Podcasts about Hiroshima

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Designated city in Chūgoku, Japan

  • 1,690PODCASTS
  • 2,476EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
Hiroshima

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Best podcasts about Hiroshima

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Latest podcast episodes about Hiroshima

Hoops & Brews
Happy Hour 118: "Did KAT dance in a Jordan commercial to Lil Uzi" (feat. Scott & Damien)

Hoops & Brews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 144:31


VIDEO: https://youtu.be/UXExyS1SpJs HAPPY HOUR 118 15:00 Pavy gone start a justice for Gobert movement 16:55 We gotta hook zion up with jet life fitness 18:30 Cam Reddish Evaluation 19:30 Rudy Gay the best prospect since Tim Duncan 20:10 Wiggins isn't a franchise changing player 22:20 Knicks fans said Fournier was gonna be French Kobe 23:00 Best Knicks moment in the last 30 years 26:00 Julius Randle contract 27:00 Westbrook bricks sound like Hiroshima 27:50 Did KAT dance in a jordan commercial to Lil Uzi 28:00 AD returning soon thoughts 1:10:00 Pavy got a sauce 1:12:00 It cost money to breathe in LA 1:13:00 Pavy would try to use Map quest in the woods 1:15:00 Trivia part 3 1:21:00 As a bulls fan I feel like a Knee doctor 1:21:00 Nets thoughts 1:27:00 Damien was able to drink when Illmatic came out 1:32:00 Players who have shocked me this season 1:40:00 Luka needs another PG on the floor with him (Jalen Brunson) 1:44:00 Damien call in 1:45:00 Cam Reddish Zion and Barrett are all ass 1:47:00 Knicks get the rebound and give it to Randle to play football 1:48:00 Thoughts on Clipper Darryl 1:52:00 Thoughts on Antonio brown situation 1:54:00 Jerry Jones made Ceedee Lamb wear number 88 1:55:00 Does Sexton need to be traded? 1:58:00 Demar or Zach? 2:01:00 If Memphis was in NY they would lead First Take conversations everyday 2:07:00 U gotta get drunk at a blazers game cause we gon lose 2:08:00 ATL Doesn't feature john collins in the offense 2:13:00 Super bowl predictions 2:19:00 Who is the greatest winner of all time? 2:21:00 Aaron Rodgers future

Artist Decoded
Sundance Film Festival & New Frontier 2022 with Shari Frilot | AD 225

Artist Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 69:25


Shari Frilot is a filmmaker who has produced television for the CBS affiliate in Boston and for WNYC and WNET in New York before creating her own independent award-winning films, including Strange & Charmed, A Cosmic Demonstration of Sexuality, What Is A Line?, and the feature documentary, Black Nations / Queer Nations? She is the recipient of multiple grants, including the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Media Arts Foundation. She is presently working on a feature film project about the crisis in water supply with producer Effie Brown's production company, Duly Noted Inc. In tandem with filmmaking, Shari also maintains a career in festival programming, occupying a distinguished position on the curatorial vanguard through her pioneering development of immersive cinematic environments. As the Festival Director of the MIX Festival in New York (1992-1996) she co-founded the first gay Latin American film festivals, MIX BRASIL and MIX MEXICO film festivals. As Co-Director of Programming for OUTFEST (1998-2001), she founded the Platinum section which introduced cinematic performance installation and performance to the festival. She is presently in her 22nd year as a Senior Programmer for the Sundance Film Festival. She is the curator and driving creative force behind New Frontier, an exhibition and commissioning initiative that focuses on cinematic work being created at the intersections of art, film, and new media technology. New Frontier 2022 Projects Discussed: “On The Morning You Wake (To The End of The World)” by Dr. Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio, Mike Brett, Steve Jamison, Arnaud Colinart, and Pierre Zandrowicz “The State of Global Peace” by Daanish Masood Alavi “Gondwana” by Ben Joseph Andrews and Emma Roberts  “Suga” by Valencia James “The Inside World” by Jennifer and Kevin McCoy “Web 3.0 / NFT Meetups” by Amelia Winger-Bearskin and Jesse Damiani “32 Sounds” by Sam Green “Seven Grams” by Karim Ben Khelifa Other Topics Discussed: Transhumanism Identity Futurism “Notes on Blindness - Into Darkness” @ New Frontier 2016 The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, Japan Projects on climate and social change NFTs and Web 3.0 Handling hardship and pain Finding vitality in community Finding reasons to be optimistic Conscious and positive use cases for technology Systemic issues artists face in the US Building the immersive experience of Sundance's spaceship through XR and VR with the creative studio Active Theory festival.sundance.org artistdecoded.com

Sake Revolution
Eat Your Sake?!

Sake Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 32:56


Episode 89. We've all sipped sake from a glass, and you may have even used sake in cooking, but did you know its also possible to eat your sake as well?  This week John and Timothy take a look at a very unique style of sake called kijoshu.  It is made by replacing some of the water used in creating the fermentation mash with finished sake.  This fortifies the mash and in turn creates a rich, sweet dessert-style sake that is often aged to deepen the flavor. Taste-wise, it could be compared to a sauterne wine or a rich sherry.  Now, you can certainly sip kijoshu from a glass, but we'll explore a totally fun pairing idea that has us reaching for a spoon instead! Listen in and taste along with us as we savor the flavors of kijoshu and try a totally new way to enjoy sake!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/sakerevolution)

UN News
Exhibition provides ‘strong, powerful' argument for nuclear disarmament

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 3:35


A powerful and haunting exhibition featuring the Hibakusha – the Japanese survivors of the nuclear bombs that devastated Hiroshima and Nagasaki more than three-quarters of a century ago – has just been staged at UN Headquarters in New York. It's not the first exhibit dedicated to the issue of nuclear disarmament that Japanese art director Erico Platt has created for the UN, and although she is far too young to be a hibakusha, she is proud to amplify their voices against the horrors of nuclear weapons. Ms. Platt explained to Liz Scaffidi, how her studies in Japan linked her to the right people, who, in turn, helped highlight again the urgency of banning nuclear weapons in what she describes as a “strong, powerful” and also beautiful exhibition, that's the best she's done…

Au cœur de l'histoire
Sakharov, l'homme qui a aussi inventé la bombe (partie 2)

Au cœur de l'histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 19:50


Entre 1949 et 1962, l'Union soviétique conduit une série d'essais nucléaires dans la ville de Semipalatinsk, au Kazakhstan. Son but : construire une arme plus redoutable encore que la bombe atomique américaine qui a détruit Hiroshima en 1945. Dans ce nouvel épisode du podcast "Au cœur de l'Histoire", Clémentine Portier-Kaltenbach dresse le portrait de l'artisan qui a permis à ces expériences de voir le jour : Andreï Sakharov, inventeur de la bombe à hydrogène. Et futur Prix Nobel de la Paix.

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
More Than Ever, Food Not Bombs Needs To Become A Reality

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 60:01


Food Not Bombs was founded in 1980 to provide direct aid to people while educating about the perversion of spending so much on the Military-Industrial Complex (MIC) while tens of millions of people do not have the basic necessities. It has turned into a global movement to build food sovereignty and organize systems outside the establishment. Clearing the FOG speaks with Keith McHenry, the co-founder of Food Not Bombs, about the criminalization of homelessness, their recent legal victory in Florida and why we must be concerned about increasing homelessness in the United States and the overall direction the country is going. McHenry speaks about his family ties to the founding of the military and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as well as the violence he and others have experienced because of their activism. For more information, visit PopularResistance.org.

Breakfast With Tiffany Show
How Japanese Spend Their New Year's?

Breakfast With Tiffany Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 29:04


Happy and Blessed 2022 to all you Breakfast With Tiffany Show supporters. We are grateful for your continuous supports. On this episode I will share my brilliant experience staying on a temple for New Year's Eve in Hiroshima. It became my yearly ritual now and I can say that it is definitely a great way to start my year instead of hosting a NYE party dealing with so much chaos and preparations. I also get to experienced the real Japanese traditional way of spending holidays with their families. Review Of The Day ~ @XtinaWittabego ( @xtinaras on IG) Listen to my last year's episode about... Episode 25: New Year's Eve Inside The Monastery Of Koyasan ~ https://www.tiffanyrossdale.com/podcast/episode/4a058251/new-years-eve-inside-the-monastery-of-koyasan Temple Aki Kokubunji (Available only in Japanese) ~ https://terahaku.jp/temple/akikokubunji/ ZENSCAPE Wellness Retreat " New Year, New You Detox" Facebook Official Event Page ~ https://fb.me/e/4rKW4wKsq January 28-30, 2022 (3-day and 2 night weekend of juice cleanse and fasting) The Fasting Hotel in Chiba ~ https://www.koyarunomori.jp For more details please e-mail us ~ breakfastwithtiffanyshow@outlook.com Leave our podcast a review, comment and ratings; Spotify ~ https://open.spotify.com/show/52ySZU9QRQOkkCfM2pJaiz?si=96fc6105f4e44a93 Podchaser ~ https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/breakfast-with-tiffany-show-1346455 Apple Podcast ~ https://podcasts.apple.com/jp/podcast/breakfast-with-tiffany-show/id1524300778 If you scroll down on the provided link above on Apple Podcast, you will find the rating section that will appear further below. For questions, requests, collaborations and comments, feel free to reach us via our e-mail ~ breakfastwithtiffanyshow@outlook.com Breakfast With Tiffany Show Official Page ~ https://www.tiffanyrossdale.com/podcast Breakfast With Tiffany Show Official Facebook Page ~ https://www.facebook.com/breakfastwithtiffanyshow Subscribe to our Official YouTube channel ~ https://bit.ly/3vIVzhE If you find this episode valuable to you, consider a minute to support the podcast by buying us plenty of tea or through the support Paypal link. We will appreciate your generosity to help grow this podcast. https://www.buymeacoffee.com/tiffanyrossdale For coaching sessions and programs with Tiffany, check out her official page  ~ https://www.tiffanyrossdale.com Follow Tiffany Rossdale Instagram ~ https://www.instagram.com/TokyoHottie Official Facebook Page ~ https://www.facebook.com/OfficialTiffanyRossdale Support the show (https://paypal.me/breakfastwithtiff)

