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Best podcasts about centers

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Latest podcast episodes about centers

Public Health Out Loud
An Alphabet Soup of Viruses: RSV and Flu during COVID-19

Public Health Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 23:28


While influenza and respiratory viruses can spread year round, cases occur most frequently between fall and spring. This week, Dr. James McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan are talking about respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, and how it compares to flu and COVID-19. RSV is a common respiratory virus that usually causes mild symptoms similar to those of a cold. Most people recover in a week or two. But RSV can be serious, especially for infants and older adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, RSV leads to approximately 58,000 hospitalizations on average each year in the United States. Our guest expert this week is Dr. Michael Koster. He's the division director for pediatric diseases at Hasbro Children's Hospital and an associate professor of pediatrics at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Dr. Koster's research interests include viral respiratory illnesses, osteoarticular infections, and pneumonia in children.  How has COVID-19 impacted the infection season for RSV and flu? How can parents protect themselves and their kids from viral infections? Download this week's episode to find out.  

Roll Over Easy from BFF.fm
Family Connection Centers & Yensing!

Roll Over Easy from BFF.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 120:00


Enjoying the show? Please support BFF.FM with a donation. Playlist 0′00″ San Francisco Street by Sun Rai on Sun Rai (Pocket) Check out the full archives on the website.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
We know how to fix the syphilis surge. Will we do it?

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 16:31


Twenty-one years ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that national adult cases of syphilis had reached their lowest levels ever, and entirely eliminating the disease among newborns seemed to be within reach.But syphilis cases have risen dramatically over the last decade for both adults and infants — even though the disease is curable, and even though we could protect babies by getting pregnant people tested and treated in time.Today, L.A. Times public health reporter Emily Alpert Reyes discusses this disturbing trend, what it says about our society and how to get the fight against congenital syphilis back on track. We also hear from someone who had a stillbirth because of syphilis and wants everyone to learn from her story.More reading:The number of babies infected with syphilis was already surging. Then came the pandemicTwo crises in one: As drug use rises, so does syphilis1,306 U.S. infants were born with syphilis in 2018, even though it's easy to prevent

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Paris Hilton Pushes Congress to take Federal Action on Troubled Teen Centers

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:58


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Let's Talk About Life
The Waiting Game

Let's Talk About Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 12:50


Roy-Allen Bumpers was first introduced to organ donation and Lifebanc through participating in the Stepping for Life show. As a member of Alphi Kappa Psi, he and his fraternity brothers work hard to help educate college students and their families about the need for more registered organ donors. Roy had a personal stake in the events because he had been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease. We reconnected with Roy while he was undergoing a dialysis treatment at the Centers for Dialysis Carein Shaker Heights. Listen to part 1 of our candid conversation as Roy talks about being a Lifebanc advocate and his current health challenge.

Rising Above Podcast
Heidi Clopton: Sensory Processing Disorders & What You Can Do

Rising Above Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:16


About Heidi Heidi and her husband, Dr. Jason Clopton, started the first vision and OT pediatric therapy practice in TN in 2002.  Heidi is the owner and therapy director of Centers of Development a pediatric private therapy practice supplying Occupational, Physical, Speech, Neuro-Visual, and Feeding therapy to children in the Upper Cumberland region. She has extensive training in child development, motor skills, Sensory Processing Disorders, Floortime/Engagement Techniques for ASD, nutrition, vestibular- visual treatments and neurology.  She lectures nationally and internationally to neuro-rehab professionals, fellow OT's, and loves to educate parents and teachers with easy to use therapy techniques! Related Links Developmental-delay.net Center of Development Facebook Page Sensory Secrets  Out of Sync Child Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight Sensory Processing Anthology

SDPB News
Students and community members question creation of 'opportunity centers' at USD| October 18th

SDPB News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 8:39


Each day, SDPB brings you statewide news coverage. We then compile those stories into a daily podcast.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Federalist Society's Teleforum: Litigation Update: Eviction Moratoria

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


On September 1, 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention took a step into nationwide housing policy, and issued a nationwide ban on evictions. With the order, the federal agency invoked a little-known WWII-era statute that empowered the agency to “make and enforce such regulations” that “are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, […]

NASPO Pulse
Thor Vue, Chief Procurement Officer, AK: Centralization Station

NASPO Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:48


Alaska's procurement office has been going through a centralization process for the past few years, so we asked Thor Vue, Chief Procurement Officer for the great State of Alaska, to discuss some of the challenges his office has faced thus far during the process. We'll talk to Thor about Alaska's new Centers of Procurement Excellence, and we play a new game called the Key takeaways game, where Josh and Kevin each present A key takeaway from the interview. Hold on to your hats!

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Lessons from Concurrent Pandemics of COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:06


Join us for an important intergenerational conversation with LGBTQ Asians and Pacific Islanders and their allies. Our panelists will share QTAPI stories and experiences of the dual pandemics of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19; their histories as Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States; their past and current roles in community organizing and the political process; as well as other issues that are part of the current cultural and political shifts and relevant to the experiences of QTAPI individuals. Meet the Speakers Ignatius Bau was the HIV prevention program coordinator at the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum in the mid-1990s, and served as a member of the President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and advisory groups about HIV/AIDS for the federal Office of Minority Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Institutes for Health. He also has served on the board of directors for the Gay Asian Pacific Alliance Community HIV Project, Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center, National Minority AIDS Project, and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. Cecilia Chung is the senior director of strategic initiatives and evaluation at Transgender Law Center, a health commissioner of San Francisco and an internationally recognized civil rights leader in the LGBT and HIV community. Chung has served as the co-chair of GNP+ and is currently a member of the WHO Advisory Council of Women Living with HIV. Vince Crisostomo is a gay Chamorro (Pacific Islander) long-term HIV/AIDS survivor who believes in the healing power of community and has dedicated more than 30 years to HIV/AIDS activism and LGBTQ communities. He is passionate about bringing health care to all and social justice equity to people of every sexual identity, HIV status, gender, race and age. Crisostomo is SFAF's director of aging services and previously managed the Elizabeth Taylor 50 Plus Network for long-term HIV survivors. He co-chaired the HIV & Aging Work Group and was an active member of the Mayor's Long-Term Care Coordinating Council. Crisostomo has led a number of grassroots HIV advocacy and LGBTQ organizations in the United States and overseas. He was executive director of the Coalition of Asia Pacific Regional Networks on HIV/AIDS, founded the Pacific Island Jurisdiction AIDS Action Group, and served as a United Nations NGO delegate for the Asia Pacific. In 2019, having won the popular vote, he was community grand marshall for San Francisco Pride. In July 2021, he was appointed to the San Francisco Human Rights Commission's LGBTQI+ Advisory Committee. NOTES This is a free program; any voluntary donations made during registration will support the production of our online programs. A complimentary lunch will be provided before the program for in-person attendees. The Commonwealth Club thanks Gilead Sciences, Inc. for its generous support of The Michelle Meow Show.  Program presented in partnership with GAPA Theatre, The Connection at the San Francisco Community Health Center, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, and The Commonwealth Club of California. This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. SPEAKERS Ignatius Bau Former HIV Prevention Program Coordinator, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum; Former Member, President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Cecilia Chung Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives and Evaluation, Transgender Law Center; Health Commissioner, San Francisco Vince Crisostomo Director of Aging Services, San Francisco AIDS Foundation Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Host and Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 6th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Illinois News Now
Andy Jackson-Sinnissippi Centers

Illinois News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 19:17


Andy Jackson-Sinnissippi Centers by Regional Media

Advice from a Call Center Geek!
Our Contact Centers Covid Evolution- Engagement to Technology

Advice from a Call Center Geek!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 17:54


Covid had changed the way many of us operate our contact centers.  In this episode of "Advice from a Call Center Geek!" we take a look back at where we were and all the policies, procedures we changed, the technology we now utilize, and the engagement that we have evolved.This is a great episode for you to take a look at your internal operation and see what areas you can improve with all the changes in the workforce and technology we have all seen.Follow Tom: @tlaird_expiviaJoin our Facebook Call Center Community: www.facebook.com/callcentergeekConnect on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/tlairdexpivia/Schedule time with me to talk about anything call center related:https://calendly.com/call_center_advice/15minLinkedin Group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/9041993/Watch us: Advice from a Call Center Geek Youtube ChannelText Me: Text "Call Center Manager" to 814-247-0633If you would like to appear on "Advice from a Call Center Geek! make sure you shoot tom an email at tlaird@expivia.net!This episode is brought to you by Balto.Balto's Real-Time Guidance helps your agents say the right things on every single callGet 26% more sales and cut ramp time by 75%.In just a little over a month.Head over to balto.ai/tom to get a free pair of Bose headphones for a demo

All You Need To Know
Press Breaker Podcast #15: Top 10 Centers

All You Need To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:31


Today, Mac and Garrett use their last week of preseason to rank the top 10 centers in the present day NBA. This week brought us crazy takes and a lot of differences in opinions.

