Podcasts about Africa

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Best podcasts about Africa

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Latest podcast episodes about Africa

Freedom Sounds Radio
Lightning and Thunder: Keeping You Warm in this Stormy October

Freedom Sounds Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


Songs about Bad Weather, Vampires, and Ghosts!(Storm Sounds)In the Rain - Keith HudsonRainy Night in Portland - Watty BurnettRain From the Skies - Delroy WilsonWhen the Lights Are Low - Joya LandisBreezin' - Mikey ChungAfter a Storm - Justin Hinds/DominoesStorm Warning - Lynn TaitRainfall - Baba BrooksRed Moon - Dynamites/King TubbysLightning and Thunder - Bim ShermanRain All Night -Don CarlosStormy Night - Roland BurrellLeaving Rome - Jo Jo BennettRoman Dub - King Tubbys Dragon's Paradise - Byron LeeVampire - UpsettersVampire - Devon IronsBandits Take Over - Screechy Dan/FrightnrsGhostbusters - Hughie IssacharScare Him - MaytalsGhostrider - Musical DoctorsGhost Town - SpecialsThrone of Blood - Prince JammyDuppy Conqueror - WailersSun is Shining - Upsetters(OUT) KFSR STORMY OCTOBER 

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 16, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the demonstrations in Sudan demanding the resignation of the interim Transitional Sovereign Council (TSC); the Central African Republic (CAR) government has offered a ceasefire to the rebel groups fighting over the last several years inside the country; in Burkina Faso the Pan-African Film Festival opened this weekend; and former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo has announced the creation of a new political party in this West African state. In the second hour we commemorate the 55th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. Finally, we examine some of the most pressing and burning issues of the day in Africa and throughout the world.

Unearthed: Memphis
Season 2: Episode Eight: Memphis Hoodoo & St. Paul’s Spiritual Holy Temple

Unearthed: Memphis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 40:53


Since it's spooky season, I thought we could talk a little about a Memphis urban legend… What do you think is one of the most well known urban legends? I'd probably say, Voodoo Village.  That's exactly what I was thinking. And I think pretty much everyone who grew up here or has lived here for any amount of time has heard about or even ventured out to the community known to locals as Voodoo Village. So what are some of the rumors you've heard about this place? I've heard that when you drive there, they pull a school bus behind your car so you can't leave. They come out and chase you with bats and machetes. There are dead animals hanging from trees. There are weird yard art objects and masonic and voodoo symbols all around the property. It's all just very strange and spooky.  I've heard all those things too, and even believed them for a very long time. Admittedly, I was too freaked out to actually go all the way there to see for myself. I believe it was my friend Neeraj and I who ventured that way late one night, but we eventually turned around and came home.  But years later, I had read a little about the so called “Voodoo Village” and learned it was actually called St. Paul's Spiritual Holy Temple. I have also read it as St. Peter's, but I do believe it's St. Paul's.  As it turns out, the history behind St. Paul's is more complicated than we thought. To understand it, we have to start with Memphis's beginnings. But I promise we'll get back to it.  Most of the information I got for this episode was from a book by Tony Kail called, appropriately, “A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo”. This really is a fantastic book. It's informative and a quick read. It made me want to dig deeper into the subject, thus this episode's topic. It's a really cool book. I suggest checking it out. You can find it in the local section at Novel. Memphis is known by many names. The Bluff City. The Home of the Blues. The Birthplace of Rock n Roll. The Cotton Capital of the World. The BBQ Capital of the World. But it's also called Mojo City.  The word “mojo” comes from an object used within the practice of Hoodoo. Memphis's Hoodoo history is not extremely well known or frankly understood, that is of course, unless you're actually in the know.  So we started this episode talking about voodoo and now we're talking about hoodoo. What is the difference? Voodoo (Vodou), meaning spirit, is considered a religion or religious practice. It is similar to Hoodoo, and in one video I watched, it said that Hoodoo was born out of Voodoo. It was brought from Africa, through Haiti, and then to America during the slave trade. It is a blend of Catholicism and African cultural and traditional beliefs. The type of voodoo we are going to be talking about for this episode is what is generally practiced in New Orleans.  There is structure and hierarchy in Voodoo. There is one God, but they do not interfere with life. But there are numerous spirits that do, and they call these spirits Loa or Lwa. Each Loa has its own area of life that it is responsible for, for example agriculture or money. Practitioners connect with these spirits when they need their assistance.  There are priestesses and priests in Voodoo. A popular Voodoo priestess was Marie Laveau. She made a name for herself by helping people from all walks of life in New Orleans. She was a hairdresser by day, but her other “side hustle” was to help people achieve their desires through her voodoo practice. She was known to help black, white, rich and poor people.  And even in her death, she is still helping people. There is a rumor that if you make a wish on her grave, and your wish comes true, you owe her a present. I, admittedly, made a wish on her tomb, and while it took some years, that wish did come true. So I actually owe her a present the next time we're in New Orleans. I'm sure many people have heard of this famous Voodoo Priestess.

