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Podcasts, interviews, lectures, narrated articles and essays, and more. This is the Mises Institute's master online media catalog.

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    • Jan 4, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from Mises Media

    How to Avoid Depressions? Foster Saving and Investment

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022

    Economic depressions are not caused by a strong decline in the money stock, but by a depleted stock of real savings. Original Article: "How to Avoid Depressions? Foster Saving and Investment" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Mark Packard On Entrepreneurial Imagination: You Can't Do Business Without It

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022

    Imagination is the first stage of any value generation journey — starting a development project, enhancing the customer experience, embarking on innovation, or building a business for the next year or the next decade. Imagination might sound like a fuzzy concept, but it's a robust business tool, the engine of the entrepreneurial design process. Mark Packard joins the E4B podcast to put imagination into a business context and describe the possibilities it opens up. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Imagination is central to entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, and to innovation and advance in all aspects of business. We see business through mental models, as a kind of a movie our minds play for us. In this movie, we remember result and experiences from the past (which requires imagination) and we create images of what might have been, or, in the future, what might be. We know these images are not real, but they play through our mental model of business reality. They inform our plans and projects. We imagine cause-and-effect relationships between imagined concepts and ideas, and between actions and outcomes. From new product development to efficient administrative processes, every aspect of business involves — and requires — imagination. We can use imagination in simulating possible results. Not only do we employ imagination in our regular business activity, we also use it for advanced complex modeling. We add new inputs to what we have constructed in our imagination — in the form of “what if” queries - to create a new mental model that's different from the current one: a prospective reality that we can plan for and try to achieve. As we try to achieve that prospective reality, we receive feedback in various forms, which we use adaptively to further adjust and improve the mental model we hold in our imagination. Imagination is dynamic, always changing. Customers are also imagining, and entrepreneurs must imagine what they are imagining. We've highlighted in earlier episodes, the Value Learning Cycle that customers complete in the process of learning what to want and what to value (see Mises.org/E4E_44). The cycle begins with predictive valuation — consumers predicting to themselves how much value they'll experience from the product or service a business is pitching to them. That's imagination at work. If they buy and consume, value is an experience that results — and experience is a mental representation that includes imagination. Then in their post-experience valuation, customers adjust their mental model based on their new value knowledge. Future predictive valuations will be imagined with this updated knowledge. Imagination is central to customer expectations of value and to customers' decision-making. Businesses use three kinds of imagination to make a value proposition. Businesses develop value propositions for customers, utilizing 3 kinds of imagination: creative imagination (imagining the design of a future product or service that will deliver a valued customer experience); empathic imagination (imagining how the customer will feel as a result of the experience); and predictive simulation (imagining what the world will be like after pursuing the contemplated action). Creative imagination is a combination of needs knowledge (what customers want) and technical knowledge (what can be produced with available resources). In both cases, more knowledge is an aid to the imaginative process. Similarly, empathic imagination can benefit from more knowledge about the customer's mental model, developed through relationships and conversations. Predictive simulation is aided by rapid learning from testing and prototyping and developing design artifacts (like landing pages and A/B tests) that enable interim simulations of customer responses. Imagination can't be shared but visions can. When we work on a team or in a firm, it's productive to be aligned on the imagined future at which the group is aiming and is working towards. Strictly speaking, we can't share imagination. Everyone's imagination is subjective and individual. You can't imagine what I'm imagining. What can be shared is a vision, because it can be described in words developed from a shared language. Of course, every individual may interpret the meaning of the words differently, but with repetition, explanation and persuasive presentation, the group can get closer and closer to shared meaning. The vision becomes a cultural artifact — how we think in this firm, what we aim for in this firm, how we see the future in (and of) this firm. Similarly, in selling value propositions to customers, businesses are trying to get those customers to share a vision. We persuade them with storytelling, whether it's in the form of advertising, or PR or social media or the words printed on a package. Rhetorical skills — being able to communicate in a way that enable other people to see and share a vision, and to adapt it to their own vision — are key to successful entrepreneurship. Some people are better at imagination than others — but you can work on the skill set. Many business icons are or have been symbols of great imagination at work, such as Steve Jobs in the past and Elon Musk today. They're better at seeing the future than others. But everyone who understands imagination at the foundational level, as Mark Packard explained it in the podcast, can get better at it, and train others to get better at it, too. Imagination is a simulation run through our mental model based on knowledge we possess. One important step is to improve the knowledge set available for the simulation — better quality knowledge, more accurate knowledge, more detailed or intimate knowledge. More needs knowledge and more technical knowledge will improve creative imagination. Keep up with new technologies and with consumer trends and marketplace developments. More customer knowledge will enhance empathic imagination. Spend more time with customers. Use qualitative research (such as the E4B contextual in-depth interview: Mises.org/E4B_151_PDF) to understand their mental model better, so that the empathic simulations you run through that mental model will improve. Predictive simulation is an act of imagination that improves with learning about what works and what doesn't. Run more tests and new kinds of explorations. Explore, explore, and explore more. Don't take your own predictions too seriously; rather, expect to be wrong in ways you never imagined. Be humble, be adaptive, be agile, and recognize that you do have to predict in order to act. Triangulate with what others are doing because they're imagining too, and they may have more and better knowledge than you. Try to reconstruct their mental models and assess whether they'd be helpful for you. Additional Resources Elon Musk's Imagination (Video): Mises.org/E4B_151_Video "Subjective Value in Entrepreneurship" by Mark Packard and Per Bylund (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_151_Paper "Empathy for Entrepreneurs: How to Understand and Identify Customer Needs and Wants from Their Perspective" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_151_PDF "Mark Packard on The Value Learning Process" (Episode): Mises.org/E4E_44

