Podcasts about Turning

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  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Turning

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Latest podcast episodes about Turning

Movie Mike’s Movie Podcast
The Best Movies Turning 30, 20 and 10 Years Old in 2022 + Movie Review: Encanto (Disney+) + Trailer Park: The Sky is Everywhere (Apple TV+)

Movie Mike’s Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 48:34


Movie Mike Deestro talks a look back to movies that came out 30, 20 and 10 years ago and celebrating a birthday this year. He goes through the Top Movies at the Box Office in 1992, 2002 and 2012 along with some other great movies that came out of each year. Mike reviews Disney's Encanto which is now available on Disney+. And in the trailer park, Mike talks about a new A24 movie coming to AppleTV+ Called The Sky is Everywhere starring Jason Segel. New Episodes Every Monday! Email: MovieMikeD@gmail.com Follow Mike on TikTok: @mikedeestro Follow Mike on Instagram: @mikedeestro Follow Mike on Twitter: @mikedeestro Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Keys For Kids Ministries

Bible Reading: Ephesians 2:4-9"Okay, I'll try again," said Aurora. Turning, she jumped into the pool with a huge splash and swam for a short distance. Then she grabbed the side of the pool and gasped for air. She looked at her dad in dismay as she climbed out. "I give up, Dad.""Don't give up. You're doing better, sweetie," Dad assured her as he offered her a towel. "Come on. Let's take a break."Aurora and her father went to the concession stand, and Dad bought hot dogs, chips, and cold drinks. "Dad, you know my friend Quinn?" Aurora asked as they ate. Dad nodded. "She's going to Bible club with me," said Aurora. "Miss Amy always invites kids who want to be saved to trust in Jesus, but Quinn thinks she's okay. She says she knows she's not good enough yet, but she's trying hard to do better and thinks she's improving. How can I convince her that we're not saved by being good?""Wow! Let's think about it a bit." Dad took a bite of his hot dog and chewed thoughtfully. "Does Quinn swim?"Aurora laughed. "About like I do, and as you know, that's not very good."Dad smiled. "Why don't you ask her if she could swim all the way from California to Hawaii?""To Hawaii!" exclaimed Aurora. "Neither of us can swim even halfway across the pool!""Could Olympic swimmers do it?" asked Dad. "Could they swim from California to Hawaii?""I doubt it," replied Aurora. "Even an Olympic swimmer would get too tired after a while.""Exactly," said Dad. "The best swimmer in the world isn't good enough to swim from here to Hawaii. If someone tried, they'd have to be rescued. And none of us is good enough to be accepted by God on our own. Everyone has sinned by doing wrong, and no one with sin can stand in God's presence. We all have to be rescued--or saved--from our sins by Jesus."Aurora nodded. "I'll tell Quinn again." She smiled. "I'm sure she'll agree nobody's good enough to swim to Hawaii, and maybe this will help her understand that nobody's ever good enough to get to heaven either. We all need Jesus to save us." -Holly F. CepedaHow About You?Are you trying to be good enough for God on your own?You may try hard to be good, but it will never be enough. None of your good deeds can take away your sin. That's why you need Jesus to save you. He took the punishment for your wrongs by dying on the cross and then rose again so you could have eternal life! Trust Him to save you.Today's Key Verse:He saved us because of his mercy, not because of any good things we did. (ERV) (Titus 3:5)Today's Key Thought:You need Jesus

SPIN IT: Business & Crisis Management with Stephynie Malik
#26 Vulnerability in Entrepreneurship with Jason Feifer

SPIN IT: Business & Crisis Management with Stephynie Malik

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 50:39


This week Stephynie is speaking with Jason Feifer. Jason is the Editor in Chief of Entrepreneur Magazine, keynote speaker, and host of the podcast 'Build for Tomorrow.' He walks us through his early days as a local reporter in Massachusetts to achieving massive success as Editor in Chief of Entrepreneur Magazine. They discuss how Jason learned to navigate the world of media and eventually run it!   Jason Feifer's Social Media & Important Links :  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyfeifer/ Build for Tomorrow Podcast: https://www.jasonfeifer.com/build-for-tomorrow/ Jasons Newsletter that comes out 2x a week- How to Become More Adaptable:https://jasonfeifer.bulletin.com/   Timestamps:  - 00:00 - Spin It! Intro  - 00:33 - Intro to Jason Feifer  - 03:36 - Lessons that Jason took away from his first position  - 07:15 - Pitching the Washington Post - 09:17 - How do you pitch a story? - 12:56 - Understanding your value when pitching - 16:34 - Adaptiveness is the most important quality a person can have - 21:43 - Build your skills and everything else will come later - 23:03 - Biggest regret Jason has from being on TV this morning - 27:50 - Turning something you regret into a learning experience - 30:30 - Vulnerability and Transparency - 38:17 - “People don't remember what you say but they do remember how you make them feel” - 39:55 - Rapid Fire Questions  - 46:58 - Jason's biggest obstacle that he turned into an opportunity - 49:09 - How our listeners can find Jason Feifer (Links Above) - 50:00 - Outro  

Elevate Life Church
Turning Over a New Fruit

Elevate Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 55:46


Billieve: a Buffalo Rumblings Podcast
Billieve: Divisional Round Preview vs. Kansas City Chiefs

Billieve: a Buffalo Rumblings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 57:30


In the AFC Divisional round of the playoffs, the Buffalo Bills are heading to Arrowhead Stadium to take on the Kansas City Chiefs in a rematch of the 2020 AFC Championship game. On the latest episode of the Billieve Podcast, hosts John Boccacino and Jamie D'Amico have everything you need to know as the Bills look to continue their 2021 revenge tour and earn their second win over the Chiefs this season. Among the topics discussed: We start off be reliving the gory that was Buffalo's 47-17 dismantling of the New England Patriots in the Wild Card round. Quarterback Josh Allen and the Bills offense was perfect in knocking off New England, and it was thoroughly enjoyable to see Bill Belichick miserable while watching the Bills pound his Patriots. Turning our attention to Sunday night's playoff game, this matchup, a rematch of last year's AFC title game, seemed destined to happen. The Bills should feel confident with their offense clicking on all cylinders and the defense making life miserable for opposing quarterbacks. But this will be the stiffest test Buffalo's D has faced since Tre'Davious White was lost for the year. Patrick Mahomes, Tyreek Hill, Travis Kelce and co. represent a formidable challenge to Leslie Frazier's defense. These teams met up on Sunday Night Football in Week 5, with Buffalo prevailing 38-20. Kansas City's defense has improved dramatically since then, and pass rushers Chris Jones, Melvin Ingram, and Frank Clark will challenge Buffalo's resurgent offensive line. Buffalo's running game has found its groove, led by Devin Singletary. An x-factor for the Bills: how well the team has run the ball when fullback Reggie Gilliam is on the field. Buffalo has changed up its run scheme from zone blocking to a pin and pull system, relying on the athleticism of the offensive line, and that is one of the key reasons why the Bills offense has become more balanced. Unlike last year, when the moment seemed too big for him, Josh Allen needs to stay in control of himself and his emotions and not force throws when nothing is there. How will Stefon Diggs, Cole Beasley, Gabriel Davis, Emmanuel Sanders and Buffalo's wideouts handle the sticky press coverage of Kansas City's corners? Jamie and I argue over whether Buffalo's defensive line has improved since these two teams met. In that meeting, Buffalo got after Mahomes without bringing a single blitz. We close by giving our score predictions as Buffalo seeks its second straight appearance in the AFC title game. Subscribe to the Buffalo Rumblings podcast channel featuring Billieve, Buffalo Rumblings Q&A, Breaking Buffalo Rumblings, Code of Conduct with J. Spence, The Bruce Exclusive, The Buff Hub, Jamie D. & Big Newt, The Overreaction Podcast, Food For Thought, The Chop Up, Hump Day Hotline, Off Tackle with John Fina, Bills Mafia Time 2 Shine and Circling the Wagons: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Google Play | Spotify | Podbean | iHeartRadio | TuneIn | Megaphone Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast
WKPWP Interview Classics (5 Yrs Ago): Bobby Roode talks about World Title run, turning heel, feud with Storm, more, plus Year-End Award talk

Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 131:37


In this week's Interview Classic episode from ten years ago (1-6-2012), PWTorch assistant editor James Caldwell and PWTorch columnist Bruce Mitchell interviewed TNA World Hvt. champion Bobby Roode for the first 20 minutes. In the interview, Roode talks about his current run as World champion, turning heel, developing on the mic, his feud with Storm and how he'd like to see that play out, whose idea it was for his family to be involved in his storyline, some surprising names he'd like to work with as top heel champion, TNA needing to be out on the road more, where TNA is in 2012, and more. For the rest of the show, Caldwell & Mitchell take calls on WWE, TNA, and ROH topics. In the Aftershow, they spend half-an-hour looking at five year-end awards categories including MVP, Top Heel/Face, MOTY, and Rising Star. Also, a big-picture discussion of the wrestling industry, and more.

Magic of the Spheres Podcast
157. Turning the Wheel from Yule to Imbolc with Maureen McCarthy

Magic of the Spheres Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 59:29


Sabrina interviews Mo about the Celtic wheel of the year. In this conversation they especially focus on the period surrounding Yule (December 21) and Imbolc (February 1).Maureen, the flowing witch.The term “witch” also means poet, seer, artist, creatrix, enchantress, divinator, and beyond. Maureen (they/them), who's names comes from the Irish Gaelic Máirín meaning, Star of the Sea, expresses as witch through their life-based artistry and performance while practicing folk herbalism, earth based magic, the tarot as healing divination ritual, and moon/menstrual mysteries.They are turned on by the ebb and flow of life and death inherent in all things, and are in a continual process of becoming a stronger and more fluid channel for the wisdom of the plants, the sun + earth connection, and their benevolent European ancestors, namely those of the Celtic linguistic group. Mo's seasonal e-zine email list:https://forms.gle/Wed9JCegeRgZL1jX7METEORITE course page and apply: https://sabrinamonarch.mykajabi.com/meteorite-2022METEORITE additional catalogue of inspiration: https://www.dropbox.com/s/qk066qcrviiza4p/METEORITE%202022%20Inspirations.pdf?dl=0✨

Audio Dharma
Happy Hour: Turning Towards Joy; And Honoring Thay

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 52:29


This talk was given by Nikki Mirghafori on 2022.01.21 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/A5aFLm5rO34. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

CATS Roundtable
John Jordan - People of color turning Republican

CATS Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 4:14


John Jordan - People of color turning Republican by John Catsimatidis

CBS This Morning - News on the Go
1/21: Diplomats meet in an attempt to deescalate Ukraine crisis. Dr. Fauci says a COVID vaccine for kids under five could be available next month.

CBS This Morning - News on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 12:15


Tensions reach a boiling point over the threat of a Russian invasion of Ukraine. More than 100,000 Russian troops are now deployed on three sides of the country, and Ukrainian forces are preparing for what could be a major fight. We're learning a number of new details about the investigation of the events surrounding the 2020 election. Turning to the pandemic, Dr. Anthony Fauci says COVID vaccinations may be available to children under five, as soon as next month. A new study this morning suggests covid vaccines do not affect fertility in men or women -- but getting the virus could. We have some sad news breaking overnight -- the music world is mourning the loss of one of rock 'n roll's unique performers, Meat Loaf.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Phony Food Articles, Hormones, & More - Episode 2021

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 56:23


: Episode 2021 - On this special Friday show, Anna Vocino joins Vinnie to talk about phony food articles, the keto flu, hormones and diabetes, our new hats, and more! Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2022/01/phony-food-articles-hormones-more-episode-2021 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS PHONY FOOD ARTICLES Some alleged news channels give terrible nutrition advice. CNN claimed popcorn was a great pre-dinner snack. This simply isn't the truth. You have to make sure you're finding the real science. Not opinions, or the like, but science-based fact, with no funding from the sugar or grain lobby. Articles like this are misinformation, and they make things fluffy and dumb. Turning something that should be an occasional treat to a 'healthy snack' is simply wrong. HORMONES Carbs mess with your ghrelin and leptin. And hormonally, causing your blood glucose to spike and mistreating your body with sugar and grains can make you insulin resistance. Messing up these hormones is what can lead to type 2 diabetes. Making sure you control these hormones is therefore very important. PURCHASE BEYOND IMPOSSIBLE The documentary launched this week, January 11! Order it TODAY! This is Vinnie's third documentary in just over three years. Get it now on Apple TV (iTunes) and/or Amazon Video! Link to the film on Apple TV (iTunes):  Share this link with friends, too! Link to the film on Amazon Video: It's also now available on Amazon (USA only for now)!  Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY 2 (2021) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY (2019) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter!

Good Risings
35.5. Hash It Out: Turning Towards - Book Excerpt on Relational Theories

Good Risings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 6:15


Good Risings is a mindset. Join Elizabeth Earnshaw for a daily dose of Advice. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.   Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Executive Producers: Elizabeth Earnshaw, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
Affirm: I Am fed from within

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 8:11


Let's take a moment to feel the truth of our existence, the source of our sustenance,  the peace of the One that is meditating in us.  He chants in me.  She's the Silence in you.  It's the Love we are, and It feeds us. "I am fed from within.  Don't change your outer way of living but inwardly know where and what Source is.  Break this attachment to the outer world.  Break the belief that you're dependent on man for justice, or for loans, or for forgiveness, or for your support.  It takes a while to break your attachment to the outer world,  but you can do it if you can remember the word, 'Now'.Now, am I and my Father one.  Now, do I draw upon the Kingdom of God within me.  Now, do I seek living waters within myself, the bread of life, the staff of life within myself.  No longer do I seek from 'man whose breath is in his nostrils', but now I know my attunement is the secret of the spiritual life.  Turning within a hundred times a day just for a momentary remembrance, 'thank you Father, the Kingdom is within me', 100 times a day.  Just smiling at the remembrance that now you are one with the infinite, the entire infinite is flowing forth into your experience."-Joel Goldsmith "To go within means to come out of thinking. And when you come out of thought, you are within.  When you find the moment of rest from thought, you are in Consciousness.  -Herb Fitch I Love you and I'm with you!Nik nikki@curlynikki.com 

This Was The Scene Podcast
Ep. 163: Thick Records w/ Zak Einstein

This Was The Scene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 85:14


Before we start, feel free to support the podcast if you've been listening for a while by signing up for my Patreon for $1 and I will love you forever. Thick Records was formed in 1994 by Detroit native Zak Einstein, who started the label when he relocated to Chicago after graduating from Michigan State University. Early releases include albums from Chicago ska-punkers The Blue Meanies, Alton, IL's Judge Nothing, Seattle's grunge rockers Truly, and the Omaha-based Commander Venus. Blue Meanies singer Billy Spunke joined Einstein and signed multiple Chicago punk rock artists including The Tossers, The Arrivals, and The Methadones. Thick released picture disc vinyl including 7" records from Alkaline Trio, At The Drive-in, ALL, and Citizen Fish. The label also released several compilations documenting Chicago rock and punk music. The compilations included 2000's Magnetic Curses: A Chicago Punk Rock Compilation, which included music from Gaza Strippers, Alkaline Trio, and Pegboy. Oil: Chicago Punk Refined, a 2003 release from the label, included tracks from nineteen Chicago-area punk acts, including Rise Against, The Lawrence Arms, The Tossers, Plain White T's, Bob Nanna, and Local H.  In 2004 Einstein moved the label to Los Angeles. The last label releases came in 2007 with CDs from The Brokedowns and Seven Storey Mountain. Thank you Monika Ebly for the intro to Zak who I got on the Skype and this is what we chat about. Brendan Kelly Rise Against Picture disc vinyl The palette of Blue Meanies CDs The letter the Blue Meanies sent to MCA What did the record label look like on a day to day basis The At the Drive-In / Burning Airlines split Turning an oil production factory into a studio What really killed the music industry What 2008 did to the label And a ton more Check out my new book The Couples' Checklist for my webcomic dailyBred. It's a great gift for Valentine's Day. I also have an Instagram for it. If you market aggressively on Instagram Stories and want custom stickers then go here to get custom stickers or just email mike@drive80.com and I can send you samples. These are great for B2C companies and Realtors. Feel free to support the podcast for as little as $1 a month through Patreon Or go to thiswasthescene.com to possibly buy some merch.

