Podcasts about Liberalism

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Political philosophy or worldview founded on ideas of liberty and equality

  • 1,375PODCASTS
  • 3,083EPISODES
  • 53mAVG DURATION
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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
Liberalism

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Best podcasts about Liberalism

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Latest podcast episodes about Liberalism

The Bob Cesca Show
Andy Parker

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 72:04


In 2015, Andy's daughter Alison was shot and killed on live television while she was reporting the news for WDBJ-7 in Roanoke, Virginia. Now, Andy's formed a PAC called Andy's Fight to raise money for candidates who support both gun safety laws and reforming social media. AndysFight.com. His book is called For Alison: The Murder of a Young Journalist and a Father's Fight for Gun Safety. And you can follow Andy on Twitter here. Meantime, if you like what you hear, please help support this show by subscribing to our bonus content at patreon.com/bobcescashow. Additional music by Astral Summer.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Death To Tyrants Podcast
Ep. 221: Mass Shootings and the World Liberalism Made, with Katherine Dee

Death To Tyrants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 49:12


This week, my guest Katherine Dee and I discuss a couple of the topics that she has tackled in her writings over at her Default Friend blog. We discuss what she sees as a sexual counterrevolution coming our way. Katherine writes, "If there's one drum I've been beating for a minute now, it's that I believe the pendulum with sexuality is going to swing, big time. And seriously, if you guys remember me for anything, have it be this." We dive right into that, and I think it helps bridge us to our discussion on the dark nihilism that pervades our culture and leads to these terrible mass shootings we keep seeing. The Left likes to focus on guns because they understand it won't actually do any good. The Right, in reaction to that, wants the band-aid of arming teachers and/or providing more security. When nobody wants to discuss the rot within our culture, nothing will ever be done. Where does this empty nihilism come from? Katherine believes that it is the modern American enlightenment tradition of liberalism. For more from Katherine, check out her blog here: For her articles that we discuss, go here: ...and here: Sponsors: The GOP Mises Caucus: Paloma Verde CBD ( ): Enter code BUCK at checkout for 20% off your order! Visit my website: Donate to the show here: Audio Production by Podsworth Media: Leave us a review and rating on iTunes! Thanks!

The Bob Cesca Show
Third World Bullsh*t

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 69:33


[Explicit Language] Our coverage of the FBI's raid at Mar-a-lago. The Red Hat heads exploding. Trump's enthusiastic praise of Christopher Wray, plus Wray's connections to Trump and other Republicans. Kevin McCarthy's threat against Merrick Garland. Outrage and threats of violence don't supersede the rule of law. Defunding the FBI. Dan Bongino's rant on Fox News. The possible statutes violated by Trump. Trump wanted generals like Hitler's generals. Evidence proving Trump flushed documents. Fact-checking the Republican's "IRS auditors" attack. With Buzz Burbank, music by Marina Rocks, Logan Piercey, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Citizen, Not Serf
Episode 187 - After Liberalism

Citizen, Not Serf

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 37:43


On this podcast I discuss the decay of modern liberalism based on two articles I read recently. What are the implications?

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Sohrab Ahmari On The Failures Of Liberalism