    New York State Has Imposed New Covid Rituals. This Time There's Some Resistance.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022

    With new mask and vaccine mandates, New York's Governor Kathy Hochul has reaffirmed the state's status as the nation's most zealous practitioner of covid cultism. Original Article: "New York State Has Imposed New Covid Rituals. This Time There's Some Resistance." This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    America's Wars Are Far More Costly than the Pentagon Admits

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022

    The true cost of America's wars—in lost productivity, resources, and opportunity cost—is far higher than even the official numbers of trillions spent on the Pentagon's many failures. Original Article: "America's Wars Are Far More Costly than the Pentagon Admits" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Ron Desantis Plans to Revive Florida's State Militia

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022

    Genuine change will likely come only through muddling through at the state and local level. That kind of work will be instrumental in the creation of decentralized alternatives to our present political order. Original Article: "Ron Desantis Plans to Revive Florida's State Militia" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Paul Gottfried: The End of the Old Right

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021

    The Human Action Podcast wraps up the year with none other than the venerable Professor Paul Gottfried! This is our final show focused on the Old Right, the early 20th century political tradition which animated later libertarian figures like Murray Rothbard. How was this great legacy of peace and freedom on the Right—the Old Republic—lost to Cold Warriors and neoconservatives? Nobody is a better sociologist of American conservatism than Dr. Gottfried, and nobody is more compelling and erudite when it comes explaining how the Right went so horribly wrong (hint: former Commies). Lots of great names discussed, from Rothbard and Nock to Kirk, Strauss, Jaffa, Buckley, Meyer, and even Gore Vidal. Don't miss this show! Additional Resources Read Professor Gottfried's work on Conservatism: Mises.org/Gottfried-Book

    America's Radical Revolution and the Constitutional Coup

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021

    How did a handful of colonies created by the European Old Order establish a unique nation conceived in liberty? In Episode 2 of the Liberty vs. Power Podcast, Patrick Newman and Tho Bishop discuss the lasting tension between the Spirit of 1776 and the Constitution of 1787. The results of America's successful war for independence is one of the most important victories for the cause of liberty, but the forces of power adapted to new opportunities. Patrick and Tho also discuss the career of the infamous Robert Morris, and follow the rise of two men who are determined to mold America into the European nationalist tradition: Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Articles "America's Libertarian Revolution" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_A "Bacon's Rebellion" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_B "How the Constitutional Convention Vastly Expanded the Powers of the President" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_C "The Founding Fathers' Coup d'État" by Albert Jay Nock — Mises.org/LP2_D "Economic Determinism, Ideology, and the American Revolution" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_E "Liberty and Property: the Levellers and Locke" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_F Books Cronyism: Liberty versus Power in Early America, 1607–1849 by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP_Crony Conceived in Liberty, Volumes I-IV by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_G Conceived in Liberty, Volume V by Murray Rothbard, Edited by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP2_H Movie The Patriot — Mises.org/LP2_J To subscribe to the Liberty vs. Power Podcast on your favorite platform, visit Mises.org/LvP.

    Review: The Real Anthony Fauci: Bill Gates, Big Pharma, and the Global War on Democracy and Public Health

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021

    Fauci-funded and Fauci-supported "AIDS research" consisted of running medical experiments on children, among other horrors. Through it all, Fauci profited handsomely with his many "partners" in Big Pharma. Original Article: "Review: The Real Anthony Fauci: Bill Gates, Big Pharma, and the Global War on Democracy and Public Health" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The Fundamentals Point to Inflation That's Much More than "Transitory"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021

    The Fed may slow or eliminate new bond purchases but is not planning to sell. Meanwhile, producer prices have skyrocketed and Americans are consuming more but producing less. Get ready for entrenched price inflation. Original Article: "The Fundamentals Point to Inflation That's Much More than 'Transitory'" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Six Powerful Business Insights From Austrian Economics

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021

    We're highlighting six of our 2021 podcasts that have special value for value creators. We invite you to listen to the special year-end podcast, and to sample each of those we've highlighted here, review the Key Takeaways we provide as a summary for each one, and download the free tools that accompany each podcast. Per Bylund explains that all successful entrepreneurs are Austrians.Episode #143: Mises.org/E4B_143Resource: "Explore and Realize (and Keep Exploring): How Austrian Entrepreneurs Generate Value on the Path to Business Success" (PowerPoint): Mises.org/E4B_143_PPT Mark Packard joins Per Bylund to explain how Austrian Value theory enables entrepreneurs to radically re-shape business thinking for greater value generation.Episode #108: Mises.org/E4B_108Resource: "The Value Generation Business Model" (Video) Mises.org/E4B_108_Video Matt McCaffrey outlines the Austrian approach to business strategy: emergent not planned.Episode #127: Mises.org/E4B_127Resource: "Emergent Strategy Process Map" (PDF) Mises.org/E4B_127_PDF Mark McGrath orients entrepreneurs to purposeful adaptation to emergence via the OODA loop.Episode #138: Mises.org/E4B_138Resource: John Boyd's "OODA Loop Graphic" (PPT) Mises.org/E4B_138_PPT Ulrich Moeller provides the organization design model for the adaptive entrepreneurial firm: it's boss-less.Episode #133: Mises.org/E4B_133Resource: "The Future Of Organization Design" (PDF) Mises.org/E4B_133_PDF Saras Sarasvathy pulls it all together in the form of The Entrepreneurial Method.Episode #131: Mises.org/E4B_131Resource: "Better Lives and a Better Society" (PDF) Mises.org/E4B_131_PDF