dude|CATHOLIC Podcast
Episode 201: Immaculata 1 of 3

dude|CATHOLIC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 31:27


In today's episode, Javier and Adrian host Connor who gives the background to the founding of Immaculata ministries, a ministry dedicated to honoring the Mother of our Lord in Kenya, Africa by building chapels, baptizing children, building grottos, sending kids to Catholic schools, and more. This episode will seem like a football redemption story, and a great one too; but trust me, when I say it gets even better in the upcoming episodes. Please connect with Immaculata ministries, you won't believe the fruit that is coming out of this non-profit. Find them on...Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/immaculata_ministries/& Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ImmaculataMinistries/Contact directly at: immaculataministries@gmail.comHoly Mother, Pray for us,Amen.

SBS Persian - اس بی اس فارسی
استرالیا از فروش مهمات به آفریقا سود می برد

SBS Persian - اس بی اس فارسی

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 7:43


به گزارش بخش خبری اس بی اس (SBS News) استرالیا مهمات و فناوری نظامی به کشورهای جنگ زده آفریقایی می فروشد؛ برخی از این کشورها در شمار کشورهایی هستند که «سربازان کودک» در آنها به اجبار به «جنگ» فرستاده می شوند.

Footnoting History
Ivanhoe and the Modern Middle Ages

Footnoting History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 18:32


(Lucy) How did Ivanhoe become a wildly popular school text? And what happened to the interpretation of the text when it did? Across the Anglophone world, Scott's medieval England became reified as a time and place of chivalric adventure, despite the novel's often ironic tone and often pointed social criticisms. This episode examines how Sir Walter Scott's imagined past became something very different as it was reinterpreted in popular culture, in sometimes sinister ways.    Click here for tips for Teaching with Podcasts! Or here to buy some FH Merch! We are now on Youtube with accessible captions checked by members of our team! And you can find out how to support us through our FH Patreon to help keep our content open access!

Living by Faith Podcast
Episode 48 - His Thoughts Are Not Our Thoughts

Living by Faith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 43:49


Welcome to Episode 48 of the Living by Faith Podcast - His Thoughts are Not Our Thoughts - Join ins as Apostle teaches us about assembling amongst other believers, his exciting trip to Africa and what to do during our 'waiting' period while waiting on an answer from God.

Reimagining Black Relations
#50 Domination by Majority and Minority

Reimagining Black Relations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:18


Percy Hintzen Ph.D., Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley and currently Professor of Global and Sociocultural Studies in the School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University shared his experiences and expertise of White and Black relations from the Caribbeans to Africa, Asia, Europe, and the rest of Americas. He highlighted the problems faced by indigenous Black countries, the advent of Europeanized Africans,  correlation between language and power, and the solution to the global colonized world."We consider them as foreigners, but at the same time, they were the ones who exercised control over every aspect of our lives. And it was very violent. They had the privilege of power and they exercised authority over us in a very violent way" - Percy Hintzen Ph.D.,

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Oct 15, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:17


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute and Steve Grundman of the Atlantic Council and the Grundman Advisory consultancy. Topics: — Congressional update as US borrowing limit is raised and Democrats work to forge a compromise spending package — Implications of budget deliberations and new Biden administration climate strategy on Pentagon spending — Whether allegations by former USAF software chief Nick Chaillan will drive DoD to address known cyber software and hardware vulnerabilities — Inflation impact on the Pentagon's spending power — How China's economic stumble could ripple across the global economy — Beijing's continuing provocations across the Pacific and America's allies increase their cooperation in the region and beyond — Europe's continuing shift on its view of China as Beijing's muscular stance alienates potential partners — UK investment in Africa ports to contest growing Chinese regional role — Takeaways from the Association of the United States Army's annual meeting this week and Cold War lessons from the US Army in Europe that are applicable today  — Israel's about face on the Iran nuclear deal, Israel's air strike in Syria and what's next in Afghanistan

