Podcasts about American Revolution

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Revolution during which the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain

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  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST
American Revolution

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Best podcasts about American Revolution

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Latest podcast episodes about American Revolution

Growing Patriots
56 – Spain in The American Revolution

Growing Patriots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 17:05


Learn how Spain helped colonists during the American Revolution!

American Revolution Podcast
ARP235 Fort Wilson

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 32:37


By late 1779, supply chain issues and inflation brought about by the war and Continental dollars creates economic desperation in Philadelphia.  Desperate militia members place the blame on greedy merchants of questionable loyalty to the cause.  Their outrage culminates in a military assault on the home of James Wilson. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Book Recommendation of the Week:  Arms, Country and Class; The Philadelphia Militia and the “Lower Sort” during the American Revolution, by Steven Roswurm.(or read on archive.org) Online Recommendation of the Week: James Wilson - Nation Builder: https://archive.org/details/jameswilsonnatio00alex Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy  ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/AmRevPodcast or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

This is the first in a new series of podcasts. Long time listeners will remember that when my book Daniel Morgan: A Revolutionary Life was published, I did a number of podcasts with experts delving into aspects of Daniel Morgan's life—from the place where he lived, to how he was flogged, to the rifles that he carried. But I thought that this was unsatisfactory for a podcast called “Historically Thinking”. It's the conversations that historians have before they write a book that show how a research project comes together, and how historical thinking gets done. So, in something of a leap of faith, I'm going to have conversations with other historians on topics that apply to a project that I'm now working on…more about that, perhaps, at the end of our conversation. In effect I'm doing podcasts on spec, which fills me with superstitious dread.  My guest today Mark Anderson, author of Down the Warpath to the Cedars: Indians' First Battles in the Revolution. It's a fascinating study of native politics, diplomacy, and war on the Canadian border during the first year of the American Revolution, a politics which would have confused a Renaissance Italian diplomat. Mark has previously written The Battle for the Fourteenth Colony: America's War of Liberation in Canada, 1774-1776. In a previous life, before establishing himself as one of the few American authorities on revolutionary-era Canada, he was an officer in the United States Air Force.  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The full court press is on the attack on voting rights in America is hitting hyper speed and hyper ventilation for the Democrat

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber Show— FIERCE AND FEARLESS in pursuit of the truth each and every day—if you can't handle the truth—this may not be for you!   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— Well I am going to start with some really bad news for some really bad men—Ghislaine Maxwell has not committed suicide—and says she will no longer protect the black book—   TWO— The Notorious Ray Epps—the one-time America's Most wanted top ten celebrity—for his actions on January 6th—is going to leave his Arizona farm and testify in D-C—   THREE— The full court press is on—the attack on voting rights in America is hitting hyper speed and hyper ventilation for the Democrats—who have now realized America is rejecting the radical agenda of no voter I-D—mass mail in ballots—ballot harvesting and all the rest—   The brow beatings the name calling—the smiling and smearing and the shaming—are all failing to persuade anyone to join the failing cause—   Americans do not want their elections controlled from Washington DC—no matter how shrill Chuck Schumer or Chuck Todd get the answer is no—   No matter how stupid Joe Scarborough or Joe Biden get in trying to call those that oppose destroying voting integrity racists and white supremacists—America is not buying it—and voters are not budging on the subject—   The Democrats lust for power is in overdrive anyway—BUT it is not working—at least not so far—   You are truly witnessing the death throws of a political party in America—Democrats have finally gone so far out of the mainstream—they will soon go the way of the Whig Party—they will be an important—but soon to be irrelevant footnote in history books—   Liberal commentators will continue to increase the volume—but as they do—they are only increasing the acceleration of the end of the line—for the socialists—the central planners the narcisissists of leftist thought in America—   America believes in Freedom—and this new American Revolution and embrace of Liberty is being led by Hispanic and Black voters—and that should tell you everything you need to know—the elitist white liberal—will soon be an extirpated species—and Karens will be a mythical villain—tossed in the trash heap of history—   We are winning my friends—we are winning—and you can tell by how much the leftists in this nation are trying to steal your right to an honest election—the evidence is all right in front of you—and there is more every single day—

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History
320 Benjamin Franklin's London House

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 72:46


Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706, to Abiah Folger and Josiah Franklin. Although Franklin began his life as the youngest son of a youngest son, he traveled through many parts of what is now the northeastern United States and the Province of Quebec and lived in four different cities in three different countries: Boston, Philadelphia, London, and Passy, France. In honor of Benjamin Franklin's 316th birthday, Márcia Balisciano, the Founding Director of the Benjamin Franklin House museum in London, joins us to explore Benjamin Franklin's life in London using details from the largest artifact Franklin left behind: his rented rooms at 36 Craven Street. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/320 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 001: James N. Green, Library Company of Philadelphia Episode 022: Vivian Bruce Conger, Deborah Read Franklin & Sally Franklin Bache Episode 149: George Goodwin, Benjamin Franklin in London Episode 169: Thomas Kid, The Religious Life of Benjamin Franklin Episode 175: Daniel Epstein, The Revolution in Ben Franklin's House Episode 207: Nick Bunker, Young Benjamin Franklin   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