    The "Acid Rain" Scare and the Science-Industrial Complex

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021

    "Science" is now indistinguishable from politics. As the "acid rain" hysteria showed back in the 1970s and 1980s, "follow the science" is just a political slogan, unrelated to actual science. Original Article: "The "Acid Rain" Scare and the Science-Industrial Complex" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Raiding the World Bank: Exposing a Fondness for Dictators

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021

    I was astounded at how many despots the World Bank was propping up. Bankrolling tyrants is the equivalent of a Fugitive Slave Act for an entire nation, preventing a mass escape of political victims. Original Article: "Raiding the World Bank: Exposing a Fondness for Dictators" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    They'll Use the Welfare State to Get Compliance on Vaccine Mandates

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021

    Regulatory powers have enabled government agencies to push vaccine mandates in new ways. But the welfare state also offers many ways to "encourage" compliance from nearly everyone. Original Article: "They'll Use the Welfare State to Get Compliance on Vaccine Mandates​" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Price Deflation and the Horrors of Falling TV Prices

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021

    Deflation empowers the citizen by allowing her modest savings to purchase more goods over time. Inflation empowers the state by reducing the size of its enormous debts in real terms—and through the inflation tax. Original Article: "Price Deflation and the Horrors of Falling TV Prices​​" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The West Must Stop Trying To Expand NATO into Ukraine

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021

    The US and NATO must do as little as possible to contribute to the conflict in Ukraine. This especially includes continuing to arm Ukraine and insisting that it has a future in NATO. Original Article: "The West Must Stop Trying To Expand NATO into Ukraine" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Theory and History

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021

    In the first episode of the Liberty vs. Power Podcast, Tho Bishop and Patrick Newman take a deep dive into the intellectual framework of Rothbardian historical analysis. This includes looking at the "conspiracy analyst" as a praxeologist, identifying what personal incentives may motivate individual actors that directly influence government policy. Tho and Patrick also discuss the importance of history as a vital tool in what Murray Rothbard considered "the science of liberty," and look at how battles over issues like Critical Race Theory highlight the ways the progressive left have leveraged historical narrative to strengthen their political agenda. Cronyism: Liberty versus Power in Early America, 1607–1849 by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP1_Crony Important Links "The Conspiracy Theory of History Revisited" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP1_A "Murray Rothbard and Jacksonian Banking" by Leonard Liggio — Mises.org/LP1_B "Coming of Age With Murray" by Hans Hermann Hoppe — Mises.org/LP1_C "The Forgotten Greatness of Rothbard's Preface to Theory and History" by George Pickering — Mises.org/LP1_D "The Fight over Economics Is a Fight over Culture" by Ryan McMaken — Mises.org/LP1_E "How to Do Economic History" by Joseph T. Salerno — Mises.org/LP1_F "The Case for Revisionism (and Against A Priori History)" by Murray N. Rothbard — Mises.org/LP1_J Additional Reading Theory and History: An Interpretation of Social and Economic Evolution by Ludwig von Mises — Mises.org/LP1_G The Economic Mind in American Civilization: 1606-1865, Volume One by Joseph Dorfman — Mises.org/LP1_H To subscribe to the Liberty vs. Power Podcast on your favorite platform, visit Mises.org/LvP.

    Nirvana Economics: How Treating the Real World like an Imaginary Ideal World Leads to Trouble

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021

    A lot of economic policy is based on "economics" which makes assumptions that have very little to do with actual reality. Original Article: "Nirvana Economics: How Treating the Real World like an Imaginary Ideal World Leads to Trouble" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    State-Level Secession Isn't Enough. The States Themselves Must Be Radically Decentralized.

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021

    The benefits of decentralization don't stop at the state level. State governments themselves must be broken up into decentralized confederations that allow for local vetoes, local sovereignty, and regional autonomy. Original Article: "State-Level Secession Isn't Enough. The States Themselves Must Be Radically Decentralized." This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Diana Jones: The New Management Model — Guarding Group Relationships