STORIES TELLING STORIES
SPOOKTOBER 2021 ep3: "The Man in the Black Suit" by Stephen King

STORIES TELLING STORIES

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:00


One of the most recognized tales in American folklore has Mississippi roots. The story has many names, including “The Delta Legend,” “The Deal with the Devil,” and “The Deal at the Crossroads,” among others. Yet each tells a similar story that centers on a midnight meeting between a frustrated guitarist and Satan himselfScholars disagree over the origins of the Crossroads myth. Some maintain that the story originated in Africa, with Satan representing an African trickster deity such as the Dahomean Legba or Yoruba Eshu. This interpretation places the tale in a broader cultural context and elevates the musician to spiritual status. Other folklorists argue that the tale possesses many Western elements and reflects slavery's impact on African American life. Regardless of its precise origins, the myth has become most associated with early twentieth-century bluesman Robert Johnson.But take the bluesman and the Mississippi Delta out of the story, and you're left with a familiar and repeating myth that has echoed throughout modern human history… drawing its closest western parallel to the German myth about Faust… who is a highly successful man yet is dissatisfied with his life, which leads him to make a pact with the Devil at a crossroads, exchanging his soul for unlimited knowledge and worldly pleasures. The Faust legend has been the basis for many literary, artistic, cinematic, and musical works that have recycled and reinterpreted the basic story through the ages. "Faust" and the adjective "Faustian" imply sacrificing spiritual values for power, knowledge, or material gain.  But if you take another step back, you can see that all these Faustian myths share similar structure with the Theophilus legend, recorded in the 13th century, in which a saintly figure makes a bargain with the keeper of the infernal world, but is rescued from paying his debt to society through the mercy of the Blessed Virgin… which itself can be traced back to Saint Theophilus the Penitent or Theophilus of Adana, who was a cleric in the sixth century Church and is said to have made a deal with the Devil to gain an ecclesiastical position.   His story is significant as it is one of the oldest popular stories of a pact with the devil and was an inspiration for the Thelphilus legend, which inspired Faust legend… which in turn may have inspired the crossroads myth of the Mississippi Delta and cemented the legacy of one Robert Johnson.Except… this explanation of western religion says nothing about the similarities existing for centuries within the previously mentioned myths stemming from African folklore... Could it be that 6th Century historians simply appropriated this piece of African cultural heritage?  It wouldn't be the first time… or perhaps we're digging too deep and the answer is something simpler… something more… sinister… the Devil is in the details… and perhaps we've been witness to the same story, the same Satan, playing the same con on unwitting men throughout all of recorded history… This is… The Man in the Black Suit… by Stephen King...INTRODUCTION AND NARRATION BY: Eric R Hill

SBS World News Radio
Vaccine uncertainty halts pandemic progress

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 8:23


New modelling shows that Covid-19 cases in Africa are going largely undetected, because of a lack of testing.

The China in Africa Podcast
Lightning Round: Africa-France Summit, FOCAC & UK Port Deal

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:49


An often contentious leaderless summit took place last in Montepellier where African youth activists did not hold back in telling French President Emmanuel Macron what they thought needed to be done to improve ties between the two regions. Eric & Cobus look at what lessons China, the U.S., and others can take away from the heated exchanges that took place.Plus, a preview of what might be on the agenda at the upcoming Forum on China-Africa Cooperation summit that is expected to take place next month in the Senegalese capital Dakar and the guys dive into a billion port development deal led by the UK and the United Arab Emirates.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesqueJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Atheist Nomads
428 Religion in Africa