The Daily Boost | Coaching You Need. Success You Deserve.

Everything you do is guided by what you think is logical in your mind. Just like everything I do is directed by my Scott LOGIC. Is it common sense? Is it experience-based? Is it how you choose to live? Yes. But mostly, it is the filter in your mind at work. Here are a few of my filters: Life is long enough. But not for everybody. Life goes quickly. But not if you're bored. Life passes slowly when you are fishing. Some people are too serious. Others are not serious enough. Both disagree with the other. You must stand in another person's shoes to understand how they see you. The reward for hard work is a chance to work more. The reward for laziness is a chance to be lazy more. Turning off your phone means it won't ring. Most things in life should be in moderation. Excess is good now and then.   It takes a fraction of the time to read a good book as it does to write one. That makes reading a book a good investment of your time. People who read more good books earn more money. People who don't read don't understand why others earn more. Saying "I don't care" means you do - at least about something. Everything you experience is filtered through what you hold as the truth. Choose what you hold carefully. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CATS Roundtable
Dick Morris - People of color turning Republican.

CATS Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 6:12


Dick Morris - People of color turning Republican. by John Catsimatidis

The Dana & Parks Podcast
D&P Highlight: Turning right from the far left lane...but why?!

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 10:23


Bikes & Big Ideas
SCOR on Turning an After-Hours Project Into a New Bike Brand

Bikes & Big Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 41:07


BMC has a strong heritage in road and cross country bikes but isn't as well known for gravity-focused offerings. Mariano Schoefer and Christof Bigler — an engineer and designer, respectively, at BMC — were looking to build the bikes they personally wanted to ride and started modifying existing models as an after-hours side project. Their tinkering caught the attention of their bosses, and long story short, their efforts spawned an entirely new bike brand, SCOR. So we sat down with Mariano and Christof to get the full backstory and the rundown on the bikes themselves.TOPICS & TIMES:Mariano and Christof's roles at BMCBackground as ridersProject originsManagement catching on & growing momentumDesign ethos & bike detailsLaunching SCORMariano & Christof's Big IdeasRELATED LINKS:Introducing: Blister LabsGetting Here: Gunnison & Crested ButteThis Week's Gear GiveawayGear Giveaway / Newsletter SignupBecome a Blister Member / Get our new Buyer's GuideRegister for the 2022 Blister SummitBlister Mountain Bike Buyer's GuideSCOR 4060 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
01-20-22 - FanDuel Sportsbook Picks Of The Week - Turning Our Bets Toward The NBA

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 8:59


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Thursday January 20, 2022

Bootstrapped Web
Wheels Are Turning

Bootstrapped Web

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 40:52


Brian has sold ProcessKit! He explains the surprisingly stress-free and smooth process. Jordan talks about his upcoming move to Chicago. Meanwhile, they also give updates on Rally's marking and sales funnels, and prioritization at ZipMessage.  Today's episode is filled with business updates, optimism, and great outlooks for 2022. Don't forget to check out ZipMessage on … Continue reading Wheels Are Turning

Good Risings
35.4. Hash It Out: Turning Towards - Our Children

Good Risings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 12:40


Good Risings is a mindset. Join Elizabeth Earnshaw for a daily dose of Advice. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.   Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Executive Producers: Elizabeth Earnshaw, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com You can now search all of the Good Risings episodes on Fathom.fm/GoodRisings! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)
Splunk Executive Shawn Bice on Turning Data Into Doing

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 27:12


630: In this interview, Shawn discusses the importance of having a strong and efficient data foundation. Shawn provides an introduction to Splunk's business and his purview. He explains how the future is shifting to a multi-cloud hybrid approach and the importance of having consistent security and observability on a shared data platform. Shawn tells us how he sees data security as a foundation for innovation, how his company is turning data into doing, and how this real-time data empowers technology teams. Finally, he talks about the evolution of the role of the IT Leader, the role that Splunk plays in the broader technology ecosystem, and trends in technology that he is excited about.

FreightCasts
Turning B2B Into B2C by Focusing on the Needs of the Individual - Sales & Marketing Summit

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 17:32


Kaylee Nix talks to Forward Air's Sylvia Cintron about adjusting your marketing strategy to make it flexible for a variety for audiences and how that can boost your business strategy. Follow FreightWaves on Apple PodcastsFollow FreightWaves on SpotifyMore FreightWaves PodcastsJoin the Sales & Marketing Summit

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders
Sara Menker and Hans Tung (Gro Intelligence and GGV Capital) - Turning Data into Action

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 57:28


Sara Menker is the founder and CEO of Gro Intelligence, which uses data, analytics, and forecasting models to inform companies involved in the agricultural supply chain and organizations impacted by climate change. Hans Tung is a managing partner at GGV Capital, focusing on early-stage investments across the global digital economy. In this conversation with Stanford adjunct lecturer Emily Ma, Menker and Tung discuss the skills, tactics and technologies needed to solve complex, systemic challenges.

Estate of Mind, The Art of Selling Luxury Real Estate
Turning Loyalty into Real Estate Referrals with Barry Kirk

Estate of Mind, The Art of Selling Luxury Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 37:48


How Different Generations Use Technology:When it comes to pointing out the differences between Millennials and Gen Z versus Gen X and Baby Boomers, technology is usually one of the biggest differentiators. Younger generations grew up with the technology we use today, or at least comparable, earlier versions of it. While it might take older generations a bit more time and effort to find and learn their way around new online communities, maneuverability is more or less second nature for Millennials and Gen Z.While it's safe to argue that this younger generation is more adept at adapting to new technologies, it's also very true that this generation has become very reliant on what they hear from fellow members of the tribes they subscribe to. As a result, these younger generations are a little less trusting of institutions (and marketing messaging from said institutions), and are in fact very good at tuning out advertisements that clutter their news feeds and inboxes.So what does this mean when it comes to real estate? Creating loyalty amongst the younger generation will naturally lend itself to expanding your reach as a real estate professional, simply because those who are loyal to you will potentially be more likely to refer you to their fellow tribe members. Building your own loyal base of clients and potential clients is key to sustainable growth, a healthy referral pipeline, and establishing yourself as a sought after professional in the luxury real estate space.Prosocial Rewards and the Peak-End Rule:One of the most effective strategies at capturing new referrals is by offering what's known in psychology terms as a prosocial reward. These specific types of rewards refer to benefits that you as a professional don't necessarily offer to potential clients, but, instead, your existing client base offers on your behalf instead. Consequently, these benefits aren't being framed as having come from the professional, but rather having been given to a potential referral directly from an existing client (as a gift, so to speak).With prosocial rewards, the person delivering the benefit, an already trusted source of information for the potential client, gets to play the role of insider as they give their friend something of value, all on the behalf of a brand or professional without the brand or professional having to really get closely involved in the process. This is a great strategy for securing new referrals from typically already qualified leads.Another helpful tip when asking for referrals centers around the concept of the peak-end rule, a psychological term that refers to the highlight and culmination of one's experiences as the lasting memories most easily recalled. Generally speaking, the peak and end are the two aspects of an experience that a potential client will remember most vividly. When asking for referrals of any kind, the best time to do so is as close to the peak of satisfaction as possible, namely because your client will never be as satisfied with your services as they are at that very point. By always keeping the peak-end rule in mind, you greatly increase the likelihood of filling your pipeline with qualified leads.Topics and Questions You'll Uncover During this Episode:Who are the next generation of homeowners?What is a niche tribe in marketing terms and how can you appeal to these groups to build out your pipeline?How can a real estate professional create a network among fellow real estate professionals?How and when is the best time for a real estate professional to ask their clients to refer them out to their network?Resources Mentioned within Episode:How to Reach Barry KirkOfficial Website - Chapman & Co. Leadership InstituteConnect with Barry on LinkedInThe Institute for Luxury Home Marketing

Good Risings
35.3. Hash It Out: Turning Towards - Ecosystems

Good Risings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 7:39


Good Risings is a mindset. Join Elizabeth Earnshaw for a daily dose of Advice. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.   Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Executive Producers: Elizabeth Earnshaw, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Love Letters, Life and Other Conversations
A Love Letter to Possibility

Love Letters, Life and Other Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:47


This week, on the Love Letters, Life, and Other Conversations podcast, Jane and Wendy talk about possibility and perspective. Inspired by Rosamund & Benjamin Zander's book,“The Art of Possibility,” they discuss:- How the stories we tell ourselves about what's going on in our lives can affect our mindset and experiences. They explore the idea of changing the narrative and empowering a new story that infuses meaning and quality into your life.- Turning challenges into opportunities by questioning our circumstances and viewing the situation through an alternative lens instead of simply following the status quo. - The freedom of seeing the world as a place full of possibility and abundance, instead of a place of scarcity.Wendy's Takeaways:Being able to articulate that although we haven't arrived at a place where everything is "perfect," we can still acknowledge the good that's a part of our day-to-day life.The joy of the idea that anything is possible while recognizing that possibility is an art, which means it requires practice.The little girl in the book's default outlook was “perfect.” It is what you make it.Jane's Takeaways:The concept that whatever the problem, whatever the story, whatever the framework, it's all been invented already. And we as individuals have everything we need at our disposal to reinvent it.Taking an alternative approach to problem-solving and reframing with a picket fence rather than a circle.Conversation cements both new ideas and new habits. Resources mentioned in this episode:Seth Godin's altMBAThe Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life - Rosamund Stone Zander & Benjamin Zander The Audacity to Be Queen: The Unapologetic Art of Dreaming Big and Manifesting Your Most Fabulous Life  - Gina DeVeeTo find out more about Jane's "I Want More the Next Thirty Years"  group that she mentions in the episode,  get in touch via email at: jane.thefrenchtable@gmail.com, or drop Jane a direct message via Instagram at @janewebsterthefrenchtable. ---------------------------------You are invited to share your love letters with them for consideration for a future conversation.  Email your love letter to loveletterconversations@gmail.com What is a love letter?  It is a letter, a text, a poem, a direct message, a drawing, a voice message, a watercolor, a recipe, a cup of tea, a smile, a home-baked meal delivered.  It's anything that connects us and makes us feel all those messy emotions, that without life would be pretty beige.Visit the Podcast Page:  https://bit.ly/3d8sCDo Stay connected with Jane and Wendy on Instagram:Jane Webster@janewebsterthefrenchtableWendy Harrop@phineaswrighthouse

Flyover Conservatives
The World is Turning Red | The Flyover Conservatives Show

Flyover Conservatives

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 26:09


1. Transfer - Middle Class Has Been Robbed2. Retire - Dems Handcuffed to Sinking Ship3. Shift - Ground Below is Swinging RightSupport Flyover… Save America… AND Speak Patriot… BY SHOPPING AT https://www.shop.flyoverconservatives.com/?Collection=Never+Forget Check Out Flyover on Banned.Video: https://banned.video/channel/flyover-conservatives Join us Monday through Friday at 6pm CST for 3 quick points about what you should know! -------------------------------------------► Sign Up For Our Newsletter! -https://bit.ly/flyovernewsletter► MEET US IN PERSON!! Text EVENTS to (816) 579-1144 to learn more► Watch ALL our content in FULL on Rumble! https://bit.ly/FlyoverRumble► Support Flyover Directly - https://www.flyoverconservatives.com/donate► Flyover Conservatives Gold and Silver Buyer of Choice - https://kirkelliottphd.com/flyover► Use Promo Code “ Flyover” when checking out at www.MyPillow.com 

Revive Your Midlife Marriage
Turning the Midlife Crisis into Midlife Triumph

Revive Your Midlife Marriage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 21:44


A midlife crisis is far more complex than the husband who buys a red sports car and leaves his wife for a younger version. You don't have to go to that extreme to be experiencing a midlife crisis. And men are not the only ones that go through it.  One study in 2000 by Elaine Wethington, a sociology professor at Cornell University, found the phenomenon was actually more common in women, experienced by 26.3% of women and 25.4%. The differences in the sexes show up for each according to gender norms and expectations. But there is some overlap as well. The term "midlife crisis" came about in 1965 with a paper written by Elliot Jaques, a Canadian psychoanalyst, who described how people going into midlife are confronted with the limitations of their life and their mortality. A crisis is a time of intense difficulty or trouble, and  I believe we go through many developmental stages of crisis in our lives. There seems to be a crisis in adolescents, into adulthood, in addition to midlife and the end of life. Life events can cause us to have a crisis.  I think what makes the midlife crisis so pivotal is the fact that we are faced with the realization that we have only part of our lives left, and there is an urgency to make sense of what is in the past and what remains. Our mortality. 

