Podcasts about American Revolution

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Revolution during which the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain

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  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
American Revolution

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Best podcasts about American Revolution

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Latest podcast episodes about American Revolution

The Dictionary
#D12 (dapple to Darjeeling)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 28:01


I read from dapple to Darjeeling.     I still don't know much of the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) but they are working at getting more/better education for kids and they love genealogy so I'm cool with both of those.  https://www.dar.org/     The "Darby and Joan" song is from here: https://youtu.be/U9P7CrhwKGE     The Dardic languages are in the Pakistan/India/Afghanistan region: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardic_languages     The word of the episode is "dareful".     Theme music from Tom Maslowski https://zestysol.com/     Merchandising! https://www.teepublic.com/user/spejampar     "The Dictionary - Letter A" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter B" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter C" on YouTube     Featured in a Top 10 Dictionary Podcasts list! https://blog.feedspot.com/dictionary_podcasts/     Backwards Talking on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIujMwEDbgZUexyR90jaTEEVmAYcCzuq     dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar https://www.tiktok.com/@spejampar 917-727-5757

History Unplugged Podcast
The American Revolution Would Have Been Lost Without a Ragtag Fleet of Thousands of Privateers

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 62:00 Very Popular


Privateers were a cross between an enlisted sailor and an outright pirate. But they were crucial in winning the Revolutionary War. As John Lehman, former secretary of the navy under President Ronald Reagan, observed, “From the beginning of the American Revolution until the end of the War of 1812, America's real naval advantage lay in its privateers. It has been said that the battles of the American Revolution were fought on land, and independence was won at sea. For this we have the enormous success of American privateers to thank even more than the Continental Navy.” Yet even in the face of plenty of readily available evidence, the official canon of naval history in both Britain and the United States virtually ignores privateers.Privateers were privately owned vessels granted permission by the new government to seize British merchantmen and men of war – filled in the gaps. Nearly 2,000 of these private ships set sail over the course of the war, with tens of thousands of Americans capturing more than 1,800 British ships. A truly ragtag fleet ranging from twenty-five-foot-long whaleboats to full-rigged ships more than 100 ft long, privateersmen were not just pirates after a good loot – as too often assumed – but were, instead, crucial instruments in the war. They diverted critical British resources to protecting their shipping, played a key role in bringing France in as an ally, replenished much-needed supplies back home, and bolstered morale.Today's guest is Eric Jay Dolin, author of “Rebels at Sea: Privateering in the American Revolution.” The story of the founding of the U.S. Navy during the Revolution has been told many times – yet often missing from maritime histories of the period is the ragtag fleet of private vessels that were, in fact, critical to American victory. Privateering provided a source of strength that helped the rebels persevere. Although privateering was not the single, decisive factor in beating theBritish—there was no one cause—it was extremely important nonetheless.

National Treasure Hunt
43. Hunt for Prequels (Midnight Ride)

National Treasure Hunt

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 81:14


Co-hosts Aubrey Paris and Emily Black recap "Midnight Ride," the second National Treasure prequel book written by Catherine Hapka and published by Disney Press. Readers (and listeners) learn the role of Ben Gates' ancestors in launching the American Revolution. Join the hunt on Twitter and Instagram using @NTHuntPodcast, and find new episodes of National Treasure Hunt every-other Wednesday on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen to podcasts. More information about the National Treasure Hunt podcast, tour, and book can be found at www.nthuntpodcast.com.

Watch This
Locke & Key time-travels to American Revolution for final season

Watch This

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 16:09


On today's What to Watch: The Locke family comes face to face with the American Revolution on the final season of Netflix's Locke & Key. Keaton and Alexis dance for the title of America's Favorite Dancer on the season finale of So You Think You Can Dance — and host Cat Deeley and judges JoJo Siwa, Stephen 'tWitch' Boss, and Leah Remini tell us what they're watching. And everyone's favorite talking tree embarks on new adventures on the new Disney+ series I Am Groot. Plus more entertainment headlines — including Street Outlaws: Fastest in America star Ryan Fellows' fatal accident while filming the show outside, a scare involving explosives on the Chicago set of Justified: City Primeval, the return of a fan-favorite character for season 5 of Cobra Kai, and Kenan Thompson named Emmys host — and trivia. More at ew.com, ew.com/wtw, and @EW. Host/Producer: Gerrad Hall (@gerradhall); Producer: Ashley Boucher (@ashleybreports); Editor: Lauren Klein (@ltklein); Writer: Calie Schepp; Executive Producer: Chanelle Johnson (@chanelleberlin). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Can't Make This Up
Rebels at Sea with Eric Jay Dolin