The John Batchelor Show
8/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:40


Photo:  George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence: George Washington to Washington, D. C., Commissioners, December 26, 1796 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:52


Photo:  Ice views in the Delaware River,  7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
6/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 7:22


Photo:  This is a photograph of the statue often incorrectly believed to represent Captain John Parker sculpted by Henry Hudson Kitson and erected in 1900.  This statue in Lexington, Massachusetts, is commonly called "The Lexington Minuteman" because it was meant to represent the Minutemen generally rather than any individual. There are no known portraits of John Parker made while he was alive.It is often confused with the Daniel Chester French statue The Minute Man in nearby Concord  6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:22


Photo:   Surf at Marblehead Neck, Marblehead, Mass. 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:27


Photo:  Print showing two soldiers of the Continental Army color guard, playing fife and drum, marching in winter. 4/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:27


Photo:  Silk painted flag of the Third Company, Third Connecticut Regiment, Continental Army, with a silver sword, green "III" and a green garland tied with a red ribbon painted in the lower left corner extending into the center on a white ground; tan linen sleeve for the flagstaff. New-York Historical Society. 1/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell   @combathistorian     @Batchelorshow  Hardcover – May 18, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:17


Photo:  Cambridge 21st August 1775. Wanted for the Continental Army .  Public requisition of supplies, including bricks, firewood, lumber, charcoal, hay, straw, corn, oats, shovels, spades, pickaxes, handsaws, and lime. 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:07


Photo:  Views of Morristown National Historical Park, Virginia.  During two critical winters of the Revolutionary War, 1777 and 1779¿80, the countryside in and around Morristown, New Jersey, sheltered the main encampments of the American Continental Army and served as the headquarters of its commander-in-chief, General George Washington.  3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

American Revolution Podcast
ARP234 Siege of Savannah

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 30:22


The Continental Army cooperates with the French Navy to recapture Savannah Georgia from the British in the fall of 1779.  A bloody assault on the city ends with the British holding the city, while the Americans and French withdraw. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Book Recommendation of the Week: The Siege of Savannah, in 1779, by Charles C. Jones (or read on archive.org) Online Recommendation of the Week: Davis, Robert S. “Black Hatian Soldiers at the Siege of Savannah” Journal of the American Revolution, https://allthingsliberty.com/2021/02/black-haitian-soldiers-at-the-siege-of-savannah Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy  ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/AmRevPodcast or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution
E148: Scott M. Smith: Major Robert Rogers and the American Revolution

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 28:37


This week or guest is JAR contributor Scott M. Smith. A legend for his service during the Seven Years War, Robert Rogers time during the American Revolution was far less glamorous. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com.

Current Affairs
Why We Should Reclaim Thomas Paine and FDR (w/ Harvey Kaye)

Current Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 62:24


Prof. Harvey J. Kaye is the author of books like Thomas Paine and the Promise of America, The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great, and most recently Take Hold Of Our History: Make America Radical Again. Running through his work is the argument that the social democratic left should draw more on the richness of the American radical tradition and take greater pride in the history of those who have struggled to achieve the promise of democratic equality. In this interview, we talk about why Kaye rejects the idea of leftist history as pure "debunking" of nationalist myths and sees it as important to create our own inspiring story about the path trodden by our ancestors. We talk about:- Why Thomas Paine, without whom the American Revolution would probably not have happened, and who alienated the other Founding Fathers and made himself despised, is the one member of the Founding generation radicals can be proud of and should celebrate- How we can take pride in the good parts of the New Deal without whitewashing FDR's indefensible decisions like Japanese internment- How right-wingers like Reagan and Thatcher have successfully crafted inspiring (but false) historical narratives and how we can combat these with true ones- Why Harvey has a certain grudging respect for Newt Gingrich - Why Bernie should have pitched democratic socialism as American rather than Scandinavian The clip of "Let America Be America Again" is performed by Danez Smith. 