Good / True / & Beautiful | with Ashton Gustafson
Episode 182: Suzanne Stabile // The Journey Toward Wholeness: Enneagram Wisdom for Stress, Balance, and Transformation

Good / True / & Beautiful | with Ashton Gustafson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:20


In everything from health care and politics to technology and economics, we are experiencing feelings of loss, anger, and anxiety. In the Enneagram's wisdom, our number determines how we respond. We automatically move to another number when we're feeling stress and to yet another when we're feeling secure. Such moves may help us feel better temporarily but don't last. For those who want to dive deeper into Enneagram wisdom, expert teacher Suzanne Stabile opens the concept of three Centers of Intelligence: thinking, feeling, and doing. When we learn to manage these centers, each for its intended purpose, we open a path to reducing fear, improving relationships, growing spiritually, and finding wholeness. Drawing on the dynamic stability of the Enneagram, she explains each number's preferred and repressed Center of Intelligence and its role in helping us move toward internal balance. Using brief focused chapters, this book provides what we need to deal with the constant change and complexity of our world to achieve lasting transformation in our lives. 

Teleforum
Litigation Update: Eviction Moratoria

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 22:55


On September 1, 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention took a step into nationwide housing policy, and issued a nationwide ban on evictions. With the order, the federal agency invoked a little-known WWII-era statute that empowered the agency to “make and enforce such regulations” that “are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the States or possessions, or from one State or possession into any other State or possession.” The agency asserted that evictions presented a unique and unacceptable danger to the public in light of Covid-19.CDC’s order was challenged almost immediately by a variety of public interest groups on a variety of statutory and constitutional grounds. At the heart of these challenges was an objection to the agency’s determination that property owners could be forced to turn over their real property to tenants who refused to pay rent.The order was, in months-long increments, in existence for most of the past year. Meanwhile, several district courts and the Sixth Circuit invalidated the moratorium, but only with respect to individual litigants. After one trip to the Supreme Court, another extension, and a final stop back at the Supreme Court, the moratorium ended. However, related rules issued by agencies like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, as well as local eviction moratoria, continue around the country.This litigation update by Caleb Kruckenberg of the New Civil Liberties Alliance, which filed the first challenge to the CDC order, discusses the origins of the moratorium, including relevant Congressional action (and inaction), the legal challenges to the moratorium, recent and possible future extensions of the moratorium, and why this case was bound for resolution by the Supreme Court. Featuring:Caleb Kruckenberg, Litigation Counsel, New Civil Liberties Alliance

Land Line Now
Drug test centers short on supplies, staff

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:17


LLN (10/13/21) – Drug test facilities are the latest part of the trucking world affected by both supply chain issues and problems filling vacant jobs. Also, as more and more truckers file for their own authority, certain aspects of the system are feeling the effects – and even slowing down under the strain. And that includes IRP and IFTA. We'll discuss some of the issues involved. And the last year-and-a-half has been full of surprises – most of them unpleasant. So many dominoes have fallen that Dean Croke at the folks at DAT have started calling our new reality the “Domino Economy.” He'll tell us which dominoes are likely to fall next. 0:00 – Newscast. 10:14 – IFTA, IRP and authority filings. 25:07 – The Domino Economy. 40:03 – Supply chain problems; phishing scams.

Center for Spiritual Living Midtown
Share the Dream - Rev Dr Bob Deen

Center for Spiritual Living Midtown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:35


We are uniquely situated to foster a global community and a world that works for everyone, by sharing all the truths of our teaching that we already  rely upon. In our individual lives, Centers, communities, and world we embody purpose, intension,  and oneness.  Where can we invite others along for the journey in a way that is radically welcoming, loving, and inclusive? Weekly Affirmation: My dreams are the stuff of Spirit itself.

Progressive Commentary Hour
Progressive Commentary Hour - Dr. Jessica Rose

Progressive Commentary Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:39


mRNA vaccine injuries and deaths in the CDC's vaccine adverse events database Dr. Jessica Rose is an immunologist and molecular biologist who has specialized in computational biology and the bio-mechanisms behind pathogenic infections. Her research and publications include investigating hepatitis B, cytomegalovirus, HIV, and anthrax. Dr. Rose is a graduate of the University of Newfoundland and Labrador, and received her doctorate from Bar Illan University in Israel. Dr Rose has now written and co-authored several important papers analyzing the data of Covid-19 vaccine injuries and deaths reported in the Centers for Disease Control's Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System  or VAERS. She also has a paper pending publication co-authored with Dr. Peter McCullough who will be guest on the program on Friday. Jessica is also a surfing instructor and Israel's national champion for women's long-board surfing. 

That Music Podcast
53 | Learning Centers in the Music Room with Aileen Miracle

That Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:19


What if I told you that you could easily implement more student choice in your classroom while at the same time increasing the level of differentiation in your lessons? Today's episode is all about how learning centers can do just that in your classroom! I brought in the expert on centers in the music room, Aileen Miracle, to share why she believes learning centers belong in the music classroom, while also giving you tips to get started! Aileen Miracle teaches general music, band, and choir in the Olentangy Local School District in Ohio; this is her twenty-third year of teaching. She received her Bachelor of Music Education from Central Michigan University in 1999, and her Master of Music in Music Education with a Kodály emphasis from Capital University in 2003. Over the past fifteen years, she has held leadership roles in local, regional, and national music education organizations. In 2016, Aileen was awarded “Teacher of the Year” at Cheshire Elementary. She has taught Methodology and Folk Song Research for the Kodály Programs at Colorado State University, Capital University, and DePaul University, and presents workshops across the nation and around the world. Links and Resources: Check out That Music Teacher Store! Grab your free centers set from Aileen Check out Aileen's blog Follow Aileen on Instagram

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball
JJ Starling Spurns Syracuse for Notre Dame, Jim Boeheim High on Centers and Ranking the Most Winnable SU Football Games 10/13