Can't Make This Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 56:33


Today I speak with Eric Jay Dolin about his recent book Rebels at Sea: Privateering in the American Revolution. **If you would like to listen to Eric's previous appearances on Can't Make This Up, listen to Black Flags, Blue Waters and A Furious Sky. "The heroic story of the founding of the U.S. Navy during the Revolution has been told many times, yet largely missing from maritime histories of America's first war is the ragtag fleet of private vessels that truly revealed the new nation's character―above all, its ambition and entrepreneurial ethos. In Rebels at Sea, best-selling historian Eric Jay Dolin corrects that significant omission, and contends that privateers, as they were called, were in fact critical to the American victory. Privateers were privately owned vessels, mostly refitted merchant ships, that were granted permission by the new government to seize British merchantmen and men of war. As Dolin stirringly demonstrates, at a time when the young Continental Navy numbered no more than about sixty vessels all told, privateers rushed to fill the gaps. Nearly 2,000 set sail over the course of the war, with tens of thousands of Americans serving on them and capturing some 1,800 British ships. Privateers came in all shapes and sizes, from twenty-five foot long whaleboats to full-rigged ships more than 100 feet long. Bristling with cannons, swivel guns, muskets, and pikes, they tormented their foes on the broad Atlantic and in bays and harbors on both sides of the ocean. The men who owned the ships, as well as their captains and crew, would divide the profits of a successful cruise―and suffer all the more if their ship was captured or sunk, with privateersmen facing hellish conditions on British prison hulks, where they were treated not as enemy combatants but as pirates. Some Americans viewed them similarly, as cynical opportunists whose only aim was loot. Yet Dolin shows that privateersmen were as patriotic as their fellow Americans, and moreover that they greatly contributed to the war's success: diverting critical British resources to protecting their shipping, playing a key role in bringing France into the war on the side of the United States, providing much-needed supplies at home, and bolstering the new nation's confidence that it might actually defeat the most powerful military force in the world. Creating an entirely new pantheon of Revolutionary heroes, Dolin reclaims such forgotten privateersmen as Captain Jonathan Haraden and Offin Boardman, putting their exploits, and sacrifices, at the very center of the conflict. Abounding in tales of daring maneuvers and deadly encounters, Rebels at Sea presents this nation's first war as we have rarely seen it before." If you would like to help Can't Make This Up (and check out some cool extras), consider becoming a supporter of the podcast on Patreon! Like the podcast? Please subscribe and leave a review! Follow @CMTUHistory on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & TikTok --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cmtuhistory/support

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 5/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 5/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 7/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 12:19


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 7/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 8/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 8:50


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders:  8/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 4/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:35


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 4/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 6/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 7:20


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 6/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 1/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 1/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 2/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 9:24


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 2/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 3/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnel

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:05


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8: In praise of the Marbleheaders: 3/8: The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware. Kindle Edition. by Patrick K. O'Donnell https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Diverse-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware-ebook/dp/B08M12FQ85 On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's army against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. One of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by navigating the treacherous river to Manhattan. At the right time in the right place, the Marbleheaders, a group of white, black, Hispanic, and Native American soldiers, repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the American Revolution. As historian Patrick K. O'Donnell recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and helped shape the United States through governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington, foreshadowing today's Secret Service. Then the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776, delivering the surprise attack on Trenton that changed the course of history . . . The Marbleheaders' story, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The Tim Dillon Show
310 - The Acid Story with Curtis Yarvin

The Tim Dillon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 157:16 Very Popular


Tim has on Curtis Yarvin (aka Mencius Moldbug, executive producer of the film "Alex's War", Gray Mirror on Substack) is a software engineer, internet entrepreneur, and blogger. They discuss taking acid as a precocious young man, the historical inaccuracies from Caesar to the American Revolution, the early days of the internet, what tech people really want, the three types of government, and the actual deep state. His substack: https://graymirror.substack.com/ The movie he exec produced: https://twitter.com/alexswarmovie SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS: HELIX BED ▶▶ https://www.helixsleep.com/timd for 200 dollars off Mattress orders and two free pillows WATCHES ▶▶ for 20% off go to https://www.vincerocollective.com/timdillon

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 5/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021 auu

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 10:54


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 5/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021 https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 6/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 15:37


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 6/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 7/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 11:14


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 7/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021 https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 8/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021 auu

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 9:24


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 8/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021 https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 4/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 10:31


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 4/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
2/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 2/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 8:22


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 2/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 1/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021 auu

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 10:18


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 1/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 3/8: The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 10:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8: Disunion and the disrupted. 3/8:  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.    Hardcover – September 21, 2021 https://www.amazon.com/Cause-American-Revolution-Discontents-1773-1783/dp/1631498983 Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The Toby Gribben Show
Frank A Mason

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 20:17


Frank A. Mason is the pen name for a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel who also served as a college professor for 25 years. As an officer in the US Air Force, Mason flew B-52s during the Cold War, served as a flying training instructor, and directed high-level staff organizations over 22 years of his early adult life. A college professor from the late 1990's to the present, Mason's alter ego earned a PhD from one of the nation's top 5 public institutions and had the privilege of mentoring hundreds of doctoral students at three respected higher education institutions. He left the professoriate to become a full-time author. The Journeyman Chronicles is Mason's series of novels about the adventures of a young master gunsmith caught up in the American Revolution. The Journeyman Chronicles is available on Amazon.com and other booksellers. Frank A. Mason is also the author of a series of modern suspense novels that will also be available in late summer, 2022, on Amazon.com and other booksellers. Mason lives in Florida with his wife who is a university professor and author of a forthcoming series of children's books. They share three adult children, who are each successful in their own right. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast
REBELS AT SEA-PRIVATEERING IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 66:08 Very Popular