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 108:20 Very Popular


Sohrab is a founder and editor of Compact: A Radical American Journal, and he’s a contributing editor at The American Conservative. He spent nearly a decade at News Corp. — as the op-ed editor of the New York Post and as a columnist and editor with the WSJ opinion pages in New York and London. His books include From Fire, by Water: My Journey to the Catholic Faith and The Unbroken Thread: Discovering the Wisdom of Tradition in an Age of Chaos. A new voice for a new conservatism, I tried to talk him through how he got to this place — politically and spiritually.You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or on the right side of the player, click “Listen On” to add the Dishcast feed to your favorite podcast app). For two clips of our convo — on whether the free market is actually a tyranny, and how many liberals actually reject democracy, e.g. Brexit — pop over to our YouTube page.Sohrab’s appearance this week is a good excuse to publish a transcript from David French, his great nemesis in conservative circles. Here’s a clip from David’s Dishcast:A reader wrote last week:I know the Sohrab episode isn’t out yet, but judging by his Twitter presence, it’s going to be a real barnburner of sophistry. His latest quips regarding foreign policy are ones that I find to be ignorant, especially his quips at Yascha Mounk. I know you’ve already shot the episode, but I’d suggest you check out the book, The End of the World Is Just the Beginning: Mapping the Collapse of Globalization. I think it really puts into perspective what American military might has brought to the world (absent, obviously, some of the more glaring blunders), and it might give context, rather than rhetoric, to Sohrab’s arguments.We clashed a little, but I also gave him space and time to explain his own strange journey to this brand of neo-reactionism. In my view, his biography tells you a lot about his need for moral and political “absolutes.” In my book, that makes him close to the opposite of a conservative.If you’re sympathetic to Sohrab’s arguments, send us a comment for next week’s edition: dish@andrewsullivan.com. On last week’s episode of the Dishcast, a listener writes:Terrific interview with Larry Summers. Though my politics are thisclose to Summers’, he floated two whoppers in his talk with you.1) His suggestion that the United States and other liberal democracies can “build their ways” out of right-wing authoritarianism with more housing, infrastructure and health care is simply not true. Not even close. The evidence is very clear that the driving force behind right-wing illiberalism is demographics and left-wing illiberalism is culture. Under investment in macro-economic indicators is a problem, to be sure, but it has nothing to do with illiberalism.2) The United States is decidedly not an exporter of inflation. The US dollar is at historic highs, which means foreigners are investing in America and in dollar denominated assets, because Joe Biden’s America represents the “nicest house in a bad neighborhood,” when measured by jobs growth, business investment, private consumption and personal savings.Summers is right that the America Rescue Plan was too generous. But he seems reluctant to consider the historic relevance of the post-WWII era when American inflation was 14% in 1947, 8% in 1948 and -1% in 1949. As in the post-pandemic era, aggregate demand in the late 1940s rebounded a lot faster than supply, and consumers worldwide bid up the prices of scarce goods, services and raw materials.Summers responds:On the reader’s first point, it’s an interesting hypothesis, but my guess is if there were more and better blue-collar jobs, more affordable housing, and more prosperity, there would be less raging populism.On the second point, I don’t agree. The demand from the US has contributed to global bottlenecks. The strong dollar means weak other currencies which adds to their inflation. I have thought much about the post-WWII period, and I doubt it is a good parallel. There was the effect of removing price controls. There were very different expectations under the gold standard and given the recent depression.I agree with my reader on the core cultural question of left over-reach. I suspect Larry does too — but it’s not a subject he’s comfortable with, especially since his Harvard cancellation. Another reader looks to the deepening tribalism on the right:Perhaps you missed it, but I haven’t seen the Dish comment on the Texas GOP platform yet. This surprises me, since the Dish is, in my view, the most important defender of classical liberalism on the web. The platform of the largest state Republican Party in the country can be found here. From the AP’s summary:Approved by 5,000-plus party delegates last weekend in Houston during the party’s biennial convention, the new platform brands President Joe Biden an “acting” commander-in-chief who was never “legitimately elected.” It may not matter who the president is, though, since the platform takes previous language about secession much farther — urging the Republican-controlled legislature to put the question of leaving the United States to voters next year. The platform also says homosexuality is “an abnormal lifestyle choice” …The platform is the guiding document of a political party that has controlled every executive office in Texas since 2002, a state of almost 40 million people. To put this number in perspective: that’s more than twice as many of our fellow citizens who attend college this year and 25 times as many of our fellow Americans who identify as transgender. Texas and Florida lie at the heart of today’s Republican Party, demographically and financially. To ignore what those Republicans stand for is as near-sighted as ignoring how California and New York stand in the vanguard of what the national Democratic Party will stand for a few years out.The platform is an affront to liberalism and an example of the “movement after Trump” that you’ve speculated about. In my view, the movement preceded Trump and will proceed in his aftermath.The extremism was on full display this week in Dallas, as CPAC cheered Viktor Orbàn’s denunciation of marriage equality (which has 71 percent support nationally). I agree it’s creepy and deranged. But so is the postmodern, pro-criminal madness of the CRT/CQT/CGT Democrats — and they run California.On the growing affection for the Hungarian president on the American right, here’s “a Hungarian living under the Orbán regime”:In my mind, he has become popular among Republicans for two reasons:The fundamental problems of Hungarian society (and most of post-communist Europe’s) are not dissimilar to those of the US — at least on the surface. The cultural cleavages between the “globalist elite” and the “deplorables” are similarly wide. Multiculturalism and the markets’ winner-takes-all logic hit these post-communist societies harder than most, because local communities had been extremely weak to begin with: the communists had been suspicious of any organic communities therefore had worked very hard to suppress and eliminate them as much as they could. Capitalism, financialization, globalization and the wholesale urbanization of culture all happened at once when these societies were completely atomized. No wonder many felt that nobody cared about their problems and all they received from the elite was some lecturing on the inevitability of these phenomena. The American society has gotten to a similar stage through a different path, nicely documented by Robert Putnam. Therefore, the US lower-middle class resonates well to the messages developed from a Hungarian experience.Viktor Orbán and his team have made conscious and expensive efforts to reach out to Trump Republicans (word in Budapest is that Arthur Finkelstein and Benjamin Netanyahu were instrumental in this effort). The regime has not spared any money to welcome, wine, and dine second- and third-tear MAGA influencers. They came, got impressed, and spread the word at home. It definitely helped that these tours have been all-inclusive: who would not like to spend a few days in cool and beautiful Budapest — for free? Moreover, they received and continue to receive official respect. This is all the more attractive now that they are far from the halls of power in the US. It should not be surprising that they were all too happy to believe the propaganda that the regime fed them.I am sure I don’t see the full picture on the American side, but these factors seem to be quite important in explaining Orbán’s popularity in the US.One of those American conservatives courted by Orbán is Rod Dreher. A reader defends Rod:I’ve generally agreed with most of your recent output and was pleasantly surprised to read your more-than-lukewarm enthusiasm for a DeSantis administration.  However, I think you’re being rather unfair on Twitter to Rod Dreher regarding Orbán and Hungary. First of all, you and Rod clearly agree that the current level of immigration to the US (and the West more generally) is unsustainably high, and that continuing to bring ever larger numbers of culturally, racially, and religiously diverse groups of primarily economic migrants into any country is bound to increase social tension and strain social safety nets. You also agree that this is especially reckless under a regnant elite ideology that constantly denigrates Western cultural traditions, antagonizing the native-born white population while simultaneously promoting the importance of group identity and solidarity for non-whites. It’s a recipe for civilizational suicide.I get that Rod is enamored with Orbán and wants an American president somewhat in that vein, but it’s ridiculous to say that he thinks everything that Orbán does for Hungary will translate well for the US or that he would support every analogous policy here. Rod explicitly denies thinking that in almost every post he writes about Orbán. In addition, Rod is right that racial issues are completely different in the US and Hungary. An ethnically homogeneous country like Hungary that seeks to restrict immigration levels in order to preserve its national character will necessarily exclude most foreign-born members of other racial groups from citizenship. White European countries that do this (and are explicit about their motivations for doing this) should not be held to a different standard than non-white, non-European countries such as Japan that do this (and are also explicit about their motivations for doing this). It is perfectly reasonable for Hungarians to look at the recent experience of Western Europe and decide that they don’t want to establish another Molenbeek in suburban Budapest. Excluding prospective immigrants for any reason is in no way comparable to committing atrocities against long-resident minority populations like the ongoing Uyghur genocide in China.Furthermore, the meat of the argument Orbán makes surrounding his objectionable Camp of the Saints reference reads to me as in the same vein as Douglas Murray’s thesis in his masterful anti-Merkelian philippic The Strange Death of Europe, the main difference being that Murray’s perspective is that of the tragic observer, while Orbán obviously has the ability to devise government policies in line with his views. And Murray was on your podcast recently.In this speech, Orbán, like Murray, is not primarily attacking the migrants themselves, but rather the European political class that constantly ignores its constituents’ wishes on the matter of immigration levels and sources, and that will not be satisfied until every EU country “diversifies” itself by accepting large numbers of Third World migrants. The same could almost be said about Raspail’s book, The Camp of the Saints, which, despite its disgustingness, provides a useful indictment of a decadent and self-loathing Western elite that is unwilling to fight to preserve its cultural heritage. Indeed, Murray, Orbán, and Raspail would essentially all endorse the same policy outcome (complete moratorium, or at least severe restriction, of non-European immigration) for essentially the same reason (desire to preserve historic character and culture of their societies). They only really differ in their level of empathy for the non-European migrants, with Murray capable of recognizing their individual humanity, Orbán treating them more as an impersonal force of nature to be repelled, and Raspail viewing them with racist contempt as a demonic horde who the last “heroes” of the West will die fighting against. None of them view chronic Third World immiseration as the West’s problem to solve, least of all by allowing the impoverished masses to indefinitely relocate to Europe.The Covid era showed that Western countries do indeed have the means to control their borders when necessary. But their ruling classes do not think that voters’ preferences for less immigration — tainted as they must be by ignorance, “xenophobia” and “racism” — are a good enough reason to actually enforce their laws. And even restrictionist-leaning administrations have trouble following through with policies that inevitably appear heartless towards those who seek shelter in the West, because each individual migrant often has a generally sympathetic story and by himself wouldn’t pose a great burden on the receiving society. Yet unfortunately the annual influx of millions of these individuals does strain Western countries, and sometimes tough choices must be made. It seems like an unfortunate reality that it takes someone who is otherwise unpalatable like Orbán to actually enforce immigration restrictions these days. I know I’d vastly prefer someone clear-eyed (even cold-hearted) and competent like him in charge of our southern border over Biden or even Trump.Lastly, it’s one thing to criticize Orbán for the specific comments he made in the speech, but your continuing guilt-by-association smears of Rod are just lazy. I could analogously indict you on the same topic — not for anything you’ve specifically said or written, but that, say, “I heard Andrew Sullivan did a friendly podcast with Ann Coulter where he largely agreed with her about our current immigration issues… In a recent article she wrote ‘(insert egregiously inflammatory sentence stripped of any context)’… Coulter also endorsed articles that were published on the website of an SPLC-certified hate group… Ergo Andrew Sullivan endorses white nationalism.” On his blog, Rod clearly and repeatedly says he disagrees with the anti-“race-mixing” language, especially as applied to America and other multiracial societies, and admits that The Camp of the Saints is a racist novel that shouldn’t be praised the way Orbán did. But those demerits don’t invalidate Orbán’s main argument. He can be “racist” by American standards and still right about the overall immigration strategy that is best for Hungary.I know you despise Orbán, and Rod rankles you with some of his posts that deploy a knee-jerk “think of the children” outrage regarding gay and trans news. But you’re better than stooping to insinuations of racism against him personally, especially when you’re pretty much on the same page regarding the challenges that mass immigration poses for the West. Not sure if it’s something you could hash out with him on a podcast or if tensions are too high, but it could be productive for both of you. Thanks for these comments, which I don’t disagree with much. I haven’t called Rod a racist, and don’t think he is. The trouble for me lies less in his defense of Orbanism than of Orbán himself — to the point of becoming a near p.r. spokesman for this authoritarian. The only moment I have actually called Rod out was when he insinuated without evidence that a gay man with monkeypox may have raped a toddler to explain why the kid came down with the disease. Rod withdrew the remark. It’s also perplexing that he shares my disgust at Camp of the Saints but finds nothing significant in Orbán’s belief that the book is “outstanding.” At some point, the rationalization has to stop. Another reader wants me to be less productive with Rod:Please, please, Andrew! Do an old-fashioned fisking already! Dreher is totally unhinged! For example: I’m not saying gays are Nazis, but …Or pick any of his recent articles. Twenty bullet points for defending the “race mixing” comment! Gays didn’t exist forever before Diaghilev! Libraries are groomers! They are so so far beyond. And if you try to comment, you are deleted or told you are doing “whataboutism.”Best not to use the term “fisking” around Rod. From a reader who loves pluralism and cultural diversity:I have trouble understanding why people in the US have trouble with newcomers.  Maybe because my dad and maternal grandparents were immigrants, I have a closer view. In my 76 years, I can’t even begin to tell you what I have learned from folks who are NOT like me: black people, immigrants from a whole lot of places in the world, plus their children. I think people who are afraid of being “replaced” have to have some deep-seated insecurity that I don’t understand. For Tucker Carlson to spout the garbage that he does to get ratings is just scary to me, because it seems to help unleash the worst in people. And believe me, it’s not just a color divide. My Polish dad and Italian mom were subject to all kinds of discrimination and harassment, but it was much easier for them to assimilate because they were white and certainly much easier for their children. My life is so much fuller because not everyone I know and care about looks, acts, or thinks the same. Including you!I’ve long lived in highly diverse places and love it. But I’m not a typical human being, and the desire to live among “people like you” is so deeply ingrained in human nature it deserves respect in public policy. I’m pro-immigrant, but the pace and scale of migration right now is far beyond what a country needs to retain a sense of itself, its history and identity. We’re at a century-high peak of immigration; and we could do with a respite for cultural and social cohesion. “A long-time subscriber, first-time correspondent” has some guest recommendations for the Dishcast: One theme I’ve particularly enjoyed on your podcast is faith and secularism in the contemporary world. I’m writing to suggest several thinkers who could bring a lot to that discussion.First is the eminent philosopher Charles Taylor, the most important living Canadian intellectual. While he’s contributed to many branches of thought, his book A Secular Age transformed the study of religious faith in the modern world. He’s also interested in the concept of multiculturalism and has stood up against efforts in Quebec to stop Muslim women from wearing the hijab. His political stance is more communitarian than liberal, though, and he’s had fascinating dialogues with Jürgen Habermas and other thinkers.Another suggestion is the Anglican theologian and philosopher John Milbank. As a founder of the Radical Orthodoxy movement, he’s taken on liberalism more directly, but I think the two of you could have a very constructive conversation about it. He would also have really interesting — and maybe provocative — things to say about continental philosophy (he has coauthored books with Slavoj Žižek!), Brexit, and the future of Western political systems.Finally, I’d recommend the Protestant theologian James (Jamie) K. A. Smith, a philosophy professor at Calvin University. He’s written many books on Christianity in the contemporary world, drawing especially on postmodern philosophy. He is particularly interested in how Christian intellectuals can engage with contemporary art and literature, and is editor-in-chief of the journal Image.I actually read A Secular Age in its entirety a couple of years ago. It’s magisterial but bloated: two words I’m not sure work on a podcast. But thanks for the other suggestions. Next up, a reader with some personal advice:I wanted to tell you something based upon a comment you made discussing your testosterone shots. Get Biote pellets. I did, and I don’t have the ups and downs. You get them put in every 4-6 months, depending on how active you are with exercise and sex. I work out every day, so I get them replaced at the 4-month mark. It’s also referred to as hormone replacement therapy. I used to use the cream daily, but I felt like s**t every morning until I put the cream on again. I have no ups and downs now, and my levels stay around 1,200. You can do less if you want, but man, I feel great for months at a time and it’s not that expensive. One more reader:You linked to an interesting piece by Lisa Selin Davis with the teaser, “What if ‘life-saving care’ for trans kids is really more about cosmetic passing?” Yes, it does seem like transitioning is mostly cosmetic. I wonder if trans advocates would support men who want to take testosterone for bodybuilding. What about professional sports, to get a competitive edge? What about Olympic sports? Any thoughts?I’m not against adult men using steroids to get bigger and hotter. Au contraire. I’m not against trans adults using any safe, pharmaceutical methods to “pass” more easily. I’m against using these very powerful substance on children without extremely careful vetting and an expansive mental health assessment. Yes, transing them before puberty could make them more likely to pass as adults — but I don’t believe most are mature enough to make that kind of decision at that age, especially when it may guarantee them sterility and, in some cases, an inability to experience orgasm ever. Keep the dissents and other comments coming: dish@andrewsullivan.com. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