Penderecki's Garden
Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima: Terror and Sorrow

Penderecki's Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:17


Fifty two strings. Eight minutes. Thirty seven seconds. Completed in 1960, Krzysztof Penderecki's Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima has become one of his most well-known works thanks to its use in soundtracks of films by David Lynch, Wes Craven and Alfonso Cuarón. In this podcast we explore its genesis, how its textures suggest an incomprehensible terror and sorrow, and its transition from abstraction to memorial.  Transcription WCAG

Maranatha Japan
MFJ - Sentado a mesa da Casa de Deus (Seated at the table in the house of God)

Maranatha Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 62:23


Olá, somos a Igreja Maranatha Fellowship Japan, localizados na província de Hiroshima. Mensagem pregada pelo Pr.Carlos A. N. Filho e com tradução simultânea para o português pelo Irmão Stewart Rodney. Mais mensagens no nosso canal do Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClgx4P5SqGbuyWydEu0nVQA? ou visite nosso site: https://maranathafellowship155738535.wordpress.com

パイロット・ジャム!
第150回【ED:今後期待の漫画・身近なアイドル】

パイロット・ジャム!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 16:14


【Show notes】・U2・ポーランドの民主化運動・アイルランド・私の息子が異世界転生したっぽい・ふつうのおんなのこにもどりたい・ふみふみこ・乃木坂46・かぐや様は告らせたい・推しの子150 ED (1).mp3【Postscript】あけましておめでとうございます。「こういうマンガが俺は好き2021」審査員長のヒロシマです。2021は思いつきだったので、2022はずっとメモしておこうと思います。(Hiroshima)あけましておめでとうございます。今年も楽しく雑談します..

I'm Quitting Alcohol
2 Years 226 days - My Hiroshima

I'm Quitting Alcohol

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:19


I'm Quitting Alcohol, is a 5 minute daily podcast by comedian David Boyle. Join Boyle as he transitions from Alcoholic maniac to sober lunatic and attempts to process the past 20 years of booze soaked mayhem. To listen from DAY 1 head to SPOTIFY. quit, alcoholic, drinking, sober, real, stories, laugh, drugs, true, sex, love, quitting, alcoholics, recovery, body, anxiety, depression, love, giving up, anonymous, soul, change, addiction, withdrawal, dance, sober, quit, success, relationships, recovery, answer, transforming, health, resource, healing, alcoholism, giving, up

Les Nuits de France Culture
Le bon plaisir - Alberto Moravia (1ère diffusion : 16/11/1985)

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 150:00


durée : 02:30:00 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit - Par Francesca Piolot - Avec Alberto Moravia, Elsa Morante, Dario Bellezza, Renzo Paris, Laura Betti, Dacia Maraini, Carmen Llera, Enzo Siciliano et Jean-Noël Schifano - Extraits des films "Hiroshima mon amour" d'Alain Resnais, et "La Ciociara" de Vittorio De Sica - Réalisation Michel Fleischmann

Hiroshima Station - Dance Music Podcast
Hiroshima Station - December 2021

Hiroshima Station - Dance Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 56:35


Strap on the snow plow, as nothing will stop the festive Hiroshima Station from arriving to jingle your bells. The sack is bulging with the usual goodies, from funky grooves to big piano and some juddering bass to take you home. Merikuri from Hiroshima Town. And a Happy New Year. Please.

History Ago Go
Fallout: Spies, Superbombs, and the Ultimate Cold War Showdown (Steve Sheinkin)

History Ago Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 55:36


New York Times bestselling author Steve Sheinkin presents a follow up to his award-winning book Bomb: The Race to Build--and Steal--the World's Most Dangerous Weapon, taking readers on a terrifying journey into the Cold War and our mutual assured destruction.As World War II comes to a close, the United States and the Soviet Union emerge as the two greatest world powers on extreme opposites of the political spectrum. After the United States showed its hand with the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, the Soviets refuse to be left behind. With communism sweeping the globe, the two nations begin a neck-and-neck competition to build even more destructive bombs and conquer the Space Race. In their battle for dominance, spy planes fly above, armed submarines swim deep below, and undercover agents meet in the dead of night.The Cold War game grows more precarious as weapons are pointed towards each other, with fingers literally on the trigger. The decades-long showdown culminates in the Cuban Missile Crisis, the world's close call with the third―and final―world war.HOST:  Rob MellonFEATURED BREW:  Thespian Espionage IPA, Weathered Ground Brewery, Cool Ridge, West VirginiaBOOK:  Fallout: Spies, Superbombs, and the Ultimate Cold War Showdownhttps://www.amazon.com/Fallout-Spies-Superbombs-Ultimate-Showdown/dp/1250149010/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3AMRT7ISNMB9N&keywords=fallout+sheinkin&qid=1640120467&sprefix=fallout+sheinkin%2Caps%2C276&sr=8-1MUSIC:  Bones Forkhttps://bonesfork.com/

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
The Life-Giving Benefits of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 58:27


Dr. Cuttler discovered evidence of the low leukemia rates of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors who were located 2 to 3 km from ground zero. He and his colleagues also discovered that Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients might be treated successfully with brain CT scans. Since 1995, Dr. Cuttler has collaborated with renowned...

NUMBER 9 WITH TOMMY
Taking The Over

NUMBER 9 WITH TOMMY

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 91:34


On today's episode, Griff drops in and drops bombs like a pilot over Hiroshima. The boys and Erica discuss possible Karen's of the workplace, Pat preaches about loving your neighbors while destroying his and a father sells his underage daughter to her baby daddy while even Jerry Springer gags. Thanks for listening and remember to send your feedback to www.number9podcast.com or on twitter @Number9pod Link To Donate for Christmas help : https://streamelements.com/no9media/tip --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/number9withtommypodcast/support

Tales from the Orne Library
Musik der Verrückten part 4: Radio Deutsch

Tales from the Orne Library

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 67:53


The Eldritch Broadcast has begun and the unearthly music of Sternenmusik Ballette reverberates through the streets of Berlin. Our investigators now face a race against time to stop this infernal broadcast, but can they overcome the power of music that drives people insane? Music Credits: "Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima," and "Kosmogonia"by Krzysztof Penderecki (Cold Spring) "Lost on Sentinel Hill," "The King in Yellow," "Azathoth," and "Under the Nameless City" by Graham Plowman "Spooky Spooks" by the Victor Military Band Theme by Noah Yardley "Ich hab die Nacht Geträumet" arr. Noah Yardley

Taal voor de leuk - het luisterboek
Stukje 15 van Japan in honderd kleine stukjes

Taal voor de leuk - het luisterboek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 4:15


Een lange onheilspellende hassha merodii vandaag, en het hoofdstuk gaat dan ook over Hiroshima. (Het is overigens niet de hassha merodii van het station van Hiroshima hoor!) (En ik heb zelf heerlijke maanden doorgebracht in Hiroshima.)Mocht je het boek liever willen lezen/bekijken (want er staan veel tekeningen in), bestel het dan hier.En o ja, de montage van deze podcast is in handen van Chris Bajema, luister ook naar zijn podcast: Man met de microfoon! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Krewe of Japan
Off the Beaten Path: Kansai ft. Rob Dyer [Part 2]

Krewe of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 78:18


In the final part of this 2-part episode, Doug and Nigel conclude their discussion with Rob Dyer (founder and CEO of The Real Japan). This time they tackle the specific off the beaten path recommendations in the Kansai area, from onsen town and art museums, to giant torii and castles in the sky. They also discuss helpful topics like navigating via taxis and with little Japanese. Post interview Doug and Nigel discuss their thoughts on their interview with Rob. As always, buckle up, this is an episode you don't want to miss! For more on Rob Dyer and his company The Real Japan visit:https://www.therealjapan.com/about/https://twitter.com/TheRealJapan1?s=20 For more on the Japan Society of New Orleans visit:https://japansocietyofneworleans.wildapricot.org/

Guilhotina | Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil
#147: Uma história da ciência e do poder, com Tatiana Roque

Guilhotina | Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 67:46


Bianca Pyl e Luís Brasilino recebem a matemática, filósofa e historiadora Tatiana Roque, autora do livro “O dia em que voltamos de Marte: uma história da ciência e do poder com pistas para um novo presente” (https://bit.ly/3ycbczr), lançado em novembro pelo selo Crítica, da editora Planeta. A obra apresenta quatro séculos de história da ciência, analisando como as transformações sociais incidiram no desenvolvimento do conhecimento e da tecnologia e, por outro lado, como esse “progresso” influenciou e influencia a sociedade. Conversamos sobre a formação das noções modernas de Ciência e Razão e sua relação com o nascimento do capitalismo, a importância da teoria da gravidade de Newton, o papel do desenvolvimento da álgebra na substituição do recurso a explicações divinas para fenômenos naturais, a participação das mulheres na pesquisa científica, a Ciência a serviço do colonialismo, as noções de inevitabilidade e neutralidade do avanço científico, o otimismo com o progresso e o choque provocado pelas bombas de Hiroshima e Nagasaki, a pesquisa bélica como motor do avanço tecnológico a partir do pós-guerra, apogeu e declínio dos programas espaciais, aquecimento global, Green New Deal, o negacionismo na extrema direita e muito mais! Mestre em Matemática e doutora em História e Filosofia das Ciências, Tatiana é professora titular do Instituto de Matemática da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), coordenadora do Fórum de Ciência e Cultura, da mesma instituição, e pesquisadora associada dos Archives Henri-Poincaré na França. Seu livro “História da Matemática: uma visão crítica, desfazendo mitos e lendas” foi um dos vencedores do Prêmio Jabuti de 2013. Trilha: The Alan Parsons Project, “Eye in the sky”; e Caetano Veloso, “Terra”.