The heroic story of the founding of the US Navy during the Revolution has been told many times but never with a focus on the thousands of privateers- private vessels- from whaleboats to gunboats, which proved themselves a critical factor in the winning of American freedom. The author Eric Jay Dolin does a brilliant job bringing us into the story and introducing us to many unsung heroes of the American Revolution at sea. ANDROID USERS- 1001 Radio Days right here at Google Podcasts FREE: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20radio%20days 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales at Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5tZWdhcGhvbmUuZm0vQURMNzU3MzM0Mjg0NQ== 1001 Heroes, Legends, Histories & Mysteries at Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20heroes 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories (& Tales from Arthur Conan Doyle) https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20sherlock%20holmes 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre on Spotify: https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20ghost%20stories 1001 Stories for the Road on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20stories%20for%20the%20road Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/search/1001%20greatest%20love%20stories 1001 History's Best Storytellers: (author interviews) on Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/1001-historys-best-storytellers APPLE USERS Catch 1001 Heroes on any Apple Device here (Free): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-heroes-legends-histories-mysteries-podcast/id956154836?mt=2  Catch 1001 CLASSIC SHORT STORIES at Apple Podcast App Now: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-classic-short-stories-tales/id1078098622 Catch 1001 Stories for the Road at Apple Podcast now:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-stories-for-the-road/id1227478901 NEW Enjoy 1001 Greatest Love Stories on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-greatest-love-stories/id1485751552 Catch 1001 RADIO DAYS now at Apple iTunes!  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-radio-days/id1405045413?mt=2 NEW 1001 Ghost Stories & Tales of the Macabre is now playing at Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-ghost-stories-tales-of-the-macabre/id1516332327 NEW Enjoy 1001 History's Best Storytellers (Interviews) on Apple Devices here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-historys-best-storytellers/id1483649026 NEW Enjoy 1001 Sherlock Holmes Stories and The Best of Arthur Conan Doyle https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/1001-sherlock-holmes-stories-best-sir-arthur-conan/id1534427618 Get all of our shows at one website: https://.1001storiespodcast.com REVIEWS NEEDED . My email works as well for comments: 1001storiespodcast@gmail.com SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY BECOMING A PATRON! https://.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork. Its time I started asking for support! Thank you. Its a few dollars a month OR a one time. (Any amount is appreciated). YOUR REVIEWS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS AT APPLE/ITUNES AND ALL ANDROID HOSTS ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED! LINKS BELOW... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Preble Hall
Privateering in the American Revolution

Preble Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 35:59


Eric Jay Dolin discusses his latest book, "Rebels at Sea: Privateering in the American Revolution." Some of his other books include "When America Met China," "Black Flags, Blue Waters," and "Leviathan."

Revolution 250 Podcast
The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin with Gordon S. Wood

Revolution 250 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 36:54


Benjamin Franklin was the most famous American of his day.  But he became famous as a subject of the British Empire, and he believed in the Empire.  How did he become an American?  For our 100th episode, we talk with Gordon Wood, author of The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin,,  and many other books on the Revolutionary era, about this most fascinating and most elusive of the founders.  It is always a pleasure to talk with Gordon Wood,  the Alva Way University Professor and Professor of History emeritus at Brown,   who joined us for our first episode in 2020.

Places I Remember with Lea Lane
America's Historic Triangle: The Best Of Jamestown, Yorktown and Williamsburg, Virginia

Places I Remember with Lea Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 21:52


Living history can be informative and fun. And visiting the early settlements and battlefields of America's Historic Triangle -- Jamestown, Yorktown and WIlliamsburg -- offers both. Beyond learning and better understanding the  past, there are the modern pleasures of dining, shopping and recreating. Victoria Cimino, CEO of Visit Williamsburg, takes us along.We begin with Jamestown, the earliest settlement. Go on to Yorktown, where the culminating battle of the American Revolution took place.  And then Colonial Williamsburg, the world's largest living history museum.And we end, of course, with Victoria's special memory of Virginia's Historic Triangle._____Victoria Cimino is president and CEO of Visit Williamsburg, the official destination marketing organization for Williamsburg, Yorktown, and Jamestown._____ Podcast host Lea Lane blogs at forbes.com, has traveled to over 100 countries, written nine books, including Places I Remember, and contributed to many guidebooks. Contact Lea!  @lealane on Twitter; PlacesIRememberLeaLane on Insta; on  Facebook, it's Places I Remember with Lea Lane. Website: placesirememberlealane.com.  New episodes drop every other week, on Tuesdays. Please tell your friends, family and colleagues about us, and follow, rate and review this award-winning travel podcast!