Uncommon Knowledge
The Last King of America: Andrew Roberts on King George III

Uncommon Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 72:01


In his long and distinguished career, British historian Andrew Roberts has produced world-class biographies of Winston Churchill, and Napoleon, several histories of World War II and the men who led the countries who fought that war, and other great conflicts in world history. Roberts's new book is The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III, a biography of the monarch who led England during the American Revolution and who has been made into something of a caricature by Americans, most recently by his portrayal in the musical Hamilton as a preening, stuck-up (but funny) king of England. In this interview and in his book, Roberts goes to great lengths to deconstruct that distortion and, in the process, give us an extremely nuanced and detailed portrait of the man who created the conditions for America's independence. Roberts also explains in great detail the dynamics between the British parliament and the nascent American government, including a fascinating account of the writing of and subsequent British reaction to the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Recorded on December 3, 2021

The Well-Educated Mothers Heart
WEMH #199 Women of the American Revolution

The Well-Educated Mothers Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 18:36


The Libertarian Christian Podcast
Ep 256: America's Revolutionary Mind, with C. Bradley Thompson

The Libertarian Christian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 44:03


In this week's episode, Doug Stuart talks with Dr. C. Bradley Thompson; a professor at the University of Clemson, and author of America's Revolutionary Mind, which happens to be the topic of this week's podcast episode. They discuss the moral history of the American Revolution, the principles the Revolution was founded upon, how to approach the challenges of a post-truth world, and how homeschooling gives hope for the future. In this new year, are we facing a similar call to action as the founding fathers? Audio Production by Podsworth Media.

Conservative Historian
Four Revolutions

Conservative Historian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:53


From 1775 through 1949, four revolutions remade the modern world.  How is the American Revolution different from that of the French, Chinese and Russian Revolutions? Download and find out.  

Revolution 250 Podcast
Mercy Otis Warren & the Women of the American Revolution with Rosemarie Zagarri

Revolution 250 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 35:08


Rosemarie Zagarri of George Mason University, author of a biography of Mercy Otis Warrren tells us about the Revolution's poet, who also wrote one of its first histories.  We also discuss her book  Revolutionary Backlash:  Women and Politics in the Early American Republic ,  and the only authorized biography of George Washington,  David Humphrey's Life of General Washington,  and a fascinating project for which Rosemarie Zagarri is the lead historian,  Mapping Early American Elections, which is a detailed and usable look at American politics from the first federal election until 1824.  

Illegible and Uncensored
#72 - Too Much Information

Illegible and Uncensored

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 39:11


Happy post-New Years,In this episode, Artie gets covid, Mike talks about confusing symptoms, and the boys talk Elon's taxes. Plus, George Washington was a teenager when he led the American Revolution, which leads us into a great conversation about too much information. Our main topic of discussion: should you get paid more?Tiktok: @illegibleanduncensored 

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast
Season 2 - Bonus Episode - recorded at Jenny's Corner

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 39:21


Episode 94 – Special Bonus Episode – recorded at Jenny's Corner - as we unveil a sample of our latest audiobook and tell you all about how this epic adventure began with Jenny – and Announcer Lad! The Order of the Seven animal team helps birth one nation under God by entering the lives of a unique generation of children chosen to become the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. Each episode is hosted by Max, Liz and Nigel – and includes a selection from the audiobook, “The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key!” For your very own copy of the audiobook, written by Jenny L. Cote, read by our own “Announcer Lad” Denny Brownlee – go to Audible.com. Just click here:  http://bitly.ws/cik6 (http://bitly.ws/cik6) And if you'd like to help ensure this podcast can continue to bless future listeners – please consider supporting Playful World Ministries and this podcast through: https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee (https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee) And we'd love to hear from you, too! Email: Jenny@epicorderoftheseven.com This episode features: 0:48 – Denny – aka Announcer Lad introduces today's bonus episode – on location at Chez Cote – aka Jenny's Corner. 1:50 – Miss Jenny makes her presence known – as she gives our Epic animals the day off! 3:45 – How Jenny and Denny met – and the journey that led them to give voice to Jenny's books 7:48 – Why we chose to jump from the first book in the series – to the seventh book! 14:12 – A sample of our latest audiobook: “The Declaration, the Sword, & the Spy.” 19:23 – Jenny defines what is meant by: Declaration, Sword, and Spy and the scope of this epic story! 24:52 – We take you back to the origins of how this podcast came into being! 27:20 – Jenny pulls Max, Liz, and Nigel back into the mix. 31:03 – Jenny reveals how the story of the American Revolution pulled her in far deeper than the facts from history class.  34:46 – Historical – fiction – fantasy – How Miss Jenny includes them in each story.   Support this podcast

New Books in African American Studies
Trevor Burnard, "Jamaica in the Age of Revolution" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 70:03