Atheist Nomads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:09


This week we have a high level view of religion in Africa, Ghana's anti-LGBT violence, Christian nationalist racism, homophobia, and transphobia, a county commissioner from my hometown saying to ask God about vaccines, and more! Dustin' off the Degree High-level view of religion in Africa News Ghana's proposed anti-LGBT law is already encouraging violent attacks NC Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson Says Transgender Rights Movement Is ‘Demonic' and ‘Full of the Antichrist Spirit' Survey: ‘Great replacement' belief correlates with Christian nationalist views Christian Conspiracists: Satan is Using Vaccines to Get Revenge via Depopulation Oregon Official: “Ask God” About Vaccines Because “You Can't Trust the Doctors” New York must allow religious exemptions to COVID-19 vaccine mandate, judge rules Dismissing Catholic abuse victims' lawsuit, ECHR rules Vatican cannot be sued in European courts Brazil's Supreme Court upholds ban on missionaries visiting uncontacted tribes, at least during the pandemic Feedback Jimmy via the website Keith Hamusute via the website Janis via the website Support This episode is brought to you by: Henry K Danielle M Pat Acks from the Humanists of Idaho SoJo Beatriz A Zoe Darryl G Arthur K Samuel C Erik from Wyoming Jennifer N Erica B Jonathan N Richard G Balázs Rebecca P And by our $1 patrons and those who want no reward. Contact information, show notes, and links to Social Media and the like can be found at https://atheistnomads.com{target=“_blank”} Theme music is provided by Sturdy Fred. Download episode

Killin' Em From The Couch
Ep. 114 - Hunting etiquette, Louis CK show, Joe Rogan coming to Nebraska

Killin' Em From The Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 146:42


The boys have a couple of call ins and a bunch of beverages. First the South Dakota Slayer Clint Hay calls in to talk hunting etiquette, up coming seasons and ice fishing.  Then American soldier Chad Lemmer calls in from Africa where he is currently serving this great nation.  

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Australia profiting from munitions sales to Africa - Австралија профитира од продажбата на муниција во Африка

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:12


Australia has been selling munitions and military technology to war-torn countries in Africa, SBS News can reveal, including those where child soldiers are still forced into combat.As the government aims to cash in on the market for military hardware, campaigners are urging it to take a closer look at some of its customers. - Австралија продава муниција и воена технологија на земји зафатени од војна во Африка, што SBS News може да открие, вклучувајќи ги и оние каде што децата војници сe уште се принудени да војуваат.Фактот што владата има за цел да заработи на пазарот за воен хардвер, кампањите ја повикуваат да ги разгледа подетално некои од своите клиенти.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #175: Is Antony Blinken Pushing Phony Diplomacy?

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:30


On COI #175, Kyle Anzalone breaks down Secretary of State Antony Blinken's meetings with the Israeli and Emirati foreign ministers. In the meeting, Blinken and Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid threatened Iran. Tehran has signaled that it is willing to return to JCPOA talks, and the threats are sure to deter Iran's openness to dialogue. Blinken suggested the US should encourage more deals like the Abraham Accords to create a pact between Israel and Palestine. However, the Abraham Accords were not peace deals, but rather US payoffs to Muslim states to end their objection to Israel's apartheid against the Palestinians.  Kyle discusses Congress considering a bill that transfers legislative war powers to the president. The proposed law would allow the president to determine if the US was to go to war with China over Taiwan. The bill is based on a false understanding of US foreign policy and military strategy.  Kyle updates US intervention in the Horn of Africa. Tigrayan forces in Ethiopia recently claimed the central government opened a new offensive. In response, the US is considering sanctions against Ethiopia. Biden has also invited the head of neighboring Kenya to the White House. President Kenyatta's visit came as the World Court decided on a major territorial dispute with Somalia, with the judges largely ruling in favor of Mogadishu. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Mongabay Newscast
Extracted, exported and forgotten: the global race for resources and the DRC

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:39


The world economy demands clean energy and cheap commodities and these are being extracted at a furious rate in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. So the DRC is benefiting from all this activity, right? Though extremely rich in natural resources, thanks to political instability plus a centuries-long legacy of commercial and colonial resource extraction, the value mainly accrues to the country's east and west, where corporations and governments benefit the most. Joining the show to discuss are Anuradha Mittal, executive director of the Oakland Institute, who describes how Western investors like university pension funds and corporations profit from oil palm plantations where human rights violations and environmental abuses are common. Then Christian-Geraud Neema Byamungu, a Congolese researcher who focuses on natural resource governance, tells us about how the growing demand for cobalt to make electric-car batteries has led to increased mining, the Chinese companies that dominate the DRC's mines, and why the contracts between those companies and the DRC are being called into question. Further reading: • ”As energy needs drive demand for minerals, forests face greater threats” • ”Pension and endowment funds linked to conflict-plagued oil palm in DRC” Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Episode artwork: palm oil production in Yalifombo village © Oskar Epelde via Oakland Institute.   Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

UN News
UN Catch-Up Dateline Geneva: Africa's COVID tracing gap, TB alert, Afghanistan and ‘The Walk'

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 16:58


In this week's show, just one in seven COVID cases is detected in Africa while deaths from another deadly disease – tuberculosis – rise for the first time in a decade, the World Health Organization tells us. An update too from Afghanistan, where the UN refugee agency is desperately worried about a lack of funds for lifesaving aid work – and plunging winter temperatures…We'll also meet the team behind The Walk, an ambitious project to raise awareness about Syrian refugees, which involves walking a huge puppet across Europe.