The JJ Redick Podcast
Heating Up in Miami, Whether Harden Can Lead the Nets, and Mavs Are Turning the Corner

The JJ Redick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 64:48


With the Bulls and Nets dealing with key injuries, Verno and KOC debate whether the Heat can take advantage and become the 1-seed in the East (03:45). They explain how "Heat Culture" keeps the team competitive. They also take a look at the resurgence of the Cleveland Cavaliers, and discuss whether the Cavs can maintain this success and end the season as a top-six team in the East (14:27). With KD out and Kyrie playing only in road games, the guys debate whether James Harden can lead the way for the Nets (26:34). After the Mavs beat the Grizzlies over the weekend, they discuss how Luka and the rest of the team are starting to click (39:27). The Lakers got a good win over the Jazz last night, but KOC points out that the Jazz need to make a move to truly compete for a title (52:17). Hosts: Chris Vernon and Kevin O'Connor Producer: Jessie Lopez Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Screaming in the Cloud
The re:Invent Wheel in the Sky Keeps on Turning with Pete Cheslock

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:52


About PetePete does many startup things at Allma. Links: Last Tweet in AWS: https://lasttweetinaws.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/petecheslock LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petecheslock/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined—as is tradition, for a post re:Invent wrap up, a month or so later, once everything is time to settle—by my friend and yours, Pete Cheslock. Pete, how are you?Pete: Hi, I'm doing fantastic. New year; new me. That's what I'm going with.Corey: That's the problem. I keep hoping for that, but every time I turn around, it's still me. And you know, honestly, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.Pete: Exactly. [laugh]. I wouldn't wish you on me either. But somehow I keep coming back for this.Corey: So, in two-thousand twenty—or twenty-twenty, as the children say—re:Invent was fully virtual. And that felt weird. Then re:Invent 2021 was a hybrid event which, let's be serious here, is not really those things. They had a crappy online thing and then a differently crappy thing in person. But it didn't feel real to me because you weren't there.That is part of the re:Invent tradition. There's a midnight madness thing, there's a keynote where they announce a bunch of nonsense, and then Pete and I go and have brunch on the last day of re:Invent and decompress, and more or less talk smack about everything that crosses our minds. And you weren't there this year. I had to backfill you with Tim Banks. You know, the person that I backfield you with here at The Duckbill Group as a principal cloud economist.Pete: You know, you got a great upgrade in hot takes, I feel like, with Tim.Corey: And other ways, too, but it's rude of me to say that to you directly. So yeah, his hot takes are spectacular. He was going to be doing this with me, except you cannot mess with tradition. You really can't.Pete: Yeah. I'm trying to think how many—is this third year? It's at least three.Corey: Third or fourth.Pete: Yeah, it's at least three. Yeah, it was, I don't want to say I was sad to not be there because, with everything going on, it's still weird out there. But I am always—I'm just that weird person who actually likes re:Invent, but not for I feel like the reasons people think. Again, I'm such an extroverted-type person, that it's so great to have this, like, serendipity to re:Invent. The people that you run into and the conversations that you have, and prior—like in 2019, I think was a great example because that was the last one I had gone to—you know, having so many conversations so quickly because everyone is there, right? It's like this magnet that attracts technologists, and venture capital, and product builders, and all this other stuff. And it's all compressed into, like, you know, that five-day span, I think is the biggest part that makes so great.Corey: The fear in people's eyes when they see me. And it was fun; I had a pair of masks with me. One of them was a standard mask, and no one recognizes anyone because, masks, and the other was a printout of my ridiculous face, which was horrifyingly uncanny, but also made it very easy for people to identify me. And depending upon how social I was feeling, I would wear one or the other, and it worked flawlessly. That was worth doing. They really managed to thread the needle, as well, before Omicron hit, but after the horrors of last year. So, [unintelligible 00:03:00]—Pete: It really—Corey: —if it were going on right now, it would not be going on right now.Pete: Yeah. I talk about really—yeah—really just hitting it timing-wise. Like, not that they could have planned for any of this, but like, as things were kind of not too crazy and before they got all crazy again, it feels like wow, like, you know, they really couldn't have done the event at any other time. And it's like, purely due to luck. I mean, absolute one hundred percent.Corey: That's the amazing power of frugality. Because the reason is then is it's the week after Thanksgiving every year when everything is dirt cheap. And, you know, if there's one thing that I one-point-seve—sorry, their stock's in the toilet—a $1.6 trillion company is very concerned about, it is saving money at every opportunity.Pete: Well, the one thing that was most curious about—so I was at the first re:Invent in-what—2012 I think it was, and there was—it was quaint, right?—there was 4000 people there, I want to say. It was in the thousands of people. Now granted, still a big conference, but it was in the Sands Convention Center. It was in that giant room, the same number of people, were you know, people's booths were like tables, like, eight-by-ten tables, right? [laugh].It had almost a DevOpsDays feel to it. And I was kind of curious if this one had any of those feelings. Like, did it evoke it being more quaint and personable, or was it just as soulless as it probably has been in recent years?Corey: This was fairly soulless because they reduced the footprint of the event. They dropped from two expo halls down to one, they cut the number of venues, but they still had what felt like 20,000 people or something there. It was still crowded, it was still packed. And I've done some diligent follow-ups afterwards, and there have been very few cases of Covid that came out of it. I quarantined for a week in a hotel, so I don't come back and kill my young kids for the wrong reasons.And that went—that was sort of like the worst part of it on some level, where it's like great. Now I could sit alone at a hotel and do some catch-up and all the rest, but all right I'd kind of like to go home. I'm not used to being on the road that much.Pete: Yeah, I think we're all a little bit out of practice. You know, I haven't been on a plane in years. I mean, the travel I've done more recently has been in my car from point A to point B. Like, direct, you know, thing. Actually, a good friend of mine who's not in technology at all had to travel for business, and, you know, he also has young kids who are under five, so he when he got back, he actually hid in a room in their house and quarantine himself in the room. But they—I thought, this is kind of funny—they never told the kids he was home. Because they knew that like—Corey: So, they just thought the house was haunted?Pete: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Don't go in the west wing,” sort of level of nonsense. That is kind of amazing.Pete: Honestly, like, we were hanging out with the family because they're our neighbors. And it was like, “Oh, yeah, like, he's in the guest room right now.” Kids have no idea. [laugh]. I'm like, “Oh, my God.” I'm like, I can't even imagine. Yeah.Corey: So, let's talk a little bit about the releases of re:Invent. And I'm going to lead up with something that may seem uncharitable, but I don't think it necessarily is. There weren't the usual torrent of new releases for ridiculous nonsense in the same way that there have been previously. There was no, this service talks to satellites in space. I mean, sure, there was some IoT stuff to manage fleets of cars, and giant piles of robots, and cool, I don't have those particular problems; I'm trying to run a website over here.So okay, great. There were enhancements to a number of different services that were in many cases appreciated, in other cases, irrelevant. Werner said in his keynote, that it was about focusing on primitives this year. And, “Why do we have so many services? It's because you asked for it… as customers.”Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, you asked for it.Corey: What have you been asking for, Pete? Because I know what I've been asking for and it wasn't that. [laugh].Pete: It's amazing to see a company continually say yes to everything, and somehow, despite their best efforts, be successful at doing it. No other company could do that. Imagine any other software technology business out there that just builds everything the customers ask for. Like from a product management business standpoint, that is, like, rule 101 is, “Listen to your customers, but don't say yes to everything.” Like, you can't do everything.Corey: Most companies can't navigate the transition between offering the same software in the Cloud and on a customer facility. So, it's like, “Ooh, an on-prem version, I don't know, that almost broke the company the last time we tried it.” Whereas you have Amazon whose product strategy is, “Yes,” being able to put together a whole bunch of things. I also will challenge the assertion that it's the primitives that customers want. They don't want to build a data center out of popsicle sticks themselves. They want to get something that solves a problem.And this has been a long-term realization for me. I used to work at Media Temple as a senior systems engineer running WordPress at extremely large scale. My websites now run on WordPress, and I have the good sense to pay WP Engine to handle it for me, instead of doing it myself because it's not the most productive use of my time. I want things higher up the stack. I assure you I pay more to WP Engine than it would cost me to run these things myself from an infrastructure point of view, but not in terms of my time.What I see sometimes as the worst of all worlds is that AWS is trying to charge for that value-added pricing without adding the value that goes along with it because you still got to build a lot of this stuff yourself. It's still a very janky experience, you're reduced to googling random blog posts to figure out how this thing is supposed to work, and the best documentation comes from externally. Whereas with a company that's built around offering solutions like this, great. In the fullness of time, I really suspect that if this doesn't change, their customers are going to just be those people who build solutions out of these things. And let those companies capture the up-the-stack margin. Which I have no problem with. But they do because Amazon is a company that lies awake at night actively worrying that someone, somewhere, who isn't them might possibly be making money somehow.Pete: I think MongoDB is a perfect example of—like, look at their stock price over the last whatever, years. Like, they, I feel like everyone called for the death of MongoDB every time Amazon came out with their new things, yet, they're still a multi-billion dollar company because I can just—give me an API endpoint and you scale the database. There's is—Corey: Look at all the high-profile hires that Mongo was making out of AWS, and I can't shake the feeling they're sitting there going, “Yeah, who's losing important things out of production now?” It's, everyone is exodus-ing there. I did one of those ridiculous graphics of the naming all the people that went over there, and in—with the hurricane evacuation traffic picture, and there's one car going the other way that I just labeled with, “Re:Invent sponsorship check,” because yeah, they have a top tier sponsorship and it was great. I've got to say I've been pretty down on MongoDB for a while, for a variety of excellent reasons based upon, more or less, how they treated customers who were in pain. And I'd mostly written it off.I don't do that anymore. Not because I inherently believe the technology has changed, though I'm told it has, but by the number of people who I deeply respect who are going over there and telling me, no, no, this is good. Congratulations. I have often said you cannot buy authenticity, and I don't think that they are, but the people who are working there, I do not believe that these people are, “Yeah, well, you bought my opinion. You can buy their attention, not their opinion.” If someone changes their opinion, based upon where they work, I kind of question everything they're telling me is, like, “Oh, you're just here to sell something you don't believe in? Welcome aboard.”Pete: Right. Yeah, there's an interview question I like to ask, which is, “What's something that you used to believe in very strongly that you've more recently changed your mind on?” And out of politeness because usually throws people back a little bit, and they're like, “Oh, wow. Like, let me think about that.” And I'm like, “Okay, while you think about that I want to give you mine.”Which is in the past, my strongly held belief was we had to run everything ourselves. “You own your availability,” was the line. “No, I'm not buying Datadog. I can build my own metric stack just fine, thank you very much.” Like, “No, I'm not going to use these outsourced load balancers or databases because I need to own my availability.”And what I realized is that all of those decisions lead to actually delivering and focusing on things that were not the core product. And so now, like, I've really flipped 180, that, if any—anything that you're building that does not directly relate to the core product, i.e. How your business makes money, should one hundred percent be outsourced to an expert that is better than you. Mongo knows how to run Mongo better than you.Corey: “What does your company do?” “Oh, we handle expense reports.” “Oh, what are you working on this month?” “I'm building a load balancer.” It's like that doesn't add the value. Don't do that.Pete: Right. Exactly. And so it's so interesting, I think, to hear Werner say that, you know, we're just building primitives, and you asked for this. And I think that concept maybe would work years ago, when you had a lot of builders who needed tools, but I don't think we have any, like, we don't have as many builders as before. Like, I think we have people who need more complete solutions. And that's probably why all these businesses are being super successful against Amazon.Corey: I'm wondering if it comes down to a cloud economic story, specifically that my cloud bill is always going to be variable and it's difficult to predict, whereas if I just use EC2 instances, and I build load balancers or whatnot, myself, well, yeah, it's a lot more work, but I can predict accurately what my staff compensation costs are more effectively, that I can predict what a CapEx charge would be or what the AWS bill is going to be. I'm wondering if that might in some way shape it?Pete: Well, I feel like the how people get better in managing their costs, right, you'll eventually move to a world where, like, “Yep, okay, first, we turned off waste,” right? Like, step one is waste. Step two is, like, understanding your spend better to optimize but, like, step three, like, the galaxy brain meme of Amazon cost stuff is all, like, unit economics stuff, where trying to better understand the actual cost deliver an actual feature. And yeah, I think that actually gets really hard when you give—kind of spread your product across, like, a slew of services that have varying levels of costs, varying levels of tagging, so you can attribute it. Like, it's really hard. Honestly, it's pretty easy if I have 1000 EC2 servers with very specific tags, I can very easily figure out what it costs to deliver product. But if I have—Corey: Yeah, if I have Corey build it, I know what Corey is going to cost, and I know how many servers he's going to use. Great, if I have Pete it, Pete's good at things, it'll cut that server bill in half because he actually knows how to wind up being efficient with things. Okay, great. You can start calculating things out that way. I don't think that's an intentional choice that companies are making, but I feel like that might be a natural outgrowth of it.Pete: Yeah. And there's still I think a lot of the, like, old school mentality of, like, the, “Not invented here,” the, “We have to own our availability.” You can still own your availability by using these other vendors. And honestly, it's really heartening to see so many companies realize that and realize that I don't need to get everything from Amazon. And honestly, like, in some things, like I look at a cloud Amazon bill, and I think to myself, it would be easier if you just did everything from Amazon versus having these ten other vendors, but those ten other vendors are going to be a lot better at running the product that they build, right, that as a service, then you probably will be running it yourself. Or even Amazon's, like, you know, interpretation of that product.Corey: A few other things that came out that I thought were interesting, at least the direction they're going in. The changes to S3 intelligent tiering are great, with instant retrieval on Glacier. I feel like that honestly was—they talk a good story, but I feel like that was competitive response to Google offering the same thing. That smacks of a large company with its use case saying, “You got two choices here.” And they're like, “Well, okay. Crap. We're going to build it then.”Or alternately, they're looking at the changes that they're making to intelligent tiering, they're now shifting that to being the default that as far as recommendations go. There are a couple of drawbacks to it, but not many, and it's getting easier now to not have the mental overhead of trying to figure out exactly what your lifecycle policies are. Yeah, there are some corner cases where, okay, if I adjust this just so, then I could save 10% on that monitoring fee or whatnot. Yeah, but look how much work that's going to take you to curate and make sure that you're not doing something silly. That feels like it is such an in the margins issue. It's like, “How much data you're storing?” “Four exabytes.” Okay, yeah. You probably want some people doing exactly that, but that's not most of us.Pete: Right. Well, there's absolutely savings to be had. Like, if I had an exabyte of data on S3—which there are a lot of people who have that level of data—then it would make sense for me to have an engineering team whose sole purpose is purely an optimizing our data lifecycle for that data. Until a point, right? Until you've optimized the 80%, basically. You optimize the first 80, that's probably, air-quote, “Easy.” The last 20 is going to be incredibly hard, maybe you never even do that.But at lower levels of scale, I don't think the economics actually work out to have a team managing your data lifecycle of S3. But the