Podcasts about american south

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Abolition Today
Femme Fatale Frenemies (REPLAY)

Abolition Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 118:00


While Max is away, Yusuf will be joined by guest co-hosts Tag Harmon and Jean'na Kenney. We'll have a candid discussion about the forgotten and most times ignored history that 40% of the enslavers were white women. We'll share an interview with Prof. Stephanie Jones-Rogers about her book, They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South. We'll see how this history shaped the erasure of black women from the Women's Suffrage Movement and Voting Rights. We're talking about Femme Fatale Frenemies: A Relationship That Started on the Plantation and perpetuates to this day. As always, we'll have powerful music clips, and we'll bring the ancestors' words back to life for a new generation with our Bridging The Gap segment.

The Prepper Broadcasting Network
Herbal Medicine for Preppers: Herbs for Allergies

The Prepper Broadcasting Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 36:14


Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone ElseRead About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9RHis other works include:The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5Christian Medicine, History and Practice:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTBHerbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture Peoplesouthernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.htmlAlso available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guidehttp:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.htmlHis weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.comHis weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbsHe offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325

Don't Ask Tig
Roy Wood Jr.

Don't Ask Tig

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 39:11


Comedian, actor, and late night comedy correspondent Roy Wood Jr. talks to Tig about who might take over as host of The Daily Show, and discusses why late night talk shows need to evolve. Tig and Roy combine their personal knowledge to advise a tourist about the best places to visit in the American South, but they disagree about the question of whether a bride or the groom's mother gets the last word about a wedding dance. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp (go to Betterhelp.com/TIG for 10% off the first month of online therapy), Rocket Money (Go to RocketMoney.com/tig and start canceling unwanted subscriptions today), Indeed (go to Indeed.com/TIG to start hiring now; terms and conditions apply; cost per application pricing not available to everyone), Shopify (go to Shopify.com/tig to sign up for a free trial and start selling online today), FightCamp (go to FightCamp.com/tig to sign up and receive your free gifts with purchase), and Showtime's The L Word: Generation Q (go to sho.com/the-l-word-generation-q to check out the new season). Need advice? Submit your question for Tig at dontasktig.org/contact.

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
Edible South - The Cultural Politics of Food and Cuisine

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 55:41


Edible South -The Cultural Politics of Food and Cuisine AgBioFEWS Cohort 3 Organized Guest Panel with: ›  Marcie Cohen Ferris, PhD, Interim Director, Center for the Study of the American South at UNC-Chapel Hill ›  Michaela DeSoucey, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology at NC State Abstracts Marcie Cohen Ferris' work examines how evolving food cultures in North Carolina and the larger American South speak to the region's complex history, culture(s), and struggle for racial justice, food equity, food sovereignty embodied in the powerful voices of a contemporary generation of farmers, food makers and creators, activists, scholars, policy makers, consumers, and more. Michaela DeSoucey's exploration of ‘food culture' requires us to acknowledge the complexity and paradoxes of the memories, desires, emotions, and debates that ‘flavor' different ingredients and dishes. She will discuss what a cultural sociological lens brings to the contemporary study of food culture, focusing on boundaries and ethics as markers of social differentiation. Related links: Edible North Carolina Center for the Study of the American South Speaker Bios Marcie Cohen Ferris (@ferrismcf), editor of Edible North Carolina, is a writer and educator whose work explores the American South through its foodways and the southern Jewish experience. She is interim director of UNC's Center for the Study of the American South and an emeritus professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she serves as an editor for Southern Cultures, a quarterly journal of the history and cultures of the U.S. South. Ferris's books include The Edible South: The Power of Food and the Making of an American Region and Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South. She is a co-editor of Jewish Roots in Southern Soil: A New History. In 2018, Ferris received the Craig Claiborne Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Foodways Alliance. Michaela DeSoucey is Associate Professor of Sociology at North Carolina State University. She is a qualitative, cultural sociologist whose research examines cultural and moral markets, consumer-focused organizations, and the politics of authenticity and risk, specifically around food. She is the award-winning author of Contested Tastes: Foie Gras and the Politics of Food, published by Princeton University Press (2016), as well as numerous articles on food-related topics from bean-to-bar chocolate to craft beer to food halls to peanut allergy. GES Colloquium is jointly taught by Drs. Jen Baltzegar and Dawn Rodriguez-Ward, who you may contact with any class-specific questions. Colloquium will be held in-person in Poe 202, as well as live-streamed via Zoom. Please subscribe to the GES newsletter and Twitter for updates. Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

The Poetry Magazine Podcast
Ashley M. Jones and Marcus Wicker on Afrofuturism, OutKast, and Living in the American South

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 43:12


This week, Ashley M. Jones speaks with Marcus Wicker about a project he began early in the pandemic while looking for sources of calm in books and music. Many of these were space-influenced—OutKast's album ATLiens, Robert Hayden's poem “American Journal”—and Wicker began exploring what an extraterrestrial who lands in Atlanta in 2020 would think of America and the way humans treat one another. We'll hear two poems from this project, “Dear Mothership,” and “How did you learn to speak English?” which appear in Poetry's December 2022 issue. Like much of Wicker's poetry, these pieces incorporate popular culture and music references alongside unflinching observations and exciting wordplay.

The Best Biome
[S2E4] Lifestyles of the Secretive and Soggy (Henslow's Sparrow)

The Best Biome

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 53:25


Episode Notes What does the American South and the Tallgrass Prairie have in common? Their grasslands support an elusive little grassland specialist that the old timey ornithologists roast way too hard: the Henslow's Sparrow. In this episode we explore the beloved longleaf pine savannas of the southern US, and ask why a little grassland sparrow who hates trees chooses to spend its winters among the longleaf pines. Photos and more are at our site. Primary Sources: Harrington, Tim; Miller, Karl; Parks, Noreen. 2013. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the longleaf pine savanna. Science Findings 152. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 6 p. Herkert, J. R., P. D. Vickery, and D. E. Kroodsma (2020). Henslow's Sparrow (Centronyx henslowii), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (P. G. Rodewald, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.henspa.01 Contact Website Facebook Twitter info@grasslandgroupies.org This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Travel Tales by AFAR
Learning to Sing in Vienna, the City of Music

Travel Tales by AFAR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 23:34


In this episode, we're traveling to Vienna with AFAR contributing writer Emma John.  Emma has music in her blood. She grew up in London playing classical violin, and about a decade ago, she traveled to the American South to learn to play bluegrass, a journey she chronicled in a story for AFAR, and in her book Wayfaring Stranger. But in all those years, she avoided singing, for reasons you'll soon hear about. And then one day, she decided to do something about it. So she booked a trip to Vienna, a city renowned for its singing talent—and the place where her musical odyssey begins.  Listen to Emma's books Wayfaring Stranger: https://geni.us/GWtmOcb Self Contained: https://geni.us/JUcD Follow Emma online Instagram: @foggymountaingal Twitter: @em_john Her website: https://emmajohn.com/ The story that inspired it all: https://www.afar.com/magazine/viennas-moment-learning-to-love-opera-in-the-city-of-music

The Prepper Broadcasting Network
Herbal Medicine for Preppers: Herbs for Pain PART 2

The Prepper Broadcasting Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 36:28


Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone ElseRead About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R His other works include:The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5 Christian Medicine, History and Practice:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture Peoplesouthernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.htmlAlso available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25 Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guidehttp:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936 The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.html His weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.comHis weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbsHe offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325

People Places Planet Podcast
Reimagining the Role of Biogas for Environmental Justice