Kino Lefter
132 - Marvel's Eternals: Tears on the Ashes with Karen Mills

Kino Lefter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 70:52


Celebrated director of Nomadland Chloé Zhao returns to cinemas with Marvel's Eternals, hyped as a new superhero masterpiece and a win for diverse casting in blockbusters, they instead delivered an absolute mess reviled by fans and critics alike. How did this happen? And why is the bombing of Hiroshima used as character development for a guy named Phastos? Karen Mills from Alberta Advantage and C.H.A.N.G.E. Agents returns. ReComradations:Karen: The Wheel of Time on Amazon PrimeEvan: Devil in a Blue Dress, dir. Carl Franklin (1995) Rate + review the show on the podcatcher of your choice! Join the Kino Lefter DiscordJoin the Kino Lefter Facebook group "Kino Lefter VIP Cinema Experience"Get access to Primo Lefter, our weekly bonus show on our Patreon for just $3 per month. 

Misterios
Informe Enigma: La Tragedia de Chernobyl

Misterios

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 119:25


El 26 de abril de 1986 una prueba de seguridad en la central nuclear de Chernóbil provocó la mayor catástrofe nuclear de la historia. La explosión del cuarto reactor desencadenó una reacción en cadena que amenazó con provocar una segunda explosión aún más potente, diez veces más fuerte que la de Hiroshima y que habría afectado a media Europa. Un secreto que los soviéticos ocultaron durante muchísimo tiempo. Durante 8 meses, unos 800.000 hombres trabajaron a contra reloj para acabar con la radiactividad construyendo un sarcófago alrededor del reactor explosionado. 1/Mercedes Pullman, nacida en la antigua Unión Soviética, vivió el accidente desde muy cerca y hoy hablamos con ella para saber que hay de verdad o mentira en la versión oficial que nos presenta la plataforma HBO acerca del accidente de Chernobyl, así como para saber cual fue la reacción del pueblo soviético ante aquella catástrofe. 2/ Hace 33 años tenía lugar el desastre en la central de Chernobyl, el impacto del accidente sobre la salud de las personas y el medio ambiente continúan, en la actualidad ocho millones de personas viven contaminadas en las áreas de Ucrania, Rusia y especialmente en Bielorrusia, sin embargo, algo más profundo queda en aquél lugar. Daniel Ortega regresa para hablarnos de los antecedentes bélicos que ocurrieron a lo largo de la historia en los alrededores de la centra nuclear de Chernobyl y como estos dejaron una huella imborrable con el paso del tiempo. Un huella que quizás fuera la responsable del accidente. 3/ Yolanda Martínez en Voces del Más Allá y a través del tarot de Osho, resolverá que tipo de energía tendrá cada signo del zodiaco de cara a este nuevo año.

Radio Platja d'aro, Informe Enigma
Reemisión *La Tragedia de Chernobyl*

Radio Platja d'aro, Informe Enigma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 119:25


Debido al confinamiento por el Coronavirus COVID-19 os ofrecemos una serie de reemisiones de los mejores programas de Informe Enigma. Sumario Informe Enigma Dirige y Presenta: Jorge Ríos Escúchanos cada viernes de 23:00h a 01:00h en directo en Radio Platja d'Aro. https://danielortegaescritor.com/ Contacto Yolanda Martínez: 647552954 Contacto StillNoufred Palamós: 629535811 Contacto Verde Limón Palamós: 609532867 El 26 de abril de 1986 una prueba de seguridad en la central nuclear de Chernóbil provocó la mayor catástrofe nuclear de la historia. La explosión del cuarto reactor desencadenó una reacción en cadena que amenazó con provocar una segunda explosión aún más potente, diez veces más fuerte que la de Hiroshima y que habría afectado a media Europa. Un secreto que los soviéticos ocultaron durante muchísimo tiempo. Durante 8 meses, unos 800.000 hombres trabajaron a contra reloj para acabar con la radiactividad construyendo un sarcófago alrededor del reactor explosionado. 1/Mercedes Pullman, nacida en la antigua Unión Soviética, vivió el accidente desde muy cerca y hoy hablamos con ella para saber que hay de verdad o mentira en la versión oficial que nos presenta la plataforma HBO acerca del accidente de Chernobyl, así como para saber cual fue la reacción del pueblo soviético ante aquella catástrofe. 2/ Hace 33 años tenía lugar el desastre en la central de Chernobyl, el impacto del accidente sobre la salud de las personas y el medio ambiente continúan, en la actualidad ocho millones de personas viven contaminadas en las áreas de Ucrania, Rusia y especialmente en Bielorrusia, sin embargo, algo más profundo queda en aquél lugar. Daniel Ortega regresa para hablarnos de los antecedentes bélicos que ocurrieron a lo largo de la historia en los alrededores de la centra nuclear de Chernobyl y como estos dejaron una huella imborrable con el paso del tiempo. Un huella que quizás fuera la responsable del accidente. 3/ Yolanda Martínez en Voces del Más Allá y a través del tarot de Osho, resolverá que tipo de energía tendrá cada signo del zodiaco de cara a este nuevo año.

Solo Documental
Alarma nuclear: La batalla de Chernobil 1/2

Solo Documental

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 93:15


'La Batalla de Chernóbil', una producción francesa de 2006 dirigida por Thomas Johnson que nos relata la lucha contra la radiactividad. El 26 de abril de 1986 una prueba de seguridad en la central nuclear de Chernóbil provocó la mayor catástrofe nuclear de la historia. La explosión del cuarto reactor desencadenó una reacción en cadena que amenazó con provocar una segunda explosión aún más potente, diez veces más fuerte que la de Hiroshima y que habría afectado a media Europa. Un secreto que los soviéticos ocultaron veinte años. Durante 8 meses, unos 800.000 hombres trabajaron a contra reloj para acabar con la radiactividad construyendo un sarcófago alrededor del reactor explosionado.

Awake At Night
Rays of Hope

Awake At Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 34:17


“How obscene it would be for a country…that still has poverty, that still has all these problems, to spend billions in nuclear weapons. What for?”   IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi has specialized in non-proliferation and disarmament issues for more than 35 years – ever since he began his career as a diplomat in his native Argentina, when the country's then military dictatorship announced that it had mastered uranium enrichment.   For many, nuclear is a feared technology. But Rafael argues that it's also a beneficial one. In his conversation with podcast host Melissa Fleming, he explains how advances in nuclear technology have led to pioneering medical treatments and smarter agriculture. He cites the launch of Rays of Hope, a new initiative to harness nuclear technology to scale cancer treatment for women across Africa.   Rafael also shares how meeting atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki drives his work at the helm of the IAEA, known as the world's ‘nuclear watchdog.'

La ContraHistoria
Bombas sobre Pearl Harbor

La ContraHistoria

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 89:39


El 7 de diciembre de 1941 poco antes de las ocho de la mañana una escuadrilla de 183 aviones japoneses penetró en el espacio aéreo de las islas Hawái y se dirigieron a Pearl Harbor, principal base de la flota estadounidense en el Pacífico. Habían despegado poco antes de seis portaviones japoneses que, de forma furtiva, habían atravesado el Pacífico sin ser detectados. No era una visita de cortesía a pesar de que Japón y Estados Unidos no se habían declarado formalmente la guerra. La escuadrilla atravesó rauda el norte de la isla de Oahu y atacó la base con todo lo que llevaba a bordo. Era domingo y a esa hora las tripulaciones de los barcos de la armada aún se estaban desperezando, muchos de esos seguían incluso dormidos. Nadie esperaba un ataque de esa envergadura por lo que los pilotos japoneses estuvieron practicando tiro al blanco sobre los buques, los muelles, las dársenas y las instalaciones del arsenal hasta que se les acabó la munición. Tras el primer ataque, que fue devastador en términos humanos y materiales, llegó un segundo compuesto por 171 aviones divididos en tres grupos. Esta vez ya no contaron con el factor sorpresa y las defensas antiaéreas pudieron reaccionar. Pero ya era tarde. El daño estaba hecho. En sólo hora y media murieron un total de 2.408 estadounidenses: 2.000 marineros, 218 aviadores, 109 infantes de marina y 68 civiles, a los que hubo que sumar 1.143 heridos de diversa consideración. La armada de Estados Unidos, por su parte, perdió un total de dieciocho barcos, incluidos cinco acorazados, pero ningún portaviones porque se encontraban en ese momento de maniobras en alta mar. Se perdieron también 188 aviones, prácticamente todos en tierra durante la primera oleada de bombardeos. Los japoneses salieron muy bien librados. Sacaron el máximo partido a su ataque sorpresa. Sólo tuvieron que lamentar 64 víctimas mortales, 29 aeronaves y cinco submarinos enanos. El ataque provocó la entrada inmediata en la guerra por parte de Estados Unidos, que se la declaró a Japón ese mismo día, sólo unas horas después de que el Reino Unido hiciese lo propio tras la irrupción de los japoneses en sus colonias orientales de Hong Kong y Malasia. Poco después, el 11 de diciembre, italianos y alemanes declararon la guerra a Estados Unidos convirtiendo lo que había empezado dos años antes como un conflicto europeo en una conflagración de alcance mundial. El ataque inauguró el teatro de operaciones del Pacífico, cuyas operaciones se prolongarían hasta agosto de 1945 con las bombas atómicas de Hiroshima y Nagasaki. El enfrentamiento a cara de perro entre Japón y los Estados Unidos no originó la segunda guerra mundial, pero si le puso punto final. Al término de la contienda los vencedores procesaron a los vencidos durante los juicios de Tokio de 1946. El primero de los cargos que presentaron ante el tribunal internacional fue el del ataque a traición y sin declaración previa de la base de Pearl Harbor, que se reconstruyó y hoy sigue siendo una de las principales bases de la US Navy en el Pacífico. En La Contrahistoria de hoy, ocho décadas después de aquel ataque, aquella victoria táctica de los japoneses que preludió una derrota absoluta, vamos a repasar en qué consistió esta operación y que consecuencias acarreó. En El ContraSello: - La masonería en la independencia de la América hispana - El sah de Persia Bibliografía: - "Pearl Harbor" de VVAA - https://amzn.to/3GpCVzk - "Japón 1941: El camino a la infamia" de Eri Hotta - https://amzn.to/3DzXRSs - "Pearl Harbor: Un ataque que convierte a la guerra en mundial" de Victoria Domingos Valentim - https://amzn.to/3oBfrBf - "Pearl Harbor: The Verdict of History" de Gordon W. Prange - https://amzn.to/31J3bpo - "Pearl Harbor: Japan's Attack and America's Entry into World War II" de Takuma Melber - https://amzn.to/30exeF6 >>> “La ContraHistoria de España. Auge, caída y vuelta a empezar de un país en 28 episodios”… https://amzn.to/3kXcZ6i Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Mínimo Necesario
Historia, celebración y memoria