fact that now AWS can largely do it for you in the background—now, there's so many things you have to think about and, like, you know, understand even what your data is there because, like, not all data is the same. And since S3 is basically like a big giant database you can query, you got to really think about some of that stuff. But honestly, what I—I don't know if—I have no idea if this is even be worked on, but what I would love to see—you know, hashtag #AWSwishlist—is, now we have countless tiers of EBS volumes, EBS volumes that can be dynamically modified without touching, you know, the physical host. Meaning with an API call, you can change from the gp2 to gp3, or io whatever, right?Corey: Or back again if it doesn't pan out.Pete: Or back again, right? And so for companies with large amounts of spend, you know, economics makes sense that you should have a team that is analyzing your volumes usage and modifying that daily, right? Like, you could modify that daily, and I don't know if there's anyone out there that's actually doing it at that level. And they probably should. Like, if you got millions of dollars in EBS, like, there's legit savings that you're probably leaving on the table without doing that. But that's what I'm waiting for Amazon to do for me, right? I want intelligent tiering for EBS because if you're telling me I can API call and you'll move my data and make that better, make that [crosstalk 00:17:46] better [crosstalk 00:17:47]—Corey: Yeah it could be like their auto-scaling for DynamoDB, for example. Gives you the capacity you need 20 minutes after you needed it. But fine, whatever because if I can schedule stuff like that, great, I know what time of day, the runs are going to kick off that beat up the disks. I know when end-of-month reporting fires off. I know what my usage pattern is going to be, by and large.Yeah, part of the problem too, is that I look at this stuff, and I get excited about it with the intelligent tiering… at The Duckbill Group we've got a few hundred S3 buckets lurking around. I'm thinking, “All right, I've got to go through and do some changes on this and implement all of that.” Our S3 bill's something like 50 bucks a month or something ridiculous like that. It's a no, that really isn't a thing. Like, I have a screenshot bucket that I have an app installed—I think called Dropshare—that hooks up to anytime I drag—I hit a shortcut, I drag with the mouse to select whatever I want and boom, it's up there and the URL is not copied to my clipboard, I can paste that wherever I want.And I'm thinking like, yeah, there's no cleanup on that. There's no lifecycle policy that's turning into anything. I should really go back and age some of it out and do the rest and start doing some lifecycle management. It—I've been using this thing for years and I think it's now a whopping, what, 20 cents a month for that bucket. It's—I just don't—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —I just don't care, other than voice in the back of my mind, “That's an unbounded growth problem.” Cool. When it hits 20 bucks a month, then I'll consider it. But until then I just don't. It does not matter.Pete: Yeah, I think yeah, scale changes everything. Start adding some zeros and percentages turned into meaningful numbers. And honestly, back on the EBS thing, the one thing that really changed my perspective of EBS, in general, is—especially coming from the early days, right? One terabyte volume, it was a hard drive in a thing. It was a virtual LUN on a SAN somewhere, probably.Nowadays, and even, like, many years after those original EBS volumes, like all the limits you get in EBS, those are actually artificial limits, right? If you're like, “My EBS volume is too slow,” it's not because, like, the hard drive it's on is too slow. That's an artificial limit that is likely put in place due to your volume choice. And so, like, once you realize that in your head, then your concept of how you store data on EBS should change dramatically.Corey: Oh, AWS had a blog post recently talking about, like, with io2 and the limits and everything, and there was architecture thinking, okay. “So, let's say this is insufficient and the quarter-million IOPS a second that you're able to get is not there.” And I'm sitting there thinking, “That is just ludicrous data volume and data interactivity model.” And it's one of those, like, I'm sitting here trying to think about, like, I haven't had to deal with a problem like that decade, just because it's, “Huh. Turns out getting these one thing that's super fast is kind of expensive.” If you paralyze it out, that's usually the right answer, and that's how the internet is mostly evolved. But there are use cases for which that doesn't work, and I'm excited to see it. I don't want to pay for it in my view, but it's nice to see it.Pete: Yeah, it's kind of fun to go into the Amazon calculator and price out one of the, like, io2 volumes and, like, maxed out. It's like, I don't know, like $50,000 a month or a hun—like, it's some just absolutely absurd number. But the beauty of it is that if you needed that value for an hour to run some intensive data processing task, you can have it for an hour and then just kill it when you're done, right? Like, that is what is most impressive.Corey: I copied 130 gigs of data to an EFS volume, which was—[unintelligible 00:21:05] EFS has gone from “This is a piece of junk,” to one of my favorite services. It really is, just because of its utility and different ways of doing things. I didn't have the foresight, just use a second EFS volume for this. So, I was unzipping a whole bunch of small files onto it. Great.It took a long time for me to go through it. All right, now that I'm done with that I want to clean all this up. My answer was to ultimately spin up a compute node and wind up running a whole bunch of—like, 400, simultaneous rm-rf on that long thing. And it was just, like, this feels foolish and dumb, but here we are. And I'm looking at the stats on it because the instance was—all right, at that point, the load average [on the instance 00:21:41] was like 200, or something like that, and the EFS volume was like, “Ohh, wow, you're really churning on this. I'm now at, like, 5% of the limit.” Like, okay, great. It turns out I'm really bad at computers.Pete: Yeah, well, that's really the trick is, like, yeah, sure, you can have a quarter-million IOPS per second, but, like, what's going to break before you even hit that limit? Probably many other things.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, feels like on some level if something gets to that point, it a misconfiguration somewhere. But honestly, that's the thing I find weirdest about the world in which we live is that at a small-scale—if I have a bill in my $5 a month shitposting account, great. If I screw something up and cost myself a couple hundred bucks in misconfiguration it's going to stand out. At large scale, it doesn't matter if—you're spending $50 million a year or $500 million a year on AWS and someone leaks your creds, and someone spins up a whole bunch of Bitcoin miners somewhere else, you're going to see that on your bill until they're mining basically all the Bitcoin. It just gets lost in the background.Pete: I'm waiting for those—I'm actually waiting for the next level of them to get smarter because maybe you have, like, an aggressive tagging system and you're monitoring for untagged instances, but the move here would be, first get the creds and query for, like, the most used tags and start applying those tags to your Bitcoin mining instances. My God, it'll take—Corey: Just clone a bunch of tags. Congratulations, you now have a second BI Elasticsearch cluster that you're running yourself. Good work.Pete: Yeah. Yeah, that people won't find that until someone comes along after the fact that. Like, “Why do we have two have these things?” And you're like—[laugh].Corey: “Must be a DR thing.”Pete: It's maxed-out CPU. Yeah, exactly.Corey: [laugh].Pete: Oh, the terrible ideas—please, please, hackers don't take are terrible ideas.Corey: I had a, kind of, whole thing I did on Twitter years ago, talking about how I would wind up using the AWS Marketplace for an embezzlement scheme. Namely, I would just wind up spinning up something that had, like, a five-cent an hour charge or whatnot on just, like, basically rebadge the CentOS Community AMI or whatnot. Great. And then write a blog post, not attached to me, that explains how to do a thing that I'm going to be doing in production in a week or two anyway. Like, “How to build an auto-scaling group,” and reference that AMI.Then if it ever comes out, like, “Wow, why are we having all these marketplace charges on this?” “I just followed the blog post like it said here.” And it's like, “Oh, okay. You're a dumbass. The end.”That's the way to do it. A month goes by and suddenly it came out that someone had done something similarly. They wound up rebadging these community things on the marketplace and charging big money for it, and I'm sitting there going like that was a joke. It wasn't a how-to. But yeah, every time I make these jokes, I worry someone's going to do it.Pete: “Welcome to large-scale fraud with Corey Quinn.”Corey: Oh, yeah, it's fraud at scale is really the important thing here.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I still remember a year ago now at re:Invent 2021 was it, or was it 2020? Whatever they came out with, I want to say it wasn't gp3, or maybe it was, regardless, there was a new EBS volume type that came out that you were playing with to see how it worked and you experimented with it—Pete: Oh, yes.Corey: —and the next morning, you looked at the—I checked Slack and you're like well, my experiments yesterday cost us $5,000. And at first, like, the—my response is instructive on this because, first, it was, “Oh, my God. What's going to happen now?” And it's like, first, hang on a second.First off, that seems suspect but assume it's real. I assumed it was real at the outset. It's “Oh, right. This is not my personal $5-a-month toybox account. We are a company; we can absolutely pay that.” Because it's like, I could absolutely reach out, call it a favor. “I made a mistake, and I need a favor on the bill, please,” to AWS.And I would never live it down, let's be clear. For a $7,000 mistake, I would almost certainly eat it. As opposed to having to prostrate myself like that in front of Amazon. I'm like, no, no, no. I want one of those like—if it's like, “Okay, you're going to, like, set back the company roadmap by six months if you have to pay this. Do you want to do it?” Like, [groans] “Fine, I'll eat some crow.”But okay. And then followed immediately by, wow, if Pete of all people can mess this up, customers are going to be doomed here. We should figure out what happened. And I'm doing the math. Like, Pete, “What did you actually do?” And you're sitting there and you're saying, “Well, I had like a 20 gig volume that I did this.” And I'm doing the numbers, and it's like—Pete: Something's wrong.Corey: “How sure are you when you say ‘gigabyte,' that you were—that actually means what you think it did? Like, were you off by a lot? Like, did you mean exabytes?” Like, what's the deal here?Pete: Like, multiple factors.Corey: Yeah. How much—“How many IOPS did you give that thing, buddy?” And it turned out what happened was that when they launched this, they had mispriced it in the system by a factor of a million. So, it was fun. I think by the end of it, all of your experimentation was somewhere between five to seven cents. Which—Pete: Yeah. It was a—Corey: Which is why you don't work here anymore because no one cost me seven cents of money to give to Amazon—Pete: How dare you?Corey: —on my watch. Get out.Pete: How dare you, sir?Corey: Exactly.Pete: Yeah, that [laugh] was amazing to see, as someone who has done—definitely maid screw-ups that have cost real money—you know, S3 list requests are always a fun one at scale—but that one was supremely fun to see the—Corey: That was a scary one because another one they'd done previously was they had messed up Lightsail pricing, where people would log in, and, like, “Okay, so what is my Lightsail instance going to cost?” And I swear to you, this is true, it was saying—this was back in 2017 or so—the answer was, like, “$4.3 billion.” Because when you see that you just start laughing because you know it's a mistake. You know, that they're not going to actually demand that you spend $4.3 billion for a single instance—unless it's running SAP—and great.It's just, it's a laugh. It's clearly a mispriced, and it's clearly a bug that's going to get—it's going to get fixed. I just spun up this new EBS volume that no one fully understands yet and it cost me thousands of dollars. That's the sort of thing that no, no, I could actually see that happening. There are instances now that cost something like 100 bucks an hour or whatnot to run. I can see spinning up the wrong thing by mistake and getting bitten by it. There's a bunch of fun configuration mistakes you can make that will, “Hee, hee, hee. Why can I see that bill spike from orbit?” And that's the scary thing.Pete: Well, it's the original CI and CD problem of the per-hour billing, right? That was super common of, like, yeah, like, an i3, you know, 16XL server is pretty cheap per hour, but if you're charged per hour and you spin up a bunch for five minutes. Like, it—you will be shocked [laugh] by what you see there. So—Corey: Yeah. Mistakes will show. And I get it. It's also people as individuals are very different psychologically than companies are. With companies it's one of those, “Great we're optimizing to bring in more revenue and we don't really care about saving money at all costs.”Whereas people generally have something that looks a lot like a fixed income in the form of a salary or whatnot, so it's it is easier for us to cut spend than it is for us to go out and make more money. Like, I don't want to get a second job, or pitch my boss on stuff, and yeah. So, all and all, routing out the rest of what happened at re:Invent, they—this is the problem is that they have a bunch of minor things like SageMaker Inference Recommender. Yeah, I don't care. Anything—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —[crosstalk 00:28:47] SageMaker I mostly tend to ignore, for safety. I did like the way they described Amplify Studio because they made it sound like a WYSIWYG drag and drop, build a React app. It's not it. It basically—you can do that in Figma and then it can hook it up to some things in some cases. It's not what I want it to be, which is Honeycode, except good. But we'll get there some year. Maybe.Pete: There's a lot of stuff that was—you know, it's the classic, like, preview, which sure, like, from a product standpoint, it's great. You know, they have a level of scale where they can say, “Here's this thing we're building,” which could be just a twinkle in a product managers, call it preview, and get thousands of people who would be happy to test it out and give you feedback, and it's a, it's great that you have that capability. But I often look at so much stuff and, like, that's really cool, but, like, can I, can I have it now? Right? Like—or you can't even get into the preview plan, even though, like, you have that specific problem. And it's largely just because either, like, your scale isn't big enough, or you don't have a good enough relationship with your account manager, or I don't know, countless other reasons.Corey: The thing that really throws me, too, is the pre-announcements that come a year or so in advance, like, the Outpost smaller ones are finally available, but it feels like when they do too many pre-announcements or no big marquee service announcements, as much as they talk about, “We're getting back to fundamentals,” no, you have a bunch of teams that blew the deadline. That's really what it is; let's not call it anything else. Another one that I think is causing trouble for folks—I'm fortunate in that I don't do much work with Oracle databases, or Microsoft SQL databases—but they extended RDS Custom to Microsoft SQL at the [unintelligible 00:30:27] SQL server at re:Invent this year, which means this comes down to things I actually use, we're going to have a problem because historically, the lesson has always been if I want to run my own databases and tweak everything, I do it on top of an EC2 instance. If I want to managed database, relational database service, great, I use RDS. RDS Custom basically gives you root into the RDS instance. Which means among other things, yes, you can now use RDS to run containers.But it lets you do a lot of things that are right in between. So, how do you position this? When should I use RDS Custom? Can you give me an easy answer to that question? And they used a lot of words to say, no, they cannot. It's basically completely blowing apart the messaging and positioning of both of those services in some unfortunate ways. We'll learn as we go.Pete: Yeah. Honestly, it's like why, like, why would I use this? Or how would I use this? And this is I think, fundamentally, what's hard when you just say yes to everything. It's like, they in many cases, I don't think, like, I don't want to say they don't understand why they're doing this, but if it's not like there's a visionary who's like, this fits into this multi-year roadmap.That roadmap is largely—if that roadmap is largely generated by the customers asking for it, then it's not like, oh, we're building towards this Northstar of RDS being whatever. You might say that, but your roadmap's probably getting moved all over the place because, you know, this company that pays you a billion dollars a year is saying, “I would give you $2 billion a year for all of my Oracle databases, but I need this specific thing.” I can't imagine a scenario that they would say, “Oh, well, we're building towards this Northstar, and that's not on the way there.” Right? They'd be like, “New Northstar. Another billion dollars, please.”Corey: Yep. Probably the worst release of re:Invent, from my perspective, is RUM, Real User Monitoring, for CloudWatch. And I, to be clear, I wrote a shitposting Twitter threading client called Last Tweet in AWS. Go to lasttweetinaws.com. You can all use it. It's free; I just built this for my own purposes. And I've instrumented it with RUM. Now, Real User Monitoring is something that a lot of monitoring vendors use, and also CloudWatch now. And what that is, is it embeds a listener into the JavaScript that runs on client load, and it winds up looking at what's going on loading times, et cetera, so you can see when users are unhappy. I have no problem with this. Other than that, you know, liking users? What's up with that?Pete: Crazy.Corey: But then, okay, now, what this does is unlike every other RUM tool out there, which charges per session, meaning I am going to be… doing a web page load, it charges per data item, which includes HTTP errors, or JavaScript errors, et cetera. Which means that if you have a high transaction volume site and suddenly your CDN takes a nap like Fastly did for an hour last year, suddenly your bill is stratospheric for this because errors abound and cascade, and you can have thousands of errors on a single page load for these things, and it is going to be visible from orbit, at