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021

    Human action lies at the core of the application of Austrian economics to business: how do people act and how can we develop the best understanding of why they act that way. We apply that thinking to customers, and we can also apply it to business organizations. If we are able to answer these questions well, we can develop a profitable business model and an effective management model. Our guest Diana Jones has a distinctive perspective about the management model that's based on understanding people's personal and private experiences rather than their place in the hierarchy or their formal role in the process. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Relationships are fundamental to all systems thinking, and to all business management. Sociometry is a tool to measure relationships. Sociometry measures relationships between people and within groups. The unit of measure is distance. People can feel close to each other and other group members, and this closeness results in certain types of behavior. People can feel distant from each other, resulting in a different kind of behavior. They can also feel close or distant to concepts, like the company mission or the annual plan, and to institutions, like the Board of Directors or the HR department or a firm's way of pursuing innovation. They can feel close or distant to colleagues in a meeting, or to the meeting purpose and agenda. Measuring and understanding relationship distance contribute directly to performance management. Sociometry reveals the disproportionate importance of informal structures over formal structures. It's easy to think of the formal organization chart as the model for managing a firm. Planning descends from higher levels to lower levels, along with instructions on how to implement and what to do. It's not how companies function in reality. What makes companies work is relationships. People form bonds with each other, and the bonds they form shape the work that they do and how they do it. The bonds are often forged via sharing of knowledge and experiences that are private and personal rather than business and process knowledge. Productivity comes from people connecting on shared experiences, so that these personal and private relationships become more relevant to business operations than the formal structures, such as hierarchy. When relationships change, behaviors change, and vice versa. When relationships shift, the whole business system shifts. Formal structures don't work, at least not in the way top management thinks. And the titles associated with hierarchical position can be alienating and toxic to relationships, symbolizing and reinforcing distance rather than closeness. Sociometry helps to focus on these informal relationships and especially on the most important ones that make a big difference: for example, to improve customer service. There's a role for leadership in this system of informal relationships, but it's not the one that generally taught or written about. Leadership can emerge amidst informal relationships, but it doesn't come from authority. Leadership is not to be confused with position in the hierarchy. Leadership entails the communication of vision and helping people understand it, share it, and do the right things to achieve it. The informal structure and its relationships make the formal structure work. The formal structure produces cynicism, anxiety, and reactionary behavior. The informal structure can eliminate these negative tendencies, unleashing untapped talent and enabling and refreshing the firm. Leaders help people as guardians of these informal relationships: monitoring, empathizing, and nurturing. Many people need help working in groups. It's typical practice in business management to assign people to groups: agile teams, project teams, product development teams, functional teams, and so on. It's seldom questioned whether or not individuals understand how to work in groups. Usually, they don't. They're unsure whether to speak up or be compliant, or whether conflict is valued to arrive at consensus or is to be avoided. This is one more element of Diana Jones' thinking and method that tells us that the traditional thinking of business organization and management process is mostly wrong. Hierarchy and formal organizational models don't work, titles and authoritative roles are counter-productive, and reporting relationships are irrelevant when compared to relationship distance / closeness. There's a lot of the traditional management model blueprint we need to scrap. The better route to exceptional team participation and team results is via empathy. In Economics For Business, which is the application of the principles of Austrian economics to business management, we allocate great importance to the use of empathy as a tool, usually in the relationship between a business or brand and its customer. For example, we use empathic diagnosis to understand a customer's dissatisfactions and unmet wants. In Diana Jones's model, empathy is an internal organizational tool. She deploys it in a sophisticated way that identifies four different types of application. Cognitive empathy: imagining and understanding how a person feels and what they might be thinking.Emotional empathy: accurately reading and sharing the feelings of another person, and reflecting on those feelings in a way that helps everyone involved.Compassionate empathy: going beyond understanding to taking action that helps people deal practically with difficult situations about which they're emotional.Group empathy: the capacity to read the emotional tone of a group that's sharing a challenging experience. The core competency is the ability to read people and their emotional tone or state. Diana Jones gives the skill a name: interpersonal perception. It's a skill that can be developed in a learning loop of experience, experimentation, curiosity, and intuition. Additional Resources "Trust-Distance Matrix: Assessing the Cost of Distance in Business Relationships" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_148_PDF Leadership Levers: Releasing The Power Of Relationships For Exceptional Participation, Alignment, and Team Results by Diana Jones: Mises.org/E4B_148_Book Diana-Jones.com

    How Market Freedom Combats Economic Inequality

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021

    Joe Biden thinks that unless there's widespread government intervention in the economy, economic inequality "brews and ferments political discord and basic revolutions." Original Article: "How Market Freedom Combats Economic Inequality" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    End Roe v. Wade: It's Time to Defederalize Abortion Policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021

    California has announced it seeks to become a "sanctuary state" for abortion should the Supreme Court overturn Roe v. Wade. That is, the situation would return much to what it was before 1973. Original Article: "End Roe v. Wade: It's Time to Defederalize Abortion Policy" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Victor Chor: The Journey From Flipping to Global High-Tech Brand Building