Mínimo Necesario

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 101:14


"Ayer, 7 de diciembre de 1941 —una fecha que vivirá en la infamia— Estados Unidos de América fue atacado repentina y deliberadamente por fuerzas navales y aéreas del Imperio de Japón. [...] Las hostilidades existen. No hay que cerrar los ojos al hecho de que nuestro pueblo, nuestro territorio y nuestros intereses están en grave peligro. Con confianza en nuestras fuerzas armadas —con la ilimitada determinación de nuestro pueblo— obtendremos el inevitable triunfo, con la ayuda de Dios”. Así comenzaba el discurso del presidente Franklin D. Roosevelt ante el Congreso el 8 de diciembre de 1941, solicitando la declaración del estado de guerra con Japón. El día anterior, más de 350 aviones japoneses habían atacado sin piedad la base estadounidense de Pearl Harbor en la isla de Oahu (Hawái). En apenas una hora y 15 minutos, los cazas y bombarderos nipones destrozaron ocho acorazados de la Armada estadounidense y 188 aviones, amén de asesinar a más de 2400 estadounidenses. Lo que empezó en Hawái terminó con las bombas nucleares de Hiroshima y Nagasaki. Al conmemorar el 80 aniversario del acontecimiento nos preguntamos, ¿qué importancia tiene la fecha en la memoria colectiva estadounidense? ¿Se puede entender Pearl Habor como el inicio de un "arco de venganzas" en el escenario de la Segunda Guerra Mundial? ¿Cómo se ha representado este episodio en el cine? Mínimo Necesario te invita a conversar. Entrevistador: Alfonso Gómez Arciniega, director de Conversaciones necesarias, maestro en Ciencia Política y candidato a doctor en Filosofía política por la Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, licenciado en Relaciones Internacionales por el ITAM y estudiante temporal de Lengua y Literatura Alemanas en la UNAM. Invitado especial: Gabriel García Jolly, filósofo de formación, editor de profesión e historiador de vocación. Ha impartido clases de Humanidades en distintas universidades y actualmente es editor en jefe de la revista Algarabía, socio de Aliosventos Ediciones, colaborador del think tank Política de a Pie y coconductor del pódcast Lo bueno, lo malo y lo feo. Visita nuestra página: www.minimonecesario.com.mx #PearlHarbor #PearlHarbor80thAnniversary #Conmemoración #ConversacionesNecesarias #MínimoNecesario --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/minimonecesario/support

The J-Talk Podcast
Episode 396 - J1 Matchday 38

The J-Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 88:20


The J1 season wrapped up on Saturday, and we begin this week's episode by commiserating with Tokushima, who became the fourth and final team relegated after their home defeat at the hands of Hiroshima. After moving on to discuss the final day results for Shonan and Shimizu, who ended up safe (to 28:15), we head up the table to the barnburner at the Nissan Stadium, where they top two slugged it out and honours - and the Golden Boot - were shared. Then we work our way through the other results, and finish up by handing out our final six (well, seven) Player of the Season awards, and look ahead to the Emperor's Cup semi finals coming up on Sunday.

Radio Influence
Talking Schmutz: Jenn Whittaker – Enola Gay and Pearl Harbor 80th Anniversary

Radio Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 93:30


On this episode, Talking Schmutz chat with Jenn Whittaker about her Screenplay about the “Enola Gay.” The famous Boeing B-29 Bomber that dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima, Japan! On the 80th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor, we talk with Jenn a true expert on the events about these historic events and current events as well. […] The post Talking Schmutz: Jenn Whittaker – Enola Gay and Pearl Harbor 80th Anniversary appeared first on Radio Influence.

Cultura.21: El magacín cultural
Sonidos que unen mundos

Cultura.21: El magacín cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 4:02


Entre la vanguardia y el budismo zen: el compositor japonés Toshio Hosokawa mezcla música tradicional nipona con estilos melódicos occidentales creando así su propio universo sonoro, una obra que le ha valido la medalla Goethe 2021.

Kultur.21: Das Kulturmagazin
Toshio Hosokawa: Klangkunst verbindet Welten

Kultur.21: Das Kulturmagazin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 4:03


Zwischen Zen-Buddhismus und Avantgarde. Der japanische Komponist Toshio Hosokawa verbindet traditionelle Musik aus Japan mit westlichen Musikstilen und schafft ganz eigene Klangwelten. Für sein Schaffen erhielt er eine der drei Goethe-Medaillen 2021.

Escuchando Documentales
La IIGM de Principio a Fin: 6- El Camino a la Victoria #documental #historia #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 49:57


La Alemania nazi realizó un último esfuerzo para intentar a volverle a dar la vuelta al desastroso rumbo que llevaba la guerra para sus intereses con la Batalla de las Ardenas. Esa pérdida y la siguiente caída de Berlín supusieron la rendición nazi. Después de las hostilidades, se establecieron los juicios por crímenes de guerra, como los de Nuremberg, y se avanzó hacia la paz con la creación de las Naciones Unidas. Mientras en el pacífico ante la más que improbable rendición japonesa, se decidió utilizar el arma en que tanto esfuerzo se había invertido, las dos bombas nucleares sobre Hiroshima y Nagasaki hicieron a los japoneses recapitular.

Key Battles of American History
Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the End of the War

Key Battles of American History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:19


Between December 1942 and July 1945, a team of scientists, working in secret facilities in various parts of the U. S., researched, built, and tested the world's first atomic bomb. Japan's failure to surrender, together with the possibility of hundreds of thousands of casualties, motivated President Truman to drop an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Despite the bomb's destruction of the city, including the immediate deaths of up to 80,000 people, Japan's leaders still refused to surrender. Three days later, an American bomber dropped a second bomb on Nagasaki, leveling that city and killing nearly as many people as had perished at Hiroshima. Soon after, the Emperor led Japan to surrender. In this episode, James and Scott discuss the Manhattan Project, the dropping of the two atomic bombs, the Japanese surrender, and the end of the Second World War.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 22: 18022 Adams: Doctor Atomic

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 167:27


John Adams's mesmerizing score, in the powerful production of Penny Woolcock, tells the story of one of the pivotal moments in human history—the creation of the atomic bomb. This gripping opera presents the human face of the scientists, military men, and others who were involved in the project, as they wrestled with the implications of their work.Purchase the music (without talk) at:Adams: Doctor Atomic (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @khedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com

Across the World
Ep37: Spread Love with Kaze - 風が広げる愛

Across the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 35:05


Episode37:Spread Love with Kaze - 風が広げる愛 (Language: English & Japanese) 今回はAccoが愛してやまないアーティスト・藤井風の魅力や、「HELP EVER ARENA TOUR」東京公演で受けとった優しさや愛というギフトについてお話しています。彼の影響を受け、Accoの母語である広島弁と英語のバイリンガルでお届けします。 "The 21 Most Exciting Young Musicians on Planet Earth" というGQの特集で世界的にフィーチャーされた風くんが紹介していた彼の好きな言葉や、彼の歌詞からみる世界観などなど、藤井風という存在からあふれ出る可能性や愛をお伝えできたら嬉しいです。 Enjoy this bilingual episode about the YouTube-native most hottest Japanese artist, Fujii Kaze. I speak in Hiroshima-ben (my mother tongue, a dialect of Hiroshima) and in English, like he dose. Please feel free to contact me and leave your comment via my SNS or my website below. 【Fujii Kaze Official Website】 https://fujiikaze.com/ 【GQ - 未来のヴォイス特集】https://www.gq.com/story/voices-of-the-future (English) 【GQ JAPAN - 藤井 風特集】https://www.gqjapan.jp/culture/article/20211010-voice-of-future-kaze-fujii (Japanese) 【藤井風 "Free" Live @NISSAN stadium】https://fujiikaze.com/free0904/en (English/Japanese) Connect with Acco: 【Across the World Website】https://www.acrossg.net/ 【Facebook Page】 https://www.facebook.com/acroslife/ 【Across The World Facebook Community】https://www.facebook.com/groups/atwcom/←Please send a request to join this community (ここからメンバー申請してコミュニティにご参加ください) 【Acco's Instagram】https://www.instagram.com/acco.sing/ 【Acco's blog & profile】https://note.com/slife/ 【E-mail】acco.actworld@gmail.com 【Acco's twitter】https://twitter.com/acco_sing 【Event/Workshop】https://actworld.peatix.com/ 【stand.fm】https://stand.fm/episodes/61a09e545be1810006473449 (こちらの音声番組でも、藤井風の愛や優しさについて話しています) Don't forget to subscribe and share with your friends who might be interested in this show, and hopefully you leave a good review on Apple Podcast. Thank you! この番組は不定期での配信となります。 次回の配信を自動で受け取っていただくため、番組登録をお忘れなく!