People Places Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 38:44


The renewable fuel standard program seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, grow the United States' renewable fuels sector, and lessen our reliance on imported oil. At its most basic, the program requires a certain volume of renewable fuel to replace or reduce petroleum-based transportation fuel, heating oil, or jet fuel. Yet, the program fails to confer benefits to all Americans, and in some respects, it may even disproportionally burden disenfranchised communities. How can we leverage renewable energy standards to better aid vulnerable communities so that energy systems advance rather than thwart environmental justice? In this episode, ELI's Georgia Ray talks to two people who have been following the issue closely: Carlos Garcia, a Federal Policy Manager at Bloom Energy, and Joel Porter, a Policy Manager for CleanAIRE NC.  Interested in learning more? Contact Carlos Garcia via email; check out Bloom Energy's webpage on biogas and its resources on energy sources for animal agriculture; and/or read about the issues Joel Porter describes in these articles on: wood pellets, marginalized communities in the American South, biogas and methane leaks, hog farms, and manure wastewater. Also check out Joel's blog on the cost of livestock factory farming in North Carolina.  ★ Support this podcast ★

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
'By Hands Now Known' shines light on cold cases of lynchings and racial violence

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 42:24


In the summer of 2020, when the murder of George Floyd was igniting protests in Minneapolis and around the country, it occurred to Margaret A. Burnham that “George Floyd” was a common-sounding name. Burnham is the founder and director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at the Northwestern University School of Law, where she is also a professor. She went into the CRRJ's archive of Jim Crow racial homicides, and a search revealed another George Floyd. The account of the jailhouse death of this first George Floyd appeared in a 1945 letter to Thurgood Marshall from a Floridian chapter of the NAACP. Floyd, a 46-year-old turpentine worker, was arrested in St. Augustine, Florida, accused of public intoxication. When Floyd protested a second search of his person at the local jail, he was beaten to death by the arresting officer. Aside from a coroner's report, Burnham and her colleagues could find no evidence that the officer who killed Floyd in 1945 faced any investigation. “It was not entirely unforeseeable that we would find this name-fellow in our archive, pleading to be exhumed and put in conversation with the iconic inspiration for what would come to be known as the 2020 ‘reckoning' with Black death at the hands of the state,” writes Burnham in her new book,By Hands Now Known: Jim Crow's Legal Executioners. “We count, and contest, because George Floyd counted. Number 1. And Number 2.” InBy Hands Now Known, Burnham looks at three interrelated themes: The way the federal government enabled the subjugation of Black Americans through both action and inaction; the relationship between racial violence and political power; and community resistance to Jim Crow that predates the “official” Civil Rights Era from 1954 to 1967. Burnham's first chapter examines one such area that shows elements of all three themes: Rendition cases gave attorneys the opportunity to try to prevent the extradition of Black men and women to jurisdictions where they faced lynching or other violence. William Henry Huff, a Black lawyer in Illinois, successfully handled 77 such cases, Burnham found in her research. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, Burnham discusses her book with the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles. She describes talking to family members of victims who never thought the full story of their loved ones' deaths would ever be told; the way shopkeepers or bus drivers were essentially deputized to violently enforce rules against Black people in the South; and how her work in 1990s South Africa with truth and reconciliation efforts impacts her view of the potential for reparations efforts in the United States. She also contends that the lack of enforcement made the kidnapping of Black people by white people not a criminal offense, regardless of what laws were on the books. Burnham, along with her partner Melissa Nobles of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has also made her research available through the CRRJ's Burnham-Nobles Digital Archive. Primary source documents such as FBI interviews, news articles and jury inquests into anti-Black killings in the American South during the early to mid-20th century are available, as well as more than 900 case pages for individual incidents.

ABA Journal: Modern Law Library
'By Hands Now Known' shines light on cold cases of lynchings and racial violence

ABA Journal: Modern Law Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 42:24


In the summer of 2020, when the murder of George Floyd was igniting protests in Minneapolis and around the country, it occurred to Margaret A. Burnham that “George Floyd” was a common-sounding name. Burnham is the founder and director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at the Northwestern University School of Law, where she is also a professor. She went into the CRRJ's archive of Jim Crow racial homicides, and a search revealed another George Floyd. The account of the jailhouse death of this first George Floyd appeared in a 1945 letter to Thurgood Marshall from a Floridian chapter of the NAACP. Floyd, a 46-year-old turpentine worker, was arrested in St. Augustine, Florida, accused of public intoxication. When Floyd protested a second search of his person at the local jail, he was beaten to death by the arresting officer. Aside from a coroner's report, Burnham and her colleagues could find no evidence that the officer who killed Floyd in 1945 faced any investigation. “It was not entirely unforeseeable that we would find this name-fellow in our archive, pleading to be exhumed and put in conversation with the iconic inspiration for what would come to be known as the 2020 ‘reckoning' with Black death at the hands of the state,” writes Burnham in her new book,By Hands Now Known: Jim Crow's Legal Executioners. “We count, and contest, because George Floyd counted. Number 1. And Number 2.” InBy Hands Now Known, Burnham looks at three interrelated themes: The way the federal government enabled the subjugation of Black Americans through both action and inaction; the relationship between racial violence and political power; and community resistance to Jim Crow that predates the “official” Civil Rights Era from 1954 to 1967. Burnham's first chapter examines one such area that shows elements of all three themes: Rendition cases gave attorneys the opportunity to try to prevent the extradition of Black men and women to jurisdictions where they faced lynching or other violence. William Henry Huff, a Black lawyer in Illinois, successfully handled 77 such cases, Burnham found in her research. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, Burnham discusses her book with the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles. She describes talking to family members of victims who never thought the full story of their loved ones' deaths would ever be told; the way shopkeepers or bus drivers were essentially deputized to violently enforce rules against Black people in the South; and how her work in 1990s South Africa with truth and reconciliation efforts impacts her view of the potential for reparations efforts in the United States. She also contends that the lack of enforcement made the kidnapping of Black people by white people not a criminal offense, regardless of what laws were on the books. Burnham, along with her partner Melissa Nobles of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has also made her research available through the CRRJ's Burnham-Nobles Digital Archive. Primary source documents such as FBI interviews, news articles and jury inquests into anti-Black killings in the American South during the early to mid-20th century are available, as well as more than 900 case pages for individual incidents.

ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network
'By Hands Now Known' shines light on cold cases of lynchings and racial violence

ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 42:24


In the summer of 2020, when the murder of George Floyd was igniting protests in Minneapolis and around the country, it occurred to Margaret A. Burnham that “George Floyd” was a common-sounding name. Burnham is the founder and director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at the Northwestern University School of Law, where she is also a professor. She went into the CRRJ's archive of Jim Crow racial homicides, and a search revealed another George Floyd. The account of the jailhouse death of this first George Floyd appeared in a 1945 letter to Thurgood Marshall from a Floridian chapter of the NAACP. Floyd, a 46-year-old turpentine worker, was arrested in St. Augustine, Florida, accused of public intoxication. When Floyd protested a second search of his person at the local jail, he was beaten to death by the arresting officer. Aside from a coroner's report, Burnham and her colleagues could find no evidence that the officer who killed Floyd in 1945 faced any investigation. “It was not entirely unforeseeable that we would find this name-fellow in our archive, pleading to be exhumed and put in conversation with the iconic inspiration for what would come to be known as the 2020 ‘reckoning' with Black death at the hands of the state,” writes Burnham in her new book,By Hands Now Known: Jim Crow's Legal Executioners. “We count, and contest, because George Floyd counted. Number 1. And Number 2.” InBy Hands Now Known, Burnham looks at three interrelated themes: The way the federal government enabled the subjugation of Black Americans through both action and inaction; the relationship between racial violence and political power; and community resistance to Jim Crow that predates the “official” Civil Rights Era from 1954 to 1967. Burnham's first chapter examines one such area that shows elements of all three themes: Rendition cases gave attorneys the opportunity to try to prevent the extradition of Black men and women to jurisdictions where they faced lynching or other violence. William Henry Huff, a Black lawyer in Illinois, successfully handled 77 such cases, Burnham found in her research. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, Burnham discusses her book with the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles. She describes talking to family members of victims who never thought the full story of their loved ones' deaths would ever be told; the way shopkeepers or bus drivers were essentially deputized to violently enforce rules against Black people in the South; and how her work in 1990s South Africa with truth and reconciliation efforts impacts her view of the potential for reparations efforts in the United States. She also contends that the lack of enforcement made the kidnapping of Black people by white people not a criminal offense, regardless of what laws were on the books. Burnham, along with her partner Melissa Nobles of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has also made her research available through the CRRJ's Burnham-Nobles Digital Archive. Primary source documents such as FBI interviews, news articles and jury inquests into anti-Black killings in the American South during the early to mid-20th century are available, as well as more than 900 case pages for individual incidents.