Between the start of the Seven Years' War in 1756 and the onset of the French Revolution in 1789, Jamaica was the richest and most important colony in British America. White Jamaican slaveowners presided over a highly productive economic system, a precursor to the modern factory in its management of labor, its harvesting of resources, and its scale of capital investment and output. Planters, supported by a dynamic merchant class in Kingston, created a plantation system in which short-term profit maximization was the main aim. Their slave system worked because the planters who ran it were extremely powerful. In Jamaica in the Age of Revolution (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020), prize-winning historian Trevor Burnard analyzes the men and women who gained so much from the labor of enslaved people in Jamaica to expose the ways in which power was wielded in a period when the powerful were unconstrained by custom, law, or, for the most part, public approbation or disapproval. Burnard finds that the unremitting war by the powerful against the poor and powerless, evident in the day-to-day struggles slaves had with masters, is a crucial context for grasping what enslaved people had to endure. Examining such events as Tacky's Rebellion of 1760 (the largest slave revolt in the Caribbean before the Haitian Revolution), the Somerset decision of 1772, and the murder case of the Zong in 1783 in an Atlantic context, Burnard reveals Jamiaca to be a brutally effective and exploitative society that was highly adaptable to new economic and political circumstances, even when placed under great stress, as during the American Revolution. Jamaica in the Age of Revolution demonstrates the importance of Jamaican planters and merchants to British imperial thinking at a time when slavery was unchallenged. Trevor Burnard is the Wilberforce Professor of Slavery and Emancipation and Director of the Wilberforce Institute at the University of Hull. Professor Burnard is a scholar of early American, imperial, world and Atlantic history, with a special interest in plantation societies in the New World and their connections to eighteenth-century modernity. He is coauthor, with John Garrigus, of The Plantation Machine: Atlantic Capitalism in French Saint-Domingue and British Jamaica, also available from the University of Pennsylvania Press. Jerrad P. Pacatte is a Ph.D. candidate and School of Arts and Sciences Excellence Fellow in the Department of History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. A social historian of gender, slavery, and emancipation in early America and the Atlantic World, Jerrad is currently completing his dissertation, entitled “The Work of Freedom: African American Women and the Ordeal of Emancipation in New England, 1740-1840” which examines the everyday lives, labors, and emancipation experiences of African-descended women in late-colonial and early republic New England. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 4, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious Lectionary: 213All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Elizabeth Ann SetonMother Seton is one of the keystones of the American Catholic Church. She founded the first American religious community for women, the Sisters of Charity. She opened the first American parish school and established the first American Catholic orphanage. All this she did in the span of 46 years while raising her five children. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is a true daughter of the American Revolution, born August 28, 1774, just two years before the Declaration of Independence. By birth and marriage, she was linked to the first families of New York and enjoyed the fruits of high society. Reared a staunch Episcopalian, she learned the value of prayer, Scripture and a nightly examination of conscience. Her father, Dr. Richard Bayley, did not have much use for churches but was a great humanitarian, teaching his daughter to love and serve others. The early deaths of her mother in 1777 and her baby sister in 1778 gave Elizabeth a feel for eternity and the temporariness of the pilgrim life on earth. Far from being brooding and sullen, she faced each new “holocaust,” as she put it, with hopeful cheerfulness. At 19, Elizabeth was the belle of New York and married a handsome, wealthy businessman, William Magee Seton. They had five children before his business failed and he died of tuberculosis. At 30, Elizabeth was widowed and penniless, with five small children to support. While in Italy with her dying husband, Elizabeth witnessed Catholicity in action through family friends. Three basic points led her to become a Catholic: belief in the Real Presence, devotion to the Blessed Mother and conviction that the Catholic Church led back to the apostles and to Christ. Many of her family and friends rejected her when she became a Catholic in March 1805. To support her children, she opened a school in Baltimore. From the beginning, her group followed the lines of a religious community, which was officially founded in 1809. The thousand or more letters of Mother Seton reveal the development of her spiritual life from ordinary goodness to heroic sanctity. She suffered great trials of sickness, misunderstanding, the death of loved ones (her husband and two young daughters) and the heartache of a wayward son. She died January 4, 1821, and became the first American-born citizen to be beatified (1963) and then canonized (1975). She is buried in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Reflection Elizabeth Ann Seton had no extraordinary gifts. She was not a mystic or stigmatic. She did not prophesy or speak in tongues. She had two great devotions: abandonment to the will of God and an ardent love for the Blessed Sacrament. She wrote to a friend, Julia Scott, that she would prefer to exchange the world for a “cave or a desert.” “But God has given me a great deal to do, and I have always and hope always to prefer his will to every wish of my own.” Her brand of sanctity is open to everyone if we love God and do his will. Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton is a Patron Saint of: Catholic Schools Educators/Teachers Loss of Parents Widows Click here for a meditation on St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 3638: JAN. 6 ANNIVERSARY: Are we Terrorists or Patriots?