Wining About Herstory
Ep155. Private War & The Only Woman on the Declaration of Independence

Wining About Herstory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 98:35


When we get knocked down, we get back up again, rising from the smush like fruit flies! This week, the ladies are covering two war-time journalists separated by hundreds of years but have a surprising amount in common. First, Kelley tells the story of Marie Colvin, a war journalist who looked like she stepped out of a Bond film, but instead of taking out enemy spies, she sought to cover the tragedy and chaos of war- no matter the cost. Then, Emily covers Mary Katharine Goddard, a Revolutionary-era printer, book shop proprietor, journalist, and patriot who put her name on the Declaration of Independence. Is it a dragon or Washington?? Doesn't matter because we're wining about herstory! Support the show

Current Affairs
Have the Suburbs Ruined Everything? (w/ Bill McKibben)

Current Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 42:18


Bill McKibben is a legendary activist and writer whose 1989 book The End of Nature introduced the problem of global warming to a general audience. Since then, he has been one of the world's leading environmental activists, taking major roles in the fossil fuel divestment movement and the campaign against the Keystone pipeline. In his latest book, The Flag, The Cross, and The Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at His Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened, McKibben looks at the Middle America he grew up in and how, beneath its image of cheery prosperity, it was accumulating moral debts that have yet to be paid. McKibben grew up in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he proudly told tales of the American Revolution as a tour guide on the town common. But he came to understand that Lexington was a far more complicated place than its mythology told him. While the town is a bastion of liberalism, and in his youth the residents came out to support Vietnam war protesters, at the same time it was deliberately keeping out affordable housing and making sure only the existing white residents saw the benefit of its skyrocketing property values. McKibben's book retells the history of his suburb and wrestles with its role in creating present crises. Today Bill McKibben joins us to discuss:The peaceful suburb of his childhood and how he came to discover its dark sideThe morally complicated role of the church in American historyThe debts that U.S. suburbanites have accrued through destructive carbon emissionsThe very disturbing sight on Paul Revere's famous "midnight ride" that is never mentionedWhy Jimmy Carter is underrated and the terrible path that America set itself on by electing Ronald Reagan in 1980Why Baby Boomers aren't all terrible and why we should involve older people in political activismNathan's article discussing Sam Walton's memoir is here. Carter's "Crisis of Confidence" speech is here. More on "where Mark hung in chains" can be read here. Find more about Third Act, McKibben's organization for older Americans looking to get involved in activism, here.

Lectures in History
Alexander Hamilton and the Early Republic

Lectures in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 56:04


Professor Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman talks about Alexander Hamilton's role in the creation of the federal government. She describes how, after the American Revolution, states operated as separate countries, which often caused problems. Alexander Hamilton, one of the authors of the Federalist Papers, argued during the Constitutional Convention for a strong central government to mediate between the states. This class was part of a course called “World History.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2274: Old Graves in an Old Town

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 3:49


Episode: 2274 Old graves in an old town and a new view of who we were.  Today, old gravestones.

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast
Why Didn't Canada Join the American Revolution?

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 12:44


The United States and Canada are like two siblings. They live next to each other, have the same parents, and are a lot alike. However, the way they both grew up was very different.  The United States achieved its independence through a revolution. The Canadians, however, didn't join the American Revolution even though they almost certainly could have. Learn more about why Canada didn't join the American Revolution on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. Subscribe to the podcast!  https://link.chtbl.com/EverythingEverywhere?sid=ShowNotes -------------------------------- Executive Producer: Darcy Adams Associate Producers: Peter Bennett & Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere Update your podcast app at newpodcastapps.com Search Past Episodes at fathom.fm Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/ Everything Everywhere is an Airwave Media podcast." or "Everything Everywhere is part of the Airwave Media podcast network Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to advertise on Everything Everywhere. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Battleground America Podcast
The New American Royalty

Battleground America Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 16:32


America now has royalty as powerful and immune to the law as any king. They're now doing exactly what originally caused the American Revolution, and they're in our faces about it.

Cider Chat
329: Cider Heroine Judith Maloney | West County Cider, MA

Cider Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:23


CiderDays 2.0 Cider Dinner on November 5, 2022 with 6 outstanding women producers from the east coast at the Hawks and Reed Performing Art Center in Greenfield, Massashusetts. Dine with Judith Maloney of West County Cider (MA), Lisa Laird Dunn of Lairds & Company (NJ), Louisa Spencer of Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchard (NH) , Eleanor Leger of Eden Specialty Ciders (VT), Nicole Blum of Carrs Ciderhouse & Preservation Orchard and Farm (MA), and Anne Garwood Hampp of Ragged Hill Cider (MA). Sing up now to receive notification to your in box on CiderDays 2.0 schedule of events and early ticket release dates and links. Judith Maloney on being America's First Cidery in 1984 In 1984 there were no commercial cidermakers in the United States. Only S. Martinelli & Co. based in Watsonville California was able to hold onto their license up to 1979, but gave it up when revenue from sales was only 1% of their overall business of offering apple juice products. Listen to John Martinelli discuss his family's story in episode 162 Terry and Judith Maloney in the early days of West County Cider   Judith Maloney Today In this Cider Chat Hear Judith backstory of her family's start from London to America in the 1940's. How she met Terry Maloney Making wine in the late 1960's with grapes from Rene di Rosa in the Carneros region or California How Judith and Terry ended up in Colrain, Massachusetts The paperwork to sell cider under a winery license and working with Agent Ernie  (Ernest) Giuliani of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (BATF) Getting scion for their orchard and the Redfield Apple Getting cider into stores, at a time when quality cider was unknown with Chef's like Jasper White Meeting Dewey the cidermaker Farm Cider in western Massachusetts Steve Wood of Farnum Hill Cider in NH helping Judith when Terry unexpectedly died in 2010 Starting CiderDays in 1994 and the building of community of makers and friends West County Cider Today Judith's son Field Maloney and a silent partner are now the owners of West County Cider. They continue to work with Pine Hill Orchards in Colraine, make Redfield Cider and other single varietal ciders that Field's father Terry showcased. Judith still travels to Boston and loves going to Formaggio Kitchen in Boston where she brings West County Cider products to sell for her son and marvel at the wide range of selections and loves tasting cider with the cheese monger there. Contact for West County Cider Website: http://westcountycider.com/ Address: 208 Peckville Rd, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370 Mentions in this chat Historical Cider Chat episodes on cider's history in America 317: How the "Cyder" Teapot Fueled the American Revolution 162: S. Martinelli's & Co. | 150 years of Cider Hear Field Maloney on Episode 001 of Cider Chat Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving! Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts. Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio , Spotify and wherever you love to listen to podcasts. Follow on Cider Chat's blog, social media and podcast Twitter @ciderchat Instagram: @ciderchatciderville Cider Chat FaceBook Page Cider Chat YouTube