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021

    Entrepreneurship is fulfilling and exciting and inspiring. It's fun. It's learning. It's a sense of achievement. It's a journey. Economics For Business loves to spotlight individual journeys to illustrate what's possible, provide learning about how to create and grow opportunities, and to inspire new entrepreneurship. This week, we are joined by Victor Chor, who leads us on a journey from a hobby of flipping on eBay to creating a brand and orchestrating a high-energy global value generation community. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights The journey starts with action — develop your “doing skills”. Victor Chor started his journey via “flipping” on eBay: sourcing items to offer for sale, and using sales feedback (what sells, what doesn't) to determine future offerings. He developed the “doing skill” (as opposed to a “knowing skill” that comes from formal business education) as he made more and more sales. Flipping was a hobby that became a business. What's the benefit? Well, it's fun. There's money profit. There's a sense of achievement. And there's learning. Experimentation is at the heart of entrepreneurial success. How do you find out what works? You experiment. Try this, try that. Learning results. Victor learned the products that sell best. He learned scaling, as a repeatable process yielding increasing returns. He learned the best feedback loops for adaptiveness — in his case inventory management and how to keep it low through accelerated sales. Experimentation is a learning loop: experiment, gather feedback, learn, improve, run more experiments. Adopting customer centricity is a further advance on the journey. To a large extent, Amazon, with its “customer obsession”, led the way in making customer centricity the norm for e-commerce and internet selling. They not only continuously raise the bar for customer service excellence in terms of quality, speed, convenience, availability, and range of choice, they also introduced wide ranging competition between 3rd party sellers on their platform. Competition is a virtuous circle for customer satisfaction: if one firm establishes an advantage or a superior offering to which customers flock, then competitors must improve their offering even more to re-qualify for customer acceptability. In this environment, entrepreneurs learn about continuous improvement and the need to create a unique customer experience that can establish some sustainable advantage. The ability to grow in sales revenues morphs into the design of unique customer experiences. A further advance in the mastery of customer centricity is to engage customers in product and service development — what we've been calling co-creation of value. Through surveys and e-mail marketing and just hanging out and talking with customers, Victor's team has developed an acute understanding of customer wants, needs and preferences. And the technology field lets us all think like customers. Victor points out that he and his team are all customers for the products they take to market. They're all looking for quality and convenience and technological excellence, all experiencing what inconveniences customers, and therefore even better able to serve their market. The next level of advance on the journey is brand building — imagining, designing, assembling, and marketing a differentiated branded offering. There is a transition point where a project can become a brand. A project to develop and deliver a high-function technology product can cross into the branded perception and branded experience area. Branding is the ultimate power in delivering uniqueness. A brand can establish a sustainable and unassailable perception. Victor Chor advanced into brand building through building his community. The people he hired into his growing business has ideas for establishing and growing a brand. Wholesaling and distribution and manufacturing partners contributed both ideas and capacity. Victor developed a very original concept of a brand as a representation of all the people involved together in the venture. His image for a brand is that “it's a ballroom”: set it up and throw a party in which many can participate and all are welcome to help shape new products and the future of the brand. Infinacore is the brand name around which Victor and his team have assembled their community. It's focused on wireless charging and related high-tech convenience: the brand mission refers to “making the wonderful world we live in as simple as plug and play”. This is a brand platform with unlimited future potential, based on how customers define simplicity and plug-and-play in the future, and how they judge what they find to be wonderful. Reaching out more and more widely expands opportunity and opens up new avenues. Early in his journey, Victor utilized the services offered via Alibaba. He made contacts, built up a buddy list, engaged in chat on the platform, and used the network to source products. Many of his contacts in manufacturing and trading companies stayed in touch over time. Some of them started their own venture and their own factories. Long term relationships developed, and links to capability and capacity multiplied and grew stronger. Everyone in this network is on their own journey, feeling what Victor called the “shared vibe” of connection and collaboration. Alibaba proved to be a catalyst for learning — for example, learning a shared language, learning to negotiate, learning to communicate, and learning working practices like minimum order quantities — and an opening of new avenues, such as contacts with factories that could provide white labeling opportunities and technology improvements for original products. Ultimately, Victor was able to develop a leadership skill in entrepreneurial orchestration: pulling together and integrating resources, people and processes in a value network dedicated to the shared pursuit of high-tech brand building. The journey is arriving at a new peak, but never ends. There's a new product / wireless charging system launch coming up for Infinacore. It represents a new peak in both technology and brand, a unique original design with new benefits. The Infinacore community has advanced to a new higher level. The company has refined its vision and mission, not simply as communication, but as a picture of the future around which everyone in the community can gather and in which all can invest their effort and emotional energy. It's ingrained. There‘s shared passion and shared emotion. This is the step that removes the anxiety of uncertainty. When the vision is shared and the mission — what the community does repeatedly every day to make progress towards the vision — is clear, then the future is not a scary unknown, but a goal towards which there is continuous advance. There's no fear. Additional Resources "The Evolution Of A Global High-Tech Brand" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_149_PDF Visit Infinacore.com Follow Infinacore on Instagram: @Infinacore

    Money Supply Growth Is Slowing—That Points to a Slowing Economy

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021

    Easy money monetary policy only serves to weaken and destroy savings and investment. And that means weaker future economic growth. Original Article: "Money Supply Growth Is Slowing—That Points to a Slowing Economy" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The Economy May Be Finally Peaking, and the Fed Won't Help Matters

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021

    The huge amounts of monetary inflation of 2020 have indeed been translated into price inflation in 2021. Yet with the Fed now poised to slow things down, we might find asset inflation could suddenly go into reverse. Original Article: "The Economy May Be Finally Peaking, and the Fed Won't Help Matters" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Equality and Envy

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021

    There are many reasons why activists and intellectuals oppose inequality. Envy is one of them. Original Article: "Equality and Envy" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Biden Has Embraced Trump's Protectionism

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021

    Tariffs and trade controls are little more than tax increases and a chance to further empower a bloated bureaucracy. Not surprisingly, Biden doesn't appear to be enthusiastic about embracing free trade. Original Article: "Biden Has Embraced Trump's Protectionism" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Tom Woods on the Old Right

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021

    We continue our look at leading figures from the Old Right with guest Tom Woods, who helped publish the late Murray Rothbard's The Betrayal of the American Right. Rothbard admired the courageous and revisionist voices promoting the Old Republic, and shared their antagonism for war and economic intervention. Tom and Jeff discuss great essays like Albert J. Nock's "Isaiah's Job" and Frank Chodorov's "The Ethic of the Peddler Class;" the latter a rousing defense of the merchant class against both bureaucrats and the country-club conservatism which would emerge under William F. Buckley. The old antiwar and anti-New Deal works of figures like Menken, Hazlitt, Howard Buffett, Chodorov, and Nock deserve far wider consideration, especially as the "New Right" spirals into the worst of Buckleyite foreign policy and know-nothing economics. You owe it to yourself to explore this great but underappreciated tradition. Additional Resources Read Rothbard's important work: Mises.org/Betrayal Albert J. Nock's "Isaiah's Job:" Mises.org/HAPNock Frank Chodorov's "The Ethic of the Peddler Class:" Mises.org/HAPChodorov Jeff Leskovar on "The Psychology of Human Action:" Mises.org/HAPLeskova