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 45:36


Before you buy into media reports that those who stormed the Capitol were 'terrorists', you should know the rest of the story…. There will be a lot of fear mongering around the 1 year anniversary, so you need to ask yourself who is behind this ‘commemoration' and why. Indeed, there is more fuss being made of this anniversary than the 20 years of anniversaries for 9/11! At the same time they've planned a day full of events in D.C., they claim to be worried that some will storm the city again. Dr. Carole wants her listeners to know that she watched President Trump's speech on the morning of January 6, 2021, and assures you that he never told people to be violent, nor to damage property at the Capitol. You will hear what he did say. Indeed, if Pence hadn't selfishly been thinking of his own political aspirations, and had asked Congress to investigate the question of voter fraud, the storming of the Capitol would never have happened. Yet, you rarely hear people talking about this. A recent poll found that 34% of Americans say that violence against the government is sometimes justified. If the American Revolution hadn't happened, American democracy wouldn't have been founded. But, you rarely hear people talking about that, either.  If we are going to call the those who charged the Capitol“rioters” or “domestic terrorists,” then we certainly should be calling those who rioted, assaulted, killed, looted, toppled, etc. in the streets for the past years, the same names. In fact, those who stormed the Capitol cannot be called Domestic Terrorists, and you will hear why. Over 700 people who were involved have been arrested and charged with crimes. You will hear about some of the most colorful ones. And finally, you will hear about who is responsible for putting America at the greatest risk for terrorism - ‘domestic' or otherwise. 

What's Your Legacy?
Marion T. Lane, Ed.D: Knowing Your Past for Future Prosperity

What's Your Legacy?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 35:52


Knowing your ancestry is a way to understand your legacy. Author, educator and researcher, Dr. Marion T. Lane reflects on her genealogy journey with Yvette. Dr. Lane's father, 101 at the time of this podcast, often told his daughter that her ancestors served with distinction in the Civil and Revolutionary Wars. However, it became real for her when she viewed the PBS Special “African American Lives” in February 2006 which featured her family, the Brown Family of Charles City County, Virginia, as a free Black family dating back to colonial times. Her quest began and she is now one of the few African American members of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. As a retired educator, she realized the importance of this information for African American children and has written 2 children's books: Patriots of African Descent in the Revolutionary War, Part 1 and More Than One Ancestry, Part 2. She has 2 more books to be released in the next year.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:14


Photo:  The tea-tax-tempest, or the Anglo-American Revolution. 8/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021 New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
7/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 12:25


Photo:  A key identifying the subjects of John Trumbull's painting Declaration of Independence, a well-known work which hangs in the United States Capitol building (purchased from the painter in 1819). Also known as Declaration of Independence in Congress, at the Independence Hall, Philadelphia, July 4, 1776. 7/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021   New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
6/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:05


Photo:   The east prospect of the city of Philadelphia in the Province of Pennsylvania 6/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021  New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
5/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:45


Photo:  American paper currency, 1776 5/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021    New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
4/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:04


Photo:  Political electricity; or, an historical & prophetical print in the year 1770 / Bute and Wilkes invent. ; Veridicus & Junius fect.              Print shows a variety of scenes relating to the politics and government of England and how their actions at home and abroad may result in the loss of the American colonies; scene numbered 24 depicts Boston, Massachusetts, as a European city and shows the industriousness of the Americans. 4/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021    New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
3/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:33


Photo:    Map from Battles of the American Revolution. 1775-1781. Historical and military criticism, with topographical illustration. 3/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021  New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice • Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now" • St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:30


Photo:  Daughters of the American Revolution 2/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021 New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice • Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now" • St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:14


Photo:  The Battle of Kings Mountain depicts colonial riflemen advancing on the British position. 1/8  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021  New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice • Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now" • St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

Path to Liberty
Samuel Adams: “All Might be Free”

Path to Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 33:04


The “Father of the American Revolution” understood what it took to advance and defend freedom in opposition to the largest empire in history. Faced with the same kind of odds stacked against us today, we'd do well to follow his advice. The post Samuel Adams: “All Might be Free” first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

Interviews
America's Radical Revolution and the Constitutional Coup

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


How did a handful of colonies created by the European Old Order establish a unique nation conceived in liberty? In Episode 2 of the Liberty vs. Power Podcast, Patrick Newman and Tho Bishop discuss the lasting tension between the Spirit of 1776 and the Constitution of 1787. The results of America's successful war for independence is one of the most important victories for the cause of liberty, but the forces of power adapted to new opportunities. Patrick and Tho also discuss the career of the infamous Robert Morris, and follow the rise of two men who are determined to mold America into the European nationalist tradition: Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Articles "America's Libertarian Revolution" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_A "Bacon's Rebellion" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_B "How the Constitutional Convention Vastly Expanded the Powers of the President" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_C "The Founding Fathers' Coup d'État" by Albert Jay Nock — Mises.org/LP2_D "Economic Determinism, Ideology, and the American Revolution" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_E "Liberty and Property: the Levellers and Locke" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_F Books Cronyism: Liberty versus Power in Early America, 1607–1849 by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP_Crony Conceived in Liberty, Volumes I-IV by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_G Conceived in Liberty, Volume V by Murray Rothbard, Edited by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP2_H Movie The Patriot — Mises.org/LP2_J To subscribe to the Liberty vs. Power Podcast on your favorite platform, visit Mises.org/LvP.