least with a per session basis thing, when you start to go viral, you understand that, “Okay, this is probably going to cost me some more on these things, and oops, I guess I should write less compelling content.” Fine. This is one of those one misconfiguration away and you are wailing and gnashing teeth. Now, this is a new service. I believe that they will waive these surprise bills in the event that things like that happen. But it's going to take a while and you're going to be worrying the whole time if you've rolled this out naively. So it's—Pete: Well and—Corey: —I just don't like the pricing.Pete: —how many people will actively avoid that service, right? And honestly, choose a competitor because the competitor could be—the competitor could be five times more expensive, right, on face value, but it's the certainty of it. It's the uncertainty of what Amazon will charge you. Like, no one wants a surprise bill. “Well, a vendor is saying that they'll give us this contract for $10,000. I'm going to pay $10,000, even though RUM might be a fraction of that price.”It's honestly, a lot of these, like, product analytics tools and monitoring tools, you'll often see they price be a, like, you know, MAU, Monthly Active User, you know, or some sort of user-based pricing, like, the number of people coming to your site. You know, and I feel like at least then, if you are trying to optimize for lots of users on your site, and more users means more revenue, then you know, if your spend is going up, but your revenue is also going up, that's a win-win. But if it's like someone—you know, your third-party vendor dies and you're spewing out errors, or someone, you know, upgraded something and it spews out errors. That no one would normally see; that's the thing. Like, unless you're popping open that JavaScript console, you're not seeing any of those errors, yet somehow it's like directly impacting your bottom line? Like that doesn't feel [crosstalk 00:35:06].Corey: Well, there is something vaguely Machiavellian about that. Like, “How do I get my developers to care about errors on consoles?” Like, how about we make it extortionately expensive for them not to. It's, “Oh, all right, then. Here we go.”Pete: And then talk about now you're in a scenario where you're working on things that don't directly impact the product. You're basically just sweeping up the floor and then trying to remove errors that maybe don't actually affect it and they're not actually an error.Corey: Yeah. I really do wonder what the right answer is going to be. We'll find out. Again, we live, we learn. But it's also, how long does it take a service that has bad pricing at launch, or an unfortunate story around it to outrun that reputation?People are still scared of Glacier because of its original restore pricing, which was non-deterministic for any sensible human being, and in some cases lead to I'm used to spending 20 to 30 bucks a month on this. Why was I just charged two grand?Pete: Right.Corey: Scare people like that, they don't come back.Pete: I'm trying to actually remember which service it is that basically gave you an estimate, right? Like, turn it on for a month, and it would give you an estimate of how much this was going to cost you when billing started.Corey: It was either Detective or GuardDuty.Pete: Yeah, it was—yeah, that's exactly right. It was one of those two. And honestly, that was unbelievably refreshing to see. You know, like, listen, you have the data, Amazon. You know what this is going to cost me, so when I, like, don't make me spend all this time to go and figure out the cost. If you have all this data already, just tell me, right?And if I look at it and go, “Yeah, wow. Like, turning this on in my environment is going to cost me X dollars. Like, yeah, that's a trade-off I want to make, I'll spend that.” But you know, with some of the—and that—a little bit of a worry on some of the intelligent tiering on S3 is that the recommendation is likely going to be everything goes to intelligent tiering first, right? It's the gp3 story. Put everything on gp3, then move it to the proper volume, move it to an sc or an st or an io. Like, gp3 is where you start. And I wonder if that's going to be [crosstalk 00:37:08].Corey: Except I went through a wizard yesterday to launch an EC2 instance and its default on the free tier gp2.Pete: Yeah. Interesting.Corey: Which does not thrill me. I also still don't understand for the life of me why in some regions, the free tier is a t2 instance, when t3 is available.Pete: They're uh… my guess is that they've got some free t—they got a bunch of t2s lying around. [laugh].Corey: Well, one of the most notable announcements at re:Invent that most people didn't pay attention to is their ability now to run legacy instance types on top of Nitro, which really speaks to what's going on behind the scenes of we can get rid of all that old hardware and emulate the old m1 on modern equipment. So, because—you can still have that legacy, ancient instance, but now you're going—now we're able to wind up greening our data centers, which is part of their big sustainability push, with their ‘Sustainability Pillar' for the well-architected framework. They're talking more about what the green choices in cloud are. Which is super handy, not just because of the economic impact because we could use this pretty directly to reverse engineer their various margins on a per-service or per-offering basis. Which I'm not sure they're aware of yet, but oh, they're going to be.And that really winds up being a win for the planet, obviously, but also something that is—that I guess puts a little bit of choice on customers. The challenge I've got is, with my serverless stuff that I build out, if I spend—the Google search I make to figure out what the most economic, most sustainable way to do that is, is going to have a bigger carbon impact on the app itself. That seems to be something that is important at scale, but if you're not at scale, it's one of those, don't worry about it. Because let's face it, the cloud providers—all of them—are going to have a better sustainability story than you are running this in your own data centers, or on a Raspberry Pi that's always plugged into the wall.Pete: Yeah, I mean, you got to remember, Amazon builds their own power plants to power their data centers. Like, that's the level they play, right? There, their economies of scale are so entirely—they're so entirely different than anything that you could possibly even imagine. So, it's something that, like, I'm sure people will want to choose for. But, you know, if I would honestly say, like, if we really cared about our computing costs and the carbon footprint of it, I would love to actually know the carbon footprint of all of the JavaScript trackers that when I go to various news sites, and it loads, you know, the whatever thousands of trackers and tracking the all over, like, what is the carbon impact of some of those choices that I actually could control, like, as a either a consumer or business person?Corey: I really hope that it turns into something that makes a meaningful difference, and it's not just greenwashing. But we'll see. In the fullness of time, we're going to figure that out. Oh, they're also launching some mainframe stuff. They—like that's great.Pete: Yeah, those are still a thing.Corey: I don't deal with a lot of customers that are doing things with that in any meaningful sense. There is no AWS/400, so all right.Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, I think honestly, like, I did talk to a friend of mine who's in a big old enterprise and has a mainframe, and they're actually replacing their mainframe with Lambda. Like they're peeling off—which is, like, a great move—taking the monolith, right, and peeling off the individual components of what it can do into these discrete Lambda functions. Which I thought was really fascinating. Again, it's a five-year-long journey to do something like that. And not everyone wants to wait five years, especially if their support's about to run out for that giant box in the, you know, giant warehouse.Corey: The thing that I also noticed—and this is probably the—I guess, one of the—talk about swing and a miss on pricing—they have a—what is it?—there's a VPC IP Address Manager, which tracks the the IP addresses assigned to your VPCs that are allocated versus not, and it's 20 cents a month per IP address. It's like, “Okay. So, you're competing against a Google Sheet or an Excel spreadsheet”—which is what people are using for these things now—“Only you're making it extortionately expensive?”Pete: What kind of value does that provide for 20—I mean, like, again—Corey: I think Infoblox or someone like that offers it where they become more cost-effective as soon as you hit 500 IP addresses. And it's just—like, this is what I'm talking about. I know it does not cost AWS that kind of money to store an IP address. You can store that in a Route 53 TXT record for less money, for God's sake. And that's one of those, like, “Ah, we could extract some value pricing here.”Like, I don't know if it's a good product or not. Given its pricing, I don't give a shit because it's going to be too expensive for anything beyond trivial usage. So, it's a swing and a miss from that perspective. It's just, looking at that, I laugh, and I don't look at it again.Pete: See I feel—Corey: I'm not usually price sensitive. I want to be clear on that. It's just, that is just Looney Tunes, clown shoes pricing.Pete: Yeah. It's honestly, like, in many cases, I think the thing that I have seen, you know, in the past few years is, in many cases, it can honestly feel like Amazon is nickel-and-diming their customers in so many ways. You know, the explosion of making it easy to create multiple Amazon accounts has a direct impact to waste in the cloud because there's a lot of stuff you have to have her account. And the more accounts you have, those costs grow exponentially as you have these different places. Like, you kind of lose out on the economies of scale when you have a smaller number of accounts.And yeah, it's hard to optimize for that. Like, if you're trying to reduce your spend, it's challenging to say, “Well, by making a change here, we'll save, you know, $10,000 in this account.” “That doesn't seem like a lot when we're spending millions.” “Well, hold on a second. You'll save $10,000 per account, and you have 500 accounts,” or, “You have 1000 accounts,” or something like that.Or almost cost avoidance of this cost is growing unbounded in all of your accounts. It's tiny right now. So, like, now would be the time you want to do something with it. But like, again, for a lot of companies that have adopted the practice of endless Amazon accounts, they've almost gone, like, it's the classic, like, you know, I've got 8000 GitHub repositories for my source code. Like, that feels just as bad as having one GitHub repository for your repo. I don't know what the balance is there, but anytime these different types of services come out, it feels like, “Oh, wow. Like, I'm going to get nickeled and dimed for it.”Corey: This ties into the re:Post launch, which is a rebranding of their forums, where, okay, great, it was a little crufty and it need modernize, but it still ties your identity to an IAM account, or the root email address for an Amazon account, which is great. This is completely worthless because as soon as I change jobs, I lose my identity, my history, the rest, on this forum. I'm not using it. It shows that there's a lack of awareness that everyone is going to have multiple accounts with which they interact, and that people are going to deal with the platform longer than any individual account will. It's just a continual swing and a miss on things like that.And it gets back to the billing question of, “Okay. When I spin up an account, do I want them to just continue billing me—because don't turn this off; this is important—or do I want there to be a hard boundary where if you're about to charge me, turn it off. Turn off the thing that's about to cost me money.” And people hem and haw like this is an insurmountable problem, but I think the way to solve it is, let me specify that intent when I provision the account. Where it's, “This is a production account for a bank. I really don't want you turning it off.” Versus, “I'm a student learner who thinks that a Managed NAT Gateway might be a good thing. Yeah, I want you to turn off my demo Hello World app that will teach me what's going on, rather than surprising me with a five-figure bill at the end of the month.”Pete: Yeah. It shouldn't be that hard. I mean, but again, I guess everything's hard at scale.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.Pete: But still, I feel like every time I log into Cost Explorer and I look at—and this is years it's still not fixed. Not that it's even possible to fix—but on the first day of the month, you look at Cost Explorer, and look at what Amazon is estimating your monthly bill is going to be. It's like because of your, you know—Corey: Your support fees, and your RI purchases, and savings plans purchases.Pete: [laugh]. All those things happened, right? First of the month, and it's like, yeah, “Your bill's going to be $800,000 this year.” And it's like, “Shouldn't be, like, $1,000?” Like, you know, it's the little things like that, that always—Corey: The one-off charges, like, “Oh, your Route 53 zone,” and all the stuff that gets charged on a monthly cadence, which fine, whatever. I mean, I'm okay with it, but it's also the, like, be careful when that happen—I feel like there's a way to make that user experience less jarring.Pete: Yeah because that problem—I mean, in my scenario, companies that I've worked at, there's been multiple times that a non-technical person will look at that data and go into immediate freakout mode, right? And that's never something that you want to have happen because now that's just adding a lot of stress and anxiety into a company that is—with inaccurate data. Like, the data—like, the answer you're giving someone is just wrong. Perhaps you shouldn't even give it to them if it's that wrong. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing what happens this coming year. We're already seeing promising stuff. They—give people a timeline on how long in advance these things record—late last night, AWS released a new console experience. When you log into the AWS console now, there's a new beta thing. And I gave it some grief on Twitter because I'm still me, but like the direction it's going. It lets you customize your view with widgets and whatnot.And until they start selling widgets on marketplace or having sponsored widgets, you can't remove I like it, which is no guarantee at some point. But it shows things like, I can move the cost stuff, I can move the outage stuff up around, I can have the things that are going on in my account—but who I am means I can shift this around. If I'm a finance manager, cool. I can remove all the stuff that's like, “Hey, you want to get started spinning up an EC2 instance?” “Absolutely not. Do I want to get told, like, how to get certified? Probably not. Do I want to know what the current bill is and whether—and my list of favorites that I've pinned, whatever services there? Yeah, absolutely do.” This is starting to get there.Pete: Yeah, I wonder if it really is a way to start almost hedging on organizations having a wider group of people accessing AWS. I mean, in previous companies, I absolutely gave access to the console for tools like QuickSight, for tools like Athena, for the DataBrew stuff, the Glue DataBrew. Giving, you know, non-technical people access to be able to do these, like, you know, UI ETL tasks, you know, a wider group of a company is getting access into Amazon. So, I think anything that Amazon does to improve that experience for, you know, the non-SREs, like the people who would traditionally log in, like, that is an investment definitely worth making.Corey: “Well, what could non-engineering types possibly be doing in the AWS console?” “I don't know, jackhole, maybe paying the bill? Just a thought here.” It's the, there are people who look at these things from a variety of different places, and you have such sprawl in the AWS world that there are different personas by a landslide. If I'm building Twitter for Pets, you probably don't want to be pitching your mainframe migration services to me the same way that you would if I were a 200-year-old insurance company.Pete: Yeah, exactly. And the number of those products are going to grow, the number of personas are going to grow, and, yeah, they'll have to do something that they want to actually, you know, maintain that experience so that every person can have, kind of, the experience that they want, and not be distracted, you know? “Oh, what's this? Let me go test this out.” And it's like, you know, one-time charge for $10,000 because, like, that's how it's charged. You know, that's not an experience that people like.Corey: No. They really don't. Pete, I want to thank you for spending the time to chat with me again, as is our tradition. I'm hoping we can do it in person this year, when we go at the end of 2022, to re:Invent again. Or that no one goes in person. But this hybrid nonsense is for the birds.Pete: Yeah. I very much would love to get back to another one, and yeah, like, I think there could be an interesting kind of merging here of our annual re:Invent recap slash live brunch, you know, stream you know, hot takes after a long week. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. The real way that you know that it's a good joke is when one of us says something, the other one sprays scrambled eggs out of their nose. Yeah, that's the way to do it.Pete: Exactly. Exactly.Corey: Pete, thank you so much. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—hopefully, you know, come back. We miss you, but you're unaffiliated, you're a startup advisor. Where can people find you to learn more, if they for some unforgivable reason don't know who or what a Pete Cheslock is?Pete: Yeah. I think the easiest place to find me is always on Twitter. I'm just at @petecheslock. My DMs are always open and I'm always down to expand my network and chat with folks.And yeah, right, now, I'm just, as I jokingly say, professionally unaffiliated. I do some startup advisory work and have been largely just kind of—honestly checking out the state of the economy. Like, there's a lot of really interesting companies out there, and some interesting problems to solve. And, you know, trying to spend some of my time learning more about what companies are up to nowadays. So yeah, if you got some interesting problems, you know, you can follow my Twitter or go to LinkedIn if you want some great, you know, business hot takes about, you know, shitposting basically.Corey: Same thing. Pete, thanks so much for joining me, I appreciate it.Pete: Thanks for having me.Corey: Pete Cheslock, startup advisor, professionally unaffiliated, and recurring re:Invent analyst pal of mine. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment calling me a jackass because do I know how long it took you personally to price CloudWatch RUM?Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Rewildology
Ep. 59 | Turning the Tide for Sea Turtles with Brad Nahill