    When Fiat Currency Stops Being Money

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021

    If the private sector does not accept a currency as a general means of payment and a store of value, the currency becomes worthless and ceases to be money. Ultimately, it becomes useless paper. Original Article: "When Fiat Currency Stops Being Money" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Poland's Beef with the EU Shows the Dangers of Political Centralization

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021

    The more the EU micromanages Polish internal affairs and punishes Poland for the simple act of exercising self-determination, more the benefits of leaving the bloc altogether will continue to increase. Original Article: "Poland's Beef with the EU Shows the Dangers of Political Centralization" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    How Governments Seized Control of Money

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021

    It took many centuries for regimes to secure the sort of prestige and power necessary to claim a monopoly over money. From the state's perspective, it has been worth it. Original Article: "How Governments Seized Control of Money" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The DC Sniper Rampage: The Biggest Police Debacle of the Century?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021

    The Washington area was traumatized for weeks by two dimwitted psychopaths who rode around brazenly shooting people from the trunk of their ancient Chevrolet. Sadly, law enforcement officials had apparently met their match. Original Article: "The DC Sniper Rampage: The Biggest Police Debacle of the Century?" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Rural Voters, Guns, and Decentralization Sank the Democrats in Virginia

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021

    A big factor behind Youngkin's electoral success in Virginia: the rural voter and their reaction to Richmond's overreach on guns, schools, and centralized political power. Original Article: "Rural Voters, Guns, and Decentralization Sank the Democrats in Virginia" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Africa's Long History of Trade and Markets

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021

    Capitalism is not a "legacy of colonialism" in Africa. In fact, markets and interregional trade have long been practiced on the continent. And markets today are still the answer to raising standards of living. Original Article: "Africa's Long History of Trade and Markets" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The Bank of Canada's Failed Mission to "Preserve the Value of Money"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021

    The Bank of Canada's stated mission is "to preserve the value of money by keeping inflation low and stable." Yet, the BOC works to inflate away the value of Canadians' purchasing power every single day. Original Article: "The Bank of Canada's Failed Mission to 'Preserve the Value of Money'" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    We've Only Just Begun to See the Benefits of the New Surge in Homeschooling

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021

    For decades, countless parents have been on autopilot when it comes to letting the state manage their child's education. But over the past two years, millions of parents have begun to take control. Original Article: "We've Only Just Begun to See the Benefits of the New Surge in Homeschooling" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    We're All Talking about Inflation, but Deflation May Also Be on the Way

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021

    When prices fall as a result of rising wealth that's good news. But deflation is also good news when it follows the bursting of a financial bubble caused by money creation. Original Article: "We're All Talking about Inflation, but Deflation May Also Be on the Way" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    This Professor Hates the Austrian School. But He Clearly Doesn't Know Much about It.

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021

    Larson's principal targets are Friedman and Hayek, but Mises and Rothbard are not spared. For Larson, promarket economists aren't just wrong. They're bad people. Original Article: "This Professor Hates the Austrian School. But He Clearly Doesn't Know Much about It." This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Murray Rothbard versus the Public Choice School

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021

    James Buchanan thought the state was a voluntary institution. Murray Rothbard, on the other hand, understood the reality of state violence and coercion. Original Article: "Murray Rothbard versus the Public Choice School" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Housing Hubris: Can Home Prices Spiral upward Forever?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021

    The causes of today's skyrocketing housing prices are different in many ways from what happened in 2008. But that doesn't mean we're barreling toward a happy ending. Original Article: "Housing Hubris: Can Home Prices Spiral upward Forever?" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The Critical Need for Independent Media

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021

    Includes an introduction by Tom Woods. Recorded in Lake Jackson, Texas, on December 4, 2021. Ron Paul's two campaigns for president (2008 and 2012) were watershed moments for liberty-minded people around the world. The "Ron Paul Revolution"—centered around his undiluted message of peace, property, and markets—changed the way millions thought about the American empire and the American financial system. Dr. Paul's focus on central banking and foreign policy caught politicians and pundits off guard, forcing them to scramble for explanations of our Middle East policy and Soviet-style central planning at the Fed. Politics in America has not been the same since the "Giuliani moment" and "End the Fed." The Ron Paul Revolution was both a political and cultural phenomenon.

    The Inca Empire: An Indigenous Leviathan State

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021

    So oppressive was the Inca regime that it's no wonder the Spaniards found many enemies willing to help topple the empire. Original Article: "The Inca Empire: An Indigenous Leviathan State" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Joe Weisenthal Thinks Debasing the Dollar Is the Moral Thing to Do

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021

    In one recent thread, Weisenthal mocked the people worried about the falling purchasing power of the US dollar, and claimed that it would be immoral for currency to maintain its value over time. Original Article: "Joe Weisenthal Thinks Debasing the Dollar Is the Moral Thing to Do" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Mohammad Keyhani: Strategic Entrepreneurship — The Smart Practice of Combining Business Theories for Marketplace Success

