, or is that what everyone expects? JOSEPH: I am cautiously optimistic because we're still so early in our journey that the only folks we've really spoken with are the ones who invested in our first fund or passed on our first fund because they don't back first-time fund managers. They come to expect that your second fund is built on the momentum of the first fund. And it's really your third fund that's built on the exit and actual realized track record of your first fund. CHAD: That makes sense. What do you think is next for Verge HealthTech? JOSEPH: Well, first things first, we got to get started with the second fund and see if we can build something to scale. I mean, the first fund was an experiment. It was a small fund, you know. Could we build the world's seed-stage global impact healthtech fund on basically a shoestring? And the second fund is now let's take everything that we wish we had for the first fund and scale it up so bigger initial ticket sizes because we want to own more, the ability to follow on properly, the ability to do more deals, which requires a much bigger team which we now have. As well as to go back and support the winners of our first fund as well as some of the companies that maybe we made a mistake on and passed but still have a strong enough relationship to revisit and get them on the next round or the round after that, or just new companies that the market has moved. You know, the area that we might have been really interested in at the seed stage is now a pre-A stage or an A stage. So that's really what we want to do with the second one. And it would be amazing to see where this goes. I'm thrilled that we actually have, well, I think, one of the best healthtech investment teams in the world; maybe I'm slightly biased with this. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And I'm excited to see what we can do together. CHAD: That's great. Well, I wish you the best. And I really appreciate you for stopping by and sharing with us. If folks want to follow along with you or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? JOSEPH: Probably LinkedIn is the best way to do it. Also, I have a blog on Medium, which I'm sure can be linked in the show notes. I've been really bad...I've been traveling intensely in the past half-year. But I promise my next blog post will be interesting. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: Because I just got back from Rwanda and Saudi Arabia, which are two very, very different countries, however, with a great emphasis on improving healthcare, especially on the digital side. CHAD: Well, that's exciting. So folks definitely can find the links for that in the notes, which you can find the notes; you can subscribe to the show and a full transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Joseph Mocanu.

Bike Tour Adventures Podcast
LP Landry & the Overcome Cafe | Mental Mindset and Managing Fear

Bike Tour Adventures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 107:14


In this episode of the Bike Tour Adventures Podcast, I have invited Louis-Philippe Landry onto the show to talk to us about overcoming our fears and how to maintain a positive mindset when things get tough. LP is a psychotherapist here in Canada, with a passion for working with people that lead an active lifestyle. Louis-Philippe's professional goal is to help other's overcome obstacles in order to reach their potential. A passionate cyclists whose ideal morning begins with an early morning bike ride before getting home for breakfast with his wife and daughters. I'm really stoked to have him on the show and share some of his wisdom with us, and hopefully help us unlock some of our hidden potential. To support the Bike Tour Adventures podcast, follow the links below: https://www.patreon.com/biketouradventures (https://www.patreon.com/biketouradventures) or https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/biketouradventures (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/biketouradventures)  Find them at: INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/lplandry_overcomecafe/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/overcomeapathy Website: https://www.overcomecafe.com/ Find me at… WEBSITE: http://www.biketouradventures.com/ (http://www.biketouradventures.com)  YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPQl_pNcMZA-hHckhVrpmaw (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPQl_pNcMZA-hHckhVrpmaw)  FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/biketouradventures/ (https://www.facebook.com/biketouradventures/)  INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/bike_tour_adventures/ (https://www.instagram.com/bike_tour_adventures/)  TWITTER: https://twitter.com/BikeTourAdv (https://twitter.com/BikeTourAdv)  ITUNES: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bike-tour-adventures/id1464406852 (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bike-tour-adventures/id1464406852)  Show Sponsors The Bike Tour Adventures podcast is incredibly lucky to have some amazing corporate sponsors. Check these great companies out and feel free to use my PROMO codes. https://redshiftsports.com/ (Redshift Sports) - Discount code: BTA15https://restrap.com/ (Restrap) - Discount code: BTAPOD10http://www.chirubikes.com/ (Chiru Endurance Bikes)https://7mesh.com/ (7Mesh Clothing)https://www.brocktoncyclery.com/ (Brockton Cyclery)https://www.racedayfuel.ca/ (Raceday Fuel)  - Discount code: CHRISP10

El sótano
El Sótano - Tributo a The Damned y despedida a Siniestro Total - 11/05/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 58:39