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 38:50


4-star guard JJ Starling picked Notre Dame over his hometown Syracuse squad. How frustrating is it to lose another standout local recruit? Plus, Jim Boeheim heaped praise on his centers at ACC Media Day. What's the outlook for a hopefully improved frontcourt unit? Also, the Orange have six games left on their schedule. The guys rank the most winnable games and how many wins SU will end up with. Tyler Aki and Tim Leonard discuss it all and more on the Wednesday edition of the Locked on Syracuse Podcast. SUBSCRIBE TO THE LOCKED ON SYRACUSE YOUTUBE PAGE! Follow the show on Twitter @LO_Syracuse and follow the guys @Tim_Leonard4 and @TylerAki_. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. StatHero StatHero, the FIRST Ever Daily Fantasy Sportsbook that gives the PLAYER the ADVANTAGE. Go to StatHero.com/LockedOn for 300% back on your first play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 598 (10-11-21): The Flu and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:02).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-8-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This revised episode from November 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. We start with a public health mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what seasonal, precautionary procedure is taking place.  And here's a hint: thinking feverishlycould influence your answer. SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec “Any problems with any vaccines before?”“No.”“Feeling OK today?  No fever or anything like that?”“No.”“And no allergies to foods or medications that you're aware of?”“No.”  …“So, you know, a little bit of arm soreness; that's probably the most of it.  Redness, irritation.   Might be kind of tired for a day or so, or even a low-grade fever or a headache is possible and normal.  If that were to happen, whatever you take for a headache is fine.  Any questions about anything?”“No.”“All right.” …“All right, leave that bandage on for about 10 minutes or so, and take it off anytime you remember after that.  And here's your copy for your records.  Thanks.”“Thank you.”“Have a good day.”If you guessed, a flu shot, you're right!  You heard an influenza vaccination being given in October 2017 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.  Flu season arrives every year with colder weather, bringing the potential to cause fever, body aches, and other symptoms, some quite serious or even fatal.  The flu affects millions of people in the United States each year, and health agencies like U.S. Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention and the Virginia Department of Health encourage vaccination for everyone older than six months, with some exceptions. But what does the flu have to do with water?  Consider these three connections. First, drinking plenty of fluids is a commonly prescribed treatment for flu sufferers in order to help prevent dehydration resulting from increased body temperature and other responses to the viral infection.  Infants, children, and the elderly are particularly at risk for dehydration. Second, the flu virus is transmitted between humans by respiratory droplets, and researchers have found that transmission is affected by air temperature and humidity. Specifically, transmission occurs more easily in cold, dry air, such as is typically found during fall and winter in temperate areas like Virginia. Third, waterfowl and shorebirds are among the various kinds of birds that harbor avian flu viruses, and water contaminated with aquatic birds' waste can potentially harbor avian flu for some time.  Understanding the factors related to the occurrence and transmission of avian viruses—including the role of contaminated water—is important in monitoring avian flu and its potential to spread to other birds, mammals, or humans. Flu season is upon us, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine by the end of October.  So if you hear this… VOICE - ~3 sec – “Are you here for a flu shot?” …now you'll have not only a health connection for the flu, but some hydrological ones, too. Thanks to staff of Kroger Pharmacy and Hokie Wellness for lending their voices to this episode. We close with some music for, or rather, against the flu.  Here's about 30 seconds of “Shots,” written by Wilson Stern and performed in a 2014, flu-shot-promoting video by the University of Florida's Student Health Care Center. MUSIC - ~28 sec Lyrics:“Last year less than half the population got their flu shot.  Why you wanna be stuck at home with a fever when you could be making this party hot?”“I heard that shot made you ill.”“Naw, son, that news ain't for real.  It tells your body what the virus looks like, so it knows how to deal”“Why you tellin' me this?  I got my flu shot last year.”“This virus mutates constantly, we got new strains here.”“Shots, shots, shots, shots….” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 393, 11-6-17, which has been archived. The influenza vaccination heard in this episode was performed October 24, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, by staff of Kroger Pharmacies, assisted by staff from Virginia Tech's Hokie Wellness program.  Virginia Water Radio thanks those staff people for their willingness to be recorded. The audio excerpt of “Shots,” copyright by Wilson Stern, was taken from the 2014 University of Florida Student Health Care Center video “Flu Shots,” copyright by the University of Florida; used with permission of Wilson Stern and the University of Florida's Division of Media Properties.  The 2 min./4 sec. video is available online at http://shcc.ufl.edu/services/primary-care/flu/flu-shots-music-video-lyrics/.   More information about Wilson Stern and the group Hail! Cassius Neptune is available online at https://www.reverbnation.com/hailcassiusneptune.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Colorized, negative-stained transmission electron microscopic image of influenza virus particles, known as virions.   Public domain photo taken in 1973 by Dr. F. A. Murphy, accessed from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=10072.Illustration of influenza infection, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Images of Influenza Viruses,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/images.htm.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection weekly map of flu activity, as of 10/2/21.  Map accessed online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm, 10/11/21.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart of work to develop the annual flu virus vaccine, with data for 2020-21.   Image accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/infographics.htm. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TYPES AND NAMES OF INFLUENZA VIRUSESThe following information is quoted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), “Types of Influenza Viruses,” November 18, 2019, online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm.“There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D.   Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics of disease (known as the flu season) almost every winter in the United States.  Influenza A viruses are the only influenza viruses known to cause flu pandemics, i.e., global epidemics of flu disease.  A pandemic can occur when a new and very different influenza A virus emerges that both infects people and has the ability to spread efficiently between people.  Influenza type C infections generally cause mild illness and are not thought to cause human flu epidemics.  Influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in people. ”Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N).  There are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes (H1 through H18 and N1 through N11 respectively).  …Current sub-types of influenza A viruses that routinely circulate in people include: A (H1N1) and A (H3N2).  In the spring of 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged to cause illness in people. … “Currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) viruses are related to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged in the spring of 2009 and caused a flu pandemic ( see CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu website for more information).  This virus, scientifically called the ‘A(H1N1)pdm09 virus,' and more generally called ‘2009 H1N1,' has continued to circulate seasonally since then.  These H1N1 viruses have undergone relatively small genetic changes and changes to their antigenic properties (i.e., the properties of the virus that affect immunity) over time.“Of all the influenza viruses that routinely circulate and cause illness in people, influenza A(H3N2) viruses tend to change more rapidly, both genetically and antigenically. … “Influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes, but instead are further classified into two lineages: B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. …Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.  Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world.  However, the proportion of influenza B viruses from each lineage that circulate can vary by geographic location.“CDC follows an internationally accepted naming convention for influenza viruses.  This convention was accepted by WHO [World Health Organization] in 1979 and published in February 1980 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 58(4):585-591 (1980) (see A revision of the system of nomenclature for influenza viruses: a WHO Memorandum[854 KB, 7 pages]).  The approach uses the following components: *the antigenic type (e.g., A, B, C); *the host of origin (e.g., swine, equine, chicken, etc.; for human-origin viruses, no host of origin designation is given); *geographical origin (e.g., Denver, Taiwan, etc.); *strain number (e.g., 15, 7, etc.); *year of isolation (e.g., 57, 2009, etc.); *for influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigen description in parentheses (e.g., (H1N1). “One influenza A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and one or two influenza B viruses (depending on the vaccine) are included in each year's influenza vaccines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Antonia E. Dalziel et al., “Persistence of Low Pathogenic Influenza A Virus in Water: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Meta-Analysis,” PLOS One, 10/13/16, online at http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161929.  Anice C. Lowen and John Steel, “Roles of Humidity and Temperature in Shaping Influenza Seasonality,” Journal of Virology, Vol. 88/No. 14, July 2014, pages 7692-7695; online at http://jvi.asm.org/content/88/14/7692.full (subscription may be required for access). Anice C. Lowen et al., “Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature,” PLOS, 10/19/07, online at http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151. Public Library of Science, “Higher indoor humidity inactivates flu virus particles,” posted by Science Daily, 2/27/13, online at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227183456.htm. David Robson, The Real Reason Germs Spread in Winter, BBC Future, 10/19/15. Jeffery K. Taugenberger and David M. Morens, “1918 Influenza: The Mother of All Pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), Vol. 12/No. 1, January 2006, online at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/1/05-0979_article. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):“Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html;“Flu Activity and Surveillance,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivitysurv.htm(includes a weekly nationwide map of flu activity);“The Flu: Caring for Someone Sick at Home,” online (as PDF) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/influenza_flu_homecare_guide.pdf;“Flu Season,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm;“How Flu Spreads,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm;“Influenza (Flu),” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.html;“Influenza in Animals,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/other_flu.htm (information on flu in bats, birds, dogs, swine, and other animals);“Information on Avian Influenza,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/;“National Influeza Vaccination Week,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/index.htm;“Prevent Seasonal Flu,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/index.html;“Who Should and Who Should NOT Get a Flu Vaccination,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/whoshouldvax.htm. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pandemic Influenza Fact Sheet for the Water Sector, 2009. Virginia Department of Health, “Epidemiology Fact Sheets/Influenza,” September 2018, online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/influenza/. World Health Organization (WHO), “Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic),” November 13, 2018, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic). For More Information about Water an

time health science bay university agency music current national natural earth home state audio college map accent animals dark surveillance tech human water web index rain united states pond research ocean weather government taiwan education public prevention vol voice illustration chesapeake snow environment journal types organisms display images skeleton persistence msonormal virology stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens flu bacteria voices arial environmental temperature times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading hail world health organization shots biology cdc lyrics civics grade nutrients public library docs colorful signature bio query flu season scales txt roles govt human body watershed transcript humidity toc naw passwords centers disease control virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean infants natural resources david m influenza grades k avian influenza science daily name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes h1n1 bulletin blacksburg prevention cdc kb msohyperlink world health organization who sections life sciences stormwater david robson policymakers n1 bmp environmental protection agency epa n11 new standard acknowledgment muscular flu shots virginia department lowen cripple creek cumberland gap 7c sols plos one tmdl feeling ok bbc future john steel geological survey mayo clinic health system h3n2 plos who world health organization circulatory emerging infectious diseases living systems dalziel virginia standards water center redness space systems colorized relative humidity audio notes
Cincinnati Edition
Child care centers are facing a staffing crisis

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:31


Many centers fear they will close due to a lack of employees.