Haunted Hospitality
Ep 85 – Frights in the Wild 2: Was It a Ghost or Just a Guy?

Haunted Hospitality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 66:41


It's time for the second installment of our weirdest, most nature-y mini series: Frights in the Wild! We're back with a vengeance and exploring six creepy stories that traverse the American South, from Florida beaches to North Carolina backroads to the Ozark Mountains.Expect stories of a girl without a face, a metamorphosing raccoon/dog/bobcat/human/not-horse, an Abraham Lincoln-ish man chilling in the woods, an eerie possible doppelgänger situation, a sad Boy Scout in two places at once, and a creepy-as-all-get-out, grinning man with white hair and black eyes—who people keep seeing!But first, Zoey is here with a Something Spooky about her trip to Zak Bagans' The Haunted Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada.Sources: https://hauntedhospitality.wordpress.com/2022/11/15/ep-85-frights-in-the-wild-2-was-it-a-ghost-or-just-a-guyVisit us on Social Media! Stay Spooky!

The Habit
Sean (of the South) Dietrich Talks to Strangers

The Habit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 42:52


Sean Dietrich is a blogger, a storyteller, a musician, a novelist, a memoirist, and a columnist. On his blog, Sean of the South, he posts a new story every day about the people and places of the American South. His new book is You Are My Sunshine: A Story of Love, Promises, and a Really Long Bike Ride. In this episode, Sean and Jonathan Rogers talk about paying attention, talking to strangers, and the unconventional path that took Sean to his work as a writer.Support the show: https://therabbitroom.givingfuel.com/memberSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Saturday Morning with Jack Tame
Catherine Raynes: The Passenger and Matthew Perry's memoir

Saturday Morning with Jack Tame

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 5:30


The Passenger – Cormac McCarthy   Traversing the American South, from the garrulous bar rooms of New Orleans to an abandoned oil rig off the Florida coast, The Passenger is a breathtaking novel of morality and science, the legacy of sin, and the madness that is human consciousness.  Friends, Lovers and the Big Terrible Thing – Matthew Perry  'Hi, my name is Matthew, although you may know me by another name. My friends call me Matty. And I should be dead.'  So begins the riveting story of acclaimed actor Matthew Perry, taking us along on his journey from childhood ambition to fame to addiction and recovery in the aftermath of a life-threatening health scare. Before the frequent hospital visits and stints in rehab, there was five-year-old Matthew, who travelled from Montreal to Los Angeles, shuffling between his separated parents; fourteen-year-old Matthew, who was a nationally ranked tennis star in Canada; twenty-four-year-old Matthew, who nabbed a coveted role as a lead cast member on the talked-about pilot then called Friends Like Us. . . and so much more.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southerner: Conversations with Interesting Southerners

Sean Dietrich is a columnist, novelist, and podcast host, known for his commentary on life in the American South. His work has appeared in Newsweek, Southern Living, Garden & Gun, The Tallahassee Democrat, Good Grit, South Magazine, Alabama Living, the Birmingham News, Thom Magazine, The Mobile Press Register, among others. He has authored fourteen books, and is the creator of the Sean of the South Podcast. For more information on Sean, visit https://seandietrich.com/ or follow him on Instagram at @seanofthesouth. For more episodes of Southerner, visit https://madesouth.com/ or follow Christopher Thomas on Instagram at @madesouth.

Karat Juice
Become a CHAMPION | LIFE CHANGING Quotes of Muhammad Ali | Motivation

Karat Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 32:42


In this episode, I'm sharing some of the most empowering quotes from Muhammad Ali. These quotes will help you to become find your inner confidence & purpose to reach your goals in life. If you're looking for inspirational quotes to help you on your journey to success, then you've come to the right video! Muhammad Ali is a champion, not only in the ring, where he was a three-time Heavyweight Champion of the world... but in everything he does. These quotes will help you to become the best you can be. Remember, it's never too late to become a champion! Who was Muhammad Ali? Muhammad Ali, original name Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., (born January 17, 1942, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.—died June 3, 2016, Scottsdale, Arizona), American professional boxer and social activist. Ali was the first fighter to win the world heavyweight championship on three separate occasions; he successfully defended this title 19 times. Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., grew up in the American South in a time of segregated public facilities. His father, Cassius Marcellus Clay, Sr., supported a wife and two sons by painting billboards and signs. His mother, Odessa Grady Clay, worked as a household domestic. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/karatjuicepod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/karatjuicepod/support

New Books Network
David Silkenat, "Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:47


They worked Virginia's tobacco fields, South Carolina's rice marshes, and the Black Belt's cotton plantations. Wherever they lived, enslaved people found their lives indelibly shaped by the Southern environment. By day, they plucked worms and insects from the crops, trod barefoot in the mud as they hoed rice fields, and endured the sun and humidity as they planted and harvested the fields. By night, they clandestinely took to the woods and swamps to trap opossums and turtles, to visit relatives living on adjacent plantations, and at times to escape slave patrols and escape to freedom. Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South (Oxford UP, 2022) is the first comprehensive history of American slavery to examine how the environment fundamentally formed enslaved people's lives and how slavery remade the Southern landscape. Over two centuries, from the establishment of slavery in the Chesapeake to the Civil War, one simple calculation had profound consequences: rather than measuring productivity based on outputs per acre, Southern planters sought to maximize how much labor they could extract from their enslaved workforce. They saw the landscape as disposable, relocating to more fertile prospects once they had leached the soils and cut down the forests. On the leading edge of the frontier, slavery laid waste to fragile ecosystems, draining swamps, clearing forests to plant crops and fuel steamships, and introducing devastating invasive species. On its trailing edge, slavery left eroded hillsides, rivers clogged with sterile soil, and the extinction of native species. While environmental destruction fueled slavery's expansion, no environment could long survive intensive slave labor. The scars manifested themselves in different ways, but the land too fell victim to the slave owner's lash. Although typically treated separately, slavery and the environment naturally intersect in complex and powerful ways, leaving lasting effects from the period of emancipation through modern-day reckonings with racial justice. Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 2021) and co-editor of Steeped in a Culture of Violence: Murder, Racial Injustice, and Other Violent Crimes in Texas, 1965–2020 (Texas A&M University Press, scheduled Spring 2023). Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in the American South
David Silkenat, "Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:47


They worked Virginia's tobacco fields, South Carolina's rice marshes, and the Black Belt's cotton plantations. Wherever they lived, enslaved people found their lives indelibly shaped by the Southern environment. By day, they plucked worms and insects from the crops, trod barefoot in the mud as they hoed rice fields, and endured the sun and humidity as they planted and harvested the fields. By night, they clandestinely took to the woods and swamps to trap opossums and turtles, to visit relatives living on adjacent plantations, and at times to escape slave patrols and escape to freedom. Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South (Oxford UP, 2022) is the first comprehensive history of American slavery to examine how the environment fundamentally formed enslaved people's lives and how slavery remade the Southern landscape. Over two centuries, from the establishment of slavery in the Chesapeake to the Civil War, one simple calculation had profound consequences: rather than measuring productivity based on outputs per acre, Southern planters sought to maximize how much labor they could extract from their enslaved workforce. They saw the landscape as disposable, relocating to more fertile prospects once they had leached the soils and cut down the forests. On the leading edge of the frontier, slavery laid waste to fragile ecosystems, draining swamps, clearing forests to plant crops and fuel steamships, and introducing devastating invasive species. On its trailing edge, slavery left eroded hillsides, rivers clogged with sterile soil, and the extinction of native species. While environmental destruction fueled slavery's expansion, no environment could long survive intensive slave labor. The scars manifested themselves in different ways, but the land too fell victim to the slave owner's lash. Although typically treated separately, slavery and the environment naturally intersect in complex and powerful ways, leaving lasting effects from the period of emancipation through modern-day reckonings with racial justice. Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 2021) and co-editor of Steeped in a Culture of Violence: Murder, Racial Injustice, and Other Violent Crimes in Texas, 1965–2020 (Texas A&M University Press, scheduled Spring 2023). Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books in Early Modern History
David Silkenat, "Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:47