Rewildology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 110:25


Today's episode is Part 3 of the Costa Rica: Life, Lava & Forests series, and our guest, Brad Nahill, is the Co-Founder and President of SEE Turtles. Brad and Brooke have a fantastic conversation about all of SEE Turtles’ initiatives, plus his story about how he found his calling by sort of falling into sea turtle work. He also openly discusses the highlights and challenges of his career. As we all know from our own life experiences, no one's journey is all unicorns and rainbows, and Brad has had his fair share of difficult moments. If you're liking the show, please hit the follow button and share with someone you think would enjoy this episode. Sharing is the best way to help the show grow! Check out the new Rewildology merch shop! https://rewildology.com/shop/ See full show notes at rewildology.com.Discover more ways to watch, listen, and interact: https://linktr.ee/RewildologyJoin the Rewildologists Community Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/rewildologistsFollow RewildologyInstagram: https://instagram.com/rewildology/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@rewildologyFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/rewildologyTwitter: https://twitter.com/rewildologyYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxNVIeC0km8ZGK_1QPy7-iA

Perfume Room
33. Turning Scent Memories into Home Fragrance (w/ Otherland CEO & Co-Founder Abigail Cook Stone)

Perfume Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 66:12


CEO & Co-Founder of Otherland Abigail Cook Stone is in the Perfume Room today talking about the ethos behind all things Otherland: verve. Don't know what that means? You'll find out in this episode! She also shares the personal stories behind some of your favorite candles, the magical process of how each scent gets created, the time she showed up to her kick-off investor meeting with 3 pounds of clementines, why the first burn is the deepest, and the secret to being in business with her SO. Oh and did you know Otherland candles are seance-friendly? Booooooook. FRAGS MENTIONED: Giorgio Armani Privé Rose Alexandrie, Giorgio Armani Privé Rouge Malachite, Amouage Honour Woman, Gap Dream, Gap Heaven, Gap Grass, Otherland: Forest Veil, Rattan, Fallen Fir, Extra Hour, Stone Fruit, Match Point, Chandelier, Rattan, Daybed; Yankee Candle: Buttercream, Mocha Nut Latte, Clean Cotton; Tocca, Voluspa, Diptyque, Capri Blue Volcano Blue, Otherland: Cardamom Milk, Tomato Terrazzo, Berkshires Granola, Woodlands, Pomander Woods, Canary; Tom Ford Soleil Blanc, Ralph Lauren Ralph, Chanel Allure, Escada Ibiza Hippie, Michael Kors Michael, Ralph Lauren Blue. FOLLOW ABIGAIL: @alphagail @otherlandco SHOP OTHERLAND: www.otherland.com FOLLOW THE POD: @perfumeroompod LET'S FIND YOUR NEXT SCENT! https://shoplist.us/emmavernon/consults

Good Risings
35.2. Hash It Out: ‘Turning Towards' in Out Various Relationships

Good Risings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:27


Good Risings is a mindset. Join Elizabeth Earnshaw for a daily dose of Advice. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.   Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Executive Producers: Elizabeth Earnshaw, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Tummy Team Journey
The Bigger Picture of My Journey Through the Eyes of My Daughter

The Tummy Team Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 61:11


The Bigger Picture of My Journey Through the Eyes of My Daughter A podcast discussion between Kelly Dean, MPT and Founder of The Tummy Team, and her oldest daughter (middle child) Kadie. Kadie shares a bit about how Kelly's core rehab journey has influenced her life. Kelly shares more about how healing her broken core started a journey of living a strong, connected and intentional life and how that impacted her kids and her family in unexpected ways. This is a fun look behind the scenes into the bigger picture of why moms need to prioritize their own self care. This episode is part of our series Embracing the New: The Focus That Comes with Turning 50! 50 and focused!   Subscribe to Our Podcast Here

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe
The mysterious phenomenon of turning sound into light

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 59:19


Daniel and Jorge talk about sonoluminescence, a mystery that has evaded explanation for almost 100 years. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Scummy Mummies - Podcast
221: Fashion, sex and turning sixty with Karen Arthur

Scummy Mummies - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 72:24


Our guest for this episode is the amazing Karen Arthur - educator, fashion creative, dancer, mum, grandmother, founder of Wear Your Happy and host of the brilliant podcast Menopause Whilst Black. She's a multimedia node! We talk about why she's encouraging everyone to wear clothes that lift their mood, and why it all starts with our knicker drawer. There's a bit of serious chat about how the Black Lives Matter movement inspired Karen to start her podcast, and we get to ask her what she wishes she'd known before she went through the menopause. Plus we hear about Karen's experience of going through therapy, why she thinks it's good to cull your insta feed, and what she looks for in a sex toy.You can find out more about all Karen's awesome work, including her podcasts, styling sessions and sewing lessons, via her linktree. She is @therealkarenarthur on instagram. **WE HAVE A SHOP!** Visit scummymummiesshop.com for our ace t-shirts, mugs, washbags, sweatshirts and beach towels. FREE UK DELIVERY!Tickets for our 2022 shows are now on sale - we are coming to Newcastle, Leeds, Chesterfield, Milton Keynes, Barnsely, Tamworth, Norwich, Taunton, Swindon, Newbury, Horsham, Wellingborough, Portsmouth, Cambridge, Devizes, Southampton, Leamington Spa, Trowbridge, Nottingham - and new dates are being added all the time! Keep an eye on scummymummies.com for announcements and tickets. We're on Twitter (@scummymummies), Instagram, and Facebook. If you like the podcast, please rate, review and subscribe. Thanks for listening! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Community Cats Podcast
Beverly Means, LMSW, Founder and Executive Director of Transitions Pet Care

The Community Cats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:02


This episode is sponsored in part by Humane Network, Doobert.com and Maddie's Fund. Turning her perspective around on being a single pet caretaker inspired Beverly Means to think about what kinds of help she would want if she could no longer care for her pets due to terminal illness or an end-of-life event. After looking for options in her community, Beverly saw the need for supportive services around this common problem, and Transitions Pet Care was created. Offering services from estate planning to rehoming options, and even supportive pet care in Decatur, GA, Transitions Pet Care is a 501(c)3 foster-based rescue. TPC serves a population of elderly, health-compromised, or terminally ill people and their pets. Stacy and Beverly discuss estate planning with our animal companions in mind. Beverly outlines options from a formal and legally-binding Pet Trust to an informal written plan including care details, veterinary info, and the pet's own preferences. She emphasizes the importance of planning for animal companions, especially with multiple pets or even a colony of community cats on your property. “It doesn't take that long to have the conversation, to write it down, and to share it with the person who may be managing that,” she advises. As a trained social worker Beverly is uniquely prepared for navigating the emotional hardships that come with this work and she believes in preparing volunteers of the program for the loss and grief that comes with helping the population they serve. “At the end of the day, it's about helping people take care of their pets in a way that helps them keep their pets and keep that pet healthy.” Learn more about Transitions Pet Care by visiting them online, or by following them on Instagram.

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast
Episode 4-471 – Cody Walks the USA Part Two

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:58


The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-471 – Cody Walks the USA Part Two  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4471.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris' other show à Intro: Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-471 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  Good morning.  It's Monday Morning the 17th of January.  Today is Martin Luther Kings Jr. Day here in the states.  We are having a storm over New England today.  It started snowing after midnight last night and changed over to a heavy rain just around sunrise.  I got up and did my best to clear the driveway before it got too wet.   In a storm like this where it snows then rains the conditions for snow removal get pretty dicey.  The rain turns the snow to slush and it's hard to move. It chokes the snow blower and gets very heavy.  Then, even worse, if you don't move it and it freezes it becomes solid ice.  And it's going to stay there until spring.  But I got most of it up, which is good because now the rain will helpfully wash the remnants I missed away. In our neck of the woods it's known as Heart-attack snow.  Because it gets so heavy that when people try to shovel it they keel over.  For people like me with a strong heart it's more appropriately chiropractor snow.  Because when you go to throw a shovel full of that slush you're more than likely going to hurt your back.  Now it's just pouring rain and windy.  Glad I don't have a run on the calendar for today.  The running is going well. I did a test mile yesterday, which was another interesting weather day.  It was minus 1 degrees Fahrenheit when I got up.  It was about 6 degrees when I got to the rail trail.  The temperature was cold, but it was windless and sunny.  It was not a bad day to run.  I found out from my Buddy Tim who lives by the rail trail that they had plowed a section and it was dry and clear.  Which was perfect for the workout I had.  It was a one mile warm up.  A test mile.  And a three-mile cool down.  You're supposed to do these workouts on the track, but the track is under a layer of snow and ice so that isn't going to happen.  It was hard to warm up with the temperature.  I hit the test mile and felt pretty strong for the first 1/2.  The last ½ was a struggle.  Looking at the data, I can see my pace drop and my HR max out in that second half.  So I still have some work to do with my fitness.  That being said, it was 30 seconds or so faster than when I ran it on the track in December.  It's a good measuring stick.   Now I know I need to work on aerobic fitness and pacing. I'm only running 15 – 20 miles a week, 2-3 times a week so I'm happy to be where I am at all.  The knee is hanging in there. It is just about 11 months since the injury popped up.  The holidays were good.  I took a week off, but caught a cold from my mother, so I spent most of it lying around.  It might be the time of year, but I find my energy level very low right now.  Now that we're back to work I'm incredibly busy and struggling to keep my head on straight.  Today we are going to catch up with Cody O'Connor who is still walking across the country.  Very interesting conversation. My normal editor Dimitry from Moscow was busy, so Carlos the Jackal di the edit on this one.  Thank you Carlos.  In section one I'll talk some more about how to begin a fitness practice as part of my beginner series.  In section two I'll talk to Sigmond Freud about how I feel about not running Boston this year. I've signed up for the Calm meditation app and have been working my way through some of those.  The ones I've been doing are more instructional.  They talk about a topic and how to approach it in your meditation.  One I was listening to this week talked about how when you have pain in your life your need to accept the pain, not fight it.  Because, when you fight it, you give it energy.  The key is to accept it.  Then it loses its ability to hurt you. The other thing is not letting thoughts of the past or the future give you stress.  To return to the now, because that's the state you can control.  It reminded me of the racing advice I've always given you.  When things get hard relax into the pain.  Be present where you are and focus on relaxing into the stress.  In this way you defang the pain and allow your best self to compete. Try that. On with the show.         About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I'll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don't have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member's only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – 24 Hour Fast - Voices of reason – the conversation Cody O'Connor – Cody Runs the USA for Cancer Families   Cody O'Connor My name is Cody O'Connor and after defeating cancer, losing my right fibula and being told I'd never walk normally again- I am embarking on the quest to walk across the USA. When fighting, I saw how my temporary illness was impacting my family. Seeing the struggles they faced I created Champions Do Overcome, a 501(c)3 non profit organization. CDO, supports families through paying monthly bills, providing food/gas, etc. which reduces stress on the family, and ensures no child is left to fight the beast alone. All of this to spread hope to all that need it coast to coast, and change the outcome for children battling pediatric cancer. Please follow our journey @overcomerteam on Instagram. Please consider donating to our cause at: Fundraiser by Cody O'Connor : Walk For Hope - Cross USA Walk For Cancer Relief (gofundme.com)   Companies Involved: Kroger & affiliates,  Infinit Nutrition, Altra Running, MyMedic, Dude Wipes, MyFanThreads, Groov App, GermX, Sacan Martial Arts, Feedback Audiology Solutions & Consulting Influencers Involved:   Rich Franklin (UFC Hall of Famer), Ben Higgins (Bachelor Star Season 20), Ashley I and Jared Haibon (Bachelor in Paradise), Harvey Lewis (Team USA 24 Hr. Run Team), and Pete Kostelnick (Record for running across USA)   Section two – Turning difficult work situations to your advantage -   Outro   Ok my friends we have walked across ½ of the US of A to the end of episode 4-471 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  Nothing left but a small mountain range between us and the Pacific.   After the holidays I'm back on my diet.  I had ballooned up to well over 190 pounds by laying about and drinking beer.  I'm making progress.  The first 10 are easy.  I'm using MyFitnessPal to track my food.  It's as good as any and I've got data in there going back a few years.  Looking at the data I've held the line for the most part around 180 or less for the last few years.   There was a point I dipped under 170.  I'm more about eating healthy than losing weigh per se, but having the data somehow gives me confidence.  If you're interested I can tell you what I'm doing, but it's basically cutting back calories and eating clean.  Mostly it's not drinking beer.  Ollie Wolly the killer Collie is having a hard time with the weather.  I can't get him out as much as I want.  I'm doing all of my running on the roads and I don't want him to get hurt.  We just got through another round of training.  He's getting quite good on the leash.  I wish I had more time to practice with him.  Off the leash he's still a feral terror-dog.   We average about once a week having a disagreement where he ends up biting me.  I bought a new pair of shoes.  I actually bought two pair.  I haven't been running so I haven't needed new shoes.  First I ordered a pair of Hoka Mach 4, because I likes the way they looked, but when I ran in them I didn't like the feel at all.  So I exchanged them for a pair of Cliftons.  I really liked the old Cliftons , but the recent versions haven't been as good.  These new ones are the Clifton 8's.  I really like them.  They are light and responsive.  I'll let you guy get on with your lives.  Sorry for being late.  I've got a lot on my plate.  And don't worry about the weather, grey skies are going to clear up, So, Put on a happy face, And I'll see you out there.   MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  

The Bridge ILM Sermons
Turning Opposition Into Opportunity – Pastor Chris Green

The Bridge ILM Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 40:23


Turning Opposition Into Opportunity – Pastor Chris Green by The Bridge Church

So Money with Farnoosh Torabi
1306: Turning Anti-Racism into Action with Authors of Dear White Women

So Money with Farnoosh Torabi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:46


Misasha Suzuki Graham and Sara Blanchard, the authors of the popular podcast Dear White Women have released a new book bearing the same title. It is, as they describe it "an anti-racism guide that challenges readers to encounter the hard questions about race (and racism) in order to push the needle of change in a positive direction." Got a question for our Friday episodes of Ask Farnoosh? Text 415-942-5002. Want more articles and videos by Farnoosh? Check out www.cnet.com/somoney. Subscribe to her weekly So Money newsletter for the latest updates and advice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
Who's in the Room? Siri, Alexa, and Confidentiality