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
The Danger of the Fake China Threat ft. Joseph Solis-Mullen Ep. 225

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 72:48


https://youtu.be/OEcx1yQn6ic This week, I invited Joseph Solis-Mullen on the show to discuss his most recent article published at the Libertarian Institute. The article, entitled "The Fake China Threat and Its Very Real Danger" does an excellent job of demonstrating why China is no threat to the United States. The first half of the episode, Joseph and I walk the listener through the last 180 years of US-Sino relations--a background that is essential for anyone seeking insight into this topic. In the second half, we discuss the inflated China threat. Joseph Solis-Mullen is a political scientist, journalist, and author. He is a current graduate student in the economics department at the University of Missouri. His work can be found at The Mises Institute, the Libertarian Institute, Eurasian Review, Journal of the American Revolution, Antiwar.com, and the Journal of Libertarian Studies. Episode 225 of the Liberty Weekly Podcast is Brought to you by: LibertyWeekly.club Join my membership and newsletter site! Mises Pieces Merch: Grab your Liberty Weekly merch here. Use code LW10 for 10% off Dissolve NATO t-shirt The Liberty Weekly Patreon Page: help support the show and gain access to tons of bonus content! Become a patron today! Show Notes: Joseph's Website "The Fake China Threat and Its Very Real Danger" "China Won't Be Taking Over the World" "Don't Confuse the Falkland Islands for Taiwan" "A Harder Line with Beijing? Let's Hope Not" (Discussing how China is more vulnerable to sanctions than Russia) Joseph's 2021 Interview on the Scott Horton Show "Taiwan and Our 'Feigned Ambiguity'" by Patrick MacFarlane  

The Tara Show
The New American Royalty

The Tara Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 16:32


America now has royalty as powerful and immune to the law as any king. They're now doing exactly what originally caused the American Revolution, and they're in our faces about it.

Gruesome: Horrific True Crime
The Harpe Brothers

Gruesome: Horrific True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 64:07


Micajah and Wiley Harpe are widely believed to be the first documented serial killers. Dating back to the American Revolution, Coni takes you through the crimes of these absolute monsters. Thank you Magic Spoon for sponsoring this episode! Don't take our word for it, try it yourself. Head to http://magicspoon.com/gruesome and use promo code GRUESOME for $5 off. Want to advertise on a podcast like ours? Head to: https://zen.ai/gruesome If your resolution is to start a podcast, now is the time! With Zencastr's easy to use platform you will be releasing episodes in no time. Head to https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=Gruesome&fpr=gruesome for 30% off your first three months! Use Fiverr the next time you need to book a freelancer by using our special link - https://zen.ai/gruesome5

Liberty Weekly - Libertarian, Ancap, & Voluntaryist Legal Theory from a Rothbardian Perspective
The Danger of the Fake China Threat ft. Joseph Solis-Mullen Ep. 225

Liberty Weekly - Libertarian, Ancap, & Voluntaryist Legal Theory from a Rothbardian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 72:48


https://youtu.be/OEcx1yQn6ic This week, I invited Joseph Solis-Mullen on the show to discuss his most recent article published at the Libertarian Institute. The article, entitled "The Fake China Threat and Its Very Real Danger" does an excellent job of demonstrating why China is no threat to the United States. The first half of the episode, Joseph and I walk the listener through the last 180 years of US-Sino relations--a background that is essential for anyone seeking insight into this topic. In the second half, we discuss the inflated China threat. Joseph Solis-Mullen is a political scientist, journalist, and author. He is a current graduate student in the economics department at the University of Missouri. His work can be found at The Mises Institute, the Libertarian Institute, Eurasian Review, Journal of the American Revolution, Antiwar.com, and the Journal of Libertarian Studies. Episode 225 of the Liberty Weekly Podcast is Brought to you by: LibertyWeekly.club Join my membership and newsletter site! Mises Pieces Merch: Grab your Liberty Weekly merch here. Use code LW10 for 10% off Dissolve NATO t-shirt The Liberty Weekly Patreon Page: help support the show and gain access to tons of bonus content! Become a patron today! Show Notes: Joseph's Website "The Fake China Threat and Its Very Real Danger" "China Won't Be Taking Over the World" "Don't Confuse the Falkland Islands for Taiwan" "A Harder Line with Beijing? Let's Hope Not" (Discussing how China is more vulnerable to sanctions than Russia) Joseph's 2021 Interview on the Scott Horton Show "Taiwan and Our 'Feigned Ambiguity'" by Patrick MacFarlane  