They worked Virginia's tobacco fields, South Carolina's rice marshes, and the Black Belt's cotton plantations. Wherever they lived, enslaved people found their lives indelibly shaped by the Southern environment. By day, they plucked worms and insects from the crops, trod barefoot in the mud as they hoed rice fields, and endured the sun and humidity as they planted and harvested the fields. By night, they clandestinely took to the woods and swamps to trap opossums and turtles, to visit relatives living on adjacent plantations, and at times to escape slave patrols and escape to freedom. Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South (Oxford UP, 2022) is the first comprehensive history of American slavery to examine how the environment fundamentally formed enslaved people's lives and how slavery remade the Southern landscape. Over two centuries, from the establishment of slavery in the Chesapeake to the Civil War, one simple calculation had profound consequences: rather than measuring productivity based on outputs per acre, Southern planters sought to maximize how much labor they could extract from their enslaved workforce. They saw the landscape as disposable, relocating to more fertile prospects once they had leached the soils and cut down the forests. On the leading edge of the frontier, slavery laid waste to fragile ecosystems, draining swamps, clearing forests to plant crops and fuel steamships, and introducing devastating invasive species. On its trailing edge, slavery left eroded hillsides, rivers clogged with sterile soil, and the extinction of native species. While environmental destruction fueled slavery's expansion, no environment could long survive intensive slave labor. The scars manifested themselves in different ways, but the land too fell victim to the slave owner's lash. Although typically treated separately, slavery and the environment naturally intersect in complex and powerful ways, leaving lasting effects from the period of emancipation through modern-day reckonings with racial justice. Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 2021) and co-editor of Steeped in a Culture of Violence: Murder, Racial Injustice, and Other Violent Crimes in Texas, 1965–2020 (Texas A&M University Press, scheduled Spring 2023). Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in African American Studies
David Silkenat, "Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:47


They worked Virginia's tobacco fields, South Carolina's rice marshes, and the Black Belt's cotton plantations. Wherever they lived, enslaved people found their lives indelibly shaped by the Southern environment. By day, they plucked worms and insects from the crops, trod barefoot in the mud as they hoed rice fields, and endured the sun and humidity as they planted and harvested the fields. By night, they clandestinely took to the woods and swamps to trap opossums and turtles, to visit relatives living on adjacent plantations, and at times to escape slave patrols and escape to freedom. Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South (Oxford UP, 2022) is the first comprehensive history of American slavery to examine how the environment fundamentally formed enslaved people's lives and how slavery remade the Southern landscape. Over two centuries, from the establishment of slavery in the Chesapeake to the Civil War, one simple calculation had profound consequences: rather than measuring productivity based on outputs per acre, Southern planters sought to maximize how much labor they could extract from their enslaved workforce. They saw the landscape as disposable, relocating to more fertile prospects once they had leached the soils and cut down the forests. On the leading edge of the frontier, slavery laid waste to fragile ecosystems, draining swamps, clearing forests to plant crops and fuel steamships, and introducing devastating invasive species. On its trailing edge, slavery left eroded hillsides, rivers clogged with sterile soil, and the extinction of native species. While environmental destruction fueled slavery's expansion, no environment could long survive intensive slave labor. The scars manifested themselves in different ways, but the land too fell victim to the slave owner's lash. Although typically treated separately, slavery and the environment naturally intersect in complex and powerful ways, leaving lasting effects from the period of emancipation through modern-day reckonings with racial justice. Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 2021) and co-editor of Steeped in a Culture of Violence: Murder, Racial Injustice, and Other Violent Crimes in Texas, 1965–2020 (Texas A&M University Press, scheduled Spring 2023). Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in History
David Silkenat, "Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:47


They worked Virginia's tobacco fields, South Carolina's rice marshes, and the Black Belt's cotton plantations. Wherever they lived, enslaved people found their lives indelibly shaped by the Southern environment. By day, they plucked worms and insects from the crops, trod barefoot in the mud as they hoed rice fields, and endured the sun and humidity as they planted and harvested the fields. By night, they clandestinely took to the woods and swamps to trap opossums and turtles, to visit relatives living on adjacent plantations, and at times to escape slave patrols and escape to freedom. Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South (Oxford UP, 2022) is the first comprehensive history of American slavery to examine how the environment fundamentally formed enslaved people's lives and how slavery remade the Southern landscape. Over two centuries, from the establishment of slavery in the Chesapeake to the Civil War, one simple calculation had profound consequences: rather than measuring productivity based on outputs per acre, Southern planters sought to maximize how much labor they could extract from their enslaved workforce. They saw the landscape as disposable, relocating to more fertile prospects once they had leached the soils and cut down the forests. On the leading edge of the frontier, slavery laid waste to fragile ecosystems, draining swamps, clearing forests to plant crops and fuel steamships, and introducing devastating invasive species. On its trailing edge, slavery left eroded hillsides, rivers clogged with sterile soil, and the extinction of native species. While environmental destruction fueled slavery's expansion, no environment could long survive intensive slave labor. The scars manifested themselves in different ways, but the land too fell victim to the slave owner's lash. Although typically treated separately, slavery and the environment naturally intersect in complex and powerful ways, leaving lasting effects from the period of emancipation through modern-day reckonings with racial justice. Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 2021) and co-editor of Steeped in a Culture of Violence: Murder, Racial Injustice, and Other Violent Crimes in Texas, 1965–2020 (Texas A&M University Press, scheduled Spring 2023). Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
David Silkenat, "Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:47


They worked Virginia's tobacco fields, South Carolina's rice marshes, and the Black Belt's cotton plantations. Wherever they lived, enslaved people found their lives indelibly shaped by the Southern environment. By day, they plucked worms and insects from the crops, trod barefoot in the mud as they hoed rice fields, and endured the sun and humidity as they planted and harvested the fields. By night, they clandestinely took to the woods and swamps to trap opossums and turtles, to visit relatives living on adjacent plantations, and at times to escape slave patrols and escape to freedom. Scars on the Land: An Environmental History of Slavery in the American South (Oxford UP, 2022) is the first comprehensive history of American slavery to examine how the environment fundamentally formed enslaved people's lives and how slavery remade the Southern landscape. Over two centuries, from the establishment of slavery in the Chesapeake to the Civil War, one simple calculation had profound consequences: rather than measuring productivity based on outputs per acre, Southern planters sought to maximize how much labor they could extract from their enslaved workforce. They saw the landscape as disposable, relocating to more fertile prospects once they had leached the soils and cut down the forests. On the leading edge of the frontier, slavery laid waste to fragile ecosystems, draining swamps, clearing forests to plant crops and fuel steamships, and introducing devastating invasive species. On its trailing edge, slavery left eroded hillsides, rivers clogged with sterile soil, and the extinction of native species. While environmental destruction fueled slavery's expansion, no environment could long survive intensive slave labor. The scars manifested themselves in different ways, but the land too fell victim to the slave owner's lash. Although typically treated separately, slavery and the environment naturally intersect in complex and powerful ways, leaving lasting effects from the period of emancipation through modern-day reckonings with racial justice. Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 2021) and co-editor of Steeped in a Culture of Violence: Murder, Racial Injustice, and Other Violent Crimes in Texas, 1965–2020 (Texas A&M University Press, scheduled Spring 2023). Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