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast
Darjeeling with Vaibhav Dewan

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:57


This week, The Musafir Stories speaks with a dear friend, traveler and host of the podcast Baap beeti, Vaibhav Dewan!Today's destination: Darjeeling and Kalimpong!Nearest Airport: Bagdogra Airport, IXBNearest Railway Station: New Jalpaiguri, NJPPrerequisites - NAPacking - Make sure to carry warm clothes and accessoriesTime of the year - April, September-October is a good timeLength of the itinerary: 6-7 daysItinerary Highlights:Vaibhav shares his itinerary around Darjeeling and Kalimpong, traveling with a toddler! The journey starts with a flight to Bagdogra or New Jalpaiguri, depending on your mode of transport.The team hails a cab ride from the station to reach Darjeeling. The first day is spent seeing around the area, including the Cable car/ropeway, which is one of the longest in Asia.The area near Chowrasta and the Mall road are full of tourists along with eateries as well as local shops to shop for souvenirs as well as restaurants and cafes.A visit to St.Joseph's school, North Point is also well worth the time, and is the location of the popular bollywood flick, “Yaariyan”Tenzing Norgay Rock and Gombu Rock are other attractions in memory of the famous Sherpa mountaineers, Tenzing and Gombu Norgay.While in Darjeeling, make sure to try out the world famous Darjeeling tea. A visit to a tea estate also helps one understand the history of tea as well as the numerous types of tea grown in this area.The local markets around the mall road also have a variety of momos sold by locals, make sure to try that out.Other nature related places that should make it to your itinerary include Rock Garden, which has a variety of plants and trees and involves a small trek to a waterfall.Next up on the itinerary was a trip to the Dali monastery, along with the museum - a great chance to interact with the monks and understand the buddhist religion and culture. There are other popular monasteries like Ghum, Aloo bari, Bhooti Basti among others.A visit to Darjeeling is incomplete without experiencing the Darjeeling Himalayan railway - make sure to take a joy ride on the popular ‘toy train'. A short trip to Batasia loop is a must do - the location of the popular hit “mere sapno ki rani' starring Rajesh Khanna and Sharmila Tagore! The railways are also a UNESCO world heritage site!Next stop is the Japanese peace pagoda built by the Nipponzhan Myohoji foundation to promote peace in the aftermath of the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.Another important point of interest is Tiger Hill, one of the most visited spots to get a view of Mt. Kanchenjunga, the third highest peak in the world at 8586m, after Mt. Everest and Mt.K2.Some popular eateries in the area include Keventers, Glenarys, Kunga's, Nathmull's, HImalayan coffee, Margaret's deck. Also don't forget to try the local spicy chilli - Daale, but try at your own risk!Kalimpong is not too far away from Darjeeling but provides an offbeat experience compared to it's more popular sibling. Places to check out include Lamahatta park, Durpin monastery, Cacti park and pineview nursery, Graham's homeschools, Morgan house and Crookety, Mangal Dham among others.Links:Vaibhav's podcast - Baap Beeti: https://open.spotify.com/show/5cELVD4HYXq0sAQ2lSKaccInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/pregnantpapa/Twitter: https://twitter.com/dewanekhaasLink to the Andaman Islands episode: https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/show/the-musafir-stories-india-travel-podcast-yg3r-RgjYIgajKrExt2J2/episode/99-andaman-islands-with-vaibhav-dewan-mznq-IqY1WlDHPAvAzyb7?startTime=0Photo by Joy Amed on UnsplashFollow the Musafir stories on:Twitter : https://twitter.com/musafirstories?lang=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/themusafirstories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/musafirstoriespodcast/?hl=enwebsite: www.themusafirstories.comemail: themusafirstories@gmail.comYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at http://www.ivmpodcasts.com/

New Books in American Studies
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in East Asian Studies
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Military History
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

Storied: San Francisco
Poet Shizue Seigel (S4E28P1)

Storied: San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:03


This podcast is almost totally about Shizue Seigel's ancestors. In the episode, the poet and author digs deep into her family's history, which goes back to Japan just two generations ago. Sakuichi Tsutsumi and Umematsu Yokote Tsutsumi were from Kyushu, a large island in the south of Japan. Irene Yoshiko Tsutsumi Saiki, Shizue's mom, was born in Hawaii. Her family moved there to work on sugar plantations, but the conditions were brutal and they weren't able to save money thanks to the sugar companies' "company store" operations. Also, conditions in the cane fields were dangerous. The family went back to Japan. Sakuichi moved to San Luis Obispo on the central coast of California. He and his cousins bought some land and used their knowledge of irrigation to help them grow produce. Thanks to an oil boom in the area, the town of San Luis was growing and its population needed vegetables. Now successful, it was time to send for his wife back in Japan. Shizue shares the incredible story of finding the tiny mountain village and home where Sakuichi's family lived. It's one of those "you have to hear to believe" tales. Shizue's mom, Irene, was born in 1920. Shizue shares many stories of her mother's family and the Japanese community in and around San Luis Obispo where she mostly grew up, notably before World War II. Her dad's family moved from Hiroshima to Hawaii with his two older brothers. Life was tough there for them as well, and so it was decided that her grandfather, Yasaburo, would go ahead to California while her grandmother, Shige Matsuoka, took their children back to Japan. Shige waited for two years with no word back from the US. She left her two kids with in-laws and decided to come over to track her husband down. Her journey east is another amazing tale you just have to hear. Check back tomorrow for Part 2 and the continuation of Shizue's life history. We recorded this podcast in Shizue's Outer Richmond apartment in November 2021. Photography by Michelle Kilfeather

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution
Episode 157: The New Model for Restaurant Success: Chef Steve Brown, founder of Swagyu Chop Shop

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:16


What does the restaurant of the future look like? Well, if we've figured anything out in our time together it's that I could look like many different things. I think Chef Steve Brown has stumbled upon a really intriguing business model. He's evolved the pop up model into a restaurant incubator, creating massive demand and awareness for his brands. In our conversation we unpack what went into conceptualizing and executing this restaurant ecosystem and how he leveraged his unique personal brand to bring it to the masses. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [2:] Taking partnership to the next level: creating a brand vibe with the love of your life [5:01] Being in hospitality vs. being in the hospitality business [6:56] Anything but a restaurant! How the Swagyu pop-up was born [8:15] It wasn't marketing... it was survival. [9:39] The Wagyu concept: born the Coachella of culinary battles [11:25] Taking it on tour: You can't perform the concert in the same town every day [12:48] The last supper: how a moment of desperation tripled revenue [16:07] Swagyu Study Hall: how Covid shaped next-level hospitality [17:13] "Uhh, Chef, we don't see it...": the journey into Brick & Mortar [18:36] Making what was for the 1% accessible to the 99% [19:36] Capitalizing on sh*tty strip malls: the golden ticket that made Swagyu Chop Shop possible [20:54] The Wagyu Smashburger: how the greatest oxymoron in the history of food became a huge success [23:46] What's better than zero waste? Negative waste. [24:16] And the beat goes on: the success keeps rolling in at every turn [25:13] Failing your way to success: trust your gut and understand your audience [27:43] Why Chef Steve Brown was able to rise from the ashes of Covid [29:09] Choosing the good choices: "I'd rather be miserable than without clarity." [29:49] Now what?: The future of Swagyu [31:12] "Wouldn't it be so funny if this worked?" [33:17] Listen for the mic drop: Chef detonates the Hiroshima of truth bombs. [33:43] "You wanna know how to expand this fast? I'll tell ya..." [36:00] Multiple revenue streams done right: Chef Steve divulges an EPIC strategy [37:41] Massive expansion during the great recession: where he's finding his employees [38:38] The creativity doesn't end at the plate: make big moves that might seem crazy. For more on all of his projects visit https://chefstevebrown.com FULL COMP is brought to you by Yelp for Restaurants: In July 2020, a few hundred employees formed Yelp for Restaurants. Our goal is to build tools that help restaurateurs do more with limited time. ________________________________ CLICK HERE to Chat with Josh Free Download: 5 Steps to Achieve a 15% Net ProfitWe have a lot more content coming your way! Be sure to check out the FULL COMP media universe by visiting: FULL COMP Restaurant Marketing School The Playbook Industry Town Halls

American History Tellers
Traitors | The Atomic Spies | 3

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 41:32


In September 1949, the world was shocked to learn that the Soviet Union had conducted its first nuclear weapons test, just four years after the United States dropped the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. U.S. authorities thought there was only one way the Soviets could narrow the nuclear arms gap so quickly -- by stealing atomic secrets from the U.S.In 1950, the FBI arrested a young Jewish couple, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, for running a spy ring and passing nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. At their trial, the Rosenbergs became lightning rods for controversy and anti-communist hysteria. But the true extent of their guilt would remain shrouded in mystery for decades to come.Better Help- Listeners get 10% OFF their first month at betterhelp.com/tellers!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Leadersmith
WHY DID WE DROP THE BOMB ON JAPAN? [EPISODE 196]