Revolution 250 Podcast
Rebels at Sea; Privateering in the American Revolution with Eric Jay Dolin

Revolution 250 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 35:49


Privateering enjoys a somewhat spotty historical reputation, being considered little more than state-sponsored pirates.  But there is no denying the importance of privateers to the cause of Independence, providing military supplies, foodstuffs. cash,  and merchantable goods  Continental treasury.  Privateers such as John Manley, Jonathan Haraden and Luke Ryan some of the first American maritime heroes, and event Continental Navy captains such as John Barry and Thomas Truxton also commanded privateers.  We hear their stories and more from  Eric Jay Dolin, author of  Rebels at Sea:  Privateering in the American Revolution. .

American Revolution Podcast
ARP251 Waxhaws Massacre

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 30:11


Colonel Banastre Tarleton slaughters a group of escaping Continentals at Waxhaw.  General Clinton's edict that all colonists must join loyalist militias convinces many paroled men to rally to patriot units commanded by leaders such as Thomas Sumter and Francis Marion.  Patriots attack and massacre a loyalist regiment commanded by Christian Huck. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Book Recommendation of the Week: The Swamp Fox: How Francis Marion Saved the American Revolution, by John Oller (borrow on archive.org). Online Recommendation of the Week: Weems, Mason L. Life of Gen'l Francis Marion, (originally published 1809): https://archive.org/details/lifeofgenlfranci00weem  Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy  ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/AmRevPodcast or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast

New Books in History
Ann Marie Borys, "American Unitarian Churches: Architecture of a Democratic Religion" (U Massachusetts Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 26:28


The Unitarian religious tradition was a product of the same eighteenth-century democratic ideals that fueled the American Revolution and informed the founding of the United States. Its liberal humanistic principles influenced institutions such as Harvard University and philosophical movements like Transcendentalism. Yet, its role in the history of American architecture is little known and studied. In American Unitarian Churches: Architecture of a Democratic Religion (U Massachusetts Press, 2021), Ann Marie Borys argues that the progressive values and identity of the Unitarian religion are intimately intertwined with ideals of American democracy and visibly expressed in the architecture of its churches. Over time, church architecture has continued to evolve in response to developments within the faith, and many contemporary projects are built to serve religious, practical, and civic functions simultaneously. Focusing primarily on churches of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple and Louis Kahn's First Unitarian Church, Borys explores building histories, biographies of leaders, and broader sociohistorical contexts. As this essential study makes clear, to examine Unitarianism through its churches is to see American architecture anew, and to find an authentic architectural expression of American democratic identity. Bryan Toepfer, AIA, NCARB, CAPM is the Principal Architect for TOEPFER Architecture, PLLC, an Architecture firm specializing in Residential Architecture and Virtual Reality. He has authored two books, “Contractors CANNOT Build Your House,” and “Six Months Now, ARCHITECT for Life.” He is an Assistant Professor at Alfred State College and has served as the Director of Government Affairs and as the Director of Education for the AIA Rochester Board of Directors. Always eager to help anyone understand the world of Architecture, he hosts the New Books Network – Architecture podcast, is an NCARB Licensing Advisor and helps coach candidates taking the Architectural Registration Exam. btoepfer@toepferarchitecture. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Ann Marie Borys, "American Unitarian Churches: Architecture of a Democratic Religion" (U Massachusetts Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 26:28


The Unitarian religious tradition was a product of the same eighteenth-century democratic ideals that fueled the American Revolution and informed the founding of the United States. Its liberal humanistic principles influenced institutions such as Harvard University and philosophical movements like Transcendentalism. Yet, its role in the history of American architecture is little known and studied. In American Unitarian Churches: Architecture of a Democratic Religion (U Massachusetts Press, 2021), Ann Marie Borys argues that the progressive values and identity of the Unitarian religion are intimately intertwined with ideals of American democracy and visibly expressed in the architecture of its churches. Over time, church architecture has continued to evolve in response to developments within the faith, and many contemporary projects are built to serve religious, practical, and civic functions simultaneously. Focusing primarily on churches of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple and Louis Kahn's First Unitarian Church, Borys explores building histories, biographies of leaders, and broader sociohistorical contexts. As this essential study makes clear, to examine Unitarianism through its churches is to see American architecture anew, and to find an authentic architectural expression of American democratic identity. Bryan Toepfer, AIA, NCARB, CAPM is the Principal Architect for TOEPFER Architecture, PLLC, an Architecture firm specializing in Residential Architecture and Virtual Reality. He has authored two books, “Contractors CANNOT Build Your House,” and “Six Months Now, ARCHITECT for Life.” He is an Assistant Professor at Alfred State College and has served as the Director of Government Affairs and as the Director of Education for the AIA Rochester Board of Directors. Always eager to help anyone understand the world of Architecture, he hosts the New Books Network – Architecture podcast, is an NCARB Licensing Advisor and helps coach candidates taking the Architectural Registration Exam. btoepfer@toepferarchitecture. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Architecture
Ann Marie Borys, "American Unitarian Churches: Architecture of a Democratic Religion" (U Massachusetts Press, 2021)