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021

    Strategic management theories and entrepreneurship theories have diverged in academia. One perspective can't recognize the other. Yet the most promising and successful new business approaches demonstrate an agile combination of both sets of theories. Professor Mohammad Keyhani joins Economics For Business to explain this phenomenon and help us point the way to the future of strategic entrepreneurship. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights. In business school thinking, there is a dichotomy between strategic management and entrepreneurship. In management scholarship, strategic management and entrepreneurship are distinct fields of study. Professor Keyhani calls them “two logics” of business. Both logics have gained legitimacy from their origins in economics. As business theories, they base their arguments on models from the field of economics, which, of course, is older and more mature. By importing thinking from economics, these business disciplines are able to construct generalizable theories (as opposed to, for example, a case study approach). The most famous generalizable theory in strategic management is Michael Porter's five forces framework, which borrowed from industrial organization economics. Most strategic management theories have been based on general equilibrium models of neo-classical economics. Strategic management became a theory of structures and constraints, and of imperfections in equilibrium (such as the concept of competitive advantage). The entrepreneurship discipline has been more varied and diverse and less dominated by economic models. Entrepreneurship scholars look to Austrian economics, which is based on verbal logic rather than mathematical models. But Professor Keyhani, in his Ph.D. dissertation, found an integration route between strategic management and entrepreneurship using the framework of game theory, adding elements of time and dynamics (both critical in Austrian theory) and adding the innovation of computer simulation (to which more and more Austrian economists are open as a way of adding computable algorithmic rigor to verbal logic). He established a way for strategic management and entrepreneurship to communicate with each other. Strategic management is a theory of competitive structures. Strategic management models are based on models of competition among players with similar value propositions, maybe with slightly different cost structures and other small differences, but all considered as competitors to each other. The models look at the nature of the competition, the structure of the competition, and seek insights into why some companies may have advantages over others. Strategy becomes an approach of identifying and building on strengths, about sustaining and managing an existing system, about operations rather than innovation, and about control and prediction. The consequence is a series of blind spots, mostly to do with the dynamics of action over time, the uncertainty that accompanies action, and the learning that results. Entrepreneurship is a theory of dynamic value creation. The question in entrepreneurship is how to create value and how to build a value creation system in the first place. The entrepreneur faces the questions, “Am I creating any value at all? Is anyone going to pay for this innovation and be happy with it? And will I be able to get more customers?” These questions precede the models that strategy and strategic management theory have been based on. Those models start off with the entrepreneur's questions having been answered, so they are not useful at the value creation stage. Based on Austrian economics, the entrepreneurship literature has provided mental tools and mental models for entrepreneurial thinking and an entrepreneurial approach to business. These include the emphasis on subjective value and customer sovereignty, and on uncertainty and unpredictability in business. There is value in action in the face of uncertainty, because it creates new information, which can support better decision-making. That mechanism is totally lacking in the equilibrium models of strategy. Theories of entrepreneurial action to generate learning are useful not only for startups but also for larger companies, to help them think and act more entrepreneurially, and to counter the defensive and anti-innovative thinking of building on strengths and defending position. Managing an existing value generation system can result in losing the long-term perspective of innovation, adding new product lines, taking advantage of opportunities, and potentially building new strengths. “Do both!” The best approach combines strategy and entrepreneurship. Professor Keyhani argues that, ideally, firms think strategically and act entrepreneurially, and he recognizes that, in the real world of practitioners, this is what businesses do. He uses blockchain as an example. No company can say that they have an existing strength in blockchain because it's a new technology and the business concepts that utilize it are only just emerging. It's a level playing field. Are there any advantages a company could have? Maybe a company has a lot of computer scientists and mathematicians. That might be a slight strength. But getting into blockchain businesses is an entrepreneurial action, largely different than building on strengths. The approach to innovation we support here at Economics For Business is “Explore And Expand”, and Professor Keyhani sees a good match between the explore-expand dichotomy and the entrepreneurship-strategy dichotomy. Exploration is a blind spot in strategic management theory and modeling — there is pretty much no exploration in the five forces framework or the RBV (resource-based view) framework. Exploration — acting for the learning value to open up options for more things that can be done in the future — is the entrepreneurial way of thinking. Effectuation (covered in episode #131: Mises.org/E4B_131) is another form of entrepreneurial logic. It recognizes that the entrepreneur faces so much uncertainty that it may not be possible to set specific objectives. But the entrepreneur knows that they want to do something, that they have knowledge and resources and relationships, and that they may be able to create some value from them. Effectuation is the “fuzzy front end” of value creation. Another way to combine entrepreneurship and strategy is speed of learning. The general capability to be more adaptive than competition, to go through the learning cycle faster, is a dynamic capability that can be strategic. Competitive moats in the software world. Is the structure-and-constraints approach of strategic management useless in the digital era we live in? Sustainable competitive advantage seems to be inapplicable when anyone can write software (or download it from Github), and access hosting and storage at scale from AWS. But in fact, software entrepreneurs do think in terms of competitive advantage. The modern term for it is “moats”. Venture capitalists look favorably on businesses that can surround themselves with a moat to keep out competition. The most discussed moat is network effects. This concept did not come from the neo-classical economics equilibrium models, but from the dynamic analysis of more users coming in to join existing users. The five forces framework suggests that advantages lie either in cost or differentiation, but a network effects advantage can be both. Two-sided platforms with two-sided network effects add even more complexity. It's strategic to achieve that status, but the theory did not emanate from traditional strategic management thinking. Professor Keyhani introduces the next entrepreneurial strategy breakthrough: generativity. We talked in episode #104 (see Mises.org/E4B_104) about the new phenomenon of digital businesses identified by Professor Keyhani: generativity. Achieving generativity confers significant competitive advantage for any entrepreneurial firms who can develop it through technology. It's an advantage that is not identified by existing strategy theories. Generativity can be thought of as the automation of open innovation. Products and services can be designed to offer features that enable outsiders to innovate with them, and these outside innovations benefit the company. For example, the Google Pixel smartphone and the Apple iPhone are generative products or generative systems. With the tools these firms provide in the phones, outside developers can create new apps, that they offer on the Pixel or iPhone platform for other outsiders to use. The app developers make money, and so do Google and Apple, both from sales of outsider-developed apps in their app stores, and from in-app purchases. Google and Apple are not utilizing their own knowledge — they don't know the problem the app is solving, or even who developed it or where they are. They don't have to make the solution, don't have to take the risk, and don't have to pay salaries or development costs. Yet they profit from the innovation. It's a huge competitive advantage for these two entrepreneurial companies. Additional Resources "The Strategic Management Model versus the Entrepreneurial Model" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_147_PDF "The Logic Of Strategic Entrepreneurship" by Mohammad Keyhani: Mises.org/E4B_147_Paper1 "Was Hayek an ACE?" by Nicolaas J. Vriend: Mises.org/E4B_147_Paper2 The ultimate list of tools for entrepreneurs—"Entrepreneur Tools" by Mohammad Keyhani: Mises.org/E4B_147_Tools