The Leadersmith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 14:49


In this episode, I want to talk about making tough decisions. Recently, Nikole Hannah-Jones tweeted that she felt shame when she visited Hiroshima. She also said, “They dropped the bomb when they knew surrender was coming because they'd spent all this money developing it and to prove it was worth it,” she wrote. “Propaganda is not history my friend.” But is that true? How did President Truman make his decision to drop the bomb? What choices did he have to wrestle with? In this episode, I walk through a historian's analysis to help you understand what happened and why. Here is a link to the article I referenced. https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/08/president-truman-atomic-bombing-of-japan-better-option/ If you enjoyed this episode, please consider subscribing and tell others who might benefit from this podcast. I would like to hear from you. You can leave a comment below.  I would like to hear if this was useful. Contact me on Twitter or Gettr @daringerdes or leave a video message: https://flipgrid.com/leadersmith  Join our FACEBOOK COMMUNITY and continue the discussion there: https://www.facebook.com/groups/learnleadership/   or Join our LinkedIn community: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/13966891/   WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO HEAR? Reach out with a comment or question: https://forms.gle/fJP6ym4LDxJrKX2c8

New Books in History
Naoko Wake, "American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 91:20


The little-known history of U.S. survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reveals captivating trans-Pacific memories of war, illness, gender, and community. The fact that there are indeed American survivors of the American nuclear attack on Hiroshima & Nagasaki is not common knowledge. Even in Hiroshima & Nagasaki the existence of American survivors is not well known. American survivors, however, number in the thousands. This number, like that of survivors in general is dwindling fast. But they have a unique and important history. And, Naoko Wake have written this book almost at the last possible moment to capture it. Counterintuitively, American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Cambridge UP, 2021) argues that it the very marginality of this group that make American survivors important. As she writes, “If, indeed, it is ‘not the centre that determines the periphery, but the periphery that ... determines the center,” US survivors' history is a periphery that threatens to disassemble established meanings of the bomb that have not taken notice of it.' (2). Based on oral testimonies and extensive documentation, American Survivors trace the history of American survivors from the interwar years to the present. American Survivors argues that Hiroshima, and to a lesser extent, Nagasaki (both of which were port towns) were cities of immigrants, and as such the attack on these cities was not just an attack on supposedly homogenous Japanese cities (as it is commonly understood) but on diverse communities. Wake traces the way immigration and re-migration between Hiroshima and the US, Korea, and other locations, as well as war time dislocations created the immigrant communities in Hiroshima. These trans-pacific connections, and what she terms “strengths of weak ties” in the history of immigration in the Pacific,” had an important impact on subsequent histories, which the b ook examines with great detail and deftness. Ran Zwigenberg is an associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Naoko Wake, "American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 91:20


The little-known history of U.S. survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reveals captivating trans-Pacific memories of war, illness, gender, and community. The fact that there are indeed American survivors of the American nuclear attack on Hiroshima & Nagasaki is not common knowledge. Even in Hiroshima & Nagasaki the existence of American survivors is not well known. American survivors, however, number in the thousands. This number, like that of survivors in general is dwindling fast. But they have a unique and important history. And, Naoko Wake have written this book almost at the last possible moment to capture it. Counterintuitively, American Survivors: Trans-Pacific Memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Cambridge UP, 2021) argues that it the very marginality of this group that make American survivors important. As she writes, “If, indeed, it is ‘not the centre that determines the periphery, but the periphery that ... determines the center,” US survivors' history is a periphery that threatens to disassemble established meanings of the bomb that have not taken notice of it.' (2). Based on oral testimonies and extensive documentation, American Survivors trace the history of American survivors from the interwar years to the present. American Survivors argues that Hiroshima, and to a lesser extent, Nagasaki (both of which were port towns) were cities of immigrants, and as such the attack on these cities was not just an attack on supposedly homogenous Japanese cities (as it is commonly understood) but on diverse communities. Wake traces the way immigration and re-migration between Hiroshima and the US, Korea, and other locations, as well as war time dislocations created the immigrant communities in Hiroshima. These trans-pacific connections, and what she terms “strengths of weak ties” in the history of immigration in the Pacific,” had an important impact on subsequent histories, which the b ook examines with great detail and deftness. Ran Zwigenberg is an associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg
The Loudest Minority

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 66:58


On today's Ruminant, Jonah is back in good health and high spirits, so much so that he can't resist boasting about a meeting he enjoyed this week with former President Bush. He's also concerned about the prospect of a second Trump presidency, intrigued by the debate over whether America was right to bomb Hiroshima, and fixated on George Will's idea that history is shaped by “small, compact, idea-driven minorities.” Members of the ambivalent right will find much to appreciate. Show Notes: - The Remnant with George Will - Jonah on elites and Pareto distribution - The Remnant with Steve Teles - Shor thing - The Remnant with Jay Cost - The Remnant with Brian Riedl - Frankenstein revisited - American prohibition, colorized - Pew's political typology test - Nikole Hannah-Jones on Hiroshima - Dan McLaughlin on the Meuse-Argonne Offensive - Trump sours on DeSantis - The Remnant with David Drucker - Cognitive limitations See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your Brain on Facts
Secret Cities (do-over, ep 170)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 33:46