On Point
The Paradox: How democracy can lead to liberalism — or fascism

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 46:43


In a truly open society, all ideas can flourish -- even those that tear down democracies. New technologies help those ideas spread. So, are fragile democracies the norm?

The Bob Cesca Show
Your Perry Mason Moment

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 74:22


[Explicit Content] Alex Jones is having a terrible time in court, and we're here for it. Complete coverage of Jones's lies under oath, his childish behavior, and, as always, the gay frogs. The January 6 committee and the DOJ are subpoenaing Jones's text messages. This is the first of four times he'll have to go through this. Crazies in Cars Getting Conspiracies. Alex Jones confessing to working with Secret Service on Jan. 6. Justice Department subpoenaed Pat Cipollone. More on the fake electors scam. Kansas voters uphold abortion rights. The upsides of ballot initiatives. Kentucky is next. Biden signs executive order to protect abortion rights. With Spicy Jody Hamilton, David "TRex" Ferguson, world premiere music by Astral Summer, Elijah Bone, and more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Common Sense American
The Truth Behind the Liberalism "Ideology" - And It's a Lot Scarier Than You Think

The Common Sense American

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 25:06


I dive into the meaning behind far-left ideologies, and come to the realization that it's all based on one thing...or rather, NOTHING.

The Bob Cesca Show
Carlos Alazraqui on the Dirtbag Left

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 44:07


[Explicit Language] Actor/comedian Carlos Alazraqui joins us to discuss the so-called dirtbag left -- alleged liberals who reject party unity in lieu of personal agendas, while attacking everyone else as corporatist Dems and party apologists. You might know Carlos from from the Stephanie Miller Show, Reno 911 as "Garcia," Rocko's Modern Life, Spongebob Square Pants, The Fairly OddParents -- so many roles that there are two Wikipedia pages to cover all of his things. Carlos has been on a crusade against podcaster Jimmy Dore and has a unique insight into his worldview. You can follow Carlos on Twitter here. Meantime, if you like what you hear, please help support this show by subscribing to our bonus content at patreon.com/bobcescashow. With additional music by Seth Adam.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rush To Reason
HR 3 John: Why Liberalism is a Mental Illness 08/01/22

Rush To Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 54:42


HR 3 John: Why Liberalism is a Mental Illness 08/01/22 by John Rush

The Bob Cesca Show
Not Interested In Food, Just Violence

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 69:30


[Explicit Language] Aggressive monkeys in Yamaguchi, Japan. Big vote in Kansas today on abortion rights. Biden authorized a drone strike that killed al-Qaeda leader Al-Zawahiri. Republicans have abandoned the troops. The Republican lies about the PACT Act. Trump's "Sir!" stories. Fist-bumping on the Senate floor. The Inflation Reduction Act. Republicans push closer to having a constitutional convention. The Liberty Amendments. Trump is a 9/11 Truther. Ivana Trump's cheap gravesite is a tax break for Trump. With Buzz Burbank, music by Seth Adam, Tarae Williams, and more! Find your state legislators here.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Larry Summers On Inflation And Mistakes

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 85:05 Very Popular


He’s in the news again this week — after persuading Joe Manchin that the climate and healthcare bill he’s pushing isn’t inflationary. Larry Summers has had a storied career, as the chief economist of the World Bank, the treasury secretary under Clinton, and the director of the National Economic Council under Obama. He also was the president of Harvard University from 2001 to 2006 and remains there as the Charles W. Eliot University Professor. You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or on the right side of the player, click “Listen On” to add the Dishcast feed to your favorite podcast app). For two clips of our convo — on how the US government spent way too little during the Great Recession and way too much during the pandemic, and how we can help the working class cope — pop over to our YouTube page.The episode has a lot of thematic overlap with our recent discussion with David Goodhart, author of Head, Hand, Heart: Why Intelligence Is Over-Rewarded, Manual Workers Matter, and Caregivers Deserve More Respect. Here’s a new transcript. And below is a clip from that episode on how our economy overvalues white-collar brain power:Back to inflation talk, here’s a dissent:I’ve been reading your blog for a little over a year now, and listening to Dishcast, which is great. I’ve noticed a few things, however, that I would like you to perhaps respond to, or at least consider. First, what you refer to as “wokeness” on the left is, I agree, an obnoxious problem that has been exacerbated by social media. But I think your recent guest Francis Fukuyama has it mostly correct in his new book, Liberalism and Its Discontents, when he identifies illiberal trends on the political left as being more of an annoyance, or at the very least, far less of a threat to the republic than illiberal trends on the right. Second, I completely disagree with this rather lazy salvo from you: “Biden’s legacy — an abandonment of his mandate for moderation, soaring inflation, an imminent recession, yet another new war, and woker-than-woke extremism — has only deepened it.” It simply is not the case that Biden has not, especially when forced to, hewed towards moderation. Yes, he is attempting to respond to a leftward shift in the Democratic Party by trying to govern more from the left, but this is simply a reflection of political reality. In addition, much of his agenda has been batted down, but more on that in a moment. Next, inflation and an imminent recession have a lot more to do with what the Fed has done over the last four decades — and definitely since the financial crisis of 2008 — than with Joe Biden. On this theme of a highly financialized economy nearing the end of the neoliberal era, I recommend Rana Foroohar on Ezra Klein’s latest podcast, where she talks about the popping of the “Everything Bubble.” Asset-value inflation, deindustrialization, a perverse focus on shareholder value rather than investing in Main Street or even R&D, and an utter lack of policy solutions, have caused this. In addition, as Foroohar herself says, the changes we need to make in our economy are going to be, in the short-to-medium term, inflationary. This means policymakers have to start making policy that actually helps both people and infrastructure, which means spending money. Unfortunately, the garden has gone untended for so long that we’re teetering on the brink of becoming a really shitty country if we don’t take more aggressive action. In addition, with regard to an upcoming recession, Noah Smith wrote on his Substack recently that Keynesian economics would suggest that a quick recession now in order to stomp out inflation would be better in the long run than milquetoast attempts to curb it by raising interest rates too slowly. The idea is that recessions — especially fast and somewhat shallow ones — can be weathered, but inflation that goes on for too long leaves lasting scars on the economy. (Smith identifies the Volker recessions as probably permanently damaging the Rust Belt.) Personally, what I worry about more on the left is not “woke-ism,” but the trendy socialist/ironic/weird outlets like Jacobin or Chapo Trap House, which seem to be doing their damndest to convince younger, more impressionable and less educated people that the whole country is fucked; it’s designed to be fucked because capitalism is fucked; and only its imminent collapse will allow for problems to be solved through revolution/redistribution. Believe me, that sentiment is becoming a real problem, and the people who buy into it are every bit as ideologically rigid, illiberal, and closed to inquiry as those on the rabid right.Next up, listeners sound off on last week’s episode with Fraser Nelson, the British journalist who sized up the prime minister race. The first comment comes from “a long-time libertarian in Massachusetts”:I’ve been reading the Dish for about a year and finally subscribed thanks to your fascinating interview with Fraser Nelson. I was particularly glad to be alerted to Kemi Badenoch.It’s taken awhile to pull the trigger on subscribing to the Dish because of your Trump bashing, since you sound more like Hillary Clinton than William Buckley. I’m perfectly fine with bashing Trump, but I prefer to see it paired with an acknowledgment of the forces that created him, i.e. the abandonment of the middle class by the two major parties, particularly the Democrats. I do think half the country would lose its mind if Trump runs again, so in that sense I sympathize with your sentiments. But the larger context is essential.Some episodes our listener might appreciate — ones sympathetic to the concerns of middle-class Trump voters — include Michael Anton, Mickey Kaus, Ann Coulter and David French. More on the Fraser Nelson pod:Thank you for an outstanding episode. Nelson has almost persuaded me to take out a Spectator subscription! I thought he summed up eloquently and fairly the state of the Conservative Party, Johnson, Sunak and Truss, and the challenges that lie ahead.Like many Brexiteers — and Nelson half-acknowledges this — the Tories have not grappled with the realities of Brexit. The most obvious lacuna in your discussion was the economy. You cannot leave the EU and not increase the size of the state. You have to have more customs arrangements (as we have recently seen at Dover), more vets, more checks and so on, ad nauseam. It’s all very well for conservatives to argue for a smaller state, but they haven’t defined what that will look like and how the services people use now (education, transport, local government, the legal system etc) will be improved, i.e. funded to a better extent than now. Underfunding is obvious and no amount of arguing “we can do it more efficiently” will cut it — the Tories have had 12 years to fix this.Moreover, picking fights with the EU has meant less investment, reduced business confidence and increased uncertainty — except of course in Northern Ireland, which has access to the single market and where business is booming. Listen to NFU President Minette Batters talk about the issues surrounding Truss’s free trade deals with Australia and New Zealand, or fishermen now dealing with the consequences of Brexit. They were once fans. Not so much now.James Carville once said, “It’s the economy, stupid.” Promising tax cuts now when much of the Western world is likely to enter a recession is ridiculously irresponsible, but hey ho, it’s a political campaign and reality will bite once we have a new prime minister, whoever she is.Also, I look forward to hearing Marina Hyde on the Dishcast!This next listener takes issue with some of my phrasing:I enjoyed the Nelson episode overall! But I have to take issue with a rare faux pas from you, where you said that Rishi Sunak is “himself obviously a globalist, just by his very career and nature.” I can’t really understand how you came to this conclusion. Is anyone who worked overseas for some time a “globalist”? Are you a “globalist” because your moved to America? What about Sunak’s “nature” makes him so?Back in 2016, Sunak supported Brexit, which was seen as the losing bet, despite much pressure from David Cameron. And he has set out very clearly in his leadership campaign that he thinks, for example, we need to be tougher on border control. Neither of these things strike me as globalist, nor a return to the Cameron era.On the other hand, I agree with your characterisation of Truss — who voted Remain before undergoing a miraculous and instantaneous change of heart the day after her side lost — as a “dime-store Thatcher.”Speaking of border control, here’s David Goodhart — also from a British perspective — on why elites favor open borders:One more listener on Fraser pod:As a Spectator subscriber (and Glasgow Uni man), I very much enjoyed Fraser Nelson. Mishearing (I think) at around the 37 minute mark when he seemed to refer to Boris getting a first at Oxford, I was reminded of this fine b****y exchange with David Cameron in the Sunday Times back in the day:Surely Boris has been the man Cameron had to beat, ever since they were at school together. 'This is one of the great myths of politics', says the PM [Cameron]. 'These things grow up and it's so long ago no one challenges them, but I don't think we really knew each other at school, he was a couple of years ahead of me. He was very clever.'Then Cameron explodes into a beaming grin. 'But', he says exultantly. 'Boris didn't get a First! I only discovered that on the Panorama programme the other night... I didn't know that'. He is suddenly lit up, almost punching the air with joy.And in that outburst of public-schoolboy competitiveness — Cameron, of course, did get a First — he reveals everything we've always thought about him.Also, when Boris was described as believing the untrue things he said at the time he said them, I’m reminded of George Costanza’s credo that “it’s not a lie if you believe it!” (which, for a fairly left liberal Tory, you’d perhaps take over a Trump analogy).Lastly, a listener looks to a potential guest:If you wish to continue to mine the vein of the global power landscape, its recent evolution this century, and its implications: Condoleezza Rice. She has an interesting perspective from one whose expertise is Russia and is a past practitioner of American statecraft with Russia and China.Thanks, as always, for the suggestion. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

Rania Khalek Dispatches
Minority Rule: The US Is Not a Democracy, with Prof. Aziz Rana

Rania Khalek Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 85:36


How is it that judges arbitrarily chosen by presidents who didn't even win the popular vote are appointed for life and can overturn our most cherished rights? What's with the veneration of the US constitution, which was written by slave owners? Is America really a democracy?To discuss this and more, Rania Khalek was joined by Aziz Rana, a professor of law at Cornell University and author of the book “The Two Faces of American Freedom.”Follow Aziz's work here: https://www.azizrana.com/ You can listen to all episodes of Rania Khalek Dispatches anywhere you get podcasts.Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3za9DRK Apple: https://apple.co/3zeYpeW TIME CODES0:00 Intro1:50 Judges for life 5:29 Why are Democrats so weak on this? 11:13 How can liberal and conservative justices be so chummy?14:27 Supreme Court's drift to the extreme right 18:49 Cult of personality around supreme court justices22:12 Court's achievements or people's achievements? 27:01 Reducing the power of the Supreme Court31:06 The myth of steady progress35:42 Can we achieve through legislation what we fail to achieve to litigation?40:43 The constitution as counter-revolutionary46:23 History of constitution worship tied to imperialism50:24 Liberalism vs the constitution: Contradictions 53:33 Have elections and democracy lost their meaning?56:27 Is the US a democracy?  59:08 Foreign policy1:02:57 Internal violence and mass shootings1:07:00 Mass incarceration 1:12:12 America does NOT have universal suffrage 1:16:21 Radical constitutional transformation 1:21:48  Federal judiciary system, is it flawed?

The Bob Cesca Show
The Scream Of The Turtle

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 71:22


[Explicit Content] It's 'Good News Day' on the show. The new and sweaty photo of Trump. Senate Democrats on the verge of passing major legislation on the climate crisis, the deficit, and taxation on corporate profits. Manchin screwed Mitch McConnell on the CHIPS bill. It's happening! The Justice Department is, in fact, criminally investigating Donald Trump for seditious conspiracy. The dumbest crooks ever used the word "fake" in their emails. Mnuchin, Pompeo, Ratcliffe, and Wolf from the Trump cabinet are set to testify. Marc Short to testify. The RNC might've just stopped Trump from running for president. 42 Republicans filibustered healthcare for veterans. With Spicy Jody Hamilton, David "TRex" Ferguson, music by Matt Springfield, Japan Van Damme, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Audio Mises Wire
Liberty versus "Relational Egalitarianism"

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022


Egalitarian liberals think that basic liberties can be violated in the quest for equality and even that "the natural duty to promote justice straightforwardly implies a duty to establish states." Original Article: "Liberty versus "Relational Egalitarianism"" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Mises Media
Liberty versus "Relational Egalitarianism"

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022


Egalitarian liberals think that basic liberties can be violated in the quest for equality and even that "the natural duty to promote justice straightforwardly implies a duty to establish states." Original Article: "Liberty versus "Relational Egalitarianism"" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Hayek Program Podcast
Liberalism for All — Liberalism and Social Justice

Hayek Program Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 72:12


On this episode of the Hayek Program Podcast, we continue a special summer series of the podcast on Liberalism for All, hosted by Jayme Lemke as she explores the underpinnings and outworkings of a free and open society. Driving the discussion is a set of core questions, including:What does it mean to be liberal in the 21st century?What is the relationship between liberalism and equality?Is the pursuit of equality a threat or opportunity for the liberal project?Joining Lemke for this episode is Nick Cowen, Senior Lecturer at the University of Lincoln. In Cowen's recent book, Neoliberal Social Justice, he asks which policies can limit arbitrary socio-economic inequalities, a point Lemke examines further as they discuss what makes an inequality arbitrary. Later in the conversation, Cowen expounds upon the idea of property-owning democracy and why it is not as different from welfare state capitalism as some proponents would argue. Additionally, throughout their dialogue, Cowen and Lemke consider whether the quests for equality and freedom stand complementary or in tension with one another.If you like the show, please leave a 5-star review for us on Apple Podcasts and tell others about the show! We're available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, and wherever else you get your podcasts.Learn more about Cowen's work from the following articles:Hayek versus Trump: The Radical Right's Road to Serfdom Basic Economic Liberties: John Rawls and Adam Smith ReconciledCapital, Ideology, and the Liberal OrderThe mirage of mark-to-market: distributive justice and alternatives to capital taxationNeoliberal Social Justice and TaxationFollow the Hayek Program on Twitter: @HayekProgramLearn more about Academic & Student ProgramsFollow the Mercatus Center on Twitter: @mercatusCC Music: TwisteriumDirt Rhodes by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3650-dirt-rhodesLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

The Bob Cesca Show
Donna Halper and The Trees

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 86:18


My great friend Donna Halper returns to the show to talk about the 1/6 committee, talk radio, and the latest news from the Justice Department. Plus we analyze Neil Peart's lyrics to a classic song by Rush called "The Trees," and how, even though it's a great Rush song, the lyrics warn that equality has unintended consequences. Donna is a professor of media analysis, a prolific writer, and a former broadcaster who introduced American radio audiences to Rush (the band). You can find her work at donnahalper.com and on Twitter. Meantime, if you like what you hear, please help support this show by subscribing to our bonus content at patreon.com/bobcescashow.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Institutionalized
British Politics with Mary Harrington

Institutionalized

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 39:05


This week we are joined by Mary Harrington to discuss the differences between British and American political cultures. Recommendations: Silence of the Animals by John Gray Liberated Enough: Feminism, Liberalism, and Conservatism by Mary Harrington Feminism Against Progress by Mary Harrington Fall Out: A year of Political Mayhem by Tim Shipman

The Bob Cesca Show
Maximum Security Retirement Home

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 73:09


[Explicit Language] Happy anniversary to the Burbanks! Thursday's 1/6 committee hearings. Trump will never criticize his fanboys. Red Hat media whines about Josh Hawley running video. Live by the bullying, die by the bullying. G. Gordon Liddy Easter egg in Trading Places. Trump's handwritten edits on his remarks. The Bannon verdict. Mike Pence's chief of staff testified to the DOJ's grand jury. Brian Kemp will testify before Fani Willis's grand jury. Kansas ballot initiative on abortion. John Roberts is no saint despite PR blitz. Democrats could pass three major pieces of legislation. With Buzz Burbank, music by Karl Lundeberg & Fascination Curve, Hourstone, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bridwell Heights Presbyterian Church PCA
Liberalism on God & Man

Bridwell Heights Presbyterian Church PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 31:00


Chapter 2 of Machen's classic -Christianity - Liberalism-

Lib Dem Podcast
Sunak vs Truss

Lib Dem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 47:45


Sunak Vs Truss - who will win, what does this say about the direction of the Conservatives and has Boris done lasting damage to politics in this countryRegular panellists Alison, Richard and John are joined by the amazing Antoinette Sandbach to discuss all these issues and more Keep up to date with the LibDem Podcast on Instagram, Facebook & Twitter - @LibDemPod Please like & subscribe to the channel on YouTube as well as through your podcast provider so you never miss an episode.If you want to support the show why not join our Patreon exclusive service at: www.patreon.com/libdempodThanks for listeningThe Lib Dem Podcast

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 11

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 54:16


Episode 99:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2-5]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 6-8]2. From Reform to War, 1906-1917[Part 9-10]3. From February to October 1917Dual PowerLenin and the BolsheviksThe Aspirations of Soldiers and WorkersThe Provisional Government in Crisis[Part 11 - This Week]Revolution in the Village - 0:25The Nationalist Challenge - 10:43Class, Nation and Gender - 26:04[Part 12]3. From February to October 1917[Part 13 - 16?]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 17 - 19?]5. War Communism[Part 20 - 22?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 23 - 26?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 27?]ConclusionFootnotes:55) 0:32Orlando Figes, Peasant Russia, Civil War: The Volga Countryside in Revolution, 1917–1921 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989); John Channon, ‘The Peasantry in the Revolutions of 1917', in E. R. Frankel et al. (eds), Revolution in Russia: Reassessments of 1917 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), 105–30.56) 2:41Graeme J. Gill, Peasants and Government in the Russian Revolution (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1979), 46–63, 75–88.57) 3:29J. L. H. Keep, The Russian Revolution: A Study in Mass Mobilization (New York: Norton, 1976), 179.58) 5:35Keep, Russian Revolution, 160.59) 7:52Channon, ‘The Landowners', in Service (ed.), Society and Politics in the Russian Revolution, 120–46.60) 8:47Aaron B. Retish, Russia's Peasants in Revolution and Civil War: Citizenship, Identity, and the Creation of the Soviet State, 1914–1922 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008); John Channon, ‘The Bolsheviks and the Peasantry: The Land Question during the First Eight Months of Soviet Rule', Slavonic and East European Review, 66:4 (1988), 593–624.61) 10:20V. V. Kabanov, Krest'ianskaia obshchina i kooperatsiia Rossii XX veka (Moscow: RAN, 1997), 81.62) 10:59Ronald G. Suny, ‘Nationalism and Class in the Russian Revolution: A Comparative Discussion', in Frankel et al. (eds), Revolution in Russia, 219–46; Ronald G. Suny, The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution and the Collapse of the Soviet Union (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993), ch. 2.63) 11:21Mark von Hagen, ‘The Great War and the Mobilization of Ethnicity in the Russian Empire', in B. R. Rubin and Jack Snyder (eds), Post-Soviet Political Order: Conflict and State Building (London: Routledge, 1998), 34–57.64) 12:58John Reshetar, The Ukrainian Revolution, 1917–1920 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1952); Bohdan Krawchenko, Social Change and National Consciousness in Twentieth-Century Ukraine (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1985), ch. 1.65) 15:35Steven L. Guthier, ‘The Popular Base of Ukrainian Nationalism in 1917', Slavic Review, 38:1 (1979).66) 16:11David G. Kirby, Finland in the Twentieth Century (London: Hurst, 1979), 46; Anthony F. Upton, The Finnish Revolution, 1917–1918 (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1980), ch. 6.67) 22:57Ronald G. Suny, The Making of the Georgian Nation (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988), ch. 9.68) 24:06Tadeusz Świętochowski, Russian Azerbaijan, 1905–1920: The Shaping of National Identity in a Muslim Community (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985), ch. 4.69) 29:23Boris I. Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda and Anti-“Burzhui” Consciousness in 1917', Russian Review, 53 (1994), 183–96 (187–8).70) 29:44Donald J. Raleigh, Revolution on the Volga: 1917 in Saratov (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1986).71) 30:20T. A. Abrosimova, ‘Sotsialisticheskaia ideeia v massovom soznanii 1917g.', in Anatomiia revoliutsii. 1917 god v Rossii: massy, partii, vlast' (St Petersburg: Glagol', 1994), 176–87 (177).72) 30:46Steinberg, Voices, 17.73) 31:22Michael C. Hickey, ‘The Rise and Fall of Smolensk's Moderate Socialists: The Politics of Class and the Rhetoric of Crisis in 1917', in Donald J. Raleigh (ed.), Provincial Landscapes: Local Dimensions of Soviet Power, 1917–53 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001), 14–35.74) 32:57Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda', 190, 191.75) 32:49Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda', 189.76) 33:00Figes and Kolonitskii, Interpreting, 154.77) 34:00A. Ia. Livshin and I. B. Orlov, ‘Revolutsiia i spravedlivost': posleoktiabr'skie “pis'ma vo vlast' ”, in 1917 god v sud'bakh Rossii i mira: Oktiabr'skaia revoliutsiia (Moscow: RAN, 1998), 254, 255, 259.78) 34:12Howard White, ‘The Urban Middle Classes', in Service (ed.), Society and Politics in the Russian Revolution, 64–85.79) 34:35Bor'ba za massy v trekh revoliutsiiakh v Rossii: proletariat i srednie gorodskie sloi (Moscow: Mysl', 1981), 19.80) 35:18O. N. Znamenskii, Intelligentsiia nakanune velikogo oktiabria (fevral'-oktiabr' 1917g.) (Leningrad: Nauka, 1988), 8–9.81) 35:53Bor'ba za massy, 169.82) 36:45Michael C. Hickey, Competing Voices from the Russian Revolution (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2011), 387.83) 38:05Michael Hickey, ‘Discourses of Public Identity and Liberalism in the February Revolution: Smolensk, Spring 1917', Russian Review, 55:4 (1996), 615–37 (620); V. V. Kanishchev, ‘ “Melkoburzhuaznaia kontrrevoliutsiia”: soprotivlenie gorodskikh srednikh sloev stanovleniiu “diktatury proletariata” (oktiab'r 1917–avgust 1918g.)', in 1917 god v sud'bakh Rossii i mira, 174–87.84) 39:14Stockdale, Paul Miliukov, 258.85) 40:53Revoliutsionnoe dvizhenie v avguste 1917g. (razgrom Kornilovskogo miatezha) (Moscow: Izd-vo AN SSSR, 1959), 407.86) 41:58V. F. Shishkin, Velikii oktiabr' i proletarskii moral' (Moscow: Mysl', 1976), 57.87) 42:18Steinberg, Voices, 113.88) 44:32O. Ryvkin, ‘ “Detskie gody” Komsomola', Molodaia gvardiia, 7–8 (1923), 239–53 (244); Krupskaya, ‘Reminiscences of Lenin'.89) 45:58Ruthchild, Equality and Revolution, 227.90) 46:36Engel, Women in Russiā, 135; Ruthchild, Equality, 231.91) 47:49Jane McDermid and Anna Hillyard, Women and Work in Russia, 1880–1930 (Harlow: Longman, 1998), 167.92) 48:31Engel, Women in Russia, 141.93) 49:01Sarah Badcock, ‘Women, Protest, and Revolution: Soldiers' Wives in Russia during 1917', International Review of Social History, 49 (2004), 47–70.94) 49:19Steinberg, Voices, 98.95) 50:03D. P. Koenker and W. G. Rosenberg, Strikes and Revolution in Russia, 1917 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1989), 314.96) 50:21Smith, Red Petrograd, 193.97) 51:37Z. Lilina, Soldaty tyla: zhenskii trud vo vremia i posle voiny (Perm': Izd-vo Petrogradskogo Soveta, 1918), 8.98) 51:59L. G. Protasov, Vserossiiskoe uchreditel'noe sobranie: istoriia rozhdeniia i gibeli (Moscow: ROSSPEN, 1997), 233.99) 52:31Beate Fieseler, ‘The Making of Russian Female Social Democrats, 1890–1917', International Review of Social History, 34 (1989), 193–226.

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Justin Peters: Deception, Discernment, Deliverance – Warnings to the Church

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 53:33


Justin Peters Ministries is a worldwide expository preaching and teaching ministry focusing on teaching the sufficiency of God's word and exposing the false teachings of the prosperity, health and wealth gospel. Justin preaches a gospel deeply rooted in the sufficiency of scripture. Today, David and Justin discuss the importance of the inerrancy of Scriptures, deity of Christ, false teachings in the American church, and warn about Bethel and Hillsong - both the organizations as well as their music.  Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Wake Up Tucson
Hour 2 Congressman David Schweikert...World View stratosphere concert...rioter kills person he professes to care about...Camille Pagila on modern liberalism

Wake Up Tucson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:40


David Schweikert joins Chris to discuss the budget and the very high percentage of the budget that is not discretionary but fixed by formulas such as medical and social costs. World View to send a band into space for a concert. President Biden has COVID...and...cancer? According to Biden himself in a speech on Wednesday he has cancer, comments the White House Comms clean-up crew immediately walked back Verdict on rioter who killed a black man during a riot about violence against blacks. Camille Pagila speaks out on how liberalism has transformed from the 50's to now---reducing individuals to a group identity and defining them in permanent victim terms...and more...

The Bob Cesca Show
The Camera Is His Butt Plug

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 69:15


[Explicit Content] Mushrooms! President Biden tests positive for COVID. Someone contracted polio in Rockland, New York while anti-vaxerism is soaring. The 1/6 committee will play outtakes from Trump's 1/6 video to the insurrectionists. What do we know about DOJ investigations involving Trump? Merrick Garland's most recent statements and his May 2022 memo. Jody's Ivana Trump conspiracy theory. The Bill O'Reilly Neck Lift. Pete Buttigieg wins! Flawless victory! With Spicy Jody Hamilton, David "TRex" Ferguson, music by Matt Jaffe, The Metal Byrds, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Dissenter
#654 Russell Blackford: Religious Freedom, Atheism, Scientism, Nihilism, and Morality

The Dissenter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 37:42


------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao ------------------Follow me on--------------------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedissenteryt/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDissenterYT This show is sponsored by Enlites, Learning & Development done differently. Check the website here: http://enlites.com/ Dr. Russell Blackford is a Fellow of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, and a Laureate of the International Academy of Humanism. He holds an honorary appointment as Conjoint Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Newcastle. He is the author of several books, including Freedom of Religion and the Secular State, 50 Great Myths About Atheism, The Mystery of Moral Authority, and The Tyranny of Opinion: Conformity and the Future of Liberalism. In this episode, we talk about religion, atheism, science, and morality. We start with religious freedom, and the modern secular state. We define atheism, and get into the conflict between religion and science. We then talk about moral authority, the objectivity of morality, moral skepticism, and the relationship between moral nihilism and atheism. -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, MARK BLYTH, ROBERTO INGUANZO, MIKKEL STORMYR, ERIC NEURMANN, SAMUEL ANDREEFF, FRANCIS FORDE, TIAGO NUNES, BERNARD HUGUENEY, ALEXANDER DANNBAUER, FERGAL CUSSEN, YEVHEN BODRENKO, HAL HERZOG, NUNO MACHADO, DON ROSS, JONATHAN LEIBRANT, JOÃO LINHARES, OZLEM BULUT, NATHAN NGUYEN, STANTON T, SAMUEL CORREA, ERIK HAINES, MARK SMITH, J.W., JOÃO EIRA, TOM HUMMEL, SARDUS FRANCE, DAVID SLOAN WILSON, YACILA DEZA-ARAUJO, IDAN SOLON, ROMAIN ROCH, DMITRY GRIGORYEV, TOM ROTH, DIEGO LONDOÑO CORREA, YANICK PUNTER, ADANER USMANI, CHARLOTTE BLEASE, NICOLE BARBARO, ADAM HUNT, PAWEL OSTASZEWSKI, AL ORTIZ, NELLEKE BAK, KATHRINE AND PATRICK TOBIN, GUY MADISON, GARY G HELLMANN, SAIMA AFZAL, ADRIAN JAEGGI, NICK GOLDEN, PAULO TOLENTINO, JOÃO BARBOSA, JULIAN PRICE, EDWARD HALL, HEDIN BRØNNER, DOUGLAS P. FRY, FRANCA BORTOLOTTI, GABRIEL PONS CORTÈS, URSULA LITZCKE, DENISE COOK, SCOTT, ZACHARY FISH, TIM DUFFY, TRADERINNYC, AND MAX BEILBY! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY PRODUCERS, YZAR WEHBE, JIM FRANK, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK, IAN GILLIGAN, LUIS CAYETANO, TOM VANEGDOM, CURTIS DIXON, BENEDIKT MUELLER, VEGA GIDEY, THOMAS TRUMBLE, AND NUNO ELDER! AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, MICHAL RUSIECKI, ROSEY, JAMES PRATT, MATTHEW LAVENDER, SERGIU CODREANU, AND BOGDAN KANIVETS!

The Bob Cesca Show
Robbie Pickering on Gaslit

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 85:38


[Explicit Language] Robbie Pickering is the co-writer, creator, and executive producer of the amazing Gaslit series on Starz about Watergate, Martha Mitchell, G. Gordon Liddy, John Mitchell, and John Dean. We talked about the creative themes of the series as well as lots of Gordon Liddy stories. Not only did Robbie create the series but he wrote several of the episodes, including one of the greatest scenes in TV history involving Liddy, Dean, and a pencil. You can find Gaslit on the Starz network and the Starz streaming app, as well as on Hulu, Amazon Prime, and AppleTV. Meantime, if you like what you hear, please help support this show by subscribing to our bonus content at patreon.com/bobcescashow. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bob Cesca Show
Our Favorite Maniac

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 64:16


[Explicit Language] The leaked Merrick Garland memo about investigations before the midterms. DOJ is running out of time given Trump's stalling tactics. DOJ has added more prosecutors to handle Trump's involvement in the insurrection. Trump likely violated five different laws. Pushing back without undermining Democrats in the midterms. Ronny Jackson threatened to shoot the president. Another insane North Carolina abortion bill. The craziest talking point ever. Gulag states sent 5,700 demands to Google for tracking data. Texas lawyer is targeting HIV drugs. With Buzz Burbank, music by Feed Your Wolves, Elijah Bone, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Brian Lehrer Weekend: NY's Courts, Liberalism's End, Lightning Bugs

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 64:53


Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. The News From New York's Highest Court (First) | The End of Liberalism? (Starts at 23:21) | It's Lightning Bug Season (Starts at 49:01) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning
Dr. Iona Italia: a cosmopolitan liberal in an identitarian age

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 71:48 Very Popular


Dr. Iona Italia's name often perplexes the public, but it's entirely explicable considering her background. Her late father was from the Parsi community of the Indian subcontinent. Descendants of Persians who continued to adhere to the Zoroastrian religion of their ancestors, the Parsis migrated to northwestern India about 1,000 years ago. Remaining predominantly endogamous, they nevertheless developed a synthetic culture, adopting the Gujarati language, Indian dress, as well as some very idiosyncratic surnames, including Italiya. As far as her first name, Iona is very common in Scotland, her mother's homeland. Though raised in Karachi, Pakistan, as a child, Italia was orphaned at ten and grew up in Britain, under the supervision of her half-sister (on her mother's side), who was nearly twenty years older. Razib and Italia discuss the complexities of her personal history and racial identity in the context of an essay posted at her Substack, The Skin I'm In. Her story, that of a mixed-race person who “presents as white” and grew up detached from her subcontinental heritage, is especially interesting in light of the new identitarian regime that has arisen on the political Left in the last few years. Razib also asks Italia about the possible future of the more old-fashioned liberalism she espouses forthrightly on her podcast, Two for Tea, as well as what distinguishes the magazine she edits, Areo, from similar publications.

No Compromise Radio Podcast
Classic Friday: Top 20 Christian Books

No Compromise Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022


Mike quickly discusses 20 of his favorite Christian books. Beware: this show moves with rapidity! Machen – Christianity and Liberalism Berkhof – Systematic Theology Calvin – Institutes Dathenus – Pearl of Christian Comfort Sibbes – Bruised Reed Ferguson – Whole Christ Horton – Christ the Lord Fisher – Marrow of Modern Divinity Sproul – Chosen by God Fesko – Justification Bainton – Here I Stand Murray – Redemption accomplished and applied Warfield – The Plan of Salvation Anderson – To the Golden Shore: the Life of Adoniram Judson Stott – The Cross of Christ Bunyan – Pilgrim’s Progress Brown and Keele – Sacred Bond: Covenant Theology Explained Clark – Covenant, Justification, and Pastoral Ministry Marshall – Divine Mystery of Sanctification Pink – The Attributes of God

The Bob Cesca Show
George Tiller the Baby Killer

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 73:22


[Explicit Content] Tuesday's 1/6 committee hearings. Trump's fake executive orders. Trump's witness tampering. Newsmax says he butt-dialed.Steve Bannon and Mark Meadows are going to prison. Trump's fetish for chaos. Rapist confesses to assaulting 10-year-old Ohio girl. Fox News and the Republicans are targeting the Indiana doctor who helped the child. "I own your body now." Rep. Ralph Norman thinks women are murdering their newborn babies. Biden administration will provide emergency medical services for pregnant women in gulag states. With Spicy Jody Hamilton and David "TRex" Ferguson, music by Lucy and the Popsonics, Novelistme, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bob Cesca Show
Cliff Schecter and Trump's Stooges

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 58:15


[Explicit Language] All new show! We were supposed to talk with Robbie Pickering, creator of the Gaslit series on Starz, but we had to postpone to next week. Instead, Cliff Schecter returns for his month drop-in. Today, we talked about abortion, ballot initiatives, the Ohio Senate race, the latest from the 1/6 committee hearings, and more. Don't forget to subscribe to Cliff's YouTube channel where he's posting daily barnburner videos. Meantime, if you like what you hear, please help support this show by subscribing to our bonus content at patreon.com/bobcescashow. With additional music by Wahlsinger.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Hayek Program Podcast
Liberalism for All — The Political Economy of Equality

Hayek Program Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 61:31


On this episode of the Hayek Program Podcast, we continue a special summer series of the podcast on Liberalism for All, hosted by Jayme Lemke as she explores the underpinnings and outworkings of a free and open society. Driving the discussion is a set of core questions, including:What does it mean to be liberal in the 21st century?What is the relationship between liberalism and equality?Is the pursuit of equality a threat or opportunity for the liberal project?Joining Lemke for this episode is John Meadowcroft, a Reader in Public Policy at King's College London, as they discuss James Buchanan's work on a political economy of equals. Meadowcroft lays out his analysis of "consensual politics" and explains why true moral equality means that "everyone counts for one." He also explains why Buchanan believed the constitutional mentality begins with moral equality and examines Buchanan's proposal for unanimous consent in politics. As they conclude their discussion, Lemke and Meadowcroft consider those disadvantaged by the status quo and discuss what can be done to forward the vision of a society of freely relating moral equals.If you like the show, be sure to leave a 5-star review for us on Apple Podcasts and tell others about the show! We're available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, and wherever else you get your podcasts.Learn more about Meadowcroft's work.Follow the Hayek Program on Twitter: @HayekProgramLearn more about Academic & Student ProgramsFollow the Mercatus Center on Twitter: @mercatusCC Music: TwisteriumDirt Rhodes by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3650-dirt-rhodesLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

The BreakPoint Podcast
Can We Hack Humans?

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 5:21 Very Popular


One of the most enigmatic, sensational, and misguided thinkers of the last 10 years is Israeli historian and pop philosopher Yuval Noah Harari. His book Sapiens, published in English in 2015, sold over a million copies as it told the story of mankind's evolution. His 2017 book Homo Deus predicts a transhumanist future, a world where technology fundamentally reshapes what kind of entity human beings are.   “We humans should get used to the idea that we are no longer mysterious souls. We are now hackable animals,” he told attendees at the 2020 World Economic Forum annual meeting. “By hacking organisms, elites may gain the power to reengineer the power of life itself,” he said two years earlier. “This will be not just the greatest revolution in the history of humanity. This will be the greatest revolution in biology since the very beginning of life 4 billion years ago.”   Harari's prophecy doesn't end there:  “Science is replacing evolution by natural selection by evolution via intelligent design,” he continued in 2018. “Not the intelligent design of some God above the clouds, but our intelligent design, and the intelligent design of our clouds: the IBM cloud, the Microsoft cloud … these are the new, driving forces of evolution.”   Conspiracy theorists might be forgiven for having a field day with such statements. After all, Harari's outspoken fans include some of the most powerful people alive: Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, former President Barack Obama, as well as executive chairman of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab. Despite a somewhat critical response from academics, the success of his books is undeniable.   Still, Harari suffers from a fatal inconsistency. While positioning himself as a prophet, interested in solving the worst abuses that could befall our future hackable selves, he cuts the ideological ground out from anything standing in their way. A keen example is his critique of both liberal democracy and the entire concept of the “individual” as outdated political norms.   “Liberalism,” he wrote in the Guardian “is unprepared for a situation when individual freedom is subverted from within, and when the very concepts of ‘individual' and ‘freedom' no longer make much sense.” Yet in nearly the same breath, Harari rushes us towards that exact conclusion: “In order to survive and prosper in the 21st century,” he writes, “we need to leave behind the naive view of humans as free individuals—a view inherited from Christian theology as much as from the modern Enlightenment.”  Though he is right about the origins of classic liberalism, the result is a self-contradictory mess. In effect, Harari is saying we should stop people from being hacked by hacking ourselves first …  and defend universal values by denying that they exist. “I don't know where the answers will come from,” Harari admits, “but they are definitely not coming from a collection of stories written thousands of years ago.”   If those stories are just stories, Harari is correct. But as C.S. Lewis described, some stories ground us in reality. This is, in fact, what Christianity does, and what reductionist materialism makes impossible.   Though new insight on technology may have helped Harari sell interesting books, dreaming of a world stripped of all values is as old as modernism itself. Had someone given him a copy of Lewis' The Abolition of Man, he may have seen his exact premise tackled by an Oxford don nearly 80 years ago.   All of this matters because ideas have consequences. Harari and those like him may be attempting to shape the trajectory of transhumanism towards a utopian future but, as often the case, public intellectuals with good intentions but bad worldviews are often the blindest to the practical implications of their thinking.   “How does liberal democracy function in an era when governments and corporations can hack humans?” Harari asked in the Guardian article.  A better question is: How does liberal democracy function in an era when people rush to assume they are merely pre-determined “hackable animals” instead of moral agents who are responsible for their decisions, living in a society of people created equal and “endowed by their creator with inalienable rights?”   History tells us the answer to that question. It can't. The entire concept of human rights is intimately connected with a Christian anthropology. Gut a society of that worldview, and there's no limit to how far we can fall.   If Harari's predictions somehow do become reality, it will have less to do with technology, and far more to do with ideas: specifically, the nihilistic, reductionist humanity he so ardently promotes. Technology makes imagined futures possible, but ideas shape how and why we use technology. If he's looking for a worldview that's better for empowering techno-tyrants, corporatists, and demagogues, he could do little better than the one he's promoting.   On the other hand, if he's looking to evade the oppression he fears, he should look to One of the old stories he derides. 

The Bob Cesca Show
Patsy Baloney

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 74:50


[Explicit Content] We're back from the break with all news shows! The rise of theocratic idiocracy. Sarah Palin reloaded. We're paying too much attention to 2024 and the presidency. Today's 1/6 committee hearings. Cassidy Hutchinson forced into hiding. Patsy Baloney's 98-hour testimony. Bannon and his liver spots agree to testify. Buzz recaps the hearings so far. Trump's IRS audited political enemies. Near-term solutions to help women in gulag states. Exceptions in the Hyde Amendment. State ballot initiatives. Infant mortality in Alabama. Floating abortion clinic in the Gulf. What Republicans are telling their people about fighting Democrats. Fox News flipflops. Trump quits the board of Troth Senchul. With Buzz Burbank, music by The Dye, Wahlsinger, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Brian Lehrer Show
The End of Liberalism?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 25:41


Francis Fukuyama, senior fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, former State Department official, author of The End of History and the Last Man (Free Press, 1992) and his latest, Liberalism and Its Discontents (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2022), reflects on the state of liberal democracy which he had seemed ascendant in the wake of the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War and offers a critique of the current state of liberalism.