Mises Media
America's Radical Revolution and the Constitutional Coup

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


How did a handful of colonies created by the European Old Order establish a unique nation conceived in liberty? In Episode 2 of the Liberty vs. Power Podcast, Patrick Newman and Tho Bishop discuss the lasting tension between the Spirit of 1776 and the Constitution of 1787. The results of America's successful war for independence is one of the most important victories for the cause of liberty, but the forces of power adapted to new opportunities. Patrick and Tho also discuss the career of the infamous Robert Morris, and follow the rise of two men who are determined to mold America into the European nationalist tradition: Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Articles "America's Libertarian Revolution" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_A "Bacon's Rebellion" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_B "How the Constitutional Convention Vastly Expanded the Powers of the President" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_C "The Founding Fathers' Coup d'État" by Albert Jay Nock — Mises.org/LP2_D "Economic Determinism, Ideology, and the American Revolution" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_E "Liberty and Property: the Levellers and Locke" by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_F Books Cronyism: Liberty versus Power in Early America, 1607–1849 by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP_Crony Conceived in Liberty, Volumes I-IV by Murray Rothbard — Mises.org/LP2_G Conceived in Liberty, Volume V by Murray Rothbard, Edited by Patrick Newman — Mises.org/LP2_H Movie The Patriot — Mises.org/LP2_J To subscribe to the Liberty vs. Power Podcast on your favorite platform, visit Mises.org/LvP.

The Kim Monson Show
The American Covenant

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 57:17


Today is Boxing Day.  This holiday originated in Great Britain and its' colonies as a day British upper classes gave “boxes” of gifts to their household staff that worked on Christmas.  Another Boxing Day tradition is that churches put out boxes for people to give money for the poor and the money was distributed the day after Christmas.  Kim and Producer Steve discuss General George Washington's famous American Revolution victories, during Christmas, at the Battles of Trenton and Princeton and the bravery of the men who served our new nation. Guest Dr. Marshall Foster, founder of World History Institute and author of the book The American Covenant:  The Untold Story, joins Kim for a robust conversation on tyranny and preserving the American Idea through the lens of America's Covenant, a covenant between America and our Creator.  It was 3500 years ago that the first covenant was written between Abraham and God.  The world has struggled with freedom and tyranny throughout the ages.  America's compact with God was written by free people and is the basis of our Declaration of Independence which ends with the words:  “We pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.”  The Great Awakening is happening now as people are taking action to restore our founding principles and are reclaiming our commitments to God.  God is a gracious God and He is a forgiving God.  This is the year to reclaim our Constitutional Republic's principles, and we must engage at the local level of government where individuals can exert more influence.  We must use our Constitution, our Bible, our money, our time and our character, within our local communities, to restore our American principles now for ourselves, our children and future generations.  Dr. Foster and Kirk Cameron have a number of “American Campfire Revival” groups across the nation.  Take the time to learn about and consider becoming a member of one.  It is the grassroots that will restore America. Marlin Kirsch, owner of Kirsch Insurance Group discusses the next open enrollment period, January 1-March 30, 2022, for Medicare.  This is a new enrollment period where participants can change their Medicare Advantage plans.  Knowledge is power and you may find a better plan for your particular healthcare situation as some plans will pay for Part B and others have changed their co-pay charges.  Check out their website, Kirsch Insurance Group, or contact them directly at 303-397-7830.

New Books in American Studies
Joseph J. Ellis, "The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783" (Liveright, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 49:22


In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783 (Liveright, 2021) returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Joseph J. Ellis, "The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783" (Liveright, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 49:22


In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783 (Liveright, 2021) returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Joseph J. Ellis, "The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783" (Liveright, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 49:22


In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783 (Liveright, 2021) returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Law
Joseph J. Ellis, "The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783" (Liveright, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 49:22


In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783 (Liveright, 2021) returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1390 Tell Stories, Not Myths: Our Second Founding (Reconstruction) (Repost)