The Prepper Broadcasting Network
Herbal Medicine for Preppers: Herbs for Pain part 1

The Prepper Broadcasting Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 29:40


Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone ElseRead About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R His other works include:The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5 Christian Medicine, History and Practice:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture Peoplesouthernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.htmlAlso available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25 Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guidehttp:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936 The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.html His weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.comHis weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbsHe offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325

HISTORY This Week
Two Shawnee Brothers Hold Their Ground

HISTORY This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 39:38


November 7, 1811. William Henry Harrison and his troops are camped near the Wabash river. They've been told to keep the peace—but Harrison wants land, and he's come here to try and take it. Less than a mile away is a flourishing Native American settlement called Prophetstown. It's led by Tecumseh, a skilled diplomat and warrior, and his brother Tenskwatawa, whose religious teachings have attracted indigenous people from across the newly-formed United States. Before dawn, these two sides will be in a battle that ends with one of their settlements burned to the ground. How did a future president exploit this conflict to catapult himself all the way to the White House? And how did Prophetstown become the most powerful alliance of Native American military, spiritual, and social forces to ever take on the US government?Thanks to our guests, Chief Ben Barnes; Peter Cozzens, author of Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Heroic Struggle for America's Heartland; and Stephen Warren, author of The Shawnees and Their Neighbors, 1795-1870. Chief Barnes and Stephen Warren are co-editors of the book, Replanting Cultures: Community-Engaged Scholarship in Indian Country. Look out for Cozzens' forthcoming book, A Brutal Reckoning: Andrew Jackson, The Creek Indians, and the Epic War for the American South. Thanks also to Douglas Winiarski, author of Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in Eighteenth-Century New England; and to Adam Jortner, author of The Gods of Prophetstown: The Battle of Tippecanoe and the Holy War for the American Frontier. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Read Between the Lines
Blake Sanz discusses his book, "The Boundaries of Their Dwelling"

Read Between the Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 31:26


Molly talks with author Blake Sanz about his book, "The Boundaries of Their Dwelling". Order "The Boundaries of Their Dwelling" from an independent bookseller at this link: https://bookshop.org/a/10588/9781609388072 or at Amazon right here https://amzn.to/3NzgHQl About The Boundaries of Their Dwelling Moving between the American South and Mexico, these stories explore how immigrant and native characters are shaped by absent family and geography. A Chilanga teen wins a trip to Miami to film a reality show about family while pining for the American brother she's never met. A Louisiana carpenter tends to his drug-addicted son while rebuilding his house after a slew of hurricanes. A New Orleans ne'er-do-well opens a Catholic-themed bar in the wake of his devout mother's death. A village girl from Chiapas baptizes her infant on a trek toward the U.S. border. In the collection's second half, we follow a Veracruzan-born drifter, Manuel, and his estranged American son, Tommy. Over decades, they negotiate separate nations and personal tragicomedies on their journeys from innocence to experience. As Manuel participates in student protests in Mexico City in 1968, he drops out to pursue his art. In the 1970s, he immigrates to Louisiana, but soon leaves his wife and infant son behind after his art shop fails. Meanwhile, Tommy grows up in 1980s Louisiana, sometimes escaping his mother's watchful eye to play basketball at a park filled with the threat of violence. In college, he seeks acceptance from teammates by writing their term papers. Years later, as Manuel nears death and Tommy reaches middle age, they reconnect, embarking on a mission to jointly interview a former riot policeman about his military days; in the process, father and son discover what it has meant to carry each other's stories and memories from afar. About Blake Sanz Blake Sanz, originally from Louisiana, has published fiction in American Short Fiction, Ecotone, Puerto del Sol, Joyland, and elsewhere. A graduate of the MFA program at Notre Dame, his writing has garnered recognition and awards from Zoetrope: All-Story, Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sozopol Fiction Seminars in Bulgaria, and other conferences and residencies. He teaches writing at the University of Denver.

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
208: Southern Hip Hop, Siestas, Poker, and Why You Should Never Give a Sword to a Man that Can't Dance with Alondo Brewington

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 69:25


Alondo Brewington starts off reflecting on his recent travels across the continent of Africa, going on safari in Tanzania, and experiencing Kigali, Rwanda—one of the cleanest and safest cities in the world.  He then takes us on his journey growing up in the American South and the role of music in his upbringing. He shares how hip hop's evolution impacted him along the way—from discovering breakdancing to first hearing Rakim to the emergence of Outkast in Atlanta.  He also reflects on his college experience in Atlanta, including the emergence of Club 112, the rise and fall of Freaknik, and the night Tupac bumped into him just hours before getting into a shootout in 1993.  He then talks about his experiences studying abroad, developing his love for travel, and transitioning into the digital nomad lifestyle.  He shares his love for martial arts, the historical and cultural significance of Capoeira, and explains why you should never give a sword to a man that can't dance.  He also talks about his love for playing poker, trading options, and performing stand up comedy as he travels the world.  He explains his approach to “risk” and reflects on common themes that tie his wide-ranging interests together.  He also talks about hosting the Cocoa Nomad Podcast, shares his tips and philosophy on pursuing financial freedom, and reflects on what travel means to him.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAIALBLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Cubism and Trompe l'Oeil, Mark Steinmetz

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 84:25


Episode No. 574 features curator Emily Braun and artist Mark Steinmetz. With Elizabeth Cowling, Braun is the co-curator of "Cubism and the Trompe L'Oeil Tradition" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The exhibition considers cubist works by Georges Braque, Juan Gris and Pablo Picasso in the context of the centuries-long trompe l'oeil painting tradition. In addition to dozens of major cubist works, the exhibition includes paintings by Samuel van Hoogstraten, William Harnett, and more. "Cubism" is on view through January 22, 2023. It is accompanied by an outstanding catalogue that was published by the museum. Indiebound and Amazon offer it for $43-50. Steinmetz is included in "Reckonings and Reconstructions: Southern Photography from the Do Good Fund" at the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia. The Do Good Fund is a Columbus, Ga.-based charity that collects and makes available to museums photography of the American South made from the 1950s to the present. The exhibition, which includes artists such as Jill Frank, Baldwin Lee, Deborah Luster, Gordon Parks, and RaMell Ross. It's at the GMOA through January 8, 2023. Steinmetz also contributed a portfolio titled "Irina & Amelia" to the new, 70th anniversary issue of Aperture magazine. The issue also features work by John Edmonds, Hannah Whitaker, Dayanita Singh, and others, and is available from Aperture for $25. Air date: November 3, 2022.

The Prepper Broadcasting Network
Herbal Medicine for Preppers - Herbs for Frostbite

The Prepper Broadcasting Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 16:03


Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone ElseRead About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else:http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9RHis other works include:The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5Christian Medicine, History and Practice:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTBHerbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture Peoplesouthernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.htmlAlso available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guidehttp:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.htmlHis weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.comHis weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbsHe offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325

The Cheats Movement Podcast
Award-Winning Author Howard Bryant Talks Rickey Henderson with Cheats (BBM Crossover)

The Cheats Movement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 31:40


On this special edition of Mixtape Talk, Cheats visits with award-winning author and journalist Howard Bryant about his latest book, Rickey: The Life and Legend of an American Original. The book is fascinating as Howard digs deep into topics like the great migration of Black from the American South to the west coast. He talks about the explosion of money in baseball during the late 70s and 80s; he talks about the treatment of Black players, such as Rickey, by white owners, such as George Steinbrenner; Howard talks about it all. And by doing so, he paints a picture of one of the most dynamic, misunderstood, and legendary players the game has ever seen: Rickey Henderson. Buckle up...Mixtape Talk 007 featuring Howard Bryant is a doozy. As always, please subscribe to the Black Baseball Mixtape on social media. Reach out to me on Twitter and IG. Thank you for your fantastic support.