New Books in Architecture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 26:28


The Unitarian religious tradition was a product of the same eighteenth-century democratic ideals that fueled the American Revolution and informed the founding of the United States. Its liberal humanistic principles influenced institutions such as Harvard University and philosophical movements like Transcendentalism. Yet, its role in the history of American architecture is little known and studied. In American Unitarian Churches: Architecture of a Democratic Religion (U Massachusetts Press, 2021), Ann Marie Borys argues that the progressive values and identity of the Unitarian religion are intimately intertwined with ideals of American democracy and visibly expressed in the architecture of its churches. Over time, church architecture has continued to evolve in response to developments within the faith, and many contemporary projects are built to serve religious, practical, and civic functions simultaneously. Focusing primarily on churches of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple and Louis Kahn's First Unitarian Church, Borys explores building histories, biographies of leaders, and broader sociohistorical contexts. As this essential study makes clear, to examine Unitarianism through its churches is to see American architecture anew, and to find an authentic architectural expression of American democratic identity. Bryan Toepfer, AIA, NCARB, CAPM is the Principal Architect for TOEPFER Architecture, PLLC, an Architecture firm specializing in Residential Architecture and Virtual Reality. He has authored two books, “Contractors CANNOT Build Your House,” and “Six Months Now, ARCHITECT for Life.” He is an Assistant Professor at Alfred State College and has served as the Director of Government Affairs and as the Director of Education for the AIA Rochester Board of Directors. Always eager to help anyone understand the world of Architecture, he hosts the New Books Network – Architecture podcast, is an NCARB Licensing Advisor and helps coach candidates taking the Architectural Registration Exam. btoepfer@toepferarchitecture. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/architecture

History Ago Go
Rebels at Sea: Privateering in the American Revolution (Eric Jay Dolin)

History Ago Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 61:59


The heroic story of the founding of the U.S. Navy during the Revolution has been told many times, yet largely missing from maritime histories of America's first war is the ragtag fleet of private vessels that truly revealed the new nation's character―above all, its ambition and entrepreneurial ethos.In Rebels at Sea, best-selling historian Eric Jay Dolin corrects that significant omission, and contends that privateers, as they were called, were in fact critical to the American victory. Privateers were privately owned vessels, mostly refitted merchant ships, that were granted permission by the new government to seize British merchantmen and men of war. As Dolin stirringly demonstrates, at a time when the young Continental Navy numbered no more than about sixty vessels all told, privateers rushed to fill the gaps. Nearly 2,000 set sail over the course of the war, with tens of thousands of Americans serving on them and capturing some 1,800 British ships. Privateers came in all shapes and sizes, from twenty-five foot long whaleboats to full-rigged ships more than 100 feet long. Bristling with cannons, swivel guns, muskets, and pikes, they tormented their foes on the broad Atlantic and in bays and harbors on both sides of the ocean.HOST:  Rob MellonFEATURED BREW:  SeaQuench Ale, Dogfish Head Brewery, Milton, DelawareBOOK:  Rebels at Sea: Privateering in the American Revolutionhttps://www.amazon.com/Rebels-Sea-Privateering-American-Revolution/dp/1631498258/ref=sr_1_1?crid=OCQS2IIHBF3J&keywords=rebels+at+sea&qid=1658348628&sprefix=rebels+at%2Caps%2C96&sr=8-1MUSIC:  boneS Forkhttps://bonesfork.com/

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo
Russillo Book Club: Our First Civil War: 'Patriots and Loyalists in the American Revolution' by H.W. Brands. Plus, Life Advice.

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 69:12 Very Popular


Russillo is joined by historian H.W. Brands to discuss his book on the American Revolution (0:50). Then, Ryen answers some listener-submitted Life Advice questions (40:57). Host: Ryen Russillo Guest: H.W. Brands Producers: Kyle Crichton and Steve Ceruti Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Jewish History with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Katz
On Bastille Day (July 24th), R' Katz Analyzes the Effect of the French Revolution on the Jews

Jewish History with Rabbi Dr. Dovid Katz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 35:26


The contrast between the American Revolution and the French re: what was demanded from the Jews as the price of equality

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The American Idea: Rival Friends: The Adams-Jefferson Correspondence with Cara Rogers | Documents and Debates (#34)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022


In this episode of The American Idea, Jeff is joined once again by Cara Rogers, Professor of History at Ashland University and Co-Director of the Ashbrook Scholar Program, for a conversation on the friendship of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Jeff and Cara explore the development of their friendship during the American Revolution and the […]

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Deborah Sampson Gannett, aka Private Robert Shurtlliff