Talk Ten Tuesdays
Outpatient CDI Risk Adjustment and HCC Capture

Talk Ten Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:18


Outpatient CDI programs can have real impact with risk adjustment and Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs). An important component of the HCC risk adjustment model is accurate and appropriate HCC capture, representing a patient's disease burden year over year.HCCs reflect hierarchies within related disease categories. A patient can have multiple HCC categories assigned, and each category, along with patient demographics, is factored into the patient's overall risk adjustment factor (RAF) score.The higher the RAF score, the sicker the patient. On the upcoming edition of Talk Ten Tuesdays, we'll will cover the basics of HCCs and what steps to take in order to begin your outpatient CDI program with a focus on these factors. Broadcast Special Guest Colleen Deighan will also conduct a Talk Ten Tuesdays Listener Survey on this topic.The live broadcast will also feature these other segments:The Coding Report: In keeping with the broadcast's theme, Laurie Johnson will report on the new psychiatric codes for fiscal year 2022.Tuesday Focus: CMS Resumes Targeted Probe-and-Educate Program: Nationally recognized professional, coder, auditor, and educator Terry A. Fletcher will return to the broadcast to report on the resumption of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Targeted Probe-and-Educate (TPE) program, which was delayed in response to the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) in March 2020. CMS has given the Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) the go-ahead to resume paused TPE reviews and initiate new reviews.Special Report: CMS One-Year Extension: Susan Gatehouse, founder and president of Axea Solutions, will report on the CMS one-year extension of New Technology Add-on Payments (NTAPs) for 13 technologies for which the payments otherwise would have discontinued beginning in 2022.News Desk: Timothy Powell, compliance expert and ICD10monitor national correspondent, will anchor the Talk Ten Tuesdays News Desk.TalkBack: Erica Remer, MD, founder and president of Erica Remer, MD, Inc., and Talk Ten Tuesdays co-host, will report on a subject that has caught her attention during her popular segment.

NBDA: Bicycle Retail Radio
Creating Centers of Excellence in Building Custom Wheels

NBDA: Bicycle Retail Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:20


This episode's guest is Master Wheel Builder Bill Mould, a Columbia University and Yale-educated scientist and engineer who served as a college professor, Air Force colonel, and civilian pilot among other things, before ‘retiring' into his passion as a master mechanic and expert in bicycle physics and wheel building.  He has written a book on bicycle physics and engineering, has hand-built more than 6,000 wheels, and continues to study wheels through research, experimentation, and conversations with experts around the world. In the industry, we affectionately refer to him as Bill Mould Wheels. Support the show (https://www.nbda.com/donate)

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
17 Statistics and Notes on Surgery Centers

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:21


In this episode Scott Becker shares 17 statistics and notes on Surgery Centers.

Science is Gray
Effective Altruism and Measuring the Effects of Our Vegan Activism w/Casey Taft PhD

Science is Gray

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:19


You've probably heard of the Effective Altruism (AE) movement before, and the effort to apply effective altruism to animal advocacy work and reducing suffering of animals. But do you know what it actually is? And is effective altruism all it's really cracked up to be?? I have seen countless debates within the animal advocacy movement about what the "best" type of activism is, with many people pushing everyone to do one single thing. In the last few years things like animal welfare legislation (focused on bigger cages, and "humane slaughter") and reducitarianism have been pushed on the movement by several well-known AE philanthropists and non profits as the end-all-be-all of evidence based "effective activism". But can we even measure the effects of our vegan and animal rights activism in the first place? How do we know what will really end speciesism, save animals, and turn the world vegan in the future? And what role should science and data actually play in social justice movements and especially animal rights work? I discuss all that and more in this episode with Casey Taft who wrote the brilliant book 'Motivational Methods for Vegan Advocacy: A Clinical Psychology Perspective'. Casey Taft is the co-founder and manager of Vegan Publishers and is a Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. He is an internationally recognized researcher in the areas of trauma and the family, winning prestigious awards for his work from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, the Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has published over 100 journal articles, book chapters, and scientific reports, and has consulted with the United Nations on preventing violence and abuse globally. He sees the prevention of violence towards animals as a natural extension of this work.

Teach 4 the Heart
QT: Getting Started with Centers & Stations

Teach 4 the Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:19


Have you wanted to try centers or stations but weren't sure where to start? In this episode, Laura Kebart shares amazing advice for how to introduce stations without feeling stressed or disorganized. This episode is just a snippet of our full conversation with Laura about centers and stations, which is available for free as part of the Rise Up Summit, an online conference for Christian educators happening October 21-26. Sign up for free at www.riseupchristianeducators.com.

Curiosity Daily
School Should Start Later, Daydreaming Perks, Hycean Planets

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 13:51


Learn about why high school starts too early; why daydreaming might be a good sign; and finding life on Hycean planets. High school starts too early in all but 3 US states — but things are changing by Steffie Drucker  Roy, S. (2014, August 26). AAP Recommends Delaying School Start Times to Combat Teen Sleep... Sleep Review. https://www.sleepreviewmag.com/sleep-health/demographics/age/aap-recommends-delaying-school-start-times-combat-teen-sleep-deprivation/   CDC. (2020, May 29). Schools Start Too Early. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/sleep/features/schools-start-too-early.html   National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS). (2017). Ed.gov; National Center for Education Statistics. https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/ntps/tables/ntps1718_table_05_s1s.asp   Jacobs, F. (2021, August 27). Here's how early school begins – and why it is bad for students. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/strange-maps/heres-how-early-school-begins-and-why-it-is-bad-for-students   Sleep for Teenagers | Sleep Foundation. (2009, April 17). Sleep Foundation. https://www.sleepfoundation.org/teens-and-sleep  Daydreaming Might Be a Sign of an Efficient Brain by Reuben Westmaas Daydreaming is Good. It Means You're Smart | News Center. (2017). Gatech.edu. https://www.news.gatech.edu/news/2017/10/24/daydreaming-good-it-means-youre-smart  ‌Godwin, C. A., Hunter, M. A., Bezdek, M. A., Lieberman, G., Elkin-Frankston, S., Romero, V. L., Witkiewitz, K., Clark, V. P., & Schumacher, E. H. (2017). Functional connectivity within and between intrinsic brain networks correlates with trait mind wandering. Neuropsychologia, 103, 140–153. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.006  A wandering mind reveals mental processes and priorities. (2012). Wisc.edu. https://news.wisc.edu/a-wandering-mind-reveals-mental-processes-and-priorities/  ‌Levinson, D. B., Smallwood, J., & Davidson, R. J. (2012). The Persistence of Thought. Psychological Science, 23(4), 375–380. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797611431465  Forget Earth-like planets — it's time to look for alien life on Hycean planets by Briana Brownell  New class of habitable exoplanets are “a big step forward” in the search for life. (2021, August 26). University of Cambridge. https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/new-class-of-habitable-exoplanets-are-a-big-step-forward-in-the-search-for-life  ‌Madhusudhan, N., Piette, A. A. A., & Constantinou, S. (2021). Habitability and Biosignatures of Hycean Worlds. The Astrophysical Journal, 918(1), 1. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/abfd9c  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dreamcatchers
BioCurious - Understanding Biorhythm in Women - Kayla Osterhoff

Dreamcatchers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 50:18


The routine of society leans on favoring those who can keep up consistently. However, why exactly do we experience burnout? How do we get over this hurdle? Kayla Osterhoff talks about her astonishing discovery on how we can address our productivity issues by understanding our biological design. Kayla is a Neuropsychophysiologist and world-renowned Women's Health Expert who is passionate about empowering women to step into the leadership roles that they are born for! Kayla is formally trained across the health sciences with a bachelor of science in health ecology, master of science in public health, and currently pursuing her doctoral degree in the field of neuropsychophysiology. Formerly, she served as a Health Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and spent several years prior working in the clinical setting. The last several years of her career have been dedicated to researching women's neurology, psychology and physiology. Kayla's investigative efforts into the brains and minds of women led her to a major discovery about women's unique cognitive and leadership abilities.In this episode, Kayla shares tips in understanding our hormonal rhythm, how a women's operating system differs, and how we can utilize the benefits of our biological phases to unleash our peak performance. Join us and listen in! [00:01 - 05:19] Opening Segment Welcoming Kayla to the showKayla shares her educational career in biology[05:20 - 15:31] Understanding the Body's Operating System How our bodies react to the environment The partnership between the brain and the mindHow biorhythm influences women's brainsThe effects of hormonal changes influence the operating system[15:32 - 48:41] Reaching Your Peak through Biological Design MasteryHow women can navigate and match the environment with itThe four phases of a woman's hormonal cycleUtilizing the superpowers to unleash peak performancePartnering with your body to avoid burnout[48:42 - 50:19] Closing SegmentListen to your body and understand what it needsConnect with Kayla!Closing wordsTweetable Quotes:“The whole thing, the through line is anatomy and physiology. It's understanding how this human operating system works, and how to optimize it.” - Kayla Osterhoff“And I understand that my body is just not a tool for me to use. It's my partner. And so I have to treat my partner really well and stay in a healthy relationship with my partner so that we can both thrive.” - Kayla OsterhoffConnect with Kayla:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/biocurious_kayla/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kayla-osterhoff/ LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes. Dreamcatchers is an inclusive organization that targets people's interest in being more instead of a certain demographic. We have people from all walks of life at many different ages. Find out more at www.dreamsshouldbereal.com. Find out more about Jerome at www.d3v3loping.com or www.myersmethods.com.