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 73:06


Original Air Date 1/5/2021 Today we take a look at the often-overlooked decade of Reconstruction in the wake of the Civil War. After hundreds of years of slavery, Reconstruction was a brief moment of relative democracy and equality before the white power structure reasserted itself and instated the policies that would be known as "Jim Crow Laws" which would last another 80 years. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com Transcript MEMBERSHIP, Gift Memberships and Donations! (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) MERCHANDISE! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: The Second Revolution Part 1 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. Ch. 2: The Power of Frederick Douglass and the 2nd American Revolution w/ David Blight - The Majority Report w/ Sam Seder - Air Date 9-29-20 Sam hosts Pulitzer Prize-winning Yale Historian David Blight to discuss his recent biography of Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, and how the Reconstruction era lives on in our contemporary politics. Ch. 3: The Second Revolution Part 2 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. Ch. 4: Slavery, Race, and the Confederate Army - Professor Buzzkill History Podcast - Air Date 8-14-18 Professor Colin Woodward joins us to discuss the importance of slavery in the minds of Confederate soldiers, as well as its effects on military policy and decision making. He tells us about the Rebels' persistent belief in the need to defend slavery Ch. 5: The Second Revolution Part 3 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 6: The Second Revolution Part 4 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 VOICEMAILS Ch. 7: Experiment with Refer-o-Matic - Nick From California New Ch. 8: Power and defining the marginalized - Pat from Chicago FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 9: Final comments on the epic Refer-o-Matic program and why we should be messaging to rural America MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE: "Statue of 'Robert Smalls, U.S. Congressman' -- The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) Washington (DC) October 2016" by Ron Cogswell, Flickr | License | Changes: Cropped   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com SUPPORT THE SHOW Listen Anywhere! Check out the BotL iOS/Android App in the App Stores! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com

This Date in Weather History
1775: Washington's historic crossing of the Delaware

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 4:43


The fall and early winter of 1775 had not gone well for the patriots during the American Revolution. One defeat was met by another. Starting with the battle of Long Island, the British chased George Washington and his shrinking army out of Brooklyn, out of New York city and finally out of New Jersey. With the end of 1775 coming fast, many in the army would not be signing back up and the revolution was on the verge of collapse. The British were so sure of victory, most of the generals and other high-ranking officers retired to the comforts of New York City for the winter, leaving garrisons of troops in many New Jersey towns under the command of either junior officers or German Hessian mercenaries. Washington was camped on the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River a distance north of Philadelphia. He was desperate, as was his army. Washington was a keen observer of the weather, like many of the nation's founders. His army had miraculously escaped the British after the battle of Long Island as a bank of early morning fog formed and hid his retreat. He understood river fog in the fall season quite well, having lived on his Mt Vernon farm along the banks of the Potomac River. He also understood that strong northwest winds in December usually brought on a change to much colder weather and surmised that the enemy across the river would be hunkered down the next morning, inside to escape the cold and it would be the day after Christmas as well and the soldiers would be sleeping in after celebrating. At 11 p.m. on Christmas night, Washington's army started its crossing of the half-frozen Delaware river at three locations. The 2,400 soldiers led by Washington successfully braved the icy and freezing river and reached the New Jersey side of the Delaware just before dawn. The other two divisions, made up of some 3,000 men and crucial artillery, failed to reach the meeting point and turned back. Washington was on his own. At 8 a.m. on the morning of December 26, Washington's remaining force, separated into two columns, reached the outskirts of Trenton, New Jersey and descended on the unsuspecting Hessians. Trenton's 1,400 Hessian defenders were groggy from the previous evening's festivities, just as Washington has surmised, they were ensconced in their buildings and underestimated the Patriot threat after months of decisive British victories throughout New York. Washington's men quickly overwhelmed the Germans' defenses, and by 9:30 a.m. the town was surrounded. Although several hundred Hessians escaped, nearly 1,000 were captured at the cost of only four American lives. Washington's victory was based as much on pluck and courage as his understanding of celebrations and even more so the weather. The bitter cold that Washington and his troops braved was the turning point. Hessian sentries were not out braving the cold, also as Washington imagined. The surprise victory was complete and total. Washington's army was boosted by the victory and one several days later at Princeton. The Patriot army did not collapse – re-enlistments and new enlistments soared with the victories. The British were shocked and the Hessians, so ruthlessly triumphant in the summer, gained respect for the Americans. In fact, many would dessert and make the new nation their home. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Patriot Lessons: American History and Civics
Washington Crosses the Delaware - A Christmas Tale of 1776

Patriot Lessons: American History and Civics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 49:55


On December 25, 1776, George Washington and his brave troops begin to march to the nearly frozen Delaware River to attack Hessian troops encamped on the other side at Trenton, New Jersey. The times are desperate for the American cause.  The high risk attack is a daring attempt to save the American Revolution from collapse. Follow Washington's troops through the winter storm, frozen river, arduous march, and pitched battle. The fate of the new nation depends on it. Check out PatriotWeek.org, Judge Warren's book at www.AmericasSurvivalGuide.com, and the Save our Republic! video series on Patriot Week's YouTube Channel. Support this podcast at: https://anchor.fm/michael-warren9 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-warren9/support

Lions Led By Donkeys Podcast
Episode 187 - Colonel Tye and the Black Loyalists of the American Revolution

Lions Led By Donkeys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 68:10


The American Revolution left a lot of people behind. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/lionsledbydonkeys sources: Egerton, Douglas R., Death of Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America Lanning, Michael Lee. African Americans in the Revolutionary War.