AP Audio Stories
Africa detecting just 1 in 7 COVID-19 cases, says WHO study

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 1:30


Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People
Episode 84: Conversation on Race and Racism With Omar L Harris

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 64:53


Omar L. Harris, former General Manager of GSK and Allergan, joins me in this conversation on race.  He has more than 20 years of experience as a global pharmaceutical executive. Omart is the founder and managing partner at Intent Consulting, a firm dedicated to improving employee experience and organizational performance. He is the author of "Leader Board: The DNA of High-Performance Teams", "The Servant Leader's Manifesto", and “Be a J.E.D.I. Leader, Not a Boss”.  Omar shares his journey to the top, the cost to him as a Black man in America, and how he came to speak out and no longer compromise his identity and his beliefs. Key topics: Omar's first experience with racism was when he was voted Prom King of his high school in Louisiana. The principal told him that he was “allowed” to be the Prom King to “snitch” on the other Black students. Harris refused, stood up to the principal, and kept his title What happened when Omar L Harris met Ku Klux Klansman David Duke while in high school How he was the only Black product manager, the only Black Director of Marketing and the only Black General Manager outside of Africa, and the only Black General Manager of a global company in the world The psychic toll of assimilation and having to whitewash himself without even realizing it Why he now feels responsible for opening the doors for other Black people How he refuses to compromise his values and will always speak out against racism and discrimination of any kind Why people who are not Black don't understand the full gravity of racism and the dangers of working while Black Why white people who call themselves allies must be willing to speak out and take a stand with friends, family, and colleagues even if parts of their lives unravel as a result How white allies can be more prepared to take action if they practice and prepare for different situations His books on leadership and how they are different than white leadership books. Why it's essential that every CEO needs to take action against racism, or they are not real leaders Check out his playlist, the TV shows he recommends, and the books he reads   Bio OMAR L HARRIS (Charlotte, NC, born in Pittsburgh, PA) is the founder of Intent Consulting and TYMPO.io (the world's first and best SaaS application for employee inclusion), a Former GM (GSK and Allergan), Business and Servant Leadership Thought-Leader, Speaker, Award-Winning Bestselling Author of 5 books, including "Be a J.E.D.I. Leader, Not a Boss: Leadership in the Era of Corporate Social Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion", June 25 2021, “The Servant Leader's Manifesto”, 2020, and “Leader Board: The DNA of High Performance Teams”, 2019). With 20+ years of global pharmaceutical executive experience building teams, Omar has worked on 4 continents (U.S., Middle East, Asia and Latin America) for Pfizer, Merck, Schering-Plough and more. As a Gallup Certified Strengths Coach, Motivational Speaker, Entrepreneur and Florida A&M University Alumni, Harris is passionate about leading teams, high-performance coaching, and inspiring the future leaders of today and tomorrow to adopt the servant leader mindset and stop toxic leadership behaviors.  Omar is also the Co-Author of “From Authors to Entrepreneurs F.A.T.E.: The Personal Side of Indie Publishing” (2015) and Author of “One Blood” fiction book (2011, pen name, Qwantu Amaru – currently being developed into a television series). Harris was a featured speaker at the 2021 International Institute of Leadership Conference with his compelling topic: “The End of the Boss – 7 Rules for the Modern Leader”, a keynote speaker at the Leadership Harrisburg Area Graduation event, a featured speaker at the 2021 Rising Leaders Summit, a featured speaker at the BB21 Rise Conference, and a featured coach at the 11th annual WBECS Summit. His work has been featured by CNN HLN Weekend Express, WPXI-TV NBC Pittsburgh, Black News Channel, The Jewish Journal, The Beating Alpha Podcast, The Living Corporate Podcast, Real Leaders, SHRM Blog, Thrive Global, CEO World Magazine, Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast, VoiceAmerica Business, Culture Stew and many more. As fun facts, Omar speaks 5 languages, plays 7 instruments, and started his first company at the age of 7. https://www.omarlharris.com/