Your Morning Nudge: Breathe & Believe

 Happy Sensational Sunday, Today's breath is the Bumble Bee Breath which Encourages inward focus, Connects you to your inner self, Calms & Centers and offers a New perspective. You are going to take a long belly Inhale through your nose and then Exhale “Zzzzz” If you don't like the bee sound or want to be a little quieter, you can exhale to  “Shhhhhh” “Sssss” “hummmm,”  So let's do it together:  Big inhale Today's nudge is: I am strongerYou can get stronger and you just may be  stronger than you think physically, mentally or emotionally. Each day you can work at improving your strength in one of these areas, or all! Exercise, work on brain teasers and  puzzles or read inspirational books. We are a work in progress. Work to make yourself stronger each and every day. Without that strength you will fall in a rut and not feel good about yourself. But if you just try each day to improve upon something, you will get stronger and believe in your strength!! Think back to a time you got through something that you didn't think you could do: maybe it was something physical like a race, something emotional like a break up, or something mental like learning a difficult subject or process. You did it and you can keep doing it. You just need to remind yourself that you Are stronger. Also, if someone is hurting or bullying you, always know that they are lashing out because they are weak. They cannot handle their adversity. Hurt people hurt people. But you, you are stronger because you are not hurting them back. Keep being the better, stronger person!Let's say it together three times while tapping each finger to our thumb: I am strongerTwo more times:  I am strongerLast one: I am stronger Have a great Sensational Sunday!

The Documentary Podcast
The Story of Aids: 1. The beginning

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 50:35


We return to the beginning of the global Aids crisis and explore the personal and political struggles of the epidemic, as it unfolded in two very different countries – the United States and South Africa – and hear stories from people who fought through it, and survived. The series begins in the USA, where 40 years ago the Centers for Disease Control published a memo flagging a rare pneumonia found in five previously healthy, young gay men in California. Two of the men had died. These would be the first recorded cases of Aids in the world – a disease which would go on to kill 35 million people.

Berlin Briefing
08.10.2021 - Klimaneustart, Test centers, Hospital strike, Indoor fitness, Leaf removal

Berlin Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 9:43


- Klimaneustart - Test centers - Hospital strike - Indoor fitness - Leaf removal ** Please check out the show notes for the links to our sources. Donation Options: https://www.berlinbriefing.de/donate/ Twitter: @berlinbriefing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinBriefing/ Mail: berlinbriefing@gmail.com

Dying to Ask
Simone Biles And Jordan Chiles On How To Live Forward

Dying to Ask

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 33:54


Olympic gymnast Simone Biles has four gymnastics moves named after her. She's the G.O.A.T (greatest of all time) despite what she went through in Tokyo. And to many, she's the greatest because of what she did in Tokyo. Simone Biles' greatest legacy may be the fact that she went public with her mental health challenges brought on by the pressure of the Olympics and the public attention of the Larry Nassar sex abuse scandal. Biles let people everywhere know that it's OK to not be OK. In doing so, she started a global conversation on mental health and anxiety that clearly needed to be had after the world has shared in a brutal pandemic experience. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates four in 10 adults this year are dealing with anxiety or a full-blown depressive disorder. And that's just the people who've reached out for help. The reality is likely much higher given the stress of pandemic life. Biles proved sometimes you have to step back in order to step back in. And, say it with me, that's OK. This fall, Biles and many of her teammates and gymnastics friends are touring the country with the "Gold Over America Tour." She's proving you can move forward, despite any challenges you face. She and her Tokyo teammate Jordan Chiles are my guests in this week's episode. On this Dying to Ask: How to keep going when the whole world knows your business How to live forward when the world wants to look back And what it's like to be on a tour bus with Simone Biles and Jordan Chiles

Marijuana Tomorrow
Episode 76 - Cannabis in the workplace questions? We've got weed answers...

Marijuana Tomorrow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 70:16


This week we'll take a look at the latest comments from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, as he says key Senators have an agreement not to advance cannabis banking reform, before legalization.  And then we'll take a look at cannabis in the workplace as both the Wall Street Journal AND the Centers for Disease Control weigh in with some questions about the new normal, workers comp claims and when is it appropriate to consume with a client? We'll be discussing all these stories and more on the BEST cannabis podcast in the business... As we like to say around here, “Everyone knows what happened in marijuana today, but you need to know what's happening in Marijuana Tomorrow!”   ----more---- Segment 1 - Majority Leader Schumer's Got A Brand New Deal https://www.marijuanamoment.net/chuck-schumer-says-key-senators-have-agreement-not-to-advance-marijuana-banking-reform-before-legalization/ ----more---- Segment 2 - Cannabis in the workplace? The WSJ and CDC have some questions... and we've got the weed answers!! https://www.wsj.com/articles/is-it-ever-ok-to-get-stoned-with-a-client-and-other-questions-as-pot-comes-to-work-11632907802   https://blogs.cdc.gov/niosh-science-blog/2021/09/30/wci-cannabis/ ----more---- This episode of Marijuana Tomorrow is brought to you by Cannabeta Realty.

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Ketamine Centers of Chicago and National Alliance on Mental Illness will help you figure out funding to treat your depression

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


Dr. Bal Nandra of Ketamine Centers of Chicago and Alexa James of the National Alliance on Mental Illness join Lisa Dent to talk about ways they can help you or your loved ones who are suffering from depression. Dr. Nandra’s patient Maria Palmer explains how one text message to his office brought her exponential relief.

The Dogist: Talking Dogs
Animal Care Centers of NYC: The Only Open Admissions Shelter in the City

The Dogist: Talking Dogs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:06


Today we're diving into RESCUE MONTH. This month, we'll be featuring four rescue organizations on The Dogist and our goal is to highlight an adoptable dog every single day for the month of October. The first organization we're featuring is the Animal Care Centers of New York City.  Individuals from all over New York City come to the ACC every day of the week for reasons as diverse as reclaiming lost pets, adopting new furry family members and getting resources to help them keep their pets in homes. Our guest today is Katy Hansen, who is the Director of Marketing & Communications at the ACC. She joined in 2015 after having spent 20 years on Wall Street.

The New Dimensions Café
Practical Help For Attaining Our Goals - Joel Fotinos - C0342

The New Dimensions Café

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 16:13


Joel Fotinos is a vice president at Penguin Random House Publishers and publisher of the Tarcher/Penguin imprint. He's also a licensed minister with the Centers for Spiritual Living. He is the author and coauthor of several books including The Prayer Chest (Doubleday Religion 2007), Multiply Your Blessings (Hampton Roads 2012), A Little Daily Wisdom (Paraclete Press 2009), Think and Grow Rich Starter Kit (Napoleon Hill) (Tarcher 2014), The Think and Grow Rich Journey: Enhance and Enrich Your Path to Success (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2013), My Life Contract: 90-Day Program for Prioritizing Goals, Staying on Track, Keeping Focused, and Getting Results (Weiser Books 2014)  Interview Date: 5/28/2015   Tags: Joel Fotinos, Personal Life Contract, contract, joy, goals, my life contract, commitment, excuses, consistency, Personal Transformation, Self Help. Writing, Philosophy

New Dimensions
Personal Life Contracts-Being Accountable To Yourself - Joel Fotinos - ND3546

New Dimensions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:20


Contracts are used to lay out expectations and responsibilities of the parties involved. We take them very seriously in business and law. Joel Fotinos says that we should take our own goals just as seriously and create personal contracts to hold ourselves accountable in our pursuit of excellence. He shares methods and ideas for committing to a Personal Life Contract. Joel Fotinos is a vice president at Penguin Random House Publishers and publisher of the Tarcher/Penguin imprint. He's also a licensed minister with the Centers for Spiritual Living. He is the author and coauthor of several books including The Prayer Chest (coauthor August Gold) (Doubleday Religion 2007), Multiply Your Blessings (coauthor August Gold) (Hampton Roads 2012), A Little Daily Wisdom (Paraclete Press 2009), Think and Grow Rich Starter Kit (coauthors Napoleon Hill, August Gold) (Tarcher 2014), The Think and Grow Rich Journey: Enhance and Enrich Your Path to Success (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2013 and My Life Contract: 90-Day Program for Prioritizing Goals, Staying on Track, Keeping Focused, and Getting Results (Weiser Books 2014)Interview Date: 5/28/2015  Tags: MP3, Joel Fotinos, Personal Life Contract, contract, Mastermind Partner, Mastermind Group, Prioritize, debt, 90 days, Am I happy, Am I free, life purpose, contract map, goals, consistent, persistent, energy follows action, excellence not perfection, accountability, responsibility, Personal Transformation, Self Help

Rocks Across the Pond
News from some the USA’s newest curling centers

Rocks Across the Pond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:09


Lots of excited news from around the curling news to discuss. We start in the US where the Southern California Curling Center hosted Team USA and the Late Late Show with James Corden. We also have news from curling center that either just opened or will soon across the US in San Francisco, Austin, Nashville … Continue reading News from some the USA's newest curling centers → The post News from some the USA's newest curling centers appeared first on Rocks Across The Pond.