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:19


Who's in the Room? Siri, Alexa, and Confidentiality Curt and Katie chat about how therapists can maintain confidentiality in a world of AI assistants and smart devices. What duty do clinicians have to inform clients? How can we balance confidentiality with the reality of how commonly these devices are involved in therapy? Can telehealth therapy be completely confidential and data secure? We discuss our shift in clinical responsibility, best practices, and how we can minimize exposure of clinical data to ensure the confidentiality our clients expect and deserve. In this podcast episode we talk about something therapists might not consider: smart devices and AI assistants We received a couple of requests to talk about the impact of smart devices on confidentiality and their compliance with HIPAA within a therapeutic environment. We tackle this question in depth: What are best practices for protecting client confidentiality with smart devices? Turning off the phone, or placing the phone on “airplane mode” Warning clients about their own smart devices and confidentiality risks The ethical responsibilities to inform about limits of confidentiality and take precautions It's all about giving clients choice and information What should therapists consider when smart devices and AI assistants are in the room? “It's not to say we have to be luddites, it's that we have to disclose the potential limits of confidentiality that clients have come to expect.”  – Curt Widhalm Whistle-blower reports on how often these devices are actually listening Turning off your phone is a lot cheaper than identity theft Consider your contacts, geolocation, and Wi-Fi connection Some of this, as we progress into a more technological world, might be unavoidable How do Alexa and Siri impact HIPAA compliance for therapists? The importance of end-to-end encryption for all HIPAA activities (and your smart device may not be compliant) The cost of HIPAA violations if identity theft can be traced back Understand the risks you are taking, do what you can, and remember no one is perfect What can modern therapists do with their smart devices? “Whether it's convenience or practicality that has you putting your client's contacts into your phone, we have to think beyond that because it really can harm our ability to keep that data safe.” – Katie Vernoy GPS location services can be left on for a safety reason, emergency services use GPS location Adjusting settings for voice activation, data sharing, when apps are running, locations, etc. Turning off and airplane mode are also options Always let the client know the limits of confidentiality Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Buying Time LLC Buying Time is a full team of Virtual Assistants, with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support, customer service, and email management to marketing and bookkeeping. They've got you covered. Don't know where to start? Check out the systems inventory checklist which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated asap. You can find that checklist at http://buyingtimellc.com/systems-checklist/ Buying Time's VA's support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting, email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly. With a full team of VA's it gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available. Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need - https://buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation/ Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Psychotherapy in Ontario: How Confidential is my Therapy? By Beth Mares, Registered Psychotherapist The Privacy Problem with Digital Assistants by Kaveh Waddell Hey Siri and Alexa: Let's Talk Privacy Practices by Elizabeth Weise, USA Today Patient and Consumer Safety Risks When Using Conversational Assistants for Medical Information: An Observational Study of Siri, Alexa, and Google Assistant, 2018 Hey Siri: Did you Break Confidentiality, or did I? By Nicole M. Arcuri Sanders, Counseling Today Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant Not HIPAA Compliant, Psychiatry Advisor Hey Alexa, are you HIPAA compliant? 2018 Person-Centered Tech   Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: Which Theoretical Orientation Should You Choose? Is Your Practice Ready for Paid Digital Marketing? An Interview with John Sanders Waiving Goodbye to Telehealth Progress: An interview with Dr. Ben Caldwell, LMFT Malpractice is No Joke   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/ Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/ Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated): Curt Widhalm 00:00 This episode of the modern therapist Survival Guide is sponsored by buying time Katie Vernoy  00:04 Buying Time has a full team of virtual assistants with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support customer service and email management to marketing and bookkeeping, they've got you covered. Don't know where to start, check out the system's inventory checklist, which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated ASAP. You can find that checklist at buying time. llc.com forward slash systems stash checklist. Curt Widhalm  00:31 Listen at the end of the episode for more information. Announcer  00:34 You're listening to the modern therapist survival guide where therapists live, breathe, and practice as human beings. To support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy. Curt Widhalm  00:50 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm, with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about all things therapy, the things that we consider the things that we don't. And stay is one of those days where we're going to be talking about some of the things that we might not consider. And this really comes with some of those smart devices in our homes, our offices, potentially even in our clients homes, and what it means for confidentiality, especially in terms of compliance with things like HIPAA, and who's always listening. And you know, Google a few years ago changed kind of their motto from do no evil to whatever it is. Now I just know that they're, they're no longer committing to not doing evil. But I want to start with kind of this idea of when we especially start with telehealth clients, but this is also going to be true when it comes to our in person sessions with things like smartphones and just kind of being cool in the modern era and having things like Amazon echoes or Google Docs, or any of these kinds of things in our offices of are those things always listening, and what does this mean for client data?   Katie Vernoy  02:07 That's a big intro. Yeah, I, I've worried about this for a while. And that's why I don't have a any kind of AI in my office, although after reading some of these articles I actually do because I have my phone in my office because I receive messages. And I do all kinds of stuff. So it's a little bit scary to think about what might be listening.   Curt Widhalm  02:33 So I mean, this is where I think any of us who have a Windows laptop, there's Cortana, if you have one of these Amazon devices, there's Alexa, if somebody you know, has Siri, these things are listening. And well, some of the tech stuff, you know, might say that they're only listening for key words that would activate them articles that we're looking at here is what we're going to dive into today. As far as does this mean that our sessions with clients are actually as confidential as we're talking about? And what does this mean for our own best practices as we go forward, having smart devices in our offices in our homes, and potentially even in our client's homes. And the way that this conversation initially came up was I was at a dinner party with some other therapists and talking about great dinner party talk that happens wherever I'm at with other therapists, which is,   Katie Vernoy  03:34 Yeah, only although therapists with me, I tend to   Curt Widhalm  03:37 Get people asking a lot ethics questions. And one of the questions that was up for discussion was our duties when it comes to talking with clients about confidentiality, particularly when it comes to telehealth. And I was describing that we have a responsibility to talk with our clients about the limits of confidentiality, that may include privacy in their own homes, if there's potentially somebody who's walking down the hallway, outside their bedroom or office door, wherever they're doing sessions from, and one of the other therapists at this party said, Well, what about any of the smart devices? Do you ever warn them about Google or Alexa or Siri actually listening? And that's what sparked this. So if you ever want a podcast episode, I am available for dinner parties for you to float ideas by.   Katie Vernoy  04:28 Okay, okay, there we go. And so this   Curt Widhalm  04:31 Has led to some research on our part here as far as what is our responsibility? And what do we need to do with our clients as it pertains to some of this AI discussion, even when we don't think that it's happening?   Katie Vernoy  04:47 Well, to me, when you propose this idea for the podcast, the first thing that came to mind was really around convenience versus confidentiality. Because when we're looking at a lot of these things, When we don't turn off voice activation, when we don't make sure that we're not connected to everything through our phones, and all of the contacts and everything within our phones, data is at risk. I mean, even if it says little as a GPA, GPS colocation, it could be a contact could be content that you're actually discussing. I mean, there's, there's a lot of different ways that folks use their phones kind of just live their lives and the convenience of having Google read through your emails, or, you know, whatever it is to be able to scan for things that need to go on your calendar, or to scan for things. You know, like, I love that I can, you know, in the before times when I was traveling, I loved that Google knew where I was flying to what flight I was on, and I would be able to get that information and notifications like you should be leaving for the airport right now. So I think it's something where the convenience of having the AI tracking us and listening to us and reading our emails, and all of that has sometimes trumped our need for privacy.   Curt Widhalm  06:09 The first article that I came across in this is an article from counseling today. This is publication of the American Counseling Association. This article was by Nicole R. Curry Sanders called Hey, Siri, did you break confidentiality? Or did I in this article, Dr. Curry Sanders actually cites an article from The Guardian newspaper, talking about an apple contractor who's a whistleblower. And this contractor is quoted as saying that they regularly hear confidential medical information, drug deals, recordings of couples having sex as a part of this contractors job providing quality control. So these devices are, at least historically have listened. Now, this flies in the face of what some of the tech articles that I'm seeing out there who say that these devices are only listening for those keywords that activate them, but that they're actually constantly on. And according to this contractors cited in this Guardian article, they are recording and sharing this information. So it's very theoretically easily believed that it's also listening in on your therapy sessions. If that's the case, with Apple having this information, everybody who's got an iPhone, that's either bringing it into your session, these devices are potentially listening to everything that's being discussed in your sessions, which is scary, because I imagine that most therapists are not talking about this as a potential breaking of the limits of confidentiality and the promise of confidentiality that makes therapy so sacred.   Katie Vernoy  07:55 And I think that as a society, we have kind of cosign on this lack of privacy, I mean, Siri, or Alexa or Google or whatever, potentially are, they're constantly listening to all of us. And that's part of life. And so are we, are we responsible above this risk that all of us are willing to take by having phones in our pockets,   Curt Widhalm  08:20 And I don't think many of us are, and we'll include the links to what we're talking about here in our show notes. You can find those over at MTS g podcast.com. The next thing that I'm looking at here is a blog post on psychiatry, advisor.com called Alexa Siri, Google Assistant are not HIPAA compliant, and it warns against. Obviously, we all at this point should know that you shouldn't be doing your notes onto one of these devices using some of these voice prompts. But if this article also warns about don't add clients to your schedule using one of these either because it's not an end to end encrypted sort of device, which is one of the requirements of HIPAA, and that HIPAA violations can cost people hundreds or 1000s of dollars. If identity theft can be traced back to them think of how convenient it is to just turn off your phone. So that way, and how much potential money this may end up saving you by just doing the simplest of things.   Katie Vernoy  09:28 Yes, yes, I again, but I still want to you know, we're I know we're   Curt Widhalm  09:34 Any good one ethics discussion should leave people anxious.   Katie Vernoy  09:39 But my question still stands. If I do my part because I am a HIPAA provider. I put my phone on Do Not Disturb or whatever I airplane mode. I put my phone on airplane mode. I don't have any other devices with listening capability in my room, and I only use my electronic health record for scheduling and communication and HIPAA compliant email, blah, blah, blah, like I do all the things, and my client still has a smartphone in their pocket, like do I actually need to warn them about that smartphone in their pocket, because they already theoretically are agreeing to this constant surveillance. By having that smartphone in their pocket,   Curt Widhalm  10:22 I think that we have a duty. And this is reflected in our ethics codes. And we have a duty to tell our clients even things that they may not consider as it pertains to therapy about, okay, where limits of confidentiality may lie? Well, there may be the constant surveillance of these devices in everyday life, but to further prompt them, at least, and especially in our first telehealth session with them that, hey, just in case you haven't considered this, your smart devices in the room may also be listening to your therapy session. And well, you know, it's not the same thing as a sibling or somebody else, brother, parents child's, you know, walking down the hallway, there is the potential that some of this information may be transmitted to people that you don't want to and if that's a consideration, if you want to unplug those devices in the general listening area right now, now would be the time to do so.   Katie Vernoy  11:24 Okay. I mean, that seems fair, I think there's going to be people talking about this, now that we've put this podcast episode out. So I think we also don't want to freak people out. I mean, I think about also there, yes, the data is being transmitted, but it's kind of like how much data are people actually looking at. I mean, it's, it's such an inundation of all of this surveillance data, that the likelihood of someone honing in on a therapy session feels small as part of quality control. And I'm not saying we shouldn't do anything about it, I'm just saying, I'm gonna. Curt Widhalm  11:59 Wave your argument away and saying that the likelihood of somebody breaking into your office and working at client files is also very small. But that does not absolve you of your responsibility to take the precautions to let our clients know about the limits of confidentiality,   Katie Vernoy  12:17 I think it's I think, in talking about it with clients, the way you just said, it sounded a little paranoid, you   Curt Widhalm  12:22 Are being listened to. Katie Vernoy  12:25 You're being listened to. It's I think there's potentially a clinical clinically relevant way to talk about it. I mean, I think, as you know, smart devices that have voice activation potentially can get activated by words that we use, you may want to turn those on, or turn them off their devices in your room, turn them off, turn off voice activation, whatever. But like, there are devices listening in your room, you may want to unplug them. You sounded a little paranoid. It's true. But But I think we want to I don't know, it just it feels a little bit. I don't know paranoid to me, I don't I don't know what   Curt Widhalm  13:03 Your paranoia is my legal precaution of that. And it doesn't have to be presented in that paranoid sort of way. It's just, you know, hey, it's known at this point, like little disclosure, here, we have a little you know, Alexa thing sitting in our living room, sometimes our TV activates it. And then we get little ads on the Alexa based on whatever show that's activated Alexa. So all of a sudden, we're getting, you know, Airbnb recommendations of, you know, wherever the TV show we just watched was located, it's not that much of a stretch of the imagination to think these things are listening, it's happened a couple of times with my phone, just in this episode, it doesn't have to be done in a paranoia sort of way. It's just kind of a, hey, if your privacy means that much to you, and you're gonna be talking about these sensitive things, you might want to consider shutting off those voice activated things in your room.   Katie Vernoy  13:55 Well, I mean, the other thing that we talked about before starting to record is also the the geolocation and potentially contacts on your phone. And so to me, I feel like, at some point there, if we are going to be in a technological society, there may be things that we just cannot avoid. And maybe I'm wrong. I mean, maybe do I do I just never turn on my phone when another person's in my office, like, I feel like being able to not have, you know, if someone's actually physically coming to my office, and our phones have crossed GPS, and all of our apps say like, Oh, they're in the same room, they must like the same things and then start feeding us all of the ads, on the things that either we've talked about, because voice activation is on, or the things that each other have searched for. I mean, it starts to get a little bit nutty, to like, basically be Luddites at the moments during which we're doing therapy.   Curt Widhalm  14:53 It's not to say that we have to be Luddites, it's that we have to disclose the potential So limits of confidentiality that clients may be coming to expect sharing on a Wi Fi network, if you're a well intentioned therapist who has a parent who wants to be, you know, on the Wi Fi network in your office while their kids doing therapy. That's one way that some of these algorithms work to match up people who should be connected on some of the social media sites, if you've got a client's phone number saved in your phone, and you've given third party apps, the permission to scan through your phonebook. These are other ways that you're potentially transmitting data to people that you have maybe lied to people about in your Notice of Privacy Practices that you give to your clients, if the information that you say that what you're doing with it, and how it's going to be shared. And you're sharing this information in inadvertent ways, I'm not aware of any court cases where a therapist has been taken to court on this, but I could see where a therapist could be held liable by having some of this data shared in ways that they never heard that their Notice of Privacy Practices, you know, they take their boilerplate language from somebody down the street, who took it from somebody down the street, who took it from somebody down the street, who took it from actually a paid layer that they actually were responsible with. So since we tend to copy and paste and borrow and pay homage to other people's paperwork, by just borrowing and stealing, and calling it our own, we may not actually be aware of everything in some of these Notice of Privacy Practices that we give out, if what you're doing is transmitting some of this client data, you at least should document that you've had some of these discussions with your clients, as a way of limiting your liability when it comes to having any of these kinds of devices around you. And if the conversation and your own anxieties hasn't pointed it out. So far, we all have these devices, this should be a regular part of the conversation. And should be something where especially talking about a lot of protected health information, especially if you're already a HIPAA covered entity, you have to be aware of this   Katie Vernoy  17:11 Going back to kind of the original thought that I had around this is that whether it's convenience, or practicality that has you put the contacts in your phone, for example, I think that we have to think beyond that. Because it really can harm our ability to keep those that data say I mean, I think about inadvertently, I have done a really good job at keeping my data away from Facebook, I don't take any of the things I don't log into anything with Facebook, I've tried to keep Facebook fairly separate, as well as I use a really old email. And it's not connected to my practice in any way. I'm not sure that anybody else wants to do that. But they're like, I don't share contacts with any of my social media. So my phone is never mind for those things I actively go through and, and deny those permissions. But to me, it could be very simple, even a slip of your of a button press so to speak, where you've shared all your contact to LinkedIn, Twitter, social media, any other social media platform that you allow all of the permissions on your phone, because it's easier because like, oh, well, I'll find my friends, I don't have to go search for them individually. I mean, there's so many ways that are very seductive, that we could do this in an inadvertent data sharing,   Curt Widhalm  18:33 You know, this is no commentary on you. But you identified yourself not as like a super tech savvy person. And yet, I would say that what you just described is more tech savvy than what most people would think about. And that's why we have some of the responsibilities that we do in talking with clients about how their health information may go beyond just our therapy sessions here. Some of these articles that we've seen talk about, you know, don't do things like write your notes, you know, pay Google write in this patient chart, X, Y, and Z. Like, those things would seem obvious, especially to a lot of our modern therapist community who would be like, yeah, that totally makes sense. But just actually having the presence of any of these devices around us, is, you know, a matter of lifestyle for some people and it's knowing to go in and how to shut off some of these things or be able to talk with some of our clients about this because something that's happened during the COVID pandemic and with a lot of telehealth is, we've also become de facto, it people when it comes to explaining to some of our clients just even how to make some of the telehealth stuff work. And so if you know our EHR platforms, and as simple as they get made before for user experiences, if people are still having trouble with those knowing to go in and where to look on a phone for here's where data gets shared back and forth with each other, well, that might be a little bit outside. The scope of what we want to talk about with clients, it's sometimes more simple as far as if you have these devices. And you don't want the conversation of what we're what we're talking about being shared with any of the apps on your phone. Best practice might be just to turn them off during our sessions. But if you leave them on, just know that we can't guarantee complete confidentiality, that's it.   Katie Vernoy  20:20 That seems fair. Um, one of the things that you said earlier, though, struck me because I think that you and I are like, obviously, we wouldn't, you know, kind of transcribe our notes or, you know, kind of do voice over notes on our phone. But that's kind of an accessibility issue for some folks who can't type or handwrite their notes. And I would be very curious on how to protect in that regard. You know, if I've got a voice recorder, that helps me to do my notes, is it within a HIPAA compliant platform that goes directly into my notes? I mean, this might be things that people need to research is how do all of my apps interact? And how do I make sure that I'm not there's not more than what I'm working on open and listening? Because I think that's hard. And I don't know that I wouldn't say I'm tech savvy, I think I actually am. But I think it's something where understanding how privacy and data works, and how things interact with each other how there's data handoffs, I think those types of things feel like they are beyond the scope of being a therapist, but I like what you're saying is like, then just turn these devices off. I guess the only problem is, I have clients that use their phone for their telehealth session. So I don't know if you know, I use simple practice. So I don't know simple practice, then make sure that other apps on the phone are not listening. I don't know if there's even a way to do that. And or if there is a way for people to, you know, like, do you go through and you just kind of disable each of the apps that you don't want to listen, I mean, it feels like there's, there's a challenge here to really having a practical solution, unless we can be certain that the platform that we're using for our video calls on the phone are actually is actually secure. And my assumption is that's the case, I just don't know what else is listening, if and if that's possible.   Curt Widhalm  22:11 And in preparation of this episode, I did not do a deep dive into how, you know, our EHR platforms when they are used on our devices, more popular EHR companies, simple practice, you mentioned those video sessions, if there is a HIPAA compliance, if they have signed a BA agreement with you, those are end to end encrypted communications. Now, what I did not do a deep dive on is does that also prevent other apps and things from also listening, if it is being used on this solitary device that your session is on TBD? You know, follow us on our social media, or whatever. And we'll sort through that through that. It does come back to this point. And especially as we can see some of these tech companies moving more and more into the healthcare space that they're going to make closer and closer approximate efforts to become HIPAA compliant. And this is always kind of a cautionary sort of thing, where I'm a part of a lot of Facebook groups, with therapists, a lot of online communities, and I see a number of people wanting to do things as inexpensively as possible. But without those ba agreements, as business associate agreements, you're not guaranteed to have the same a HIPAA protections if that data does get leaked out or shared in other ways. And so these are your responsibilities as therapists when it comes to confidentiality and this AI conversation.   Katie Vernoy  23:44 And there's a lot of different ways to try to do that. I was one of you were talking, I was thinking about a conversation I had with Roy Huggins from persons under attack, who unfortunately recently just died. And it's a very tragic loss for our profession. And just the way that he would talk about HIPAA compliance. And I'm sure Person Center tech will continue that work was that you have to understand the risks that you're taking, and do what you can and then be comfortable with a risk you're still taking because he's not be perfect. And so I think it's I think it's, it's hard because it can be very scary, because we can't necessarily get to a place where we've we've taken every single precaution. I mean, we could go to a black site, have everyone come in separate ways, no GPS phones are left at their houses, and then be in a room together and then leave. There might be other liability if nobody knows where you are, and you're alone in a room with a client. But I think as a society, I don't think we can protect ourselves from every single thing. But these are things that we can protect ourselves against. pretty simply, I mean, you just turn it off. Um, I think, and that's something that I don't know that a lot of people were thinking about this. Now,   Curt Widhalm  24:57 One of the questions on one of these articles got asked, I think is worth discussing here is for people who are working at sites that require you to have a cell phone on you for safety reasons, whether it be in the floor of a hospital male use system, if you're working for an agency where you go and visit clients houses or whatever, it's what did you see, in kind of the responses to those articles there,   Katie Vernoy  25:26 The main thing is to turn off voice activation, so that there's not a voice activation element. So it's not recording the content, making your phone, a regular cell phone and trying to get rid of some of the other, you know, kind of the smart elements of it, I think can be very helpful. The thing that you can't avoid, if you're trying to go for safety is really, you got to keep GPS on if you need to make an emergency call, they need to be able to ping your cell phone. And so I think there's there are some, some safety issues or not, there are some privacy issues that you can't avoid if you need to have a cell phone. And it's for safety reasons. But I think it's something where the voice assistant technologies, those things are maybe not that easy to find, but but you can, you know, there's some instructions in this, and I'll put this in the show notes so that you can find it. But you know, turning off those voice activation, making sure that you've made yourself as tight as possible. As far as any kind of data that's going out turning off, you know, all of the apps, making sure there's nothing running in the background, even going through your apps and having the permission set to only while the app is on, I think is helpful, because then if Facebook is tracking your location, and Instagram is tracking your location, and Google and whatever, if those are tracking your location all the time, then there's a lot of data being shared. But if you turn those, if you only have those on when you have those apps open, and you consciously close them before you go in my hope is that they're not also running in the background. I've also had something where I put my phone on really low battery use before where it only allows for phone. So it basically shuts down anything running in the background so that you don't have things going that you don't know about. But you know, if you're wanting safety going all the way to turning it off or airplane mode is going to maybe an advisable for safety.   Curt Widhalm  27:24 And in these conversations and what I would suggest is let your clients know what the limits of confidentiality are. And and this doesn't have to be a huge in depth pieces of conversations. Some of your clients may have more interest in what you're talking about, or paranoia depending on why you're seeing those clients. But we would love to hear your experiences with this kind of stuff or thoughts or considerations that you have. You can share those with us on our social media. You can find links to those in our show notes. And once again, those are over at MTS g podcast.com. You can join our Facebook group, the modern therapist group and spill your data to us and Mark Zuckerberg. And until next time, I'm Kurt Wilhelm with Katie Vernoy and Siri.   Katie Vernoy  28:17 Thanks again to our sponsor buying time   Curt Widhalm  28:20 Buying Time's VAs support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly with a full team of VAs gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available.               Katie Vernoy  28:48 Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need. That's buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation once again, buying time llc.com forward slash book dash consultation.   Announcer  29:04 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Al Madrasatu Al Umariyyah
AMAU Jr || Turning Your Homes into Places of Knowledge || Ustadh Muhammad Tim Humble