UN News
News in Brief 14 October 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:43


COVID-19 caused rise in TB deaths for first time in a decade  Africa's COVID-19 diagnosis gap; just 1 in 7 infections detected  Mali maestro's message of peace to Sahel region's youngsters drawn to extremism  

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
New Facility, New Grain Exports

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:02


Port Milwaukee and The DeLong Company's new $35-million agricultural maritime export facility will be one of the first on the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Seaway system to handle Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles. DDGs are an animal feed supplement derived as a byproduct of ethanol high in nutrients. Future service at the facility will also include the export of Wisconsin-grown soybeans, corn and grain. DeLong Company Vice President Bo DeLong says the facility will open export opportunities to places like Europe, Africa and the Middle East. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Take as Directed
Dr. Leana Wen: “The End of the Pandemic is in Sight”

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:38


Dr. Leana Wen joined us this week to explore her personal history and its revelations, laid out in remarkably candid detail in her newly released memoir, Lifelines: A Doctor's Journey in the Fight for Public Health.  And to speak to the most pressing current challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Her childhood struggles, as a young immigrant Chinese girl living amid insecurity, taught powerful lessons about poverty, race, and health. Her tenure as Health Commissioner in Baltimore, operating in close partnership with the late Congressman Elijah Cummings, opened the way to confront opioid addiction, stigma, maternal and infant mortality, and the acute vulnerabilities of youth. In her new life in the print and cable mediascape, she follows the advice of former Senator Barbara Mikulski: “do what you are best at – and needed for.” The Biden administration needs to up its game with the public: “It's not enough just to get the science right.” It is about values, communication, and public trust. America's hardened polarization -- surrounding vaccines, masking, and distancing -- is too advanced to fix: it is best to focus on engaging individual by individual. Listen to learn more.  Dr. Leana Wen is an emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University. She is a contributing columnist at the Washington Post and a CNN medical analyst. She's served as Baltimore's Health Commissioner.  

Face the Truth
Episode 115: Passing the Torch feat. Bishop Riggen

Face the Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:24


Bishop Riggen recounts the miraculous story of how A2Z Missions began. The truth is marching on in the Southern parts of Africa.

Afropop Worldwide
The Black History Of The Banjo

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:00


We trace the history of this most American of instruments from its ancestors in West Africa through the Caribbean and American South and into the present, as a new generation of Black women artists reclaim the banjo as their own. Rhiannon Giddens, Bassekou Kouyate, Bela Fleck and more talk claw-hammers, trad jazz, Appalachian folk, African ancestors and the on-going story of American music, which would be woefully incomplete without a Black history of the banjo. Produced by Ben Richmond

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Cloudwatch with Ewere Diagboya