Talk Ten Tuesdays
The Dilemma of Coding Mental Health

Talk Ten Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:26


The COVID-19 pandemic rages on, exposing huge gaps in America's vulnerable healthcare system, posing life-or-death questions that tear at our collective subconsciousness.There's also the constant drumbeat of headline news: vaccination mandates versus personal freedom, for example. Are two shots sufficient, or are three better? Should young children be vaccinated or not? With staff shortages and the rationing of care, who gets an inpatient bed and who doesn't?Today, as never before, mental stress is the new norm. And with the pandemic pandemonium comes the annual National Mental Health Awareness Week, sponsored by the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI). At this intersection is the tragic reality that millions of Americans are living with some form of mental health condition.Reporting on mental health during the next edition of Talk Ten Tuesdays will be Dr. H. Steven Moffic, an award-winning author who is considered by many to be among America's most prominent psychiatrists.The live broadcast will also feature these other segments:The Coding Report: In keeping with the broadcast's theme, Laurie Johnson will report on the new psychiatric codes for fiscal year 2022.Tuesday Focus: Author and consultant Ellen Fink-Samnick will return to the broadcast to report on workplace trauma, noting how trauma has gripped the national workforce, with an intense collective induced stress felt by professionals, patients, and then experienced by frontline practitioners.RegWatch: Stanley Nachimson, former Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) career professional-turned-well-known healthcare IT authority, will report on the latest regulatory news coming out of Washington, D.C.News Desk: Timothy Powell, compliance expert and ICD10monitor national correspondent, will anchor the Talk Ten Tuesdays News Desk.TalkBack: Erica Remer, MD, founder and president of Erica Remer, MD, Inc., and Talk Ten Tuesdays co-host, will report on a subject that has caught her attention during her popular segment.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - In Conversation with Dr. Otis Brawley (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 19:40