El sello bilbaíno Guns of Brixton Records lanza el LP “Fan Club; tribute to The Damned”. El álbum de homenaje recoge grabaciones de 15 bandas del País Vasco versionando canciones de estos históricos pioneros del punk británico. Los últimos minutos los dedicamos a recordar los conciertos de despedida de Siniestro Total este pasado fin de semana.   Playlist; THE DAMNED “Fan club” (Damned Damned Damned, 1977) VOIDIOTS “Stab your back” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) RADIO CRIMEN “Neat neat neat” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) TIPARRAKERS “Hit or miss” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) MORGUE 21 “Nueva rosa” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) SONIC TRASH “Lively arts” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) CRAP “Melody Lee” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) AITOR OCHOA and MAD MULE “Disco man” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) SEÑOR NO “Nasty” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) MOONSHAKERS “She” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) LA SECTA “Fan club” (Fan Club; tribute to The Damned, 2022) SINIESTRO TOTAL “Assumpta” (Menos mal que nos queda Portugal, 1984) SINIESTRO TOTAL “Nocilla, que merendilla” (¿Cuándo se come aquí?, 1982) SINIESTRO TOTAL “Superavit” (Siniestro Total II; El regreso, 1983) Versión y Original; EL GRUPPO SPORTIVO “Go'n'get it!” SINIESTRO TOTAL “Al final” (Bailaré sobre tu tumba, 1985) SINIESTRO TOTAL “Que les corten los huevos” (De hoy no pasa, 1987) Escuchar audio

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.05.10 Under The Radar with Kat Bass

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 124:06


As broadcast May 10, 2022 with plenty of sugar for your stream.  Tonight we open with Detroit legend Sixto Rodriguez receiving an honorary postgraduate degree from his alma mater in light of the Oscar-winning documentary about his amazing life.  Kat Bass joins us once again to take over most of the show as well, with big new cuts you just gotta hear from Sharon Van Etten's new LP, Arcade Fire (played in the wrong order), along with Let's Eat Grandma headlining a solid bill.  #feelthegravityTracklisting:Part I (00:00)Rodriguez – Street BoySharon Van Etten – Mistakeslate night drive home – Awkward ConversationsRolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – Dive DeepArcade Fire – Age of Anxiety II (Rabbit Hole) Part II (33:13)Arcade Fire - Age of Anxiety I flor - 24 Sea Girls - DNA Vero - Spin Voxtrot - Raised By Wolves Letting Up Despite Great Faults - She Spins Part III (64:45)Wings of Desire - A Million Other Suns The Boys with the Perpetual Nervousness - Look Back The Stroppies - The Perfect Crime Sasha Alex Sloan - New Normal Sunflower Bean - In Flight Titus Bank - Radio Part IV (95:28)Let's Eat Grandma - Watching You Go The Walters - Black Moon BoyWithUke - Heart of IceValley - CHAMPAGNE Marci - Immaterial Girl Jaywood ft Ami Cheon - Just Sayin 

ESG Decoded
Dr. Monique Cunningham on the “G” in ESG

ESG Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 37:26


ESG Decoded is the podcast powered by ClimeCo to share relevant updates related to business innovation and sustainability in a clear and actionable manner. To excel in today's competitive business environment, a successful ESG Leader needs a balance of compliance, sustainability, and project management skills - backed by robust policy design expertise. In this episode, Kaitlyn Allen talks with Dr. Monique Cunningham, who has over 15 years of experience leading strategic ESG projects for multiple high-profile organizations, including St. Thomas University, the City of Tallahassee, and the Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America, Inc. (OICA). She is the rare professional with experience across the E, S AND G of ESG. In addition to her vast professional experience as a risk management and compliance professional, Dr. Cunningham holds a Doctorate in law and policy from Northeastern, an MBA from Nova Southeastern University, and a Bachelor's in biology from Barry University. Listen as Kaitlyn and Monique remind us that the ‘G' in ESG is foundational – you cannot have the ‘E' and the ‘S' without Governance. The oversight and implementation of any ESG program or policy cannot occur in isolation; all ESG priorities must be interlaced throughout the organization. This is where governance becomes an elevated component of the process. The approach to governance must be in tandem with an organization's mission and values while aligning with its approaches to compliance and risk mitigation matters. Monique possesses a wealth of knowledge for all things ESG. In the ESG landscape, she sees the forest and the trees. She has experience across all pillars, and she understands the governance best practices that drive stakeholder value and mitigate risk. Better still, Monique explains concepts in a way that is easy to understand. Take your time with this topic, and reference the resource boosts below: Dr. Cunningham (1) Monique Cunningham, LP.D, MBA, CSM, CCEP | LinkedIn (2) Florida and the Clean Power Plan: a state, a federal regulation and a climate situation. (northeastern.edu) – Dissertation by Dr. Monique Cunningham Compliance Professional Resources (1) CCEP | SCCE Official Site (corporatecompliance.org) (2) Certified Environmental and Safety Compliance Officer (CESCO) | NREP Isle de Jean Charles Resources (3) HUD Action Plan for Isle de Jean Charles, LA (4) Isle De Jean Charles Resettlement Project | IsleDeJeanCharles.la.gov King Tides Resources (1) King Tides and High Tides | City of Fort Lauderdale, FL (2) King Tides and Climate Change | US EPA Subscribe to ESG Decoded, where you consume your podcasts and connect via social media to share your feedback and topic suggestions. Enjoy this episode!