    Lessons from the Ron Paul Revolution

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021

    Recorded in Lake Jackson, Texas, on December 4, 2021. Ron Paul's two campaigns for president (2008 and 2012) were watershed moments for liberty-minded people around the world. The "Ron Paul Revolution"—centered around his undiluted message of peace, property, and markets—changed the way millions thought about the American empire and the American financial system. Dr. Paul's focus on central banking and foreign policy caught politicians and pundits off guard, forcing them to scramble for explanations of our Middle East policy and Soviet-style central planning at the Fed. Politics in America has not been the same since the "Giuliani moment" and "End the Fed." The Ron Paul Revolution was both a political and cultural phenomenon.

    Why Don't Police Unions Protect Whistleblowers?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021

    It is clear that there are situations in which the unions' interests diverge from the public's interest in transparency and good policing. But the unions' interests also often diverge from the interests of individual members. Original Article: "Why Don't Police Unions Protect Whistleblowers?" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    The Heroic Draft Dodgers of the American Civil War

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021

    Not all of America's young men of the North bought into the federal propaganda. When the federal government was forced to resort to a military draft, many Americans resisted. Original Article: "The Heroic Draft Dodgers of the American Civil War" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

    Welcome and Introductory Remarks

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021

    Recorded in Lake Jackson, Texas, on December 4, 2021. Ron Paul's two campaigns for president (2008 and 2012) were watershed moments for liberty-minded people around the world. The "Ron Paul Revolution"—centered around his undiluted message of peace, property, and markets—changed the way millions thought about the American empire and the American financial system. Dr. Paul's focus on central banking and foreign policy caught politicians and pundits off guard, forcing them to scramble for explanations of our Middle East policy and Soviet-style central planning at the Fed. Politics in America has not been the same since the "Giuliani moment" and "End the Fed." The Ron Paul Revolution was both a political and cultural phenomenon.

    The Ron Paul Doctrine

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021

    Recorded in Lake Jackson, Texas, on December 4, 2021. Ron Paul's two campaigns for president (2008 and 2012) were watershed moments for liberty-minded people around the world. The "Ron Paul Revolution"—centered around his undiluted message of peace, property, and markets—changed the way millions thought about the American empire and the American financial system. Dr. Paul's focus on central banking and foreign policy caught politicians and pundits off guard, forcing them to scramble for explanations of our Middle East policy and Soviet-style central planning at the Fed. Politics in America has not been the same since the "Giuliani moment" and "End the Fed." The Ron Paul Revolution was both a political and cultural phenomenon.

    End the Fed! How Ron Paul Made Monetary Policy an Issue

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021

    Includes an introduction by Jeff Deist. Recorded in Lake Jackson, Texas, on December 4, 2021. Ron Paul's two campaigns for president (2008 and 2012) were watershed moments for liberty-minded people around the world. The "Ron Paul Revolution"—centered around his undiluted message of peace, property, and markets—changed the way millions thought about the American empire and the American financial system. Dr. Paul's focus on central banking and foreign policy caught politicians and pundits off guard, forcing them to scramble for explanations of our Middle East policy and Soviet-style central planning at the Fed. Politics in America has not been the same since the "Giuliani moment" and "End the Fed." The Ron Paul Revolution was both a political and cultural phenomenon.

    Jim Bovard on H.L. Mencken

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021

    HL Mencken is the writer you need to read immediately. He was savagely brilliant, caustic, and witty, but also prolific across genres in ways almost unthinkable of journalists today. His skill with the English language was virtually unmatched in the 20th century, as was his deep and abiding contempt for utopian statism in any form. And his broadsides against two world wars were incredibly courageous at the time. Our great friend Jim Bovard joins the show to discuss Mencken's work, his complicated elitism, his Old Right politics and social views, and the magnificent pleasure of reading this master. "H.L. Mencken, The Joyous Libertarian" by Murray N. Rothbard: Mises.org/Joyous Mencken Wikiquote: Mises.org/HLQ

    That Bangladesh Mask Study!

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021

    Our guest is Ben Recht, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley, who recently got hold of and analyzed the raw data from the Bangladesh cluster randomized control trial of masking which made headlines in September. SHOW NOTES​ Ben Recht: Twitter and webpageBen Recht's recent blog post: Revisiting the Bangladesh Mask RCTMichel Accad Why N-of-1 is EnoughEp. 97 with Peter Klein on “Evidence-Based Economics: What the Doctor Ordered?“Watch the episode on the Accad & Koka Report YouTube channel

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