Quick, switch over to Vodacast to see the pictures I talk about in the episode! We all lose things -- keys, wallets, patience -- but how do you lose an entire city?  Hear the stories of three American towns built in a hurry but kept off the map, secure Soviet enclaves known by their post codes, ancient cities found by modern technology, and the ingenious engineering of underground dwellings. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, .   Links to all the research resources are on our website.    In the opal-mining region of South Australia, lies the town of Coober Peedy.  You're welcome to visit, but don't expect to see much.  There aren't many buildings, though the landscape is dotted with ventilation shafts.  There's almost no movement at all.  So if the town is here, where are its 3500 residents?  Look down.  My name's Moxie and this is your brain on facts.   In 1943, three ordinary-looking US cities were constructed at record speed, but left off all maps.  Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Richland, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico held laboratories and sprawling industrial plants, as well as residential neighborhoods, schools, churches, and stores.  The three cities had a combined population of more than 125,000 and one extraordinary purpose: to create nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan project, the U.S. military's initiative to develop nuclear weapons.     Their design was driven by unique considerations, such as including buffer zones for radiation leaks or explosions. In each case, there were natural features, topographical features, that were considered to be favorable. In all three cases, they were somewhat remote—in the case of Richland and Los Alamos, very remote—which offered a more secure environment, of course. But also, in the event of a disaster, an explosion or a radiation leak, that would also minimize the potential exposure of people outside the project to any sort of radiation danger.  The sites were  selected far from one another in case German or Japanese bombers somehow managed to penetrate that far into the United States, it would be harder for them in a single bombing run to take out more than one facility.  K-25 plant at Oak Ridge, which was where they enriched uranium using the gaseous diffusion method, was the largest building in the world under a single roof, spanning more than 40 acres.    Before you being any building project, you have to clear the site of things like trees, high spots, people. In 1942, the government approached the families that lived near the Clinch river in Tennessee, some of whom had farmed there for generations, and kicked them out, telling them the land was needed for a “demolition range,” so as to scare off hold-outs with the threat of adjacent explosions.  The town scaled up fast.   Oak Ridge was initially conceived as a town for 13,000 people but grew to 75,000 by the end of the war, the biggest of the secret cities. The laboratories took up most of the space, but rather than constructing basic dormitories for employees, the architects and designers settled on a suburban vision.  To pull this off quickly and secretly, the architects relied on prefabricated housing, in some cases, a house might come in two halves on the back of a truck to be assembled on-site. These were called “alphabet houses;” A houses were the most modest (read: tiny), while D houses included dining rooms.  Housing was assigned based on seniority, though allowances were sometimes made for large families.     And race.  This was the early 40's, after all.  The secret suburbs for factories manufacturing megadeaths were segregated by design.  Their houses were called “hutments,” little more than plywood frames without indoor plumbing, insulation or glass in the windows.  Though two of the first public schools in the south to be desegregated were in Oak Ridge. They even threatened to secede from Tennessee in order to desegregate, so at least there's that.  There were white families in the hutments as well and all of the residents of that lower-class neighborhood were under more surveillance and stricter rules than the families in better housing.  Married couples may be forbidden to live together.  By the end of the war, most of the white families had been moved out of the hutments and but many of the African American families continued to live in the basic dwellings until the early 1950s.    These towns didn't appear on any official maps, and visitors were screened by guards posted at the entrances.  Anyone over 12 had to have official ID.  Firearms, cameras, and even binoculars were prohibited.  Billboards were installed all over town to remind workers to keep their mouths shut about their work, even though most workers knew very little about the project's true scope.  For example, you job may be to watch a gauge for eight hours and flip a switch if it goes to high.  You don't know what you're measuring or what the machine is doing.  All you've been told is to flip the switch when the needle hits a certain number.  In Los Alamos and Richland, the entire neighborhood may have the same mailing address.  At Oak Ridge, street addresses were designed to be confusing to outsiders. Bus routes might be called X-10 or K-25 while dorms had simple names such as M1.  There were no signs on buildings. The town was full of such ciphers, and even employees didn't know how to decode them all.  The use of words such as “atomic” or “uranium” was taboo lest it tip off the enemy.   When the US dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945, the city's secret was out. Many residents celebrated at this turning point in the war, but not all.  Mary Lowe Michel, a typist in Oak Ridge, is quoted in an exhibit on display now at the National Building Museum in DC: “The night that the news broke that the bombs had been dropped, there was joyous occasions in the streets, hugging and kissing and dancing and live music and singing that went on for hours and hours. But it bothered me to know that I, in my very small way, had participated in such a thing, and I sat in my dorm room and cried.”  All three cities remained part of the military industrial complex, continuing to work on nuclear weapons during the cold war as well as broader scientific research.  Today Oak Ridge is heavily involved in renewable energy, minus the barbed wire fence.   For most of the twentieth century, if the US was doing it, so was the USSR.  We had closed cities to build nuclear weapons, and so did the Soviet Union.  We had three, they had….lots. Like, a lot a lot.  Like, multiple screens on the Wikipedia list.  Where the US began to open its closed cities after the war, the USSR was building more and more, and not just for nuclear weapons.  These closed cities were nicknamed “post boxes,” because they would be named for the nearest non-secret city and the end of their post code; or simply “boxes” for their closed nature. During the two decades following World War II, dozens of closed cities were built around the country. Some were naukogradi (“science cities”) or akademgorodoki (“academic cities”), while others developed military technology and later spacecraft.  The official name was closed administrative-territorial formations or zakrytye administrativno-territorial'nye obrazovaniya, or ZATOs.    The cities were largely built by slave labor from the Gulag prison camps, which at the time accounted for 23% of the non-agricultural labor force in the Soviet Union.  They were guarded like gulags, too - surrounded by barbed wire and guards, with no one was allowed to enter or leave without official authorization.  Many residents did not leave the city once between their arrival and their death.  That being said, the captive residents enjoyed access to housing, food, and health care better than Soviet citizens elsewhere.  While most towns in the Soviet Union were run by local communist party committees, military officials oversaw the secret cities that would eventually be home to over 100,000 people.  Even during construction, officials were ordered to use trusted prisoners only, meaning no Germans, POWs, hard criminals, political prisoners.  Nevertheless, even living alongside Gulag prisoners, residents believed they were making a valuable contribution to their country. Nikolai Rabotnov, a resident of Chelyabinsk-65, remembered, “I was sure that within our barbed labyrinth, I inhaled the air of freedom!”   Arzamas-16, today known by its original name Sarov, was one of the most important sites in the early development of the first Soviet atomic bomb and hydrogen and was roughly the Soviet equivalent of Los Alamos.  Scientists, workers, and their families enjoyed privileged living conditions and were sheltered from difficulties like military service and economic crisis.  Leading researchers were paid a very large salary for those times.  Chelyabinsk-65 or Ozersk was home to a plutonium production plant similar to the American facilities built at Richland.  Located near a collective farm in the southern Ural Mountains, Chelyabinsk-65 was more or less built from nothing, where Arzamas-16 was an existing town that was taken over.  After the basics of the city were completed, early years were very difficult for the residents. The cities lacked basic infrastructure and suffered from high rates of alcoholism and poor living conditions. The Mayak Plutonium Plant dumped nuclear waste in the nearby Techa River, causing a health crisis not only for the residents of Chelyabinsk-65 but for all the villages which ran along it.   Conditions at Chelyabinsk-65/Ozersk would not improve until after the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.  You remember that story, it was in our episode For Want of a Nail.  Owing to the plutonium plant, Chelyabinsk-65 is still one of the most polluted places in the world. Some residents refer to it as the “graveyard of the Earth.”  Somehow, though, it's considered a prestigious place to live where.  When the government polled residents after the Cold War had thawed over whether to open the city, they voted to keep it closed.  In fact, half of the nuclear scientists said they would refuse to stay if it was opened.  As one resident explained, “We take pride in the fact that the state trusts us enough to live and work in Ozersk.”   In 1991, the Soviet Union officially disbanded and its fifteen republics became independent, four of which had nuclear weapons deployed on their territories. This was of great concern to the West, as these newly formed nations did not have the financial or technological means to properly store and safeguard these weapons.  With budgets a fraction of what they were in the decades before, the standard of living in the ZATOs quickly declined.  Security went with it, as the soldiers who guarded the ZATOs also saw their wages slashed.   With little prospect of employment and limited security, scientists suddenly had the freedom not only to leave their cities but to leave the country.  Fear quickly spread in the United States that they could help develop nuclear programs in other countries, such as Iran.  In 1991, the Nunn-Lugar Act financed the transportation and dismantlement of the scattered nukes to not only reduce the number of nuclear weapons in the world but to provide the scientists with proper employment.  One result of this effort was the International Science and Technology Center in Moscow, which employed many former atomic scientists on non-weapons programs and still exists today.      If you need to hide a city from your enemies, you'd do well to move it underground.  Built in the late 50s in Wiltshire, England, the massive complex, codename Burlington was designed to safely house up to 4,000 central government personnel in the event of a nuclear strike.  In a former Bath stone quarry the city was to be the site of the main Emergency Government War Headquarters, the country's alternative seat of power if the worst happened.  Over 2/3mi/1km in length, and boasting over 60mi/97km  of roads, the underground site was designed to accommodate the Prime Minister, the Cabinet Office, civil servants and an army of domestic support staff.   Blast proof and completely self-sufficient the secret underground site could accommodate up to 4,000 people  in complete isolation from the outside world  for up to three months.  Though it was fortunately never used, the grid of roads and avenues ran between underground hospitals, canteens, kitchens, warehouses of supplies, dormitories, and offices.  The city was also equipped with the second largest telephone exchange in Britain, a BBC studio from which the PM could address the nation and a pneumatic tube system that could relay messages, using compressed air, throughout the complex.  An underground lake and treatment plant could provide all the drinking water needed.  A dozen huge tanks could store the fuel required to keep the generators in the underground power station running for up to three months.  The air within the complex could also be kept at a constant humidity and heated to around 68F/20C degrees.   The complex was kept on standby in case of future nuclear threats to the UK, until 2005, when the underground reservoir was drained, the supplies removed, the fuel tanks were emptied and the skeleton staff of four were dismissed. Some cities were not secret in their heyday, but were lost to time until recently.  In what's being hailed as a “major breakthrough” for Maya archaeology in February 2018, researchers have identified the ruins of more than 60,000 buildings hidden for centuries under the jungles of Guatemala.  Using LiDAR, or Light Detection And Ranging, scholars digitally removed the tree canopy from aerial images of the area, revealing the ruins of a sprawling pre-Columbian civilization that was far more complex and interconnected than most Maya specialists had supposed.   Mounted on a helicopter, the laser continually aims pulses toward the ground below, so many that a large number streak through the spaces between the leaves and branches, and are reflected back to the aircraft and registered by a GPS unit. By calculating the precise distances between the airborne laser and myriad points on the earth's surface, computer software can generate a three-dimensional digital image of what lies below.  To put the density of this jungle into perspective, archaeologists have been searching the area on foot for years, but did not find a single man-made feature.   “LiDAR is revolutionizing archaeology the way the Hubble Space Telescope revolutionized astronomy,” said Francisco Estrada-Belli, a Tulane University archaeologist and National Geographic Explorer. “We'll need 100 years to go through all [the data] and really understand what we're seeing.”  The project mapped more than 800 sq mi/2,100 sq km of the Maya Biosphere Reserve in the Petén region of northern Guatemala, producing the largest LiDAR data set ever obtained for archaeological research.  The old school of that held that Mayan civilization existed as scattered city-states, but these findings suggest that Central America supported an advanced civilization that was, with as many as 14 million people at its peak around 1,200 years ago, comparable to sophisticated cultures like ancient Greece or China.  The LiDAR even revealed raised highways connecting urban centers and complex irrigation and agricultural terracing systems.  And that was without the use of the wheel or beasts of burden   Despite standing for millennia, these sites are in danger from looting and environmental degradation.  Guatemala is losing more than 10 percent of its forests annually, and habitat loss has accelerated along its border with Mexico as trespassers burn and clear land for agriculture and human settlement.  “By identifying these sites and helping to understand who these ancient people were, we hope to raise awareness of the value of protecting these places,” Marianne Hernandez, president of the Foundation for Maya Cultural and Natural Heritage.   Lidar has also helped scientists to redraw a settlement located on the outskirts of Johannesburg, South Africa, and it tells the beginnings of a fascinating story.  Scientists from the University of Witwatersrand believe the newly discovered city was occupied in the 15th century by Tswana-speaking people who lived in the northern parts of South Africa.  Many similar Tswana city-states fell during regional wars and forced migration in the 1820s, and there was little oral or physical evidence to prove their existence.  Though archaeologists excavated some ancient ruins in the area in the 1960s, they couldn't comprehend the full extent of the settlement. By using LiDAR technology, the team was able to virtually remove vegetation and recreate images of the surrounding landscape, allowing them to produce aerial views of the monuments and buildings in a way that could not have been imagined a generation ago.    Using these new aerial photographs, they can now estimate that as many as 850 homesteads had once existed in and around the city they've given the temporary designation of SKBR.  It's likely that most homesteads housed several family members, meaning this was a city with a large population.  There are also stone towers outside some homesteads, as high as 8ft2.5m high with bases 16ft/5m wide.  The academics believe these may have been bases for grain bins or even burial markers for important people.  Though the team estimates they are still another decade or two away from fully understanding the city's inhabitants and how the city came to be, and ceased to exist.   Modern technology has also helped us find an ancient city in Cambodia.  Constructed around 1150, the palaces and temples of Angkor Wat were, and still are, the biggest religious complex on Earth, covering an area four times larger than Vatican City.   In the 15th Century, the Khmer kings abandoned their city and moved to the coast.  They built a new city, Phnom Penh, the present-day capital of Cambodia.  Life in Angkor slowly ebbed away.  Everything made of wood rotted away; everything made of stone was reclaimed by the jungle.   An international team, led by the University of Sydney's Dr Damian Evans, was able to map out /370 sq km around Angkor in unprecedented detail in less than two weeks - no mean feat given the density of the jungle.  Rampant illegal logging of valuable hardwoods had stripped away much of the primary forest, allowing dense new undergrowth to fill in the gaps. It was unclear whether the lasers could locate enough holes in the canopy to penetrate to the forest floor.  The prevalence of landmines from Cambodia's civil war are another area where shooting Lidar from a helicopter really shines. The findings were staggering.  The archaeologists found undocumented cityscapes etched on to the forest floor, with remnants of boulevards, reservoirs, ponds, dams, dikes, irrigation canals, agricultural plots, low-density settlement complexes and orderly rows of temples. They were all clustered around what the archaeologists realized must be a royal palace, a vast structure surrounded by a network of earthen dikes—the ninth-century fortress of King Jayavarman II. “To suspect that a city is there, somewhere underneath the forest, and then to see the entire structure revealed with such clarity and precision was extraordinary,” Evans told me. “It was amazing.”     These new discoveries have profoundly transformed our understanding of Angkor, the greatest medieval city on Earth.  Most striking of all was evidence of large-scale hydraulic engineering, the defining signature of the Khmer empire, used to store and distribute seasonal monsoon water using a complex network of huge canals and reservoirs.  Harnessing the monsoon provided food security - and made the ruling elite fantastically rich. For the next three centuries they channelled their wealth into the greatest concentration of temples on Earth.  Angkor was a bustling metropolis at its peak, covering /1,000 sq km; It would be another 700 years before London reached a similar size.     Bonus fact: and not to be a pedant, but “monsoon” refers no to the heavy rains in the rainy season from May to September, but to the strong, sustained winds that bring them.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  Some cities are hidden, not for reasons of subterfuge or dereliction, but by necessity.  80% of the world's opal comes from the area of Coober Peedy, but that wealth is nothing to the sun it's going to continue with the Mad Max motif.  It may be 115 degrees F/47C outside, but it's only 74F/23C underground.  When heavy mining equipment was introduced a century ago, people took advantage of it to dug themselves homes, a church, hotels and B&Bs, a museum, casino, a gift shop, and, of course, a pub.  Remember...thanks... Source: http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/history/laser-scans-reveal-maya-megalopolis-below-guatemalan-jungle.aspx https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lost-city-cambodia-180958508/ https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29245289 https://www.citylab.com/design/2018/05/inside-the-secret-cities-that-created-the-atomic-bomb/559601/ https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-to-build-secret-nuclear-city https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/may/03/off-the-map-the-secret-cities-behind-the-atom-bomb-manhattan-project https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/soviet-closed-cities https://metro.co.uk/2015/05/28/theres-a-whole-town-in-australia-that-lives-underground-5219091/ https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2016/09/coober-pedy-opal-mining/ https://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/coober-pedy-underground-homes.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/articles/2005/12/14/burlington_nuclear_bunker_feature.shtml https://theculturetrip.com/africa/south-africa/articles/a-lost-african-city-has-just-been-discovered-by-scientists/ https://www.historicmysteries.com/derinkuyu-underground-city-cappadocia/