Steel Magnolias - Holding on to the good of The South
Sean Dietrich LIVE at The Franklin Theatre

Steel Magnolias - Holding on to the good of The South

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 39:28


Here in the American South, we have a question we ask one another. Who are your people? That means, who is your family? We like to know how we connect to one another.  Our guest today is not a part of our biological family, but we do feel like he is OUR people.   Sean Dietrich is a writer, storyteller, musician, lover of bloodhounds, Atlanta Braves fan and Andy Griffith enthusiast.  His perspective on the simple, yet important things in life, is so refreshing. Meet us at the table to hear more from our friend, Sean of the South. This episode was recorded live at The Franklin Theatre (Franklin, TN) on Oct. 30, 2022. We are excited to discuss with Sean his new book, You Are My Sunshine, as well as other fun stories from life as a southerner.  New release: "You Are My Sunshine" - https://amzn.to/3U5QR8M Autobiography: "Will The Circle Be Unbroken?" - https://amzn.to/3DKpyv7 Subscribe to Sean's daily column: https://seandietrich.com Connect with Us! Join our Patreon Community of supporters for a Southern Sister Chat BONUS episode, perks and SWAG: https://www.patreon.com/steelmagnolias Sign up for our mailing list: https://mailchi.mp/e3cef217a5e7/sweetnews  Instagram @SteelMagnoliasPodcast   Episode Transcript: https://steelmagnoliaspodcast.com/episode/sean-dietrich-live-at-the-franklin-theatre    

Smacked Raw Podcast
Indy Wrestling Gazette w/ The Machine Bryce Maddox| Botched Spots and Chair Shots | Vol1 issue3

Smacked Raw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 16:33


  The Machine Bryce Maddox joins Will to discuss the world of Indy wrestling. From CCW to wrestling abroad in Spain, they try and touch on as much as they can while Bryce does his cardio. From working the territories in the American South, to cutting his teeth on the “old school” ways. The current CCW Champion is an avid gym goer and even deep dives a little into his musical choices.   Out Now on All Platforms!!!

The Chauncey DeVega Show
Ep. 371: Baynard Woods Reflects on What Happens When You Confront and Try to Disown Whiteness

The Chauncey DeVega Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 95:22


Baynard Woods is the author of the new book Inheritance: An Autobiography of Whiteness. His essays and other writing have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, and many other publications. In this conversation, he reflects on the meaning of whiteness in American society and questions of denial, privilege, and responsibility. Baynard also explains how white racial identity has been created, sustained, and protected through a type of conspiratorial silence and violence across generations. Baynard Woods shares what happened when he tried to disown whiteness by confronting his own family's role in maintaining the white supremacist terror regime in the antebellum and postbellum American South. In the end, confronting and attempting to disown one's inheritance of whiteness comes at a great personal cost – one that Baynard Woods was not fully prepared for. Chauncey DeVega counsels balance and perspective about the upcoming 2022 midterms. To that end, Chauncey advises pro-democracy Americans that the war against neofascism and Trumpism and their related evils is going to very long and difficult regardless of what happens on November 8. Sustaining our collective humanity is going to be essential for victory. There is also a Halloween themed “Easter egg” at the end of this episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show. WHERE CAN YOU FIND ME? On Twitter: https://twitter.com/chaunceydevega On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chauncey.devega My email: chaunceydevega@gmail.com HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW? Via Paypal at ChaunceyDeVega.com Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thechaunceydevegashow

The Business
Documentary filmmaker absorbs the American South's history in ‘Descendant'

The Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 28:32 Very Popular


Documentary filmmaker Margaret Brown was born and raised in Mobile, Ala., and has had an absorbing interest in the American South, including her 2004 documentary “Be Here to Love Me: A Film About Townes Van Zandt.” But only while filming “The Order of Myths,” in 2008, she learned of the last known slave ship brought to the United States in the late 1850s, and the nearby community former slaves formed. “I didn't remember learning about that in school. That was the first time I had heard of the Clotilda [ship] or Africatown,” she states. That was the moment when she came across the topic of her newest project, the film “Descendant.” Now, Brown shares how she created partnerships to make the film, and got Questlove, Netflix and the Obamas to become involved in it. But first, Kim Masters banters with Matt Belloni about Warner Bros. Discovery's unpredictable decision to hire filmmaker James Gunn and producer Peter Safran to run the DC Universe. 

Peachtree Corners Life LIVE
A Conversation with Ruwa Romman on a Broad Range of Issues and Being Muslim in America

Peachtree Corners Life LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 50:06


Ruwa Romman is the Democratic nominee running to represent Georgia State House District 97. During our conversation, she addresses the most pressing issues for the residents of Berkeley Lake, Duluth, Norcross, and Peachtree Corners, and growing up Muslim in the American South.

The Prepper Broadcasting Network
Herbal Medicine for Preppers: Herbs for Kidneys and Bladder

The Prepper Broadcasting Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 29:33


Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone ElseRead About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R His other works include:The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5 Christian Medicine, History and Practice:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.htmlAvailable for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture Peoplesouthernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.htmlAlso available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25 Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guidehttp:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936 The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.html His weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.comHis weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbsHe offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325

New Books in American Studies
Dan Immergluck, "Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 36:52


Atlanta, the capital of the American South, is at the red-hot core of expansion, inequality, and political relevance. In recent decades, central Atlanta has experienced heavily racialized gentrification while the suburbs have become more diverse, with many affluent suburbs trying to push back against this diversity. Exploring the city's past and future, Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta (U California Press, 2022) tracks these racial and economic shifts and the politics and policies that produced them. Dan Immergluck documents the trends that are inverting Atlanta's late-twentieth-century “poor-in-the-core” urban model. New emphasis on capital-driven growth has excluded low-income people and families of color from the city's center, pushing them to distant suburbs far from mass transit, large public hospitals, and other essential services. Revealing critical lessons for leaders, activists, and residents in cities around the world, Immergluck considers how planners and policymakers can reverse recent trends to create more socially equitable cities. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. He is the author of Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River (Lexington, 2022). His general area of study is on media representations of people and place at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on his next book where he conducted research on an annual canoeing and kayaking event that takes place on the Upper Mississippi River. To learn more about Michael O. Johnston you can go to his website, Google Scholar, Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Dan Immergluck, "Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 36:52


Atlanta, the capital of the American South, is at the red-hot core of expansion, inequality, and political relevance. In recent decades, central Atlanta has experienced heavily racialized gentrification while the suburbs have become more diverse, with many affluent suburbs trying to push back against this diversity. Exploring the city's past and future, Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta (U California Press, 2022) tracks these racial and economic shifts and the politics and policies that produced them. Dan Immergluck documents the trends that are inverting Atlanta's late-twentieth-century “poor-in-the-core” urban model. New emphasis on capital-driven growth has excluded low-income people and families of color from the city's center, pushing them to distant suburbs far from mass transit, large public hospitals, and other essential services. Revealing critical lessons for leaders, activists, and residents in cities around the world, Immergluck considers how planners and policymakers can reverse recent trends to create more socially equitable cities. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. He is the author of Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River (Lexington, 2022). His general area of study is on media representations of people and place at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on his next book where he conducted research on an annual canoeing and kayaking event that takes place on the Upper Mississippi River. To learn more about Michael O. Johnston you can go to his website, Google Scholar, Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Sociology
Dan Immergluck, "Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 36:52