In the second edition of this two-part Oncology, Etc. episode, hosts Dr. Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and Dr. David Johnson (University of Texas) continue their conversation with Dr. Otis Brawley, a distinguished professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins and former Executive Vice President of the American Cancer Society. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: elearning.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 10/5/2021   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING] DAVID JOHNSON: Welcome back to Oncology, Etc, and our second segment of our conversation with Otis Brawley, professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical School and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Pat, I don't know about you, but Otis is a very impressive man, and he had a lot of really interesting things to say about his career development, family, et cetera in the first segment. This second segment, we're going to get to hear more about his time at the ACS. What were your thoughts about segment one? PATRICK LOEHRER: Well, I loved talking to Otis, and you too, Dave. Parenthetically, Otis once told me in a dinner conversation we had that he felt like Forrest Gump, and I can identify with that. Where over the field, our field of oncology over the last several decades, we've met some incredibly wonderful people, and we've been lucky to be part of the history. The three of us, I think, do have a deep sense of the historical context of oncology. This is a young field, and there's just some extraordinary people, many of them real true heroes, and Otis has his figure on the pulse of that. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah, that's why he's been in some of the right places at the right time, and we'll hear more about that in this segment coming up now. PATRICK LOEHRER: Now Otis has had a career in many different areas, including ODAC, the NCI, the ACS, now at Hopkins. So let's hear a little bit more about Dr. Brawley's experience at the American Cancer Society and particularly with his experience with the former CEO, John Seffrin. DAVID JOHNSON: Sounds great. [MUSIC PLAYING] OTIS BRAWLEY: John and I had a wonderful run at the American Cancer Society. Got to do a lot of things. Got to testify for the Affordable Care Act. Got to do some of the science to actually argue that the Affordable Care Act would help. And I was fortunate enough to be there long enough to do some of the science to show that the Affordable Care Act is helping. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah, I mean actually all of the things you accomplished at the ACS are truly amazing. Let me ask you, just on a personal level, what did you like most about that job, and then what did you like least about that job? [LAUGHTER] OTIS BRAWLEY: I like the fact-- there were a lot of things I liked about that job. There were a couple hundred scientists and scientific support people that you got to work with. And I used to always say, I do politics so you can do science. And what I used to like the most, every Wednesday afternoon that I was in town, I would walk around just to watch those people think. I used to joke around and say, I'm just walking around to see who came to work today. But I really enjoyed watching them work and watching them think, and that was fun. Another fun aspect of the job was people used to call and ask a little bit about the disease that they are a family member would have. And sitting down with them on the phone in those days-- we didn't have Zoom-- and talking to them through their disease. Not necessarily giving them advice on what to do in terms of treatment, but helping them understand the biology of the disease or connecting them with someone who was good in their disease. And I happen to, by the way, have sent some patients to both of you guys. That was a lot of fun. Then the other thing, of course, was the fact that you could actually influence policy and fix things. I'll never forget sitting across from Terry Branstad, then the governor of Iowa, and convincing him that the right thing to do is to raise the excise tax on tobacco in Iowa. Being able to see that you're effective and to see that you're positively influencing things. The bad side, some of the politics. I didn't necessarily like how some of the money was being raised or where they were raising money from. I think that you have to have a certain standard in terms of where you accept money. And we always had that tension with the fundraisers. But it's also true-- and I will give them a nod-- you can't do the fun things unless you raise money. So I really truly enjoyed my time at the American Cancer Society. And by the way, a shout out to Karen Knudsen, who is the CEO running the American Cancer Society now. And I'm fully committed to helping the ACS and helping Karen be successful. DAVID JOHNSON: One of the things I read-- I think I read this that you had said that one of your proudest accomplishments was revising the ACS screening guidelines. Tell us just a little bit about that. OTIS BRAWLEY: Yeah, going all the way back to the early 1990s, I started realizing that a lot of these guidelines for screening, or back then, this is before the NCCN guidelines for treatment even, that were published by various organizations, including the American Cancer Society. We're almost the equivalent of-- get the impression that in the 1960s, it would have been a smoke-filled room. But you gather a bunch of people into a room, and they come up with, this is what we should be doing. Indeed, the American Cancer Society in 1991 endorsed annual PSA screening for prostate cancer based purely on getting a group of primarily urologists into a room, and that's what they came up with. There was very little review of the science. There really was no science at that time except the science to show that PSA screening found cancer. There were no studies to show that led to men benefiting in that they didn't die. Indeed, in 1991, there was no study to show that treatment of early prostate cancer saved lives. The study to show treatment of prostate cancer saves lives was first published in 2003, and the radiation saves lives in 1997, 1998. Surgery saves lives in 2003 and screening has a small effect published in 2009. But they started recommending it in 1991 in this almost smoke-filled room kind of atmosphere. When I got to the American Cancer Society, I started an effort, and we involved people from the National Academy of Medicine, we involved people from the NCCN, from the American Urological Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Physicians. And we got together in that almost smoke-filled room again, but the idea was, how do you make responsible guidelines? And we wrote that up into a paper guide widely accepted by all of the organizations, and it involves a review of the literature that is commissioned by someone. And they spend a long time reviewing the literature and writing a literature review. And then you have a group of experts from various fields to include epidemiology and screening, social work, someone who's had the disease. Not just the surgeons and medical oncologists who treat the disease but some population scientists as well. They sit down and they reveal all of the scientific data, and then they start coming up with, we recommend this. And then they rank how strong that recommendation is based on the data. We published this in 2013 in The Journal of the American Medical Association. I do think that was important, you're right. That's Otis trying to bring his policy and his belief in orthodox approach to science and bring it all together. PATRICK LOEHRER: So let me reflect a little bit more on something. There is a book that I also just recently read by Dax-Devlon Ross, and it's a book entitled, Letters to my White Male Friends, and it was a fascinating read to me. You have this public persona and professional persona of being an outstanding physician, clinician, public speaker. But what we the three of us have never really had the conversation today is we have much more interest now in DEI. One of our other speakers talked about the fact that there's a tax that is placed upon underrepresented minorities and academics. They are all expected to be on committees. They have to be doing different things. And so the things that they love to do, they can't do it because they have to represent their race or their gender or their ethnicity. OTIS BRAWLEY: I have been blessed and fortunate. There are problems, and there are huge burdens that Black doctors, and women doctors by the way, have to carry. I have been fortunate that I have skated through without a lot of that burden. Maybe it has to do with oncology, but I will tell you that I have been helped by so many doctors, men and women, predominantly white, but some Asian, Muslim, Jewish, Christian. I don't know if it's oncology is selective of people who want to give folks a fair shake and really believe in mentoring and finding a protege and promoting their career. I have been incredibly, incredibly fortunate. Now that I say that, there are doctors, minority doctors and women, who don't have the benefits and don't have the fortunes that I have had, and we all have to be careful for that. As I said early on, John Altman told me that I will thank him by getting more Blacks and women into the old boys club. And so that was his realizing that there is a-- or there was a problem. I think there still is a problem in terms of diversity. Now I have seen personally some of the problem more outside of oncology in some of the other specialties. More in internal medicine and surgery, for example. By the way, there are also some benefit. I did well in medical school in third and fourth year in medical school at the University of Chicago because there were a group of Black nurses who were held that I wasn't going to fail. The nurses took me under their wing and taught me how to draw blood, how to pass a swan. The first code I ever called, there was a nurse standing behind me with the check off list. And so there are some advantages to being Black as well. But there are some disadvantages. I've been very fortunate. My advice to Black physicians is to keep an open mind and seek out the folks in medicine who truly do want to help you and truly do want to mentor you. And for the folks who are not minority or not women in medicine, I say, try to keep an open mind and try to help everybody equally. PATRICK LOEHRER: Thank you. DAVID JOHNSON: I want to go back to your book for a moment. And again, for those who've not read it, I would encourage them to do. So it's a really honest book, I think, well-written. You made a comment in there-- I want to make sure I quote it near correctly. You said that improvement in our health care system must be a bottom up process. What do you mean by "bottom up?" OTIS BRAWLEY: Well, much of it is driven by demand from patients and other folks. The name of the book was, How We Do Harm. And the synopsis is there are bunch of people who are harmed because they don't get the care that they need. And there's a bunch of people who are harmed because they get too much medicine and too much care. And they rob those resources away from the folks who don't get care at the same time that they're harmed by being overtreated, getting treatments that they don't need. The other thing, if I can add, in American health care, we don't stress risk reduction enough. I used to call it "prevention." Some of the survivors convince me to stress "activities to reduce risk of disease." We don't do a lot in this country in terms of diet and exercise. We try to do some work somewhat successfully on tobacco avoidance. We need to teach people how to be healthy. And if I were czar of medicine in the United States, I would try to make sure that everybody had a health coach. Many of us go to the gym and we have a trainer. We need trainers to teach us how to be healthy and how to do the right things to stay healthy. That's part of the bottom up. And in terms of costs you know my last paper that I published from the American Cancer Society, I published purposefully, this is my last paper. Ahmedin Jemal who's a wonderful epidemiologist who I happen to have worked with when I was at the National Cancer Institute and again later in my career at the American Cancer Society, I pushed Ahmedin-- he publishes these papers, and we estimate x number of people are going to be diagnosed with breast cancer and y number are going to die. He and I had talked for a long time about how college education reduces risk of cancer death dramatically. If you give a college education to a Black man, his risk of death from cancer goes down to less than the average risk for a white American. There's something about giving people college education that prevents cancer death. I simply challenged Ahmedin, calculate for me how many people in the United States would die if everybody had the risk of death of college-educated Americans. And he came back with of the 600,000 people who die in any given year, 132,000 would not die if they had all the things from prevention through screening, diagnosis, and treatment that college-educated people. Just think about that-- 132,000. Then I started trying to figure out what drug prevents 132,000 deaths per year? And I couldn't think of one until recently, and it happens to be the coronavirus vaccine. Which ironically has shown itself to be the greatest drug ever created in all of medicine. But in cancer, there's no breakthrough drug that is more effective than just simply getting every human being the care from risk reduction and prevention all the way through treatment that every human being ought to be getting. The solution to some of that starts with fixing third grade and teaching kids about exercise, about proper diet. PATRICK LOEHRER: We're going to have to wind things up here. But real quickly, a book you would recommend? OTIS BRAWLEY: Skip Trump, who's someone that we all know, wonderful guy used to run Roswell Park Cancer Center, just published a book actually it's coming out in September called, Centers of the Cancer Universe, A Half Century of Progress Against Cancer. I got a preprint of that, and it is a great book. It talks about what we've learned in oncology over the last 50 years since Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act. Keep in mind, he declared war on cancer on December 23, 1971. So we have an anniversary coming up in December. PATRICK LOEHRER: I want to close. Another book, I read the autobiography of Frederick Douglass. It's a wonderful read. It really is good. There were some endorsements at the end of this book, and one of them was written by a Benjamin Brawley, who wrote this review in a book called, The Negro in Literature and Art in 1921. And Benjamin Brawley was writing this about Frederick Douglass, but I would like to have you just reflect a moment. I think he was writing it about you, and I'm just going to read this. He basically said, at the time of his death in 1895, Douglass had won for himself a place of unique distinction. Large of heart and of mind, he was interested in every forward movement for his people, but his charity embraced all men in all races. His mutation was international, and today, many of his speeches are found to be the standard works of oratory. I think if your great, great grandfather were here today, he would be so incredibly proud of his protege, Otis. And it's such a privilege and pleasure to have you join us today on Oncology, Etc. Thank you so much. OTIS BRAWLEY: Thank you. And thank both of you for all the help you've given me over the years DAVID JOHNSON: Great pleasure having you today, Otis. I want to also thank all of our listeners for tuning in to Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO educational podcast. We really are here to talk about anything and everything. So we're looking for ideas. Please, if you have any suggestions, feel free to email us at education@ASCO.org. Thanks again, and remember, Pat has a face for podcasts. [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: Thank you for listening to this week's episode of the ASCO e-learning weekly podcasts. To make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

The Gateway
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - The dollars and cents of Medicaid expansion

The Gateway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:27


The federal government says Missouri will receive nearly $1 billion for expanding Medicaid to individuals making roughly $17,800 a year. U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Chaquita Brooks-LaSure says the money helps the state cover more people and encourage more individuals to enroll.

To The Point - Homes Services Podcast
The 7 Centers of Management Attention: Part 3

To The Point - Homes Services Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:20


Join us live from Service World Expo 2021 as Ken Goodrich takes us through the 7 Centers of Management Attention! In this third part of our 4-episode series, we'll be looking at Lead Generation and Lead Conversion, the parts of your business that you need to keep the lights on! 

Politically Speaking
Chiquita Brooks-LaSure

Politically Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 7:16


Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure talks with St. Louis Public Radio's Jason Rosenbaum about what Medicaid expansion could mean for the state's people and budget. This interview was conduct on October 4, 2021.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Ina Park and Log Off Movement's Celine Bernhardt-Lanier and Aliza Kopans