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:21


About EwereCloud, DevOps Engineer, Blogger and AuthorLinks: Infrastructure Monitoring with Amazon CloudWatch: https://www.amazon.com/Infrastructure-Monitoring-Amazon-CloudWatch-infrastructure-ebook/dp/B08YS2PYKJ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ewere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/nimboya Medium: https://medium.com/@nimboya My Cloud Series: https://mycloudseries.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I periodically make observations that monitoring cloud resources has changed somewhat since I first got started in the world of monitoring. My experience goes back to the original Call of Duty. That's right: Nagios.When you set instances up, it would theoretically tell you when they were unreachable or certain thresholds didn't work. It was janky but it kind of worked, and that was sort of the best we have. The world has progressed as cloud has become more complicated, as technologies have become more sophisticated, and here today to talk about this is the first AWS Hero from Africa and author of a brand new book, Ewere Diagboya. Thank you for joining me.Ewere: Thanks for the opportunity.Corey: So, you recently published a book on CloudWatch. To my understanding, it is the first such book that goes in-depth with not just how to wind up using it, but how to contextualize it as well. How did it come to be, I guess is my first question?Ewere: Yes, thanks a lot, Corey. The name of the book is Infrastructure Monitoring with Amazon CloudWatch, and the book came to be from the concept of looking at the ecosystem of AWS cloud computing and we saw that a lot of the things around cloud—I mostly talked about—most of this is [unintelligible 00:01:49] compute part of AWS, which is EC2, the containers, and all that, you find books on all those topics. They are all proliferated all over the internet, you know, and videos and all that.But there is a core behind each of these services that no one actually talks about and amplifies, which is the monitoring part, which helps you to understand what is going on with the system. I mean, knowing what is going on with the system helps you to understand failures, helps you to predict issues, helps you to also envisage when a failure is going to happen so that you can remedy it and also [unintelligible 00:02:19], and in some cases, even give you a historical view of the system to help you understand how a system has behaved over a period of time.Corey: One of the articles that I put out that first really put me on AWS's radar, for better or worse, was something that I was commissioned to write for Linux Journal, back when that was a print publication. And I accidentally wound up getting the cover of it with my article, “CloudWatch is of the devil, but I must use it.” And it was a painful problem that people generally found resonated with them because no one felt they really understood CloudWatch; it was incredibly expensive; it didn't really seem like it was at all intuitive, or that there was any good way to opt out of it, it was just simply there, and if you were going to be monitoring your system in a cloud environment—which of course you should be—it was just sort of the cost of doing business that you then have to pay for a third-party tool to wind up using the CloudWatch metrics that it was gathering, and it was just expensive and unpleasant all around. Now, a lot of the criticisms I put about CloudWatch's limitations in those days, about four years ago, have largely been resolved or at least mitigated in different ways. But is CloudWatch still crappy, I guess, is my question?Ewere: Um, yeah. So, at the moment, I think, like you said, CloudWatch has really evolved over time. I personally also had that issue with CloudWatch when I started using CloudWatch; I had the challenge of usability, I had the challenge of proper integration, and I will talk about my first experience with CloudWatch here. So, when I started my infrastructure work, one of the things I was doing a lot was EC2, basically. I mean, everyone always starts with EC2 at the first time.And then we had a downtime. And then my CTO says, “Okay, [Ewere 00:04:00], check what's going on.” And I'm like, “How do I check?” [laugh]. I mean, I had no idea of what to do.And he says, “Okay, there's a tool called CloudWatch. You should be able to monitor.” And I'm like, “Okay.” I dive into CloudWatch, and boom, I'm confused again. And you look at the console, you see, it shows you certain metrics, and yet [people 00:04:18] don't understand what CPU metric talks about, what does network bandwidth talks about?And here I am trying to dig, and dig, and dig deeper, and I still don't get [laugh] a sense of what is actually going on. But what I needed to find out was, I mean, what was wrong with the memory of the system, so I delved into trying to install the CloudWatch agent, get metrics and all that. But the truth of the matter was that I couldn't really solve my problem very well, but I had [unintelligible 00:04:43] of knowing that I don't have memory out of the box; it's something that has to set up differently. And trust me, after then I didn't touch CloudWatch [laugh] again. Because, like you said, it was a problem, it was a bit difficult to work with.But fast forward a couple of years later, I could actually see someone use CloudWatch for a lot of beautiful stuff, you know? It creates beautiful dashboards, creates some very well-aggregated metrics. And also with the aggregated alarms that CloudWatch comes with, [unintelligible 00:05:12] easy for you to avoid what to call incident fatigue. And then also, the dashboards. I mean, there are so many dashboards that simplified to work with, and it makes it easy and straightforward to configure.So, the bootstrapping and the changes and the improvements on CloudWatch over time has made CloudWatch a go-to tool, and most especially the integration with containers and Kubernetes. I mean, CloudWatch is one of the easiest tools to integrate with EKS, Kubernetes, or other container services that run in AWS; it's just, more or less, one or two lines of setup, and here you go with a lot of beautiful, interesting, and insightful metrics that you will not get out of the box, and if you look at other monitoring tools, it takes a lot of time for you to set up, for you to configure, for you to consistently maintain and to give you those consistent metrics you need to know what's going on with your system from time to time.Corey: The problem I always ran into was that the traditional tools that I was used to using in data centers worked pretty well because you didn't have a whole lot of