Atlanta, the capital of the American South, is at the red-hot core of expansion, inequality, and political relevance. In recent decades, central Atlanta has experienced heavily racialized gentrification while the suburbs have become more diverse, with many affluent suburbs trying to push back against this diversity. Exploring the city's past and future, Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta (U California Press, 2022) tracks these racial and economic shifts and the politics and policies that produced them. Dan Immergluck documents the trends that are inverting Atlanta's late-twentieth-century “poor-in-the-core” urban model. New emphasis on capital-driven growth has excluded low-income people and families of color from the city's center, pushing them to distant suburbs far from mass transit, large public hospitals, and other essential services. Revealing critical lessons for leaders, activists, and residents in cities around the world, Immergluck considers how planners and policymakers can reverse recent trends to create more socially equitable cities. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. He is the author of Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River (Lexington, 2022). His general area of study is on media representations of people and place at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on his next book where he conducted research on an annual canoeing and kayaking event that takes place on the Upper Mississippi River. To learn more about Michael O. Johnston you can go to his website, Google Scholar, Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Dan Immergluck, "Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 36:52


Atlanta, the capital of the American South, is at the red-hot core of expansion, inequality, and political relevance. In recent decades, central Atlanta has experienced heavily racialized gentrification while the suburbs have become more diverse, with many affluent suburbs trying to push back against this diversity. Exploring the city's past and future, Red Hot City: Housing, Race, and Exclusion in Twenty-First-Century Atlanta (U California Press, 2022) tracks these racial and economic shifts and the politics and policies that produced them. Dan Immergluck documents the trends that are inverting Atlanta's late-twentieth-century “poor-in-the-core” urban model. New emphasis on capital-driven growth has excluded low-income people and families of color from the city's center, pushing them to distant suburbs far from mass transit, large public hospitals, and other essential services. Revealing critical lessons for leaders, activists, and residents in cities around the world, Immergluck considers how planners and policymakers can reverse recent trends to create more socially equitable cities. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. He is the author of Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River (Lexington, 2022). His general area of study is on media representations of people and place at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on his next book where he conducted research on an annual canoeing and kayaking event that takes place on the Upper Mississippi River. To learn more about Michael O. Johnston you can go to his website, Google Scholar, Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Sunlight
Vision: Running for Office

Sunlight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 48:33


Today, I'm interviewing 2 candidates running for office here in Western North Carolina. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara is a North Carolinian, Christian minister, founding director of the Campaign for Southern Equality (CSE), and mother of 3. Service and faith are the driving forces in her work, from teaching in prisons to founding an organization to advocate for LGBTQ equality across the Deep South. By showing up—especially in small towns—and telling the stories of families, Jasmine's organization (CSE) helped win marriage equality in North Carolina and Mississippi. She is running to unseat Republican Madison Cawthorne for US Congress.    Maggie Ullman was Asheville's first Sustainability Director. Her leadership has resulted in over $5 million of new grant dollars to communities in the American South who work with their local government to address climate change equitably. She is a candidate for Asheville City Council.     Together, both Maggie and Jasmine want to bring people together to incite change and protect what's precious.    In this episode, Maggie, Jasmine and I talk about why local elections are so important, how you can get involved, and how even the tax code is proof that representation matters.    Also mentioned in today's episode:    Jasmine's background and vision  Maggie's background and vision Why the tax code represents only the people who were in the room when it was passed Why local elections matter and what city government does  County level politics and what it includes  How priorities translate from local to national politics  How you can get involved in your local area to get candidates you care about elected If you enjoyed this episode, please rate, review and share it!    Links:   Connect with Jasmine and Maggie:  Jasmine's website: https://www.jasmineforcongress.com/ Maggie's website: https://www.maggie4avl.com/

Real Talk
Ep. 57 - Real Talk Round Up - Mark & Jon

Real Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 67:56


Happy Monday, friends! Today, we're testing out a new type of feedback episode, calling it the Real Talk Round Up. Joining us for this is Reformed Perspective's Executive Director, Mark Penninga and editor, Jon Dysktra. We're grateful for their thoughtful perspectives on these last number of episodes. Also included in this new format is the brief coverage of a certain topic (this weeks being teacher shortages) and a book review/recommendation. Be sure to let us know what you think of this style of feedback. We are always open to new ideas. Contact us via social media or email us at reformedrealtalk@gmail.com  0:00 - Intro 3:00 - Youth Culture Recap 8:40 - New Reformation Catechism on Human Sexuality Recap 13:35 - CanRC and URC Relations Recap As mentioned, If you have a voracious reader in your house, and they've already worked their way through Tolkien's the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, and Lewis' Narnia, what's next? Well, Jon Dykstra had on offer a top 10 list of fantasy books that, while not all explicitly Christian, do seem to come from a Christian worldview.    10. The Sword Bearer - by John White - written by the author when his kids request more Narnia stories. It is imitative, kids going to another world, though updated in that instead of going through a wardrobe, they enter via a TV.    9 .Wings of Dawn by Sigmund Brouwer - Thomas is a young boy seeking to win back his castle by using the technologies that might seem like magic in England, but which were in use at that time elsewhere in the world (like gunpowder, or kites).   8. Warlord of Nin - Stephen Lawhead - well written sword and knights story set in another realm. Lawhead had some clear Christian undertones to this earlier stories that get lost in this later book, so go with early Lawhead.   7. Urchin of the Riding Stars by M. L McAllister - squirrels with swords. Need I say more?   6. The Rise and Fall of Mount Majestic by Jennifer Trafton - a fun romp, with all sorts of inventive ingredients including:   • Piles of poison-tongued jumping turtles • A castle built on top of a mountain that rises and falls once each day. • A tyrant twelve-year-old pepper-hoarding king 5 Brave Ollie Possum by Ethan Nicolle - the author is one of the guys behind Babylon Bee. A kid who is scared of everything can't get his parents to believe him that there is something on the roof outside his window. But he's right. Kind of a terrifying premise, but the comic hijinks soon take over, with the scared boy getting turned into a possum, a creature that faints whenever it is scared.    4. Dawn of Wonder by Jonathan Renshaw - a nephew made me and most of our church read it. And no one has regretted doing so. Only downside is that book 2 has been more than 5 years in the waiting.    3. The Green Ember by S.D. Smith - rabbits with swords. 'Nuff said.   2. Bark of the bog owl by Jonathon Rogers - loosely and hilariously riffing off the story of David and Saul. But in the American South, if it had castles. It's been described as a Mark Twain crossed with C.S. Lewis.    1. On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness by Andrew Peterson - sat on shelf how can person so go at music really also be good at writing too? What are the odds? But this is fantastic, rating right up there with Lewis and Tolkien. Three children contending with the Fangs of Dang, Lizard Creatures that have conquered the land of Skree, and their ruler Gnag the nameless.    A BIG THANKS TO OUR OFFICIAL SPONSOR, TRIVAN! WE APPRECIATE YOU HELPING US MAKE THIS CONVERSATION POSSIBLE. BE SURE TO CHECK THEM OUT AT WWW.TRIVAN.COM  To keep up with the podcast, check out our website: https://www.realtalkpodcast.ca/ Follow us on Facebook and Instagram for updates, clips, and more!  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ReformedRealTalk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/reformedrealtalk/ We'd love to hear from you. Please send us your questions, comments, or other feedback at reformedrealtalk@gmail.com. Thanks for listening! If you liked what you heard, please share this podcast with your family and friends!

Strange History
Episode 35: Haint Ya Scared

Strange History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 27:02


This episode is another monsterous one! You'll learn about Haints, the Boo Hag, creepy vampire creatures that prowl the American South. You'll hear a spooky story wrote by Brad, learn about paint, and find out how your local newspaper can keep monsters from stealing your soul. Be sure to check to check out out friends over on The Cryptid Code: https://anchor.fm/cryptid-code/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/strange-history/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/strange-history/support

Closer Look with Rose Scott
Intersectional studies at Georgia State University; Record executive Jermaine Dupri

Closer Look with Rose Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 52:13


On this edition of Closer Look: Georgia State University has a grant to support intersectional studies. An upcoming forum will focus on the American South and Black feminism. And we revisit a conversation with record executive, music producer and artist, Jermaine Dupri.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Black Neighborhoods | Day 12 | Where was the first Black school in the American South?