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 41:16 Very Popular


Deborah Sampson could count William Bradford and Myles Standish in her family tree. That tree didn't include Robert Shurtlliff; that was the alias Deborah used to enlist in the Continental Army. Research: "Deborah Sampson." Encyclopedia of World Biography Online, vol. 37, Gale, 2017. Gale In Context: Biography, link.gale.com/apps/doc/K1631010696/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=67aa7490. Accessed 13 June 2022. Cowan, Leigh Alison. “The Woman Who Sneaked Into George Washington's Army.” New York Times. 7/2/2019. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/02/arts/design/the-woman-who-sneaked-into-george-washingtons-army.html Davis, Curtis Carroll. “A ‘Galantress' Gets Her Due: The Earliest Published Notice of Deborah Sampson.” Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society  1981-10-21: Vol 91 Iss 2. https://www.americanantiquarian.org/proceedings/44517675.pdf Foner, Philip S. “Black Participation in the Centennial of 1876.” Phylon (1960-) , 4th Qtr., 1978, Vol. 39, No. 4 (4th Qtr., 1978). https://www.jstor.org/stable/274895 Gannett, Deborah Sampson. “Diary of Deborah Sampson Gannett in 1802 (facsimile).” Facsimile by Eugene Tappan. 1901. https://archive.org/details/diaryofdeborahsa00gann/ Grant De Pauw, Linda. “REPLY: Deborah Sampson Gannett.” H-Minvera Discussion Logs. 2/9/2000. https://lists.h-net.org/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=h-minerva&month=0002&week=b&msg=7zkXCrd1QbfeT5kbVeln8A&user=&pw= Hiltner, Judith. “'The Example of our Heroine': Deborah Sampson and the Legacy of Herman Mann's The Female Review.”  American Studies , Spring, 2000, Vol. 41, No. 1. Via JSTOR. https://www.jstor.org/stable/40643118 Hiltner, Judith. “She Bled in Secret': Deborah Sampson, Herman Mann and ‘The Female Review.'” Early American Literature , 1999, Vol. 34, No. 2. Via JSTOR. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25057161 Hiltner, Judth R. “'Like a Bewildered Star": Deborah Sampson, Herman Mann, and ‘Address, Delivered with Applause'.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly , Spring, 1999, Vol. 29, No. 2. Via JSTOR. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3886083 Historic New England. “Gown.” https://www.historicnewengland.org/explore/collections-access/gusn/189811/ Katz, Brigit. “Diary Sheds Light on Deborah Sampson, Who Fought in the Revolutionary War.” Smithsonian. 7/2/2019. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/diary-sheds-light-deborah-sampson-who-fought-revolutionary-war-180972547/ Lafleur, Greta L. “Precipitous Sensations: Herman Mann's ‘The Female Review' (1797), Botanical Sexuality, and the Challenge of Queer Historiography.” Early American Literature , 2013, Vol. 48, No. 1. Via JSTOR. https://www.jstor.org/stable/24476307 Letter from Paul Revere to William Eustis, 20 February 1804. Transcript. https://www.masshist.org/database/viewer.php?item_id=326&img_step=1&mode=transcript#page1 Mann, Herman. “The female review: or, Memoirs of an American young lady; whose life and character are peculiarly distinguished--being a Continental soldier, for nearly three years, in the late American war. During which time, she performed the duties of every department, into which she was called, with punctual exactness, fidelity and honor, and preserved her chastity inviolate, by the most artful concealment of her sex. : With an appendix, containing charcteristic traits, by different hands; her taste for economy, principles of domestic education, &c..”  1797 . https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/evans/N24494.0001.001?view=toc Michals, Debra, editor. “Deborah Sampson.” National Women's History Museum. https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/deborah-sampson Michals, Debra.  "Margaret Cochran Corbin."  National Women's History Museum.  2015. www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/margaret-cochran-corbin. Nell, William C. “Colored Patriots of the American Revolution.” Robert F. Wallcut. 1855. https://archive.org/details/coloredpatriots00stowgoog/ Nellis, Rachel. “Deborah Sampson at War.” The American Revolution Institute. May 15, 2020. https://www.americanrevolutioninstitute.org/video/deborah-sampson-at-war/ Norwood, William Frederick. “Deborah Sampson, Alias Robert Shirtliff, Fighting Female of the Continental Line.” Bulletin of the History of Medicine. March-April 1957. Via JSTOR. http://www.jstor.com/stable/44443973 Phoner, Philip S. “Black Participation in the Centennial of 1876.” Phylon (1960-) , 4th Qtr., 1978, Vol. 39, No. 4. Via JSTOR. : https://www.jstor.org/stable/274895 Roberts, Cokie. “Founding Mothers.” Excerpted at the Museum of the American Revolution. https://www.amrevmuseum.org/read-the-revolution/founding-mothers Serfilippi, Jessie. “Deborah Sampson.” George Washington's Mount Vernon Center for Digital History. https://www.mountvernon.org/library/digitalhistory/digital-encyclopedia/article/deborah-sampson/ Sharon Historical Society. “Publications of the Sharon Historical Society of Sharon, Massachusetts.” 1905. https://archive.org/details/publicationsofsh02shar/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.