Al Madrasatu Al Umariyyah

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 70:05


JOIN OUR 1 YEAR VIRTUAL MENTORSHIP PROGRAM FOR 7-19 YEAR OLDS WITH USTADH TIM HUMBLE AND USTADH ABDULRAHMAN HASSAN: https://www.amaujunior.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amauofficial/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/AMAU Telegram: https://t.me/amauofficial YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/AMAUofficial Twitter: https://twitter.com/AMAUofficial iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/al-madrasatu-al-umariyyah/id1524526782 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/08NJC1pIA0maaF6aKqZL4N Get in Touch: https://amau.org/getintouch BarakAllahu feekum. #AMAU #Islam #Dawah

What Would Love Do?
Is Your Masculine Energy Turning Guys Off? It’s Not You…

What Would Love Do?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:31


Is Your Masculine Energy Turning Guys Off? It's Not You… There's a lot of talk in the coaching world about masculine and feminine energy and I'd like to make this as easy to understand as possible. Every human has a mix of masculine and feminine energy, there's nothing abnormal about that. Masculine energy simply means […] The post Is Your Masculine Energy Turning Guys Off? It's Not You… appeared first on Understand Men Now With Jonathon Aslay.

Getting Old Quickly
91. Birthday Surprise

Getting Old Quickly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 31:23


In Episode 91, Billy Donnelly talks about the birthday surprise he received this year for his 42nd, in the form of an out-of-town visitor. He discusses how the feelings that accompanied this surprise ran counter to how he felt last year (which can be heard in full on Episode 39: Turning 41) when his birthdays felt overlooked and under-celebrated. He also dives into the importance of both showing and telling those that matter to us and that we care about how we feel about them, and that it doesn't have to be either/or... it really needs to be a marriage of both.

The WWE Podcast
WWE Week in Review: Is Roman Reigns Turning Babyface? Charlotte Confronts Lita, What's Next for RK-Bro & Surprise Rumble Entrant Revealed?

The WWE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 87:17


With the Royal Rumble just 2 weeks away, matches and Rumble participants are coming into focus. This week we saw Sonya once again screw with Naomi, RK-Bro lose their tag team titles, Roman and Seth going face-to-face, Lita and Charlotte being teased and much more including who we believe could be the surprise Royal Rumble entrant!Don't forget to give this episode's sponsor some love, "The Matt And Mark Movie Show" by visiting them on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/themattandmarkmovieshow/ Or listen to their show here:https://mattandmarkmovieshow.blubrry.net/

UNSHACKLED! on Oneplace.com
Program 3705 Laura Perry Part 1 (PG)

UNSHACKLED! on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 30:00


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/110/29 3705 Laura Perry Part 1 (PG) (Rebellion, Satanism, LGBTQ Agenda) As an energetic and strong-willed child, Laura longed for the same connection with her mother that her brother had. Turning to partying and rebellion to numb the pain, she ended up across the country from her parents, with evil spirits attached to her. Her uncle tries to intervene, but Laura didn't welcome his help. The pain and powerlessness she experienced led a broken Laura to pursue a masculine ego that would protect her and encourage her to reinvent herself. Leading to her first step into a dangerous identity game.

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever
JF2693: The Secret Strategy for Turning Motels into Profitable Long-Term Housing with Andrew LeBaron

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 28:51


Andrew LeBaron decided he needed to niche down his real estate strategy. That's when he had the idea to convert motels into long-term stays. Varying slightly from an apartment, Andrew's motel conversion strategy allows him to cut certain costs and hurdles that typically accompany multifamily properties. In this episode, Andrew walks through the benefits of long-term stays over apartments, the budget differences between motels and multifamily, and how he's created his conversion strategy. Andrew LeBaron | Real Estate Background Syndicator, Apartment Motel Owner. His business model is reviewing small to midsize motel/hotel assets, underwriting the deal, purchasing, converting, and refinancing. Portfolio: GP on motel assets: 42-unit, 13-unit, 22-unit, and an 18-unit. Upcoming deal for a 129-unit Motel that he will convert to apartments. Based in: Phoenix, AZ Say hi to him at: buymoretime.com | Facebook and Twitter: @andrewinvestor Best Ever Book: Raising Capital for Real Estate by Hunter Thompson Click here to know more about our sponsors: Deal Maker Mentoring | PassiveInvesting.com | FollowUp Boss

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Turning Life Around with NSNG® - Episode 2017

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 40:45


Episode 2017 - On this Saturday show, Terri Barnhardt joins Vinnie and the two talk Colorado snow, Terri's journey, diabetes development, turning life around with NSNG, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2022/01/turning-life-around-nsng-episode-2017 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS TERRI'S JOURNEY Terri is based out of Colorado. She's waiting for more snow. She was always reasonably heavy. At around age 21, she worked in Grand Canyon, and still gained 60 lbs in 9 months. At the time, her doctor just told her to cut down on the peanut butter. This weight gain occured while she was active each day. The diet was made up of lots of Mexican food (rice and beans), lots of margaritas, heavy carbs. She continued gaining weight, and developed diabetes, was on statins, and the like. When she was type 2, around 2012, her A1C was 13.3. Then, she ballooned up from there. TURNING LIFE AROUND In about 2016, she was diagnosed with two separate types of cancer that were unrelated within two months. She had kidney cancer and bone cancer in her opposite leg. Her kidney surgery happened first, and then she underwent leg surgery. At that point, she heard cancer would kill her or at least take her leg. She had metal parts. Terri then found a doctor who told her she needed to lose 100 lbs or he would put her on full time oxygen. Weight Watchers didn't work. Then, she found NSNG®. She went all in, and it changed her life. It took Terri a few weeks to figure out where her good intentions were being stolen. She got off all of her insulin within six weeks. She had other incredible developments, along with her weight loss, too. Terri feels this way of living saved her life. PURCHASE BEYOND IMPOSSIBLE The documentary launched this week on January 11! Order it TODAY! This is Vinnie's third documentary in just over three years. Get it now on Apple TV (iTunes) and/or Amazon Video! Link to the film on Apple TV (iTunes):  Share this link with friends, too! Link to the film on Amazon Video: It's also now available on Amazon (USA only for now)!  Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY 2 (2021) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY (2019) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter!

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Joe's worst week ever, Marilyn Mosby is charged with 4 felonies plus is the MSM turning on the WH? - 1.14.22 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:30


Grace talks this hour about Joe Biden's winning week with his voting bill getting torpedoed and his vaccine mandate getting blocked and Baltimore prosecutor Marilyn Mosby getting charged for 4 felonies.