La Vie Creative
EP 173: Paris History Avec a Hemingway (Hemingway, the Early Years)

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 32:09


One hundred years ago today, on 20 December 1921, the newlywed Hemingway's arrived in Paris. After almost two weeks on the  S.S. Leopoldina that left New York on December 8th the two finally arrived in the City of Light. Relying on Hadley and her eight years of French, the two found their way through day to day life. Friend and author Sherwood Anderson armed Hem with letters of introduction to other American expats and even made them a reservation at the Hotel Jacob et d'Angleterre on the Rue Jacob in Saint Germain-des-Près. Filled with fellow Americans, the hotel fittingly sits on the same spot that Benjamin Franklin and John Adams worked on the Treaty of Paris in 1783 that would end the American Revolution. When Ernest and Hadley stayed it was just 12 francs a day and in a bit of disrepair. Holes in the staircase carpet that Hem would call “traps for drunk guests”, but the price was right. Today the staircase and the inner garden is still the same, although they have changed the carpet.  On those cold days of December the two would walk the streets of St Germain “arm through arm, peering into courts and stopping in front of little shop windows”. Dining almost nightly at the nearby Le Près aux Clercs on the corner of Rue Bonaparte and Rue Jacob, just steps from their hotel. They could get a fantastic meal for just 12 francs and dine like royalty.. Those next few months and years are the most documented of his life. The countless books change the facts or add in a bit of their own point of view. Listen to the newest episode of Paris History Avec a Hemingway on La Vie Creative Podcast to hear about these early days when everything was “poor and happy”. More info and photos: https://www.claudinehemingway.com/paris-history-avec-a-hemingway-podcast-1Support Claudine on Patreon and get more of Paris and all her stories and benefits like discounts on her tours, custom history and exclusive content  https://www.patreon.com/bleublonderougefacebook https://www.facebook.com/BleuBlondeRougeInstagram https://www.instagram.com/claudinebleublonderouge/Join us every Sunday for a LIVE walk through Paris filled with history https://www.claudinehemingway.com/eventsSign up for the weekly Blue Blonde Rouge newsletter  https://view.flodesk.com/pages/5e8f6d73375c490028be6a76 Author & historianPodcast La Vie Creative, Paris History Avec a Hemingway Hemingway tours of ParisClaudineHemingway.comIG @claudinebleublonderougeFB @bleublonderouge La VIe Creative - Paris History Avec a Hemingway podcast.New Every Monday And find my live from Paris videos and more at my YouTube channel Live From Paris Every Sunday, filled with the history of the places, buildings and the people that came before us.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

CounterPunch Radio
Jacqueline Keeler

CounterPunch Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 74:55


This time on CounterPunch Radio, author and journalist Jacqueline Keeler joins Eric to discuss a range of critical issues affecting Native people in the US and Canada, including the ongoing struggle against pipelines and extractive industries, the impact of COVID on Native communities, the fight against native mascotry, and more. Jacqueline also helps reframe how we think of US history, the American Revolution and Founding Fathers, and the nature of the settler-colonial presence on this continent. This is a conversation you don't want to miss. Break Music: “Stadium Pow Wow” by The Halluci Nation ft. Black Bear Intro/Outro: “The Corridors of Power” by Dean Wareham More The post Jacqueline Keeler appeared first on CounterPunch.org.

The Thomas Jefferson Hour
#1473 Our First Civil War with H.W. Brands

The Thomas Jefferson Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 54:28


We present a special conversation between Clay Jenkinson and best-selling author, historian and Pulitzer Prize finalist H. W. Brands. They discuss Brand's new book, Our First Civil War: Patriots and Loyalists in the American Revolution. You can order Clay's new book at Amazon, Target, Barnes and Noble, or by contacting your independent bookstore. The Language of Cottonwoods is out now through Koehler Books. Mentioned on this episode: Our First Civil War: Patriots and Loyalists in the American Revolution Find this episode, along with recommended reading, on the blog. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn more about Clay's cultural tours and retreats at jeffersonhour.com/tours. Check out our new merch. You can find Clay's publications on our website, along with a list of his favorite books on Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and other topics. Thomas Jefferson is interpreted by Clay S. Jenkinson.