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 116:10


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more On Today's Show 32 minute News Recap Dr Ina Park begins at 34 mins  From InaPark.net : I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.  My parents are immigrants from South Korea who had an arranged marriage and ended up actually liking each other.  Being a first-generation Asian kid in the US, the extent of my sex education from my parents was, “don't have sex before you get married or we will kick you out of the house.” (In case you are wondering, I was already sexually active by the time I received this advice) My career in sexual health began as a peer educator at the University of California-Berkeley, where I dressed up as a giant condom and performed a live demo with a prophylactic and a banana on the steps of Sproul Hall.  After that there was no looking back: sexual health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and HIV prevention have been a steady presence in my life ever since.  After receiving my medical degree from UCLA, I completed residency in Family Medicine at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles.  I then followed my husband to the University of Minnesota-School of Public Health for my master's degree. I possess a deep love for Minnesota, but two winters there was enough for me.  I settled back in California, where I completed a fellowship in Sexually Transmitted Diseases at the UC San Francisco School of Medicine (UCSF).  After all this training it was time to get a real job.  I'm now an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at UCSF.  I also serve as the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center and a Medical Consultant for the Division of STD Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  A few years ago, I decided that my time on this earth would be best spent making people feel better about their sex lives, reducing stigma around STIs, conducting good science and sharing it with the world as best I can.  So I decided to try my hand at writing a book about STIs, Strange Bedfellows, and someone (who is not related to me) thought it was good enough to publish.  Writing a book is similar to pregnancy and childbirth; it's a hell of a lot harder than it looks, and when it's over you need a few years to forget how bad it was before you can think of doing it again.  I live in Berkeley with my husband and two sons.  If I had more time, I would plant vegetables, pickle them, knit and brew bone broth.  I don't do any of those things.  I do practice yoga, and feebly attempt to meditate from time to time, but most of my waking hours are spent parenting and thinking about syphilis.   If you'd like me to come and speak to your group about my book or generally about the topic of sex and STIs or sexual health, please contact me here Buy Strange Bedfellows ------------------------------------------------------------- 1:22 At LOG OFF, we are passionate about lowering social media's impact on mental health while teaching teenage users and their parents about how to navigate the vast inner -workings of life on social media. Celine Bernhardt-Lanier is a Franco-American  high school senior and the CEO of LOG OFF. In 2020, she launched a digital wellbeing initiative by helping teens connect better with others, their true selves, and nature as a means to promote healthier use of technology. A teen leader on the boards of Fairplay and LookUp.live, Celine is a certified digital wellness educator with the Digital Wellness Institute, and a guest student of Stanford University's Digital Wellness course. She is the creator of a digital wellbeing resource for parents, adult professionals and youth; She also is the author of an article on “Nomophobia” and digital wellbeing in the United States and Spain. Celine also is a global speaker and moderator through podcasts, youth summits, and other events for youth and adult audiences worldwide. Aliza Kopans is a first-year at Brown University and a Digital Wellness Youth Activist serving on Fairplay's Action Network Advisory Board and LookUp.Live's Teen Leadership Council. Co-creator of "Dear Parents," a digital well-being resource from teens to parents and co-founder of "Tech(nically) Politics," a youth-led movement aimed at changing governmental regulations of digital spaces, Aliza is dedicated to creating change towards a human—not screen—focused world. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Habitual Excellence
Dr. Patrick Conway, CEO of Care Solutions at Optum

Habitual Excellence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:59


Show notes: https://www.valuecapturellc.com/he52 Welcome to Episode #52 of Habitual Excellence, presented by Value Capture. In today's episode, our guest is Patrick Conway, M.D. who became CEO of Care Solutions at Optum in June 2020. Prior to that, Patrick served as a senior executive in residence at United Health Group and Optum. From 2017-2019, he was President and CEO of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. Previously, Conway served as Deputy Administrator for Innovation and Quality at the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). In this role he also held the position of Director of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI). Conway joined CMS in 2011 as the agency's Chief Medical Officer and served as Principal Deputy Administrator and Acting Administrator, the most senior non-political leader at CMS. In the episode, Patrick discusses the following with host Mark Graban: How and where did you first get introduced to Lean concepts and Lean management? What did Lean mean to you, specifically, as a pediatric physician? When you were Chief Medical Officer for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, you were a speaker at the Catalysis Lean Healthcare Transformation Summit, what messages were you sharing? What was the application of Lean within CMS? What's the role of role of payment systems and incentives as a driver of improvement in safety, quality, and cost? What was the role of CMS, HHS, and the federal government in encouraging improvements to patient safety & quality? In encouraging Lean or related methods? After CMS you went to BCBS of NC, tell me more about the work there. In your role as CEO of Care Solutions at Optum at UnitedHealth Group, what does Lean mean to you? What is your role in this? Tell us about going to the front line with home health care… Bringing Covid vaccination and testing to patients? Final reflection question - what do you wish others would learn sooner than later about leadership / improvement?

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
September 30, 2021 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 52:59


Thursday on the NewsHour, Congress passes a key government funding measure, but Democrats remain divided over critical legislative negotiations. The Centers for Disease Control issues an urgent appeal to pregnant Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19. As Mozambique battles an ISIS-affiliated insurgency, we examine the drivers of the conflict and the few options left for everyday citizens. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Only 32% of pregnant Americans are vaccinated, with divide worsening along racial lines

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 5:20


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its most urgent appeal for pregnant individuals to get the COVID-19 vaccine. New CDC data shows that pregnant people are twice as likely to be hospitalized due to the virus. Just 32% of pregnant Americans are currently vaccinated, and the racial disparities are stark. Amna Nawaz explores the issue with gynecologist Dr. Joia Crear-Perry. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2686 - A New Vision Of Feminism That De-Centers Whiteness w/ Rafia Zakaria

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 72:47


Emma hosts Rafia Zakaria, weekly columnist at The Baffler, to discuss her recent book Against White Feminism: Notes on Disruption, on how feminist thought has been by the ideology of whiteness, allowing a feminism to surface that reinforces capitalism and the exploitation of women of color. Particularly focusing on the late 20th Century brand of girl boss and “lean in” feminism, Emma and Rafia dive into how “trickle-down feminism” acts to center platforms, policies, and ideas generated by and for white women, while silencing women of color as the white saviors know best. Rafia then dives into the important tradition of feminist critiques of race in the US, from Audre Lorde to Kimberle Crenshaw, that helped build the space for feminisms like hers, that critique whiteness and capitalism, also exploring what the absence of this space looks like, as we see in the UK's feminist tradition. They move onto a discussion of how the coverage and response to the withdrawal from Afghanistan have emphasized the problems of white feminism, as Zakaria reflects on the US' first (supposedly) “feminist” war and the divide between the wishes of the feminist leaders in the ear of the White House and the women actually on the ground in Afghanistan, and how this “feminist” war served to reinforce and inflame the gender apartheid in the region and drastically impact the well being and livelihood of countless women. After touching on the historical elements of white feminism, working back to the suffrage movement in the early 20th Century and the frequent attempts to exclude women of color from both the fight and the rights, she and Emma look at the state of white feminism today, and how it works to undermine, silence, and condescend to women of color while bolstering the savior complexes of white folks, and why the development of feminisms such as Black feminism and Islamic feminism serve to strengthen feminism and help it grow in strength and numbers. Emma also continues her coverage of Biden's crumbling agenda as the bipartisan vote looms with Pelosi and Schumer backing all the way down to a “public declaration” on reconciliation from Manchin, after months of him double backing on his previous public statements. And in the Fun Half: Brandon and Emma join Matt as he reflects on his debate with Michael Tracey and what his base gives away about him, while Hayden from Dallas brings his own perspective on Tracey's chat, and they admire the CBS Original “United States of Al” as it carries Aaron Sorkin's torch of “the white savior's wet-dream” political programming. Dave Rubin and Mayor Bronson of Anchorage remind us of the true morals of the Holocaust, from Greta “Adolf” Thunberg the authoritarian threat to taking “never again” to heart when it comes to masks, Jack from Birmingham talks about the international spread of US radical right culture and polarization, and Candace Owens and Greg Gutfeld take on the left's lack of compassion in wanting to house the houseless, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: BetterHelp gives you access to your own fully licensed and accredited therapist via phone, chat, or video. A lot of therapists elsewhere have long waitlists and it can take weeks or months before they can see you… But when you sign up with BetterHelp, they match you with a therapist based on your specific needs, and you'll be communicating with them in less than 24 hours. BetterHelp is giving our audience 10% off their first month when you go to https://betterhelp.com/majorityreport Aura: Think about all of your online accounts, finances and devices. What are you doing to protect them? Because if you're like most people, you're probably reusing your passwords all over the place, and a data breach to any one of those services could create a lot of problems for you. Aura is a new type of security service that protects your online data and devices with one simple subscription. You'll get alerted to fraud and threats FAST like if your online accounts or passwords were leaked online, or if someone tries to open a bank account in your name. With an easy online dashboard and alerts sent straight to your phone, Aura keeps you in control and guides you through solving any issues. So if you want to secure your online presence from hackers and scammers, check out Aura. You'll get 40% off all plans when you go to https://aura.com/majority Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Donate to Jeff from Georgia's GoFundMe here.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: R&B star R. Kelly found guilty of racketeering, immoral acts across state lines

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 4:35


A federal jury in New York found rhythm and blues star R. Kelly guilty of racketeering and crossing state lines for immoral acts. President Joe Biden defended giving booster shots for COVID-19 now that the Centers for Disease Control has approved Pfizer's third dose for certain groups. At least two-thirds of Britain's gas stations are out of fuel due to a shortage of truckers and panic buying. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders