Podcasts about Austria

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Country in Central Europe

  • 7,149PODCASTS
  • 13,787EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 5, 2022LATEST
Austria

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    Best podcasts about Austria

    Show all podcasts related to austria

    Latest podcast episodes about Austria

    Mike Gallagher Podcast
    Guest Host Carl Jackson on Liz Cheny's Criminal Referral Desires + Mike checks in with us from Austria, and more!

    Mike Gallagher Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 36:37


    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    On The Continent
    Upfront: England vs Austria preview

    On The Continent

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 33:38


    The Euros is nearly here! Flo, Rachel and Chloe are here with your definitive guide to England's opening game tomorrow night!We look at Sarina Wiegmann's options in midfield - will she opt for captain Leah Williamson? There's also chat about how the Lionesses' potent attack can unlock a stubborn Austrian defence.Got a question for us? Tweet us @FootballRamble, @FloydTweet, @GirlsontheBall and @Morgie_89Artwork photo - GirlsontheBall ©***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    All Things Narrative
    Working with Communities through Collective Narrative Practices

    All Things Narrative

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 60:55


    Today I am honored to share my conversation with world-renowned Narrative Practitioner, teacher, and writer David Denborough. We discuss David's experience working in prisons, contributing to social actions, deconstructing masculinity, and his use of songs and folk culture to honor people's stories. Introduction (0:00) Developing a Passion for Narrative Practices (5:55) Rewriting Storylines of Identity in Prisons (11:56) Collective Narrative Practices & Folk Culture (26:50) "A Song of Survival" + Working at the Dulwich Centre (45:50) What Keeps David Going (53:30) David Denborough works as a community worker, teacher and writer/editor for Dulwich Centre. He is particularly interested in cross-cultural partnerships which limit the chances of psychological colonization and create possibilities for cross-cultural inventions, such as the Team of Life Narrative Approach and Tree of Life (with Ncazelo Ncube-Mlilo). These collective narrative methodologies seek to assist people to address the effects of traumatic experiences without having to speak directly about them. David is also vitally interested in how collective narrative practices can spark and/or sustain social movementand in projects that respond to racism and seek to strengthen social cohesion/inclusion.  Recent teaching/community assignments have included Brazil, Palestine, Singapore, Austria, Brazil, Hong Kong, Kurdistan (Iraq), India, Canada, Sri Lanka, Argentina, Chile, South Africa and a number of Aboriginal Australian communities. David is also a coordinator of the Master of Narrative Therapy and Community Work with the University of Melbourne where he is also involved in supporting/supervising graduate researchers. His songs in response to current social issues have received airplay throughout Australia and Canada. His books/publications include: Retelling the Stories of Our Lives Everyday Narrative Therapy to Draw Inspiration and Transform Experience and Collective Narrative Practice: Responding to Individuals, Groups and Communities Who Have Experienced Trauma. To learn more about David and his work, please visit The Dulwich Centre website.  All Things Narrative offers group workshops and 1-on-1 coaching that can empower you to live a meaningful story. Learn more and get your FREE consultation at: allthingsnarrative.com Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Read my Film Diary (including reviews and rankings) on Letterboxd

    Adult Site Broker Talk
    Adult Site Broker Talk Episode 109 With Ivan Of AltErotic

    Adult Site Broker Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 68:04


    Bruce F., host of Adult Site Broker Talk and CEO of Adult Site Broker, the leading adult website broker, who is known as the company to sell adult sites, is pleased to welcome Ivan of AltErotic to Adult Site Broker Talk. Russian Born Ivan came to United States in 1979 with his parents during the Cold War. His travels took him and his family through Austria and Italy where they lived for months. Living above a whore house in Austria was a precursor to Ivan's Award winning adult filmmaking career. AVN called him the “Horror Porn Maestro” with his witty Texas' Asshole Massacre and Dawn of the Head self entitled series of movies called Ivan's Slut-O-Rama. Ivan has over 100 AVN Award nominations. He's won Web Director of the Year and followed that up with back-to-back wins for the same honor at the XRCO Awards. Adult Site Broker is the most experienced company to broker adult sites. They've sold and helped people buy more xxx sites than any other broker. Adult Site Broker is the leading company to sell porn sites and buy porn sites. They help their clients work out equitable deals. Check out their brand-new website at www.adultsitebroker.com, the leading destination to broker porn sites. Adult Site Broker also has an affiliate program, ASB Cash, at https://asbcash.com, where you can earn up to 20% referring people to buy adult sites and sell adult sites to Adult Site Broker, the porn website broker. And they are now offering a FREE marketplace for sellers with properties valued at less than their minimum listing amount of $50,000, www.asbmarketplace.com. For more information, please visit us at www.adultsitebroker.com to help you broker adult sites. Listen to Ivan of AltErotic on Adult Site Broker Talk, starting today at www.adultsitebrokertalk.com

    Do you really know?
    [RERUN] What is Islamism?

    Do you really know?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 4:33


    What is Islamism? A spate of terrorist attacks have been carried out across Europe in recent weeks, most notably in France and Austria. Political leaders have attributed the violence to Islamists, calling for a united front in battling this form of radicalism. Nevertheless, use of the term “Islamism” is somewhat controversial. It's important to make the distinction between the religion Islam itself, which is practised by all Muslims, and the separate political concept of Islamism.  So what's the difference between Islam and Islamism? What's so controversial about the term Islamism then? Are there other better alternatives to talking about Islamism? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! To listen the last episodes, you can click here: Why is Elvis known as the King? Is the menopause still a taboo subject? What is shrinkflation, the sneaky tactic manufacturers are hiding from consumers? A podcast written and realised by Joseph Chance. In partnership with upday UK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Cut To The Race | By FormulaNerds
    THE ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE ROUND 10 - F1 BRITISH GP RACE REVIEW 2022

    Cut To The Race | By FormulaNerds

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 98:58


    On this week's ‘Cut to the Race' Podcast, Oli is joined by Abby and James, as they discuss the action-packed and epic race that was the British Grand Prix at Silverstone. ** This episode is brought to you by EightSleep - Ready for better sleep? Eight Sleep users fall asleep up to 32% faster, reduce sleep interruptions by 40%, and get overall more restful sleep. Replace your mattress or just add the Pod technology to your existing mattress. Get £150 off your purchase by visiting https://www.eightsleep.com/formulanerds/ The trio briefly touch on the timings from practice that saw Lewis Hamilton look promising at his home race. The action of qualifying is also covered as a  surprise Williams driver made it into Q3, but Sebastian Vettel and Lance Stroll weren't as lucky. The panel discuss the National Anthem before launching into the drama that was Silverstone. The horrific opening lap incidents going into Turn 1 are dissected by the trio as well wishes are sent to Zhou Guanyu and Alex Albon. Admiration is sent to George Russell for his sportsmanship, and all the Marshalls, who were involved with the protestors. On-track battles between Perez, Hamilton and the Ferrari's are most definitely a topic of conversation as well as the fight between Max Verstappen and Mick Schumacher, which the panel share their views on. They then discuss race results, their race ratings and their drivers of the day, as is tradition. Next up is Austria with the second Sprint Race of the season so be sure to check out our race review next week.   Keep up to date with all the latest Formula 1 News @ www.formulanerds.com   Follow Us: - Facebook www.Facebook.com/FormulaNerds - Twitter www.twitter.com/Formula_Nerds - Instagram www.instagram.com/FormulaNerds - TikTok www.tiktok.com/@formulanerdsofficial   For Advertising & Sponsorship Opportunities:- Email Business@FormulaNerds.com

    Football Daily
    Euro 2022: The 5 players to watch

    Football Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 52:53


    For the first Daily Euros podcast Steve Crossman is joined by England defender Anita Asante, ex-England striker Natasha Dowie and The Telegraph's Luke Edwards to draw up their list of the top five players to look out for across the tournament. The rules were simple, all picks had to come from outside of the home nations and no more than one player per country. But, the panel do give their thoughts on who could be England's and Northern Ireland's one-to-watch. We're also hear the latest from the Lionesses, as our reporter in the camp - Juliette Ferrington - catches up with Beth Mead, who reveals the side's mental strength is as strong as ever ahead of the opening game with Austria on Wednesday. TOPICS: 3'00 Excitement around the tournament and the growth of the game 6'40 Which England player is the 'one-to-watch'? 11'00 Beth Mead interview with Juliette Ferrington 13'40 What to expect from Northern Ireland 18'30 Player one - Alexia Putellas 25'00 Player two - Vivianne Miedema 31'50 Player three - Lina Hurtig 36'40 Player four - Caroline Graham Hansen 42'00 Player five - Valentina Bergamaschi 44'30 Players who missed out

    Programa del Motor: AutoFM
    F1 GP de Gran Bretaña 2022 Las 10 claves en AutoFM. Primera victoria de Carlos Sainz

    Programa del Motor: AutoFM

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 26:40


    LAS CLAVES DEL GP DE GRAN BRETAÑA Matador junior. Carlos Sainz logra su primera pole y su primera victoria, por fin, haciendo una gran clasificación y desoyendo las órdenes de equipo. 2. No hubo milagro. Que el pavoroso accidente de Guayu Zhou se saldará sin heridas es una prueba más de la seguridad alcanzada por la F1. No cabe hablar de milagro, hay mucho trabajo detrás. Y más por hacer. 3. El gafe de Charles Leclerc. Entre la fiabilidad y la estrategia de Ferrari, Leclerc empieza a ver cómo el mundial queda más y más lejos. 4. Max Verstappen no se rinde. Pese a que se rompió el suelo de su coche, el holandés logró minimizar daños acabando séptimo. Así se ganan los títulos. 5. La remontada. Imperial “Checo” Pérez que se sobrepuso al cambio de morro del inicio para acabar segundo. 6. Lewis Hamilton está de vuelta. Llevamos tiempo diciéndolo, cuando el Mercedes esté para cotas mayores, Lewis estará de vuelta. Carrera para enmarcar del inglés. Segundo podio seguido. 7. Brillante Fernando Alonso. Sublime en clasificación en agua, una vez más, y sólido en carrera. El mejor del resto, por delante de Lando Norris. 8. Por fin. Desde que tuvo toda una serie de accidente, Mick Schumacher ha ido recobrando confianza y aquí logró su primeros puntos (8º y 4 puntos). Gran duelo con Max. 9. Qué bueno es Lando Norris. Sus excelentes fines de semana son habituales y quizá por eso destacan menos, pero de nuevo se lució. Un talentazo. 10. Brecha de seguridad. En la primera vuelta de la primera salida, un grupo de activistas saltó a la pista y se sentó en ella. La bandera roja evitó una desgracia. Inconcebible. Los españoles y “Checo”: - Carlos Sainz (1º): Primera pole, primer triunfo y casi primer hat-trick. Sólo un error en carrera en un gran fin de semana. - Sergio “Checo” Pérez (2º): Remontada espectacular y gran lucha al final para completar el doblete latino. Más flojo en clasificación pero soberbio en carrera. - Fernando Alonso (5º): De los cinco primeros en carrera, tres hablaban español. Fernando Alonso ha entrado ya en modo martillo pilón y a buen seguro seguirá marcando muchos puntos a partir de ahora Destacados: La estrella: Carlos Sainz, triunfo merecido. El estrellado: Charles Leclerc, sin fortuna. La sorpresa: El ritmo de Mercedes. Qué momento: Lucha Charles Leclerc - Lewis Hamilton - Sergio ‘Checo’ Pérez. Para no perderse en GP de Austria de F1 (8-10 julio): - Para Scudería Ferrari es urgente seguir recortando puntos a Red Bull. F1 Team. - La Escudería Red Bull F1 Team a dar el do de pecho en su casa. ¿Será la mejora de Mercedes un espejismo?. Todos los programas de F1 en AutoFM los tienes juntos en esta lista: https://www.ivoox.com/f1-2022-autofm_bk_list_10094520_1.html Presenta: Fernando Rivas @rivasportauto Coordina: Jose Lagunar @JoseLagunar Colabora: Iván Vicario @VicarioMartin Web Coches clásicos: http://www.grupov.es/revistas/20-coches-clasicos/revista Puedes seguirnos en nuestra web: https://autofm.es/ Twiter: @AutoFmRadio Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/autofmradio/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC57czZy-ctfV02t_PeNXCAQ Contacto: info@autofm.es

    Be Kind
    Data-driven Marketing: How to do Web3 Marketing the right way!

    Be Kind

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 37:24


    This episode is about marketing utilizing data, and how your project can actually start utilizing it. + About the guests: Mark Forschner - CEO of DigiBridge - NFT Trader/Analyst - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markforschner/ Richard Scheufler - Advisor @DigiBridge - Chief Marketing Consultant of VIB Marketing Agency - Founder of NFT Art Gallery, Drone Providers and Marketing Foundation USA - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-scheufler/ Steven Forschner - Head of Outreach & Partnership @DigiBridge - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/steven-forschner-60742a212/ --- Wavect is a smart contract & DApp development agency located in Austria. We are in crypto since 2017/2018 and are working with international companies of all sizes. https://wavect.io https://linkedin.com/in/wsdt #marketing #data #web3

    Data Skeptic
    Privacy Preference Signals

    Data Skeptic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 33:28


    Have you ever wondered what goes on under the hood when you accept a website's cookies? Today, Maximilian Hils, a PhD student in Computer Science, at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, dissects the ad tech industry and the standards put in place to protect users' data. He also shares his thoughts on the use of VPNs as well as other tools that help shield your data from prying eyes on the internet. Click here for additional show notes Thanks to our sponsor: https://clear.ml/ ClearML is an open-source MLOps solution users love to customize, helping you easily Track, Orchestrate, and Automate ML workflows at scale.

    The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
    Genetically Engineering Animals In Factory Farms To Fit Into Torture Mode - Vandana Shiva, PhD - Interview

    The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 8:57


    Genetically Engineering Animals In Factory Farms To Fit Into Torture Mode - Vandana Shiva, PhD - Interview Vandana Shiva, Ph.D. • https://www.navdanya.org/site/• Book - Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply Besides being a physicist, ecologist, activist, editor, and author of numerous books, Vandana Shiva is a tireless defender of the environment. She is the founder of Navdanya, a movement for biodiversity conservation and farmers' rights. She is also the founder and director of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Natural Resource Policy. Shiva fights for changes in the practice and paradigms of agriculture and food: “I don't want to live in a world where five giant companies control our health and our food.” Intellectual property rights, biodiversity, biotechnology, bioethics, and genetic engineering are among the fields where Shiva has contributed intellectually and through activist campaigns. During the 1970s, she participated in the nonviolent Chipko movement, whose main participants were women. She has assisted grassroots organizations of the Green movement in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Ireland, Switzerland, and Austria with campaigns against genetic engineering. Shiva has also served as an adviser to governments in India and abroad as well as non-governmental organizations, including the International Forum on Globalization, the Women's Environment and Development Organization, the Third World Network, and the Asia Pacific People's Environment Network. #VandanaShiva #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #RealFoodForHealth #Glyphosate #Pesticides #Monsanto CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

    F1: Lift & Coast
    CARLOS SAINZ FORMULA 1 RACE WINNER

    F1: Lift & Coast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 53:21


    Silverstone stays undefeated, the best race of the season! Massive crash for Zhou, Mick with his first points, and Carlos Sainz is now a race winner. Lewis Hamilton showed incredible race pace. We now head to Austria, will Mercedes continue to improve? Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tidalleague/  

    Nightlife
    You say Austria, and I say Australia. Let's call the whole thing off.

    Nightlife

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 18:24


    They're two countries in different hemispheres of the earth. So, how can people continue to mix them up?

    Jonathan van Bilsen
    Bavaria and the River Rhine - July, 2022

    Jonathan van Bilsen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 29:01


    Southern Germany is often referred to as the land of fairytales. The Black Forest in Bavaria is a traveller's paradise. Join Jonathan van Bilsen as he explores Neuschwanstein Castle, discovers some interesting facts about Octoberfest, visits Frankfurt and Munich and travels along the Rhine

    Gate 7 International Podcast
    Episode 178: Olympiacos vs RB Salzburg 1-3 | Preseason in Austria Over | Where is this Team Going?

    Gate 7 International Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 28:03


    REACTION to the friendly against RB Salzburg. Costa & Lambro analyse Olympiacos last friendly on Austrian soil and look back at the preseason camp and what we have seen in all the friendlies.

    The Travel Show
    Travel Show: Larry in Austria

    The Travel Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 69:26


    NCL free air and at sea promotion, Highlights of Salzburg, Holy Land Fall tour, England, Wales & Scotland with Abby Bonell

    Nightlife
    You say Austria, and I say Australia. Let's call the whole thing off.

    Nightlife

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 18:24


    They're two countries in different hemispheres of the earth. So, how can people continue to mix them up?

    The Empowered Spirit Show
    The Empath's Oracle with Raven Digitalis

    The Empowered Spirit Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 39:00


    This episode is being brought to you by Forecast located in Homewood Alabama. Forecast is a hair salon on a mission to shape a movement in the beauty industry focusing on education, fashion, and creativity. Forecast strives to train stylists with the latest in education to provide their guests with the latest trends. Follow them on Instagram @forecastsalon or find them online at https://www.forecastsalon.com/ As this podcast goes to air, we have just gone through the first new moon of summer.   Cancer is about the inner feelings… your emotions.. your intuition and learning how to lead with your innate ability to know… see and hear and feel. It is a time of being sensitive to yourself and others around you.  If you only display the outer shell, how will others really know who you are?  Showing your sensitivity isn't a weakness... it's a strength. The Cancer season is a time of self-care.. nurturing your inner child… and allowing for the growth to open up. It is a time to find  patience with yourself for all your growth.  It is a time to approach life with curiosity and growth.  This is the rhythm of where we are right now: new phases ...  Summer is the time to develop faith in your life, you can remove the darkness with your light, and trust that, just like the Sun, you will rise each day no matter where your path takes you. Knowing  your energy ... your truth … your voice.. your Spirit is so valuable at this time. And that's where the RITES come in to help you move through all this stuff! Rites being Reiki.. intuition.. tarot.. eft and stones and crystals. Finding ways to tend to the struggles of your life  with these tools in your every day can add inspiration and amusement, and joy. Energy Focus for the Week – live on Sunday nights on Instagram and FB. We talk about what's going on, we align our energy, set intentions for the week and I  pull the Tarot cards for guidance. Join us! As we move through these comic transitions, now is the time to clean up your energy with an energy clearing session.  Schedule one now... in person or online. When you work with the energy body, it helps to release the old patterns and all that old stuff… especially from winter.  Empowered Spirit Private Mentoring Program. Schedule a Spiritual Upgrade Breakthrough call with me and let's talk about how my programs can help you. In today's episode, I speak with Raven Digitalis all the way from Hawaii… you can hear all the birds around him in this interview… Raven is the author of The Empath's Oracle, The Everyday Empath amongst other things.. Empaths … what a great topic for this season!  Empaths are often misunderstood!  We talk about the oracles, empaths.. gift or curse… finding. Your power,  self-care tools for the Empath, the darker side… the shadows.. how to grow from that, and how the oracles (and the Tarot) can help you grow along your path. Raven Digitalis is the author of The Empath's Oracle, The Everyday Empath, Esoteric Empathy, Shadow Magick Compendium, Planetary Spells & Rituals, and Goth Craft (Llewellyn Worldwide publications). Trained in Georgian Witchcraft, Raven has been an earth-based practitioner since 1999, a Priest since 2003, a Freemason since 2012, and an empath all of his life. He holds a degree in cultural anthropology from the University of Montana and co-operated a nonprofit Pagan Temple for 16 years. He is also a professional Tarot reader, DJ, card-carrying magician, and animal rights advocate. Llewellyn        www.ravendigitalis.com.         Facebook.      Instagram Konstantin Bax (Germany) is an artist whose paintings have been exhibited in Austria and the United States. He describes his works as being based on the concept of balance. Bax's artistic expression is marked by the marriage of control and chaos as well as punk and perfection.   Instagram This splendid oracle deck is uniquely designed to act as an empath's companion on the road to spiritual enlightenment. Each card comes alive with fluid lines, abstract figures, and dazzling hues that you can draw on to answer your questions, reflect on life lessons, and more. Featuring a companion book by well-known author and empath Raven Digitalis, The Empath's Oracle helps you to build a daily spiritual practice and live an empowered life.   Everyone has an Empowered Spirit that wants to come through. Self-care leads to self-awareness which can help you to find your unique Spirit that is so needed in the world .. right now. As Raven shares, You get to choose who you hang out with and who you share or don't share, your energy with. There is more than meets the eye in the world around us that can affect your energy. Reach out to Raven for his Empath Oracle cards and his books. If you need help with your Spiritual practice, reach out to me. Schedule a Spiritual Upgrade Breakthrough call with me and let's get you started! Thanks again for listening! To your Spirit, Terri Get the Energy Mastery App Follow Terri on Instagram Find her on LinkedIn Episode Credits: Sound Engineer: Laarni Andreshttps://www.facebook.com/laarni.andres.7

    Russell Investments
    Q2 earnings season preview: Key watchpoints for markets

    Russell Investments

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 4:06


    In the latest podcast update:•Markets see-saw on inflation reports, economic data releases•Three reasons why Q2 earnings season could be challenging•June employment report, CPI reading loom large for U.S. marketsIMPORTANT DISCLOSURE:These views are subject to change at any time based upon market or other conditions and are current as of the date at the top of the page.Investing involves risk and principal loss is possible.Past performance does not guarantee future performance.Forecasting represents predictions of market prices and/or volume patterns utilizing varying analytical data. It is not representative of a projection of the stock market, or of any specific investment.This material is not an offer, solicitation or recommendation to purchase any security. Nothing contained in this material is intended to constitute legal, tax, securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment, nor a solicitation of any type.The general information contained in this publication should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax and investment advice from a licensed professional.  The information, analysis and opinions expressed herein are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual entity.Please remember that all investments carry some level of risk. Although steps can be taken to help reduce risk it cannot be completely removed. They do no not typically grow at an even rate of return and may experience negative growth. As with any type of portfolio structuring, attempting to reduce risk and increase return could, at certain times, unintentionally reduce returns.Investments that are allocated across multiple types of securities may be exposed to a variety of risks based on the asset classes, investment styles, market sectors, and size of companies preferred by the investment managers. Investors should consider how the combined risks impact their total investment portfolio and understand that different risks can lead to varying financial consequences, including loss of principal. Please see a prospectus for further details.The S&P 500® Index, or the Standard & Poor's 500, is a stock market index based on the market capitalizations of 500 large companies having common stock listed on the NYSE or NASDAQ.The MSCI AC (All Country) World Index: Captures large and mid-cap representation across 23 Developed Markets (DM) and 24 Emerging Markets (EM) countries. With 2,791 constituents, the index covers approximately 85% of the global investable equity opportunity set.The FTSE 100 is a market-capitalization weighted index of UK-listed blue chip companies.With a fixed number of 600 components, the STOXX® Europe 600 Index represents large, mid and small capitalization companies across 17 countries of the European region: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. It is derived from the STOXX® Europe Total Market Index (TMI) and is a subset of the STOXX® Global 1800 Index.Indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested in directly.Copyright © Russell Investments Group LLC 2022. All rights reserved.This material is proprietary and may not be reproduced, transferred, or distributed in any form without prior written permission from Russell Investments. It is delivered on an “as is” basis without warranty.CORP-12077Date of first use July, 2022

    ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast
    Eurovision Chat Over Coffee From The Archive: Conchita

    ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 24:28


    One of the most recognisable performers at the Eurovision Song Contest 2014 was Austria's Conchita Wurst. Let's head into the archives and go back to April 2014, as Ewan meets Conchita before Eurovision victory rewarded us with a legend. The post Eurovision Chat Over Coffee From The Archive: Conchita appeared first on ESC Insight - Home of the Unofficial Eurovision Song Contest Podcast.

    The Tech Humanist Show
    Why Human Experience? (vs Customer, Consumer, User, etc)

    The Tech Humanist Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 32:25


    This week, we're exploring why it behooves businesses and business leaders to look at their users, consumers, customers, etc., as humans first. Slightly shifting perspective to consider the humanity behind purchasing decisions can lead to greater loyalty, more frequent use, and genuinely happier users, all of which add up to more business success and better outcomes for the world. Together with my guests, we discuss how human-centric decisions apply to various industries and how you can build better relationships that lead to success for all of humanity. Guests this week include Charlie Cole, Neil Redding, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Ana Milicevic, Cathy Hackl, Marcus Whitney, and David Ryan Polgar. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. Produced and edited by Chloe Skye, with research by Ashley Robinson and Erin Daugherty at Interrobang and input from Elizabeth Marshall. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube, or head to KOInsights.com. Full Transcript Kate O'Neill: When you buy something, you're a customer. But — to paraphrase a line from the movie Notting Hill — you're also just a person, standing in front of a business, asking it to treat you like a human being. Over the last two decades plus working in technology, I've often held job titles that were centered on the experience of the user, the consumer, or the customer. In fact, the term ‘customer experience' has been in use since at least the 1960s, and has become so common that a recent survey of nearly 2,000 business professionals showed that customer experience was the top priority over the next five years. And while generally speaking this emphasis is a good thing, my own focus over the past decade or so has shifted. I've realized that the more macro consideration of human experience was a subtle but vital piece missing from the discussion at large. Because when we talk about experience design and strategy, no matter what word we use to qualify it—customer, user, patient, guest, student, or otherwise—we are always talking about humans, and the roles humans are in relative to that experience. In order to refocus on human experience instead of customer, you have to change the way you think about your buyers. You owe it to yourself to think not just about how people can have a better experience purchasing from your company, but also what it means to be fully human within the journey that brings them to that moment, and the uniquely human factors that drive us to make decisions leading to purchase or loyalty. A recent piece by Deloitte shared in the Wall Street Journal echoes this idea and offers five ways to be more human-centric in business: 1) be obsessed by all things human, 2) proactively identify & understand human needs before they are expressed, 3) execute with humanity, 4) be authentic, and 5) change the world. That's what today's episode is about: using empathy and strategic business-savvy to understand what it means to be human, and how that intersects with the worlds of technology and business. Neil Redding: “When you look at everything that has to do with buying and selling of things, it's so closely tied with what we care about, what we value most, value enough as humans to spend our hard-earned money on. And so, the realm of retail reflects something really deeply human, and profoundly human.” Kate: That was Neil Redding, brand strategist and self-described “Near Futurist” focused on the retail space. He's right—buying and selling things has become deeply entwined with humanity. But when we purchase something, it's not because we think of ourselves as “customers” or “end users.” We buy because we have a need or desire to fulfill, and sometimes that need is purely emotional. A ‘customer' buys your product—a human buys your product for a reason. 84% of consumers say that being treated like a person instead of a number is an important element to winning their business. It does seem like business professionals are catching on, as 79% say it's impossible to provide great service without full context of the client and their needs. But understanding something isn't the same as putting it into practice—only 34% of people say they feel like companies actually treat them as individuals. One major difference is the question of framing. Customer experience frames the motivator as, ‘how effectively the business operates the events related to a purchase decision.' It drives companies to focus on improving their own metrics, like bringing down call center wait times. These may yield worthwhile outcomes, but they're inherently skewed to the business perspective and aligned to the purchase transaction. Focusing instead on human experience shifts the perspective to the person outside the business, and what they want or need. It allows consideration of the emotional state they may be bringing to the interaction, which leaves greater room for empathy and context. A human experience mindset suggests that each individual's unique circumstances are more important than aggregate business metrics, because the reason why that person is interacting with your company probably can't be captured by measuring, say, how long they might have to wait on the phone. You could bring that wait time to zero and it still may not have any impact on whether the person feels heard, respected, or satisfied with the outcome — or whether they want to engage with you again. But as fuzzy as it is to talk about human experience, we know that measurement is fundamental to business success, so we have to find a way to define useful metrics somehow. For each business, that number is likely a bit different. So how do you know whether your customers feel like they're being treated as humans instead of just numbers? Charlie Cole, CEO of the flower delivery website ftd.com, believes one answer is obsessing over customer satisfaction metrics. Charlie Cole: “The best way to win this industry is just kick ass with the customer. We obsess over NPS scores, uh, as kind of leading indicators of LTV scores.” Kate: If you're not familiar with the acronyms, allow me to decipher: NPS stands for Net Promoter Score, which measures how likely the customer is to recommend the business, and LTV in this context means ‘lifetime value,' or the amount a customer may spend at your business over the course of their lifetime. Charlie Cole: “But remember, it's not the receiver's lifetime, it's the sender's lifetime. I mean, think about it. My stepmom is—just had a birthday April 9th, and I sent her a plant. If I went on a website and picked out a Roselia, and she received an Azelia, she's gonna be like, ‘thank you so much, that was so thoughtful of you,' and I'm gonna be pissed, right? And so like, we have to make sure we optimize that sender NPS score. It was shocking to us when we looked into the NPS, when we first got to FTD, our NPS, Kate, was in like the teens! My CTO looked at it and he goes, ‘how is this possible? We send gifts, who doesn't like receiving gifts?' And so we were looking at this stuff and we realized like, this is how you win. And I think when people look at the world of online delivery, there's very few companies that are extremely customer-centric… and in our world it matters. It's births, it's deaths, it's birthdays, it's Mother's Days… it's the most emotional moments of your life that you're relying on us for, so I think that gravitas just goes up to the next level.” Kate: Net Promoter Score offers directional insight about the customer experience, but it still isn't quite measurement of the broader human experience. The typical NPS question is phrased, “How likely is it that you would recommend [company X] to a friend or colleague?”, which forces customers to predict future actions and place themselves into hypothetical or idealistic scenarios. It is also measured on a 1-10 scale, which is pretty arbitrary and subjective — one person's 9 would not be another person's 9. A clearer way to ask this and gain more useful human-centric data would be with simple yes/no questions, asking people about actual past behaviors. For instance, “in the past 6 weeks, have you recommended [company X] to a friend or colleague?” Other alternative measures include PES, or Product Engagement Score, which measures growth, adoption, and stickiness of a given product or service, and doesn't require directly asking customers questions about their past or future habits. Instead, data comes in in real-time and allows for a clear measurement of success relative to a product's usage. While these metrics are useful in various ways, one thing missing from them is emotion. As humans, we are animals deeply driven by our emotions: research from MIT Sloan finds that before humans decide to take an action—any action, including buying something—the decision must first go through a filtering process that incorporates both reason and feelings. Reason leads to conclusions, but emotion leads to action. And if a customer feels frustrated by the customer service they're experiencing—perhaps they feel like they are being treated like a number, and not a person—they'll file a complaint, share on social media, and tell their friends and family to avoid the business. These actions can be quite time-consuming, but people will give up their time to right a wrong they feel they've experienced. All this is to say that if you want to retain human loyalty or attract new people to your business, you have to create a positive emotional response in your customers, which means understanding more about who they are than simply what product they might want. Many businesses have discovered that one of the best ways to create an emotional connection with people is through branding. A great brand image can forge a permanent bond with someone who feels strongly that the company shares their values and practices what they preach. Once someone has connected a brand to their own identity, it becomes much more difficult to convince them to switch to another company—even if that company provides the same product at lower cost—because switching companies feels like losing a part of them. Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Director of the Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency, and Accountability team at Twitter, explored the concept of branding with me when she came on my show last year. Rumman Chowdhury: “Human flourishing is not at odds with good business. Some of what you build, especially if you're a B2C company, it's about brand. It's about how people feel when they interact with your technology or your product. You are trying to spark an emotion. Why do you buy Coke vs Pepsi? Why do you go to McDonald's vs Burger King? Some of this is an emotional decision. It's also this notion of value. People can get overly narrowly focused on value as revenue generation—value comes from many, many different things. People often choose less ‘efficient' outcomes or less economically sound outcomes because of how it makes them feel. A frivolous example but an extreme example of it would be luxury brands. Apple spends so much money on design. Opening every Apple product is designed to feel like you're opening a present. That was intentional. They fully understand the experience of an individual, in interacting with technology like a phone or a computer, is also an emotional experience.” Kate: If you're able to understand what people connect to about your brand, you can invest into magnifying that image. If your customer loves that you invest into clean energies, it becomes less important how much time they spend on the phone waiting for a service rep. Operational metrics can't show you this emotional resonance, so instead you have to think about what makes you stand out, and why people are attracted to you. Sometimes, however, human emotion has nothing to do with the product or brand in question, and more to do with the circumstances surrounding it. There's perhaps no better example of this than flowers, which can be given for myriad reasons, and usually at the extreme ends of the emotional spectrum. I'll let Charlie Cole explain. Charlie Cole: “For us, it's buyer journey by occasion. So, you are sending flowers for the birth of a newborn. You are sending flowers for the tragic death of a teenager. You are sending flowers for the death of your 96 year old great grandfather. You are sending flowers for your wife's birthday. I would argue that even though the end of all those buyer journeys is ‘flowers,' they are fundamentally different. And you have to understand the idiosyncrasies within those buyer journeys from an emotional component. You have to start with the emotions in mind. You're buying running shoes. The buying journey for like a runner, for like a marathoner, a guy who runs all the time, is emotionally different than someone who just got told they need to lose weight at the doctor. Someone who travels for business all the time versus someone who's taking their first ever international…travel. Like, my wife retold a story the other day to my aunt about how her first European trip was when she won a raffle to go to Austria when she was 17. And her, like, single mom was taking her to Europe, and neither of them had ever been to Europe. That's a different luggage journey than me, who used to fly 300,000 miles a year. And I think that if you take the time to really appreciate the emotional nuance of those journeys, yes there's data challenges, and yes there's customer recognition challenges, so you can personalize it. But I would urge every brand to start with like the emotional amino-acid level of why that journey starts, and then reverse-engineer it from there. Because I think you'll be able to answer the data challenges and the attribution challenges, but I think that's a place where we sometimes get too tech-y and too tactical, as opposed to human.” Kate: Another challenge unique to flowers and other products usually given as gifts is that there are two completely different humans involved in the transaction, each with different expectations and emotions riding on it. Charlie Cole: “There's two people involved in every one of our journeys, or about 92% of them: the buyer, and the receiver. So how do I message to you, I don't want to ruin the surprise! But I need to educate you, and oh yeah, I'm a really really nervous boyfriend, right? I wanna make sure everybody's doing it right, and it's gonna be there on time, and I need to make sure it's going to the right place… So the messaging pathways to the sender and receiver are fundamentally different. If you kind of forget about your buying journey, and imagine everything as a gifting buyer journey, it just changes the messaging component. Not in a nuanced way, but darn near in a reciprocal way.” And while some businesses struggle to connect emotionally with the humans that make up their customer base, the tech industry—and specifically social media companies—seem to fundamentally understand what it is that humans crave, in a way that allows them to use it against us. They thrive because they take something that is quintessentially human—connecting with people and sharing our lives—and turn it into a means for data collection that can then be used to sell us products that feel specifically designed for us. Like most of us, Neil Redding has experienced this phenomenon firsthand. Neil Redding: “We spend more and more of our time in contexts that we are apparently willing to have commercialized, right? Instagram is kind of my go-to example, where almost all of us have experienced this uncanny presentation to us of something that we can buy that's like so closely tied to… I mean, it's like how did you know that this is what I wanted? So myself and people close to me have just said, ‘wow, I just keep buying this stuff that gets presented to me on Instagram that I never heard of before but gets pushed to me as like, yeah it's so easy, and it's so aligned with what I already want. So there's this suffusion of commercial transaction—or at least discovery—of goods that can be bought and sold, y'know, in these moments of our daily lives, y'know, so that increasingly deep integration of commerce and buying and selling of things into our self-expression, into our communication, works because what we care about and what we are willing to buy or what we are interested in buying are so intertwined, right? They're kind of the same thing at some deep level.” Kate: Part of the reason this works is that humans crave convenience. Lack of convenience adds friction to any process, and friction can quickly lead to frustration, which isn't a mind state that leads to more business. The internet and social media has made keeping up with friends and gathering information incredibly convenient, so an advertisement here or there—especially one that looks and feels the same as everything else on our feed—doesn't bother us like it might in other contexts. And when those advertisements have been tailored specifically to our interests, they're even less likely to spark a negative emotion, and may in fact encourage us to buy something that we feel is very “us.” The big question for business leaders and marketers then is how do you digitize your business so that it emphasizes the richness of the human experience? How do you know which technologies to bring into your business, and which to leave aside? There are plenty of established and emerging technologies to choose from: Interactive email helps marketers drive engagement and also provides an avenue for additional data collection. Loyalty marketing strategies help brands identify their best customers and customize experiences for them. Salesforce introduced new features to help humanize the customer service experience with AI-powered conversational chatbots that feel pretty darn close to speaking with an actual human. Virtual and Augmented Reality website options allow customers to interact with products and see them in their hands or living rooms before they buy. With all the choice out there, it can be overwhelming. And t oo often, businesses and governments lean into the “just buy as much tech as possible!” approach without thinking integratively about the applications of said technology. Many companies are using that technology to leverage more data than ever before, hoping to customize and personalize experiences. David Ryan Polgar, a tech ethicist and founder of All Tech Is Human, explains why this method may not yield the results you think—because humans aren't just a collection of data points. David Ryan Polgar: “Are we an algorithm, or are we unique? I always joke, like, my mom always said I'm a, a snowflake! I'm unique! Because, when you think about Amazon and recommendations, it's thinking that your past is predicting your future. And that, with enough data, we can accurately determine where your next step is. Or even with auto-suggestion, and things like that. What's getting tricky is, is that true? Or is it subtly going to be off? With a lot of these auto-suggestions, let's say like text. Well the question I always like to think about is, how often am I influenced by what they said I should say? So if I wanna write, like, ‘have a…' and then it says ‘great day,' well, maybe I was gonna say great day, but maybe I was gonna say good day. And it's subtly different, but it's also influencing kinda, my volition. Now we're being influenced by the very technology that's pushing us is a certain direction. And we like to think of it, ‘well, it's already based on you,' but then that has a sort of cyclical nature to actually extending—” Kate: “Quantum human consciousness or something.” David: “Exactly! Exactly.” Kate: “Like, the moment you observe it, it's changed.” Kate: It's so easy, especially when you work with data, to view humans as output generators. But we're living in an age where people are growing increasingly wary of data collection, which means you may not know as much about the people whose data you've collected as you think you do. Becoming dependent on an entirely data-driven model for customer acquisition may lead to faulty decisions — and may even be seen as a huge mistake five years from now. Instead, I always talk about “human-centric digital transformation,” which means the data and tech-driven changes you make should start from a human frame. Even if you're already adopting intelligent automation to accelerate your operations, in some cases, very simple technologies may belong at the heart of your model. Here's Neil Redding again. Neil Redding: “Using Zoom or FaceTime or Skype is the only technology needed to do what a lot of stores have done during COVID, where their customers expect the store associate interaction when they come to the stores, they just create a one-on-one video call, and the shopper just has this interaction over videochat, or video call, and kind of does that associate-assisted shopping, right? And so you have that human connection, and again, it's nowhere near as great as sitting across a table and having coffee, but it's better than, y'know, a 2-dimensional e-commerce style shopping experience.” Kate: As a parallel to video conferencing, Virtual Reality has opened up avenues for new human experiences of business as well. Cathy Hackl, a metaverse strategist and tech futurist, explained a new human experience she was able to have during COVID that wouldn't have been possible without VR. Cathy Hackl: “I'll give you an example, like with the Wall Street Journal, they had the WSJ Tech Live, which is their big tech conference, and certain parts of it were in VR, and that was a lot of fun! I mean, I was in Spatial, which is one of the platforms, hanging out with Joanna Stern, and with Jason Mims, and like, in this kind of experience, where like I actually got to spend some 1-on-1 time with them, and I don't know if I would have gotten that if I was in a Zoom call, and I don't know if I would have gotten that in person, either.” Kate: Virtual Reality and video technologies have also opened up new avenues for healthcare, allowing patients to conference with doctors from home and only travel to a hospital if absolutely necessary. Marcus Whitney is a healthcare investor and founder of the first venture fund in America to invest exclusively in Black founded and led healthcare innovation companies; he explains that these virtual experiences allow for better happiness, healing, and comfort. Marcus Whitney: “Going forward, telehealth will be a thing. We were already on the path to doing more and more healthcare in the home. It was something that they were trying to stop because, is the home an appropriate place for healthcare to take place? Lo and behold, it's just fine. Patients feel more secure in the home, and it's a better environment for healing, so you're gonna see a lot more of that. I think we're finally gonna start seeing some real breakthroughs and innovation in healthcare. Most of the lack of innovation has not been because we didn't have great thinkers, it has largely been regulatory barriers. Remote patient monitoring was a huge one that came up in the last year, so now we have doctors caring about it. What moves in healthcare is what's reimbursable. They were always trying to regulate to protect people, but then they realized, well, we removed the regulatory barriers and people were fine, so that regulation makes actually no sense, and people should have more choice, and they should be able to do telehealth if they want to.” Kate: And that's just it: humans want choice. We want to feel seen, and heard, and like our opinions are being considered. There's another technology on the horizon that could give people more power over their technology, and therefore freedom and choice, that will likely cause massive change in the marketplace when it is more widely available: Brain-computer interface. Cathy Hackl explains. Cathy Hackl: “So I'm very keen right now on brain-computer interface. The way I'm gonna explain it is, if you've been following Elon Musk, you've probably heard of neuro-link—he's working on BCI that's more internal, the ones I've been trying are all external devices. So I'm able to put a device on that reads my brainwaves, it reads my intent, and it knows that I wanna scroll an iPad, or I've been able to turn on lights using just my thoughts, or play a video game, or input a code… I've been able to do all these things. And I'm very keen on it, very interested to see what's going on… I think the biggest thing that's stuck with me from studying all these technologies and trying them out from an external perspective, is that my brain actually really likes it. Loves the workout. Like, I'm thinking about it, and I'm like, the receptors here, pleasure receptors are like lighting up, I'm like ‘ohmygosh!' So I'm still sitting with that. Is that a good thing? Or a bad thing? I don't know, but I think these technologies can allow us to do a lot of things, especially people with disabilities. If they don't have a hand, being able to use a virtual hand to do things in a virtual space. I think that's powerful.” Kate: That story also illuminates the fact that there are many different types of people, each with different needs. Digital transformation has given people with disabilities a new way to claim more agency over their lives, which creates a brand new potential customer-base, filled with humans who desire freedom and choice as much as the next person. Now, let's talk about some companies who are doing at least a few q things right when it comes to the digital transformation of human experience. Starbucks, for instance. One of the worst parts of shopping in-store was waiting in line, and then the social pressure from the people behind you wishing you would order faster. If you weren't a regular customer, the experience could be overwhelming. When they launched their mobile order app, it tapped into a number of things that made the experience of buying coffee faster and easier, with all sorts of fun customization options that I never knew existed when I only ordered in-store. Now, even brand new customers could order complex coffee drinks — meaning in that one move the company may have brought in new customers and allowed the cost per coffee to increase — all without people feeling pressure from other shoppers, and without the inconvenience of waiting in line. Then there's Wal-Mart, who during the pandemic instituted ‘Wal-Mart pickup,' a service where people can shop online and pick up their goods without ever having to step into the store. The service is technically operating at a financial loss, but Wal-Mart understands that solid branding and convenience are worth more to their company's bottom-line in the long run than the amount of money they're losing by investing into this particular service. Of course, some businesses are better suited for the online-only world than others. As more companies attempt to digitize their businesses, it's incredibly important to tap into the human reasons that people wanted to engage with your business in the first place. In some cases, businesses have failed to make this connection, assuming that “if people liked us as a physical product, then they'll continue using us when we're digital,” or worse, “if we simply make people aware of us, they will become customers!” This assumption ignores human nature, as Ana Milicevic, a longtime digital media executive who is principal and co-founder of Sparrow Digital Holdings, explains. Ana Milicevic: “To be relevant in this direct to consumer world, you also have to approach awareness and customer acquisition differently. And this is the #1 mistake we see a lot of traditional companies make, and not really understand how to pitch to a digital-first, mobile-first consumer or a direct subscriber. They're just not wired to do it that way, and often times the technology stacks that they have in place just aren't the types of tools that can facilitate this type of direct interaction as well. So they're stuck in this very strange limbo where they are committed to continuing to acquire customers in traditional ways, but that's just not how you would go about acquiring a direct customer.” Kate: Acquiring those direct customers requires an understanding of what humans want—a large part of which is meaning. And how people create meaning in their lives is changing as well. Long before the pandemic, trends were already pointing toward a future where we live more of our lives online, but those trends have also been accelerated. So beyond digitizing your business, it may also be useful to invest time, money, and energy into discovering how the humans of the future will create meaning in their lives. Cathy Hackl discussed some of the trends she's seen in her own kids that show how today's children will consume and make purchasing decisions in a very different way than most modern businesses are used to. Cathy Hackl: “Something else that I'm noticing… y'know we're going to brick and mortar, but we're going to brick and mortar less. So you start to see this need for that virtual try-on to buy your makeup, or to buy clothes, and it's also transitioning not only from the virtual try-on into what I'm calling the direct-to-avatar economy. Everything from virtual dresses that you're buying, or custom avatars, y'know you're starting to create this virtualized economy. And this is the reason I always talk about this now, is my son recently did his first communion, and when we said, ‘hey, what do you want as a gift?' he said, ‘I don't want money, I want a Roblox gift card that I can turn into Robucks,'—which is the currency they use inside Roblox—'so that I can buy—whichever gamer's skin.' And, y'know, when I was growing up, my brother was saving up to buy AirJordans. My son doesn't want that, y'know, he wants Robucks, to buy something new for his avatar. This is direct-to-avatar; is direct-to-avatar the next direct-to-consumer?” Kate: Our online avatars represent us. We can customize them to directly express who we feel we are. Part of the reason this idea is so attractive is that many people—increasingly so in the context of online interaction—seek out meaningful experiences as our ‘aspirational' selves. We gravitate to the communities that align with facets of who we wish we were. And perhaps less productively, we may also choose to present the idealized version of ourselves to the world, omitting anything we're embarrassed by or that we feel may paint us in a negative light. But honestly, all of this makes sense in the context of making meaning, because humans are generally the most emotionally fulfilled when we feel empowered to control which ‘self' we present in any given interaction. With this much freedom of choice and expression, and with the complications of the modern supply chain—which I will talk about more in depth in our next episode—it's important to acknowledge that creating convenience and improving human satisfaction aren't going to be easy tasks. Behind the scenes, there is a tremendous amount of work that goes into providing a satisfying customer experience. Let's go back to the example of flowers and see what Charlie Cole has to say. Charlie Cole: “If it's too cold they freeze, if it's too hot they wilt, if UPS is a day late they die. And then, the real interesting aspect—and this isn't unique to flowers—the source is remarkably centralized. So the New York Times estimated that 90-92% of roses that are bought in America for Valentine's Day come from Columbia and Ecuador. And so, if anything goes wrong there, then you really don't have a chance. Imagine the quintessential Valentine's Day order: A dozen long-stem roses, New York City. Easy, right? I used to live on 28th and 6th, so let's say Chelsea. Okay, I've got 7 florists who could do it. Who has delivery capacity? Roses capacity? The freshest roses? The closest to proximity? The closest to the picture in the order? Who has the vase that's in the order? Did they buy roses from us? Because I like to be able to incentivize people based on margins they already have. And so without exaggeration, Kate, we have about 11-12 ranking factors that educate a quality score for a florist, and that's how it starts the process. But then there's all the other things, like how do we know somebody didn't walk into that florist that morning and buy all the roses, right? And so there's this real-time ebb-and-flow of demand because our demand is not ours! They have their own store, they have their own B2B business, they might take orders from some of our competitors. They might have their own website. We have no idea what any given florist happens in real time because they are not captive to us. What we've learned is the place we have to get really really really really good is technology on the forecasting side, on the florist communication side, and the customer communication side. Because I can't control the seeds on the ground in Columbia, but I can really control the communication across the entire network as far as we go, as well as the amounts the we need in various places.” Kate: Creating that small-scale, emotional human moment where someone receives flowers requires immense computing power and collaboration between multiple businesses and workers. Which is part of why Charlie Cole also believes that in some cases, the best way to help your business succeed is to invest in helping other businesses that yours interacts with. Charlie Cole: “Small businesses… I think it's our secret sauce. And I think COVID has shined a light on this: small businesses are the core of our communities. Right? They are the absolute core, and I think it was always nice to say that, but now we know it. And so here's what I think we do better than anybody else: we've invested more in helping our florists run their own small business independently of us than we have about optimizing our marketplace. We launched new POS software. We launched a new local website product where we're like the first person ever to become a reseller for Shopify because we made a custom platform for florists. We're just their website provider. They're actually competing with FTD.com in a lot of ways—but I think that's where we're gonna differentiate ourselves from all the other people that are perceived as, by small businesses, (their words not mine) leeches. Right? I think to actually effectively run a marketplace which is fulfilled by small businesses, you need to invest as much in helping them win their local market independent of you.” Kate: You could make the case that there is no more evolved human experience than choosing to help others. So if your business is engaged in activities that allow other businesses—and therefore humans—to thrive, you may also be building your brand in a direction that creates more customer loyalty than any exit survey or great service interaction ever could. Beyond understanding human emotions and needs, you can help your business by leaning into understanding how we create meaning. At our core, we are compelled to make meaning. Whether we realize it or not, meaningful experiences and interactions are the driving force behind many of our decisions, financial or otherwise. Meaning is different for everyone, but having it is vital to our happiness. If you are able to engage with potential customers in a way that helps them create meaning, or allows them to use your product to make meaning on their own, you are aligning your success with your customers' success, and that bodes well for the long term. At the end of the day, making any of these changes starts at the very top of your business. Leadership needs to set the tone, creating a culture that allows room for workers at every level to engage more meaningfully with customers, and with each other. (By the way, for more discussion on creating or changing work culture, you can check out our last episode, “Does the Future of Work Mean More Agency For Workers?”) Your effort will benefit not only your business, but society as a whole. Remember the Deloitte piece in the Wall Street Journal I mentioned at the start of the episode, with ways to be more human-centric in business? Number 5 on that list was “change the world,” and research from Frontiers suggests that the well-being of any society is directly linked to how the people living within it feel about their lives and purpose. How we do that may be as simple — and as complicated — as helping people to experience meaning at any level. While the technologies around us keep changing, the opportunity becomes increasingly clear for people who work around creating customer experiences and user experiences to open up the aperture to see humanity through a fuller lens. This way, as you set your business up for longterm success, you also advocate for making human experiences as meaningful as possible — and you just might be changing the world for the better. Thanks for joining me as I explored what it means to think of customers as human. Next time, I'll be exploring the supply chain and how, despite the vast technology involved, the closer you look the more you realize: the economy is people.

    Classic Ghost Stories
    A Night on the Borders of the Black Forest by Amelia B Edwards

    Classic Ghost Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 68:56


    Amelia B Edwards Born in 1831 in London and died in 1892 aged 60 in Weston Supermare at the seaside near Bristol. She was a novelist, traveller and enthusiastic amateur Egyptologist. Her mother was Irish and her father had been an officer in the British Army and then became a banker.  She was married, but her emotional attachments were with women and she lived with and was apparently in love with Ellen Braysher, widow, and Ellen Byrne a school inspector's wife. A Night on The Borders of the Black Forest was recommended by Nadia Astorga in May 2022 This is the third story by Amelia B we've done, the other's being The Phantom Coach and Salome. This is the first of hers that is less a ghost story (if fact not a ghost story at all) and more an adventure.  The collection of stories is also entitled A Night On The Borders of the Black Forests and was published in 1890. For comparison Le Fanu's Carmilla set in Styria in Austria was published in 1872 and Stoker's Dracula was published in 1897. Elizabeth Gaskell's The Grey Woman was published in 1861. It reminded me most of The Grey Woman because it is set in the border area of France and Germany at about the same period and there are brigands in the woods in both. It's a definite nod to the Gothic but also a right rollicking adventure story and so reminds of The Grey Woman but also the Scottish set  A Journey of Little Profit by John Buchan from 1896, because it is also a tale of wanderings on foot and George Borrow's Wild Wales was published in 1862, which deals with supposedly true wanderings in the Wild. Mary Braddon's The Cold Embrace and Hoffman's The Sandman also have people tramping all over Germany and venturing into France and the Netherlands. It must have been busy on the roads.  Wordsworth had an edition of the Prelude out in 1850. This thrilling love for mountainous wild places titillated the middle class urban readers on a trivial level while Wordsworth was aiming for the spiritual, but each to their own indeed. The story structure: Neat. Enjoying the milieu as much as anything. The tramping over the countryside. On his own, meets up with Gustav, on to the village, the coach trip, wandering at night, the inn, suspicions mount.  The innkeeper won't drink the wine. It tastes bad. It smells funny as does the coffee. Burned! Why not set the dogs on them? Why not just poison them dead rather than drug them with a soporific?  I think that's a plot hole. And if they don't sell the stuff they steal (it's in the granary) what's the point of murdering strangers? But a good read and nicely written, easy to narrate. A sprinkling of German terms for colour. Gustav shows too much interest in the slow-witted peasant girl Annchen for my liking. After all, he's got a madchen at home.  She won't drink the wine either. The beer seems fine though. The landlord checks how much Gustav as drunk.  If You Appreciate The Work I've Put In Here You could buy me a coffee  https://ko-fi.com/tonywalker (https://ko-fi.com/tonywalker) Become a Patron https://www.patreon.com/barcud (https://www.patreon.com/barcud) And you can join my mailing list and get a  free audiobook:  https://bit.ly/dalstonvampire (https://bit.ly/dalstonvampire) Music By The Heartwood Institute https://bit.ly/somecomeback*** (https://bit.ly/somecomeback***)

    Offside Rule: WSL Edition
    Big Euros preview show with Michaeldottir and Johndottir

    Offside Rule: WSL Edition

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 79:46


    Kait Borsay and Lynsey Hooper (aka Michaeldottir and Johndottir - you'll have to listen to find out what we're talking about!) are joined by women's football journalist slash encyclopedia Sophie Lawson and commentator Vicki Sparks for our big Euros preview show.  Plus journalists Bea Redondo, Frida Fagerlund and Anne-Marie Postma break down the big three nations Spain, Sweden and the Netherlands.  Are England strong enough to bring it home? Will Spain even make it out of the group? Do the Netherlands have enough leaders? And who are the dark horses?  RUNNING ORDER  GROUP A England (2.45) Austria (10.30) Northern Ireland (15.15) Norway (20.15) GROUP B  Germany (24.30) Spain with Bea Redondo (29.4%)  Finland (38.00) Denmark (39.45) GROUP C  Sweden with Frida Fagerlund (44.15) Netherlands with Anne-Marie Postma (50.00) Portugal (56.45) Switzerland (58.30) GROUP D  France (1.01.45) Italy (1.06.45) Belgium (1.10.30) Iceland (1.11.45) Final predictions and sweepstake (1.16.15) Producer: Sophie Penney 

    Coronavirus Daily
    Remembering the plight of millions of Ukrainian refugees forced to leave their country to escape the Russian invasion

    Coronavirus Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 9:03


    A lot of attention was paid in the early days of Russia's invasion to the plight of millions of Ukrainians who had to flea their hometowns in advance of Russian forces descending on Kyiv. But once Russia's initial offensive flopped and the focus of the war shifted to the East, the world shifted much of its focus away from Ukrainian refugees. But there are still an estimated 5-million Ukrainians living outside of the country right now, as the war grinds on ... most of them set up temporarily scattered across Eastern Europe; there could be just as many or more who are internally displaced. Their desperate situations have not changed ... nor has their need for help. We spoke to a woman who left Mariupol early just before Russia started to attack. Mila and her family went to Spain. If you remember, Mila's grandma was stuck in Mariupol and she and her family weren't able to contact grandma for a couple weeks. Grandma has since evacuated the city and is safe. Mila's life has taken a bit of a different path than she thought before the war. She's now in Vienna, Austria.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Money Talk With Tiff
    Money Hero Academy with Florian Fritz

    Money Talk With Tiff

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 21:44


    Florian Fritz joins Tiffany in this week's episode to share his expertise on how he helps others build financial freedom, and breaks down the differences between financial institutions in Austria and the United States.  About Our Guest Florian is the founder of the Money Hero Academy, where he is teaching small business owners how build true wealth and financial freedom by working on money mindset, money management and money making skills. As a financial advisor, Florian realized during the last financial crisis in 2008 that the financial industry was only looking out for their own best interest and not that of their clients. That's why he learned from some of the world's best financial coaches like Robert Kiyosaki and his Rich Dad advisors and many others how wealth creation really works. He tested many of the learnings working with a real estate company, increasing their sales by 86% per year on average for 9 years and helping hundreds of people to improve their investment returns. He created a system from what he learned and his own experience that allows everyone to take control of their finances and create the life of their dreams instead of always hoping for the next raise or the next client. Florian is an International Trainer who has shared virtual stages with people like Robert Kiyosaki, Nick Vujicic, Joseph Mclendon III and many others. Connect with Florian Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fritz.florian/ Website: www.moneyheroacademy.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/florian.fritz.526/ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/moneyhero Connect with Tiffany on Social Media Facebook: Money Talk With Tiff Twitter: @moneytalkwitht Instagram: @moneytalkwitht LinkedIn: Tiffany Grant

    BSD Now
    461: Persistent Memory Allocation

    BSD Now

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 49:40


    NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report First Quarter 2022 (https://www.freebsd.org/status/report-2022-01-2022-03/) Installing Nginx on OpenBSD 7.1 (https://unixcop.com/installing-nginx-on-openbsd-7-1/) News Roundup Live Webinar: Open-source Virtualization: Getting started with bhyve (https://klarasystems.com/webinars/live-sessions-singup/webinar-open-source-virtualization-getting-started-with-bhyve/) Hosted by Jim Salter and Allan Jude Live July 12th at 13:00 ET Available on-demand a few days later Persistent Memory Allocation (https://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=3534855) Colorize your BSD shell (https://forums.FreeBSD.org/threads/colorize-your-bsd-shell.85458/) How to Install cgit With Gitolite and Nginx on FreeBSD 13 (https://herrbischoff.com/2021/10/how-to-install-cgit-with-gitolite-and-nginx-on-freebsd-13) EuroBSDCon 2022 (Austria) Program announced (https://2022.eurobsdcon.org/program/) Come to Austria and learn about the latest happenings in the BSDs 2 days of tutorials, and 2 days of 3 concurrent tracks of talks Registration is open now. See you there! *** Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Brad - Drive question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/461/feedback/Brad%20-%20Drive%20question.md) Carl - Wiring question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/461/feedback/Carl%20-%20Wiring%20question.md) Jon - Jails question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/461/feedback/Jon%20-%20Jails%20question.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

    The Apple Seed
    S2 E20: Independence Day Tribute to the Statue of Liberty by Andy Offutt Irwin

    The Apple Seed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 52:50


    This episode shares all sorts of stories about freedom and liberty as we approach the celebration of Independence Day. We'll hear stories about the symbols we often associate with freedom and some of the great things about America. (4:04) Andy Offutt Irwin shares a story of his Aunt Marguerite and what the legacy of the Statue of Liberty, or the Statue's full name "Liberty Enlightening the World," means to her and her family in a story called "Free the Imprisoned Lightning," recorded live in the Apple Seed Studio. (34:36) In today's entry in The Radio Family Journal Sam talks about a time he was cast as one of the von Trapp children in The Sound of Music. He discusses the symbol that the edelweiss flower has become in Austria and American sunflower lined roads of freedom. (41:24) We listen to a compilation of some people's thoughts on what makes the United States, well, the United States. We hope you enjoy this grateful message about the value of freedom. (44:52) Our Producer, Brian Tanner, shares a memory of an Independence Day celebration that we do not recommend trying at home.

    Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast
    „Nukleares Gegengewicht schaffen“

    Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 24:30


    Im Interview: Dr. Stefanie Babst, Ex-NATO-Strategin und Sicherheitsexpertin, analysiert den NATO-Gipfel in Madrid, die Zugeständnisse an Recep Tayyip Erdoğan und die Gefahr einer neuen atomaren Aufrüstungsspirale auf der Welt. Sommer 2022: Nichts geht mehr auf der Schiene und in der Luft. Unsere Börsenreporterin Annette Weisbach berichtet über die leicht rückläufige Inflation in Deutschland und ihre Kollegin Anne Schwedt in New York schätzt den Auftritt vom amerikanischen FED-Chef Jerome Powell beim European Central Bank Forum in Portugal ein. Verkehrte Welt: In Peru tanzt man für die Sonne und in Italien betet man für Regen! Austria oder Australia? Peinlich: Die Rock-Band KISS verwechselt bei Konzert in Wien die Flagge Österreichs mit der von Australien.

    Classic Movie Reviews
    Episode 214 - The Sound Of Music

    Classic Movie Reviews

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 68:24


    “The Sound of Music” 1965 is a musical and drama film andamong our favorite movies. The creative talent of Director Robert Wise beautifully captures the von Trapp family story. We have reviewed many films directed by Mr. Wise including “The Andromeda Strain” 1971 (Episode 38), “Run Silent Run Deep” 1958 (Episode 117), and “West Side Story” 1961 (Episode 118). His films are excellent.The movie centers around the life of Maria played by Julie Andrews, Captain von Trapp played by Christopher Plummer, and the von Trapp children. The first half of the film showcases the family and the music while the second half presents the horror caused by the annexation of Austria into the Third Reich. In addition to being a marvelous film it received five Academy Awards.Here's the IMDB page for ”The Sound Of Music”Check us out on Patreon at www.patreon.com/classicmoviereviews for even more content and bonus shows.

    Software Engineering Unlocked
    What hinders your career as a developer? – Mindset.

    Software Engineering Unlocked

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 29:54


    This episode is sponsored by Tonic.ai – where your data is modeled from your production data to help you tell an identical story in your testing environments. [00:01 - 05:08] Opening Segment Need to generate fake data that looks, acts, and behaves like production data for your test environments? Check out Tonic.ai!Head over to https://www.tonic.ai/ and sign up today for a free two weeks trial sandbox!Dagna talks about experiencing a plateau in her career as a software engineerRealizing the lack of support networksHow this led her to set up her own coaching business[05:09 - 11:26] How Cultural Upbringing Affects Work PerformanceWhat Dagna is doing to help immigrants like her fit into their American workplaceUsing the Hofstede model to understand the cultureCultural differences in the US and other countriesIndividualism and collectivismLong-term orientation and short-term orientation[11:27 - 26:14] Engineering Mindset for SuccessCoaching clients on career advancement and finding fulfillmentThe importance of mindsetCommon limiting beliefs engineers have and overcoming themBeing your own advocate, your work does not speak for itselfCreating a safe space for feedbackThe feedback Dagna received from her superior and how it changed how she was writing codeKnowing when to move onThe state of the US and European job market[26:15 - 29:54] Closing SegmentDagna's advice: Don't take code reviews and feedback personallyKnow more about the process Dagna uses to take her clients' careers to the next level at https://www.themindfuldev.com/podcastFinal wordsTweetable Quotes“How you think is how you act.” - Dagna Bieda“What you really have to do is market yourself. You have to talk about your achievements and accomplishments and not expect everybody in the company to just know what it is that you're doing.” - Dagna Bieda“It's very important to understand how what you're doing fits into the business as a whole, the business that you're working for, and how to communicate about it.” - Dagna BiedaResources Mentionedhttps://www.tonic.ai/ - Sign up now for a two-week free trial!The Culture Map by Erin Meyer - https://erinmeyer.com/books/the-culture-map/Dagna's WebsiteConnect with Dagna by following her on LinkedIn. Go to theMindfuldev.com and theMindfulDev.com/podcast to learn more about her coaching business.Let's Connect! You can connect with me, Dr.  McKayla on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube to look into engineering software, and learn from experienced developers and thought leaders from around the world about how they develop software!LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to know more about the engineering software world. Your ratings and reviews help get the podcast in front of new listeners. _______Transcription[00:00:00] Dr. McKayla: Hello, and welcome to the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. I'm your host, Dr. McKayla. And today I have the pleasure to talk to Dagna Bieda. She's a software engineer turned career coach for software engineers. She's been coding for over 10 years and has been a coach or has been coaching for the past two-plus years.[00:00:24] Dr. McKayla: And today I will learn everything around how to get a job, how to be successful as a software engineer, and how to advance your career. But before I start, let me introduce you to an amazing startup that's sponsoring today's episode, Tonic.ai, the fake data company. So what does Tonic.ai do? I'm sure you know how complex and cumbersome it is to create quality test data.[00:00:51] Dr. McKayla: It's a never-ending chore that eats into valuable engineering resources. Random data doesn't do it and production data is neither safe nor legal for developers to use. What if you could mimic your entire production database to create a realistic dataset with zero sensitive data? That sounds amazing, right? [00:01:10] Dr. McKayla: Tonic.ai does exactly that. With Tonic.ai, you can generate fake data that looks, acts, and behaves like production data because it's made from production. Yet, Tonic.ai guarantees privacy so your data sets are safe to share with developers, QA, data scientists, heck, even distributed teams around the world. Visit Tonic.ai to sign up today or click the link in the show notes to get a free two weeks trial sandbox.[00:01:38] Dr. McKayla: Well, Dagna, I'm, I'm so excited to learn everything that, you know, you have been through. in your career as a software engineer and how you actually help software engineers get the most out of their career. So can you tell me a little bit, how did you go about to this shift from, you know, being a software engineer, yourself to being a full-time career coach for software engineers? Why did that happen and how?[00:02:03] Dagna Bieda: Absolutely. And first of all, thanks so much for having me on your show, McKayla. Essentially, you know, in my own career, I have seen some incredible accelerated progression in my own career. When I started programming, I went from a junior engineer to a senior engineer fairly quickly.[00:02:22] Dagna Bieda: It happened in less than three years, which, it takes a lot more for a lot of engineers in our industry. And it was all because of the people that were in my corner that supported me, that mentored me. And because I was very relentless about asking them for feedback to tell me how I can improve, how I can do better.[00:02:44] Dagna Bieda: And as I kind of like, went up in my career in my senior engineering role, what happened is I experienced this plateau, you could say. And I recognized, later on, you know, in hindsight that I was just working really hard on the wrong things, but I didn't have that kind of support that I needed that would have showed me like, Hey, Dagna, what you're focusing on is not going to take you to that next level.[00:03:11] Dagna Bieda: So after having that aha moment, I recognized like, okay, I was going super quickly, advancing in my career in the early, in the beginning, because of that support. Later on, I didn't have that support. I had to figure it out by myself. And so , it was so much slower of a process when I was trying to figure it out myself.[00:03:32] Dagna Bieda: So I decided that, you know, this is a great idea for a business because not everybody, being a software engineer, has that support network that they could lean on. So I could step in and become that support network for my clients. And that's exactly what I do today. And it's just amazing. And I've helped so many clients, you know, I've had over the past three years that I've been coaching, I've helped over 50 engineers.[00:03:59] Dagna Bieda: They had various backgrounds. Some of them work at fan companies. Some of them work for like small mom and pop shops, and they had experience ranging anywhere from 2 to 20 years of experience. Some were self-thought. Some had college degrees, some are boot camp graduates. And you know what I do right now as a coach and that lits me on fire and, you know, brings a lot of fulfillment to my life is to help my clients find that in their life and in their career.[00:04:28] Dr. McKayla: Okay. And so, what does it take from a junior to become a senior? And why was there no support for you when you were a senior to get, you know, to the next level? Maybe what was your next level? Was it like a staff engineer that you wanted to become, or is it more in a managerial role that you wanted to develop yourself? So what's the next, the next step?[00:04:52] Dagna Bieda: I wanted to become a team lead and team lead is like a mix of both, right? On one hand, like from an HR perspective, maybe you are not on the org chart on top of like a team, but you are leading your team with your technical expertise. So like it's a mix of the managerial and the engineering responsibilities.[00:05:09] Dagna Bieda: The big reason why I had the plateaued is because I moved from Poland to the United States. And as an immigrant. I didn't realize that, you know, the way I was thinking and going about work, while it made perfect sense back in Poland, it didn't necessarily set me up for success in my American workplace.[00:05:30] Dagna Bieda: And also like right now, a lot of my clients are immigrants moving from one country to another. And what I help them is to understand how their cultural upbringing affects their performance at their workplace. Because for me that was one of the blockers, right? I had to really kind of like understand my new situation, my new culture, how I was fitting in what was stopping me, and for example, there's this one situation that I can, that comes to mind is when, when I posted a joke in slack that I thought was super funny and, and being an Eastern European, we have this dark sense of humor.[00:06:06] Dagna Bieda: And, you know, in this new American company, what happened was I was called to HR and I was told that that was inappropriate. And I was like, what? That was super funny. What are you talking about? So, that was like one of the things that I had to realize, like, okay, This is the type of sense of humor that just doesn't go with my workplace.[00:06:27] Dagna Bieda: So I can, you know, keep doing that on my own and private, but this is not going to help me in terms of work advancement, right? [00:06:34] Dr. McKayla: So can you, can you go a little bit more into this in this cultural aspect, right? Okay. There are the jokes that obviously, there are cultural differences. What's funny, what's not, what's inappropriate, right, and so on. But is there also like for leadership because you were talking about tech lead, right? So it's, how, how can you show the outside world that you're ready for it? Is there a difference in your experience? [00:06:58] Dagna Bieda: Yes. So that's another like cultural aspect, you know, like, there's this specific tool that I use for analysis that helped me really map those differences. And it's called the Hofstede model. And essentially, it has, like, this database that compares different countries on, like, six different dimensions, right? And one of the things for the United States specifically is that individualism is super highly rated, right? And Poland is more rated closer to being like a collective culture, right, where we work together towards success. And I can tell you, for example, there was this initiative that I was leading in my American workplace.[00:07:45] Dagna Bieda: And what happened was I was talking to different people, different types of stakeholders. They agreed with me. So I thought, okay, if I have a buy-in, something's going to happen now, right. Because that's how it would have worked back in Poland, right? In the American workplace, I was expected to, once I picked up the initiative to lead it from end to end. And, you know, I wasn't aware of that. So, you know, I got all the stakeholders on board. Everybody agreed to my idea and then nothing happened, and I got so frustrated. I'm like, why there's nothing happening? Like, didn't we all agree, should we all collaborate together? And because they didn't realize that my cultural upbringing was different, nobody could give me that kind of feedback, right? [00:08:29] Dr. McKayla: Yeah.[00:08:29] Dagna Bieda: They just didn't know how to support me there. [00:08:32] Dr. McKayla: I think this topic is so interesting because right now I'm working on the book on code reviews and I'm working a lot about feedback and disagreements, agreements, and how to solve that, right, how to collaborate together.[00:08:45] Dr. McKayla: And so one book that I'm actually deep diving into that I found really interesting was The Culture Map. I don't know if you are familiar with, from Erin Meyer, and there she... [00:08:55] Dagna Bieda: Oh, that's interesting. Okay. [00:08:56] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, you can have a look at it and she also looks at a different perspective. And one is, for example, agreements, how are people from different countries agreeing? And for example, Germany or Austria, right? It's a little bit more collaborative or, you know, collective, right? Collective agreement. [00:09:11] Dagna Bieda: Exactly. [00:09:12] Dr. McKayla: It's really, really important. So it takes a very long time until everybody agrees. And it's a little bit an upfront process, right? Whereby in America, it's more, well, one decision is made by the leader, but then this decision can also be questioned along the way, right? And so it's quicker, quicker to get started, right? And one person brings up and says, okay, this is how we are going to do it.[00:09:34] Dr. McKayla: And then people are working on this vision. This is how she explains it, right? But yeah. And then over time, you can actually challenge that a little bit, right? You can say, but maybe, you know, we should change course because we have more information now and so on. And in Germany, it's exactly the other way around, right? So we are investing a lot in this process of collective agreement, on this is the right way to go. But because there's a lot of, you know, a lot of time and information that goes into this process, it's really hard to challenge that later on, right? So after three months of discussing that we are going to do that.[00:10:09] Dr. McKayla: It's really hard to say a month later, oh, maybe you should change that again, which I think is perfectly fine in America. I don't know. Can you see that as well? Is that something that...[00:10:20] Dagna Bieda: Oh, absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. And another interesting thing is like, for example, in terms of the short-term versus long-term orientation, in the United States, the culture as a whole is on the Hofstede model described as a more short-term oriented. So the company would be more like working towards your quarterly goals, right? And when I work, for example, with some of my clients that have Asian upbringing and working in the United States, that their cultures tend to have this long-term orientation.[00:10:51] Dagna Bieda: What happens is, for example, in an interview, whenever they present themselves, they're talking about, you know, building a solid foundation for a long term. But what happens is. American companies don't necessarily value that, right? Because, and they even have this, this saying here to hit the ground running, right? So when I work with my clients, I tell them, look, if you're starting to work in a new workplace, American workplace, you want to present yourself as someone who's operating fast and can bring results really quickly because of valuing of that short term results rather than long term. [00:11:27] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, yeah, yeah. I can totally see that. So you are working as I understood it, you're working with a very range of experiences, right? So you said people are coming from boot camp, but it's just coming from boot camp with no experience and want to go into the workplace or is it more, are they already, you said two years, something like this.[00:11:48] Dagna Bieda: Yeah. [00:11:49] Dr. McKayla: Is it really an even distribution here or do you see that it's cooling in one direction, right? More the junior engineers in the first, let's say, five years or more the senior engineers or midterm, maybe? [00:12:02] Dagna Bieda: I would say that the majority of my clients are the mid-level professionals and the more senior professionals that are kind of like finding themselves a little stuck, maybe not sure about their next step.[00:12:13] Dagna Bieda: And they're looking for, you know, figuring out first of all, how are they stopping themselves? Second of all, how to find fulfillment in their career rather than chasing money or promotions. And, you know, the truth is there's, to my knowledge, nobody else that offers the type of services that I offer, which is working on the engineering mindset for success, right?[00:12:36] Dagna Bieda: And you know, what got you to that senior engineer position was very likely your technical foundation. And I do not work on that technical foundation while having been a software engineer myself, I can definitely send my clients some pointers, like what are the gaps that they have in their skill set that they should, like, fill up in terms of you know, career advancement, but what I really am passionate about and what I really love to focus on is that mindset piece, right? Like, what kind of blind spots do you have? What kind of limiting beliefs do you have? I actually like to say that I moved from programming computers to reprogramming human minds. And it really beautifully describes what it is that I do, because once you change your mindset, I put it this way.[00:13:21] Dagna Bieda: How you think is how you act. And how you act is the results that you're getting then from, you know, the reality, the real world. [00:13:31] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Can you tell me some limiting beliefs? I also regularly reflect on mine and, right now, you know, I'm also in a, this state where I think, because of the pregnancy and the very new birth, I think this is such an inward-facing period in my life again, right, where I'm thinking, like, what are the beliefs that I have, and that are holding me back and so on. I would be really curious, can you give some examples of beliefs that engineers have, maybe that you have seen patterns? [00:14:00] Dagna Bieda: Absolutely. [00:14:01] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, that hold them back.[00:14:02] Dagna Bieda: There are two that are super common and super popular. Number one is believing that your work speaks for itself, which it doesn't. It does not. Like, okay, if someone else works on the same code base with you and they can look at your code, they could see the value that you bring to the table if they put in the work and effort to actually go into the code, look up what it is that you committed and, you know, have some thoughts on that.[00:14:28] Dagna Bieda: But, in order to be successful in an engineer's role, what you really have to do is market yourself. You have to talk about your achievements and accomplishments and not expect everybody in the company to just know what it is that you're doing, because people just don't know. They have their own work that they're prioritizing.[00:14:44] Dagna Bieda: And it's very critical to figure out if you have that limiting belief of work speaks for itself because again, it doesn't. That keeps a lot of talented engineers stuck in their career. That's number one. The second one, which always cracks me up, but I used to think that way too. There was a moment, and I have to be honest with you, there was a moment I thought the same way. And the second limiting belief is essentially, that you are surrounded, as an engineer, with idiots that just don't want to listen to your amazing ideas.  And here's the thing, whenever, as an engineer, you have an incredible idea and you want to pitch it. You want to get people on board.[00:15:25] Dagna Bieda: It's super important for you to communicate about it in a certain way. You have to be able to negotiate. You have to be able to like really describe it, but describe it in terms of the priorities of your stakeholders, right? So if I'm going to, and I'm guilty of that as well. Like, there was this two projects that I worked on in my most recent engineering job, and I was responsible for taking care of a mobile app.[00:15:48] Dagna Bieda: And it was a pain in the butt that the build of the app was taking a few minutes, you know, and I just felt it was so inefficient. So I went ahead and I refactored how this particular app was built. And I reduced the build time from few minutes to, like, 30 seconds. And I was so proud of myself, you know, I was so like, yes, this is amazing in reality, what happened is, that what I did that work that I did, impacted my life and one other engineer. Nobody else cared. It didn't matter. Then I had a second task or project that I worked on in the same company, which was creating a deliverable for a client, super boring, a lot of copy and pasting, a lot of like following steps. I did not enjoy doing that at all, but guess what?[00:16:36] Dagna Bieda: Whenever it was deployed and the client could spread the mobile app to their own client base, I got praise from the sales representative from our BA, from the project manager. My tech lead was like, wow, Dagna, that was a super fast turnaround. You know, everybody across the organization was like, yay, success.[00:16:57] Dagna Bieda: And I'm thinking to myself, Wow. I would have never in a hundred million years figured this out on my own. If, if you ask me as an engineer to like put a value on this project versus that project, I would've thought that the refactoring was better. So here's long story, but essentially what I'm trying to say is, it's very important to understand how what you are doing trickles, like, how what you're doing fits into the business as a whole, the business that you're working for and how to communicate about it. That's the, really the key of what I was trying to say here. [00:17:35] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I think that's really, really important, but I also found myself working at companies where. You are assigned things, right? So you're not really asked for your opinion. if this is now really helpful or not or, or something like this. And then maybe reassigned as well, right, which I think there are, there are several impacts to that. First of all, what would be your advice for people that are assigned projects where they also know maybe doesn't look like this has a big impact on the company, right? So it's also limiting my ability to advance my career here. What should you do? How do you communicate about that? What's your advice? [00:18:18] Dagna Bieda: Yeah, we're kind of going back to, you know, to that communication piece, right? So, first of all, one thing that I want to share the assumption I'm coming here up with is that whoever assigns you that work is not a mind reader, so they would not necessarily have your priorities, your career priorities in mind.[00:18:37] Dagna Bieda: So it's important to, whenever you are asking for work to kind of like be proactive and say, Hey, I am really working towards becoming, let's say a staff engineer, becoming a team lead, becoming an engineering manager, can you help me out and assign the kind of work to me that will help me achieve that goal, right?[00:18:58] Dagna Bieda: Asking for that help and support because most of us are nice and friendly people, and we want to help. But we don't always know what's the best way to provide that help. So being kind of like your own advocate and talking about what it is that you want to do is really critical here. A second thing is, you know, whenever you're in those one-on-ones with your manager, is to really ask for feedback. How are you doing, how you could be doing better, and creating that safe space for feedback. You know, something that is my strength actually, and really helped me with accelerating in my career early on was that relentlessness in asking for feedback. Like, I had this team lead that worked with me that helped me become a senior engineer because he kind of vouched for me in the meetings that I wasn't part of.[00:19:53] Dagna Bieda: And he really said like, Hey, she's ready. She can handle it. She can be a senior engineer. I think she's ready. And that's what got me the promotion. But when him and I worked together, I was telling him, look, I really want to know. Don't worry. You're not going to hurt, hurt my feelings. I want to advance, I want to be hitting the ground running, and I want to really work on the things that are holding me back.[00:20:16] Dagna Bieda: And, you know, one of the critical pieces of feedback that he initially didn't want to give me, because it felt like maybe he would hurt my feelings or maybe was too much. I don't know. But after I was pushing and pushing for that feedback, he essentially told me, Dagna, fast is great. But reliable is better.[00:20:35] Dagna Bieda: And that advice changed how I was thinking about writing code, because I was really prioritizing being fast, delivering as soon as possible, right? But sometimes my fast solutions were not fully thought out. And a senior engineer really has to have that understanding of how the engineering decisions impact business, the team and what it is that, that they're trying to accomplish as a team. [00:21:03] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I'm thinking back of a time, right, where I think it's totally true that we have to go and advocate for ourselves, but I also wonder how many people are a little bit stuck in that, well, this is what the business needs, right? I understand that you want to advance your career. You want to become, you know, a senior engineer or a tech lead or whatnot.[00:21:27] Dr. McKayla: You know, saying that the project doesn't seem to have such big impact, right? And big impact, I think has to do with the stakeholder. Who is it visible to, right? Who is going to see and hear your name and, and so on. I thought, I think there's a little bit of political background towards that as well. Have you worked with people that are just really stuck in a situation where there is nobody that really advocates for them too much, or they are assigned a project that's, you know, low visibility and they're stuck there. Would you say the best is to move companies or? [00:22:01] Dagna Bieda: The short and sweet answer is yes. And, you know, in the very first meeting that I have with my clients whenever we start our coaching sessions in the program, what we do is we figure out what are their specific life and career goals, and what are their values and, how their current workplace supports those values. And then we measure them in a specific way. And after that, specific exercise, we're able to confidently say whether it's worth staying in that place or if it's time to move on.[00:22:38] Dr. McKayla: And so, whenever I see, like, in my Twitter bubble, right? I'm also very much in the American, you know, world somehow. And everybody is like, oh my God, the marketplace is, or the market is so hot now. And, you know, jobs are everywhere. I don't know in Europe, I don't feel that way.[00:23:00] Dagna Bieda: Got it. [00:23:00] Dr. McKayla: Is, is it like this? Do you feel like right now, it's so hot and everybody can, you know, change their career in a second and get better and you know, why would you even stay there? I feel like even if you have a good place, let's move because you can make more money and so on, which is a very different mindset.[00:23:18] Dr. McKayla: I don't see that here in Europe so much. It doesn't feel that hard or it also feels like if I'm at the good company and, you know, I make a market okay salary, I don't feel that people are looking forward, changing every one and a half, two years, more. [00:23:34] Dagna Bieda: Yeah. So two years is very common for people who are very ambitious.[00:23:39] Dagna Bieda: I want to try to see how different companies do different things and gain those experiences across a variety of industries or companies of different sizes. So, two years is definitely something that's seen as fairly normal. And I feel like you touched on an important subject there, it's very important to realize that the European job market is much more fragmented, right?[00:24:03] Dagna Bieda: Because we have different countries, different cultures, and it's not as easy to, you know, have access to all those opportunities. In the United States, it's way more streamlined because you know, it's one country and people mobility is also completely different. So like if you live in LA and then next year you get a job in New York, it's much more likely that you're just going to pick everything up and move for that job.[00:24:30] Dagna Bieda: In Europe, we are not like that. so it's more like choosing a town you want to live in, and then you find a job within that town, say, for example, right? So in that sense, we have just different priorities in Europe, and there are different priorities here in the United States, and that impacts that job market, absolutely. With that being said, with the COVID, the pandemic, and the acceleration of the remote workplaces, there's more and more opportunities for the Europe software engineers, for example, or anyone else really to access those American jobs. I cannot think of, like, anything in particular, but there's more and more companies that are supportive of those remote jobs and help pair American companies with offshore workers.[00:25:18] Dagna Bieda: And it's kind of like in that saying where Europeans work to live and Americans live to work. There's definitely something in that, some truth to it. I mean, I remember when I moved to United States and I was, you know, trying to get my very first engineering job and, on the phone interview, someone would tell me, like, we offer three weeks vacation, we're generous.[00:25:42] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, it's different. [00:25:43] Dagna Bieda: Yeah, right? It's different. It's different. There's so much more vacation time back in Europe, back at home. In the United States, even though they are coming up with, like, this unlimited time off policies it really depends on the company. Some companies are just trying to not pay you out the accrued time off.[00:25:59] Dagna Bieda: So you have to like really be wary when you are verifying if it's really unlimited time off. But with that being said, I had a client and she took like 10 weeks off within a year. So you know, there are companies that, yeah, there are companies that really kind of like honor that. [00:26:15] Dr. McKayla: Okay. Okay. Well, I have a last question for you, actually, and it's about code reviews because you were touching upon communication and also showing your work and what you are doing. How do you think can people use code reviews to do that, to accomplish that, to, you know, make their work a little bit more visible? Is it something that you thought about? How that fits together? [00:26:39] Dagna Bieda: So in terms of code reviews, the advice that I really give to my more inexperienced clients who are earlier in their career journey is to not take them personal.[00:26:51] Dagna Bieda: Just take it in as an information, as a guidance and, you know, earlier in their career, a lot of software engineers tend to take those comments, that feedback very personally, and they have their feelings hurt. But in reality, it's just feedback. It's just objective information that you can use to better yourself.[00:27:11] Dagna Bieda: Now, in terms of my more senior client, their skills are at the level that, you know, I don't see code reviews being very critical there because they already, you know, have mastered that technical foundation. So what I focus on really is those skills that are missing: the people skills, the communication, how you market yourself and all the things that we talked about today.[00:27:34] Dr. McKayla: Okay. Okay, cool. So, Dagna, thank you so much. Maybe you can also tell us a little bit how people can follow your work can find you, and maybe something that you want to. You know, give on the way for the engineers on how to find the career or the next step that makes them happy. [00:27:56] Dagna Bieda: Yeah, absolutely. So the best way to really get in contact with me is through my LinkedIn profile. You just can go to LinkedIn and find me under Dagna Bieda, D A G N A B I E D A. And then you can also go ahead to my website, the mindfuldev.com/podcast, and you'll find there a case study. And that case study beautifully explains the process that I follow with my clients and how it helped them really level up in their career. For one client, it meant going from an underappreciated senior engineer to a startup CTO in three months. For another client, it meant moving from a senior engineer to a VP of engineering and innovation at his company. For another client, that meant doubling his salary as we work together. So, you know, if that case study is something that you're interested in, you can then reach out to me and we can see if we're a good fit to work together and how I can help you accelerate your career.[00:28:57] Dr. McKayla: Okay. Cool. Thank you so much. Thank you, Dagna, for being on my show. [00:29:01] Dagna Bieda: Absolutely. It was a blast. Thanks for having me, McKayla. [00:29:04] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Thank you. Bye. [00:29:06] Dr. McKayla: This was another episode of the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please help me spread the word about the podcast, send the episode to a friend via email, Twitter, LinkedIn, well, whatever messaging system you use. Or give it a positive review on your favorite podcasting platforms such as Spotify or iTunes. This would mean really a lot to me. So thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and I will talk to you in two weeks. Bye.

    Premier League Preview Show
    Lionesses Euros Special

    Premier League Preview Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 47:49


    Faye Carruthers is here to bring you Women's Football Weekly. Faye is joined by former England defender Laura Bassett for an England special ahead of the start of the 2022 Women's Euro on 6th July. They'll be discussing England's warm up games and hearing from the Lionesses camp ahead of the opening game against Austria, which will all be live on Talksport! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Italian Wine Podcast
    Ep. 973 Valerie Kathawala | Voices

    Italian Wine Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 35:29


    Welcome to Episode 973 Cynthia Chaplin interviews Valerie Kathawala, in this installment of Voices, on the Italian Wine Podcast. More about today's guest: If you want to learn more about today's guests, you can by visiting: Valerie Kathawala is a New York-based writer focused on the wines of Germany, Austria, South Tyrol and Switzerland, with a particular interest in biodynamics. Valerie is a lifelong student of German culture and language and has lived and worked in both Germany and Austria. Her crossover from translation and editorial work at the United Nations to writing about wine was a natural, maybe inevitable, confluence of these experiences. Valerie's work appears in the pages of SevenFifty Daily, Pipette, Glug, Meininger's Wine Business International, Pellicle, WineFolly, The Vintner Project, The Cork Report, and Grape Collective. She is a co-founder and co-editor of the wine magazine TRINK. To learn more about today's guest visit: Website: valeriekathawala.com / trinkmag.com Instagram: @valkatnyc / @trink_magazine Facebook: Valerie Belz Kathawala / TRINK Twitter: @valkatnyc / @magazinetrink Linkedin: Valerie Kathawala / TRINK Magazine About today's Host: Cynthia Chaplin is a Vinitaly International Academy certified Italian Wine Ambassador, a professional sommelier with Fondazione Italiana Sommelier, a member of Le Donne del Vino, and a Professor of Italian wine and culture. Born in the USA, Cynthia moved to Europe in 1990 where she has lived in Spain, Belgium, England and Italy. She chose to center her career in Rome and immerse herself in the Italian wine sector, which is her passion. She has taught university students and expats, works with embassies, corporations and private clients, creating and presenting tastings, events, seminars and in-depth courses. Cynthia is a wine writer, translator, and a judge at international wine and sake competitions. She consults with restaurants and enotecas assisting in the development of comprehensive wine lists and excellent food pairings, as well as advising private clients who want to develop a comprehensive Italian wine collection. She lives with her British photographer husband on the shore of Lake Bracciano, north of Rome, where they share their beautiful garden with one massive grapevine, two border collies and an arrogant diva cat. If you want to learn more about today's host, you can by visiting: Facebook: Italian Wines in English Instagram: kiss_my_glassx Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cynthia-chaplin-190647179/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

    A que no te atreves
    ¿Cómo podemos empoderarnos entre mujeres? ¿Cómo lograr la felicidad a través de la solidaridad y la inclusión a otras/os? Con la artista Wanny Angerer

    A que no te atreves

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:45


    En A que no te atreves dedicamos este episodio a hablar de cómo podemos empoderarnos como mujeres y qué podemos hacer para encontrar esa conexión con nuestra misión de vida y con la felicidad a través de la solidaridad y el amor. Hoy nos acompaña la reconocida artista hondureña Wanny Angerer, directora del proyecto Moving Cultures que busca la unidad en la diversidad. Además de ser madre, defensora de los derechos de las mujeres y estar involucrada en un sin número de proyectos sociales, Wanny ha vivido en países tan diversos como Honduras, Estados Unidos, Austria, Zimbabwe, Colombia, India, Panama, Kenia y actualmente se encuentra en Bangkok, desde donde grabamos este podcast. Síguenos en el Instagram de @aquenoteatrevescontaniachaidez y en TikTok como @aquenoteatrevescontania