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 56:09


Day 12 The Address: 16 Penn Circle, St Helena Island, SC 29920 The Story: At this moment, it stands. The very first school established in America for freed African children... It was founded before the dust of the Civil War settled. ... beneath the sway of Spanish moss on great oak trees, ... on a 47-acre campus on the island of Saint Helena, off the coast of South Carolina. This is the land of the great Gullah people. Africans who, through centuries of oppression, have held strong to their culture, language, and beautiful customs. Today, walk with us through the dirt roads of time on a voyage to the Penn School, a bold institution founded by Quakers and led by a Free Black Woman. This story will leave your heart filled with hope and your mind ignited with a new blueprint for liberation.

Holy City Sinner Radio
Episode 61 - Suzanne Pollak with the Charleston Literary Festival

Holy City Sinner Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 28:24


This week's guest is Suzanne Pollak, the head of development for the Charleston Literary Festival, a celebration of literature featuring renowned authors in unique settings. This year's festival runs from November 4th to November 13th, 2022. The event was founded in 2017 as a result of collaboration between the historic Charleston Library Society in the US and the Charleston Trust in the UK. The Library Society is the oldest cultural organization in the American South, and the Trust is home to the rural meeting place of the renowned Bloomsbury Group of writers, artists and intellectuals. To learn more about the event, visit charlestonliteraryfestival.com. This episode's music is by Tyler Boone (tylerboonemusic.com). The episode was produced by LMC Soundsystem.

The ShannyPants Show
Mallary Hope American Singer-Songwriter

The ShannyPants Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 62:02


Enjoy my conversation with Mallary Hope where we talk about her beginnings in the music industry and some highlights along the way. We also have some good laughs talking about our families and crazy kiddos. "Mallary Hope is a Georgia-born storyteller who uses music to convey her experiences, and the world around her. At 9-years old, Hope – aptly named by her mom – began to understand that music is at the core of her being, as the sweet sound of Karen Carpenter's voice on The Carpenters' “Superstar” brought her to tears. A short couple of years later, Amy Grant's “El Shaddai” was the first song she learned to play on the guitar, followed by Dolly Parton's “Coat of Many Colors.” Mallary's childhood church provided her the first stage where she was able to share her captivating vocals with others. With supporting parents willing to give their daughter every opportunity they could, they moved the family to Nashville, where it didn't take long for Hope to meet plenty of supporters in the music industry, and for her to make it to one of the most legendary stages the world over – the Grand Ole Opry – where she has performed many times since. “I love Jesus and Johnny Cash,” shares Hope, exemplifying everything about her personal faith she wants to share with the world, along with her deep love and appreciation of music that knows no boundaries. “People want to be encouraged. My songs evoke emotion. It is my desire that my songs can bring meaning and clarity to the various things we all go through in our lives.”Hope, who has been covered by The New York Times, performed on Fox & Friends, receives airplay from both Christian and Country radio stations, and whose music videos are supported by CMT, has toured alongside artists as varied as Skillet and Darius Rucker, and has written songs for fellow artists like Lauren Alaina, Danny Gokey, Sara Evans, and Faith Hill. And as for the beginning of one of her life's dearest and most important relationships, her thoughtful boyfriend (at the time) proposed to her on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry House, in one moment marrying multiple things dearest to Hope: her faith, her (future) husband, and of course, music. From the early and lasting influences of Karen Carpenter to Amy Grant to Dolly Parton, Mallary is using that beautiful voice with forever echoes of her deep American South upbringing, along with her overall inescapable platform of music, to share what inspires her, and encourage others along the way." Source: https://www.klove.com/music/artists/mallary-hopeFind more information about Mallary Hopehttps://mallaryhopemusic.com/Mallary on Instagram 〰️〰️Shanny

The Storied Outdoors
Ep 55: Sean Dietrich: Author, Musician, Humorist

The Storied Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 65:49


This week's guest is author and Southern humorist, Sean Dietrich! Sean is a columnist, novelist, and podcast host, known for his commentary on life in the American South. His work has appeared in Newsweek, Southern Living, Garden and Gun, The Tallahassee Democrat, Good Grit, South Magazine, Alabama Living, the Birmingham News, Thom Magazine, and The Mobile Press Register. He has authored thirteen books, and is the creator of the “Sean of the South” Podcast. His latest book, You Are My Sunshine, is releasing this month. It's a laugh-out-loud funny true story of a loving relationship, a grand adventure, and a promise kept. Born in Kansas City Missouri, moved around a bit till he landed in Florida close enough to Alabama to be more of an Alabamian than a Floridian, and now resides in Alabama. Sean and his wife Jamie have been married for 19yrs. Be sure to tune in to hear our conversation with Sean as well as a guest appearance from Thelma Lou, the hound dog as she alerts the neighborhood of the mailman apparently threatening to approach Sean's front door. Buy You are my Sunshine here. Follow Sean on Instagram @seanofthesouth Follow Sean on facebook Sean of The South Follow Sean on his YouTube Listen to his PodCast Sean of the South Join Sean's News letter to keep up with all thats going on with him. Here Visit Sean's website, seandietrich.com. Visit Growley Leather Co. and save 15% by using code TSO2022 www.growleyleather.com Take advantage of the discount code MBFTSO for 15$ off of your order with www.mobilebayfirewood.com If you have questions or comments please send them to thestoriedoutdoors@gmail.com introduction music written and recorded by Brad Hill.

Good Food
Two Buck Chuck, Vishwesh Bhatt, White House Food Conference

Good Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 57:11 Very Popular


Wine critic Esther Mobley looks back at the legacy of Fred Franzia, who championed inexpensive wine and brought Two Buck Chuck to the masses. Chef Vishwesh Bhatt reflects on his childhood in India and how his cooking took shape in the American South. Dr. Nancy Rawson provides an update on her research on the loss of smell and taste as a symptom of COVID. As a child, Grace Young stood in line to meet Julia Child. Now she's being honored with an award named after her culinary icon. Political reporter Ximena Bustillo explains the agenda of the White House Food Conference. Chef Spencer Bezaire is roasting squash in a 600-degree oven at his Silver Lake restaurant Eszett.

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Black Neighborhoods | Day 4 | Have you heard of Fannie's Freedom Farm?

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 49:34


Day 4 “You can pray until you faint, but unless you get up and try to do something, God is not going to put it in your lap.” - Fannie Lou Hamer The Address: 40 Acres, Ruleville, Mississippi The Story: Raise your hand if you knew that Fannie Lou Hamer started a 600- Acre Farm to feed The People!! Shut the front door!!! What! For real? For real. Fannie was trying to save actual lives up in here. Today, we finna learn y'all. But before we travel back in history to Ruleville, Mississippi, let's start here… What did you eat for breakfast this morning? Where did the food come from? Is it organic or GMO? Was it grown on US soil? Did a Black farmers hands touch it? Let's talk about it. For Fannie. We already know that YOU know that Fannie Lou Hamer sang This Little Light of Mine. You can see in your head the Fannie Lou who put her purse on the table at the DNC as she talked about being beaten for registering Black voters across Mississippi. But Farmer Fannie!? Let's turnip (you see what i did there??)! Ha. I can't wait to tell you about her radical work that never gets discussed. Fannie Lou Hamer understood that the most intractable problem facing people in the American South was poverty. She said “I know what the pain of hunger is all about.” So, with a $10,000 grant, she bought 40 acres of land and created Freedom Farm Cooperative. When it succeeded, she bought an additional 640 acres. Somebody make me a T-shirt that says “Fannie Fed the People!” Today, her farm is no longer there. Let's talk about why… In her honor, we pledge to eat better and do better. (Shoot, someone may quit their job, buy some overalls, and move to Ruleville. Hope so.)