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - Pot Stickers, Anyone?

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 8:19


The short answers to your questions are: Yes, you should be terrified and no, there isn't anything you can do about it.I've spoken and written many times about the book entitled “2034,” authored by two veterans, including an Admiral, which spells out in chillingly realistic ways, how World War III will come to pass at the hands of China's meticulous planning, plotting, and execution. I've read the book twice, and while some of its' plot twists, particularly as it relates to how the war plays out, are questionable, it should be required reading for every American. In fact, the only problem I have with the book is its' title. 2034 seems unrealistically far away for such a scenario to occur. Perhaps 2028 or 2026 would be a more likely timeline.I've said for decades that the ignorance, arrogance, and apathy of Americans will be what ends our reign as the greatest nation on Earth and it is playing out before our very eyes right now. We, the American people, not our alleged “leaders,” are to blame for the terrifying reality we now live in. And let's start with that; the overwhelming majority of Americans have no idea what is happening, and if you were to tell them most would wave their hand dismissively and say something arrogantly ignorant like “Eh, those (insert racial slur here) ain't nothing compared to us. We'll just Hiroshima them and it will all be over.” After decades of literally financing China by insisting on buying almost everything we own from them, China is close to its' generations-long plan of becoming the world's newest, and only, superpower. To be clear, I'm not talking about China owning America's debt, because that is a fallacy repeated by dumbasses. Of the $28 trillion America is in debt, $22 trillion of it is owned by us, the American people. We've only received $6 trillion from foreign countries, and China isn't even the largest holder of the debt of the United States, Japan is. I'm speaking specifically of us; the American consumer, and our needs and insistence on owning the best of the best at the lowest possible price, all of which comes from China, either directly or indirectly. https://www.thebalance.com/who-owns-the-u-s-national-debt-3306124 If they aren't literally manufacturing the product you're buying in Mainland China, they are providing the chips, parts, and internal infrastructure needed to make almost everything you own. Yes, even if it says “Made in the USA,” it almost certainly has China's fingerprints all over it. The old joke about Chinese goods being of low quality is long since untrue, and even people who try to claim that “no, everything isn't made in China,” can't make believable arguments. In fact, China has launched a national policy to become the world's supplier of almost everything by 2025…and there's no indication that they will fail. https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/made-china-2025-threat-global-tradeBear in mind that no company exists independently in China; all forms of commerce there exist to fund the Communist Party that controls the country. As more of the world has outsourced almost all of its needs to China, we have created an economic behemoth that has plunged hundreds of billions of dollars into defense spending…and that's just what they admit to. Many estimates claim that China is actually spending as much as the United States on their military, and just lying to the world about it. Whatever they're doing, they're doing it well, as the world has seen the last few weeks.To be crystal clear; China is not some thriving, hyper-successful economic titan; quite the opposite, which is what makes them so dangerous. They are teetering on the brink and have learned from history that pre-emptive offenses often win the day. It's beyond obvious that they are preparing for something and that we have no idea what, exactly, it is, or what we'll do about it.China has solidified a rock-solid alliance with Russia and Iran and all indications are that Pakistan is next. That's a terrifying axis of evil armed to the teeth. It is no secret that America's largest corporations and institutions are being hacked at will by China, and last week it was confirmed that China recently tested a hypersonic weapon system we had no idea they were so far along with in terms of development and deployment. While the U.S. already possesses hypersonic weapons, China is kicking our ass in space, deploying endless satellites designed specifically to knock out all of our abilities to monitor and launch counter-offensives in the event of an attack. And all of this is what we're being told we know…imagine what the U.S. government isn't telling us, and worse, imagine what they themselves don't know. The most likely next course of action is China invading Taiwan and daring the world, most notably the U.S. to do something about it. From there, who knows? Perhaps China unleashes its' massive and deadly submarine fleet; a force so powerful we don't even know how many subs they have nor how close to America they can get (or already have gotten). https://asiatimes.com/2021/10/chinas-ai-push-deemed-a-strategic-threat-to-the-us/https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10136241/Joint-Chiefs-head-says-Chinas-alleged-hypersonic-weapons-test-concerning.htmlhttps://www.businessinsider.com/insider-weekly-china-economy-lambda-zillow-microsoft-2021-10https://www.yahoo.com/now/iran-cements-alliance-china-russia-230000645.htmlhttps://www.newsweek.com/chinas-submarine-fleet-catching-us-causing-partners-panic-1643709https://www.scmp.com/news/china/military/article/3151686/china-raises-nuclear-submarine-stealth-game-redesign-andhttps://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/19/technology/china-hacking-us.htmlhttps://www.newsweek.com/china-building-destructive-space-weapons-blind-us-satellites-intelligence-report-reveals-1583672https://spacenews.com/pentagon-report-china-amassing-arsenal-of-anti-satellite-weapons/In the meantime, with China now financing Iran, the world's leader in terrorism, and with all indications being that China is about to occupy Bagram Air Force base in Afghanistan…a base mind you, built with your tax dollars by the best military on the planet, it's easily conceivable that terror attacks on U.S. interests will increase exponentially as a way to slowly cripple us, while also misdirecting our anger on the Middle East and away from China. https://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/will-taliban-hand-over-bagram-air-base-for-ct-ops-to-china-or-us-101635481648530.htmlSo…what to do? Absolutely nothing. Oh sure, you can rally your friends and family and decide that you're going to vote in as many Republicans as possible to the congress and White House, knowing that they will be as tough as possible on China and will throw as much money as they can at the U.S. military. Doing so, of course, will simultaneously embolden and strengthen Saudi Arabia, not to mention whatever social issues you may care about and not agree with conservatives on. Not to mention, there's no guarantee that anything can stop what seems inevitable and has been caused by this nation's choices over the last many decades.I suppose you could start the doomsday prepping garbage, but I still don't understand why anyone would want to survive and then live in a world that had required you to escape to an underground panic room and eat canned food for months before emerging to hell on Earth.You could go buy a ton of guns, which you'll ultimately wind up using on fellow Americans who will turn on one another instantly and begin purging their way to destruction. Personally, if we get to that point, my guns are meant to put my animals and wife out of their misery before joining them.Yes, this does all sound very apocalyptic and it probably won't happen, but it certainly is plausible. After all, we have had two world wars already, one which ended with atomic bombs…and we have 8 decades of technological advancements since then to terrify us. But hey…the good news is that once they conquer us, we'll finally find out the answer to the old joke about whether or not they call “Chinese food,” just “food” in China?!?!?! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.