variability on an hour-to-hour basis. Sure, when you installed new servers or brought up new virtual machines, you had to update the monitoring system. But then you started getting into this world of ephemerality with auto-scaling originally, and later containers, and—God help us all—Lambda now, where it becomes this very strange back-and-forth story of, you need to be able to build something that, I guess, is responsive to that. And there's no good way to get access to some of the things that CloudWatch provides, just because we didn't have access into AWS's systems the way that they do. The inverse, though, is that they don't have access into things running inside of the hypervisor; a classic example has always been memory: memory usage is an example of something that hasn't been able to be displayed traditionally without installing some sort of agent inside of it. Is that still the case? Are there better ways of addressing those things now?Ewere: So, that's still the case, I mean, for EC2 instances. So before, now, we had an agent called a CloudWatch agent. Now, there's a new agent called Unified Cloudwatch Agent which is, I mean, a top-notch from CloudWatch agent. So, at the moment, basically, that's what happens on the EC2 layer. But the good thing is when you're working with containers, or more or less Kubernetes kind of applications or systems, everything comes out of the box.So, with containers, we're talking about a [laugh] lot of moving parts. The container themselves with their own CPU, memory, disk, all the metrics, and then the nodes—or the EC2 instance of the virtual machines running behind them—also having their own unique metrics. So, within the container world, these things are just a click of a button. Everything happens at the same time as a single entity, but within the EC2 instance and ecosystem, you still find this there, although the setup process has been a bit easier and much faster. But in the container world, that problem has totally been eliminated.Corey: When you take a look at someone who's just starting to get a glimmer of awareness around what CloudWatch is and how to contextualize it, what are the most common mistakes people make early on?Ewere: I also talked about this in my book, and one of the mistakes people make in terms of CloudWatch, and monitoring in generalities: “What am I trying to figure out?” [laugh]. If you don't have that answer clearly stated, you're going to run into a lot of problems. You need to answer that question of, “What am I trying to figure out?” I mean, monitoring is so broad, monitoring is so large that if you do not have the answer to that question, you're going to get yourself into a lot of trouble, you're going to get yourself into a lot of confusion, and like I said, if you don't understand what you're trying to figure out in the first place, then you're going to get a lot of data, you're going to get a lot of information, and that can get you confused.And I also talked about what I call alarm fatigues or incident fatigues. This happens when you configure so many alarms, so many metrics, and you're getting a lot of alarms hitting and notification services—whether it's Slack, whether it's an email—and it causes fatigue. What happens here is the person who should know what is going on with the system gets a ton of messages and in that scenario can miss something very important because there's so many messages coming in, so many integrations coming in. So, you should be able to optimize appropriately, to be able to, like you said, conceptualize what you're trying to figure out, what problems are you trying to solve? Most times you really don't figure this out for a start, but there are certain bare minimums you need to know about, and that's part of what I talked about in the book.One of the things that I highlighted in the book when I talked about monitoring of different layers is, when you're talking about monitoring of infrastructure, say compute services, such as virtual machines, or EC2 instances, the certain baseline and metrics you need to take note of that are core to the reliability, the scalability, and the efficiency of your system. And if you focus on these things, you can have a baseline starting point before you start going deeper into things like observability and knowing what's going on entirely with your system. So, baseline understanding of—baseline metrics, and baseline of what you need to check in terms of different kinds of services you're trying to monitor is your starting point. And the mistake people make is that they don't have a baseline. So, we do not have a baseline; they just install a monitoring tool, configure a CloudWatch, and they don't know the problem they're trying to solve [laugh] and that can lead to a lot of confusion.Corey: So, what inspired you from, I guess, kicking the tires on CloudWatch—the way that we all do—and being frustrated and confused by it, all the way to the other side of writing a book on it? What was it that got you to that point? Were you an expert on CloudWatch before you started writing the book, or was it, “Well, by the time this book is done, I will certainly know [laugh] more about the service than I did when I started.”Ewere: Yeah, I think it's a double-edged sword. [laugh]. So, it's a combination of the things you just said. So, first of all, I have experienced with other monitoring tools; I have love for reliability and scalability of a system. I started Kubernetes at some of the early times Kubernetes came out, when it was very difficult to deploy, when it was very difficult to set up.Because I'm looking at how I can make systems a little bit more efficient, a little bit more reliable than having to handle a lot of things like auto-scaling, having to go through the process of understanding how to scale. I mean, that's a school of its own that you need to prepare yourself for. So, first of all, I have a love for making sure systems are reliable and efficient, and second of all, I also want to make sure that I know what is going on with my system per time, as much as possible. The level of visibility of a system gives you the level of control and understanding of what your system is doing per time. So, those two things are very core to me.And then thirdly, I had a plan of a streak of books I want to write based on AWS, and just like monitoring is something that is just new. I mean, if you go to the package website, this is the first book on infrastructure monitoring AWS with CloudWatch; it's not a very common topic to talk about. And I have other topics in my head, and I really want to talk about things like networking, and other topics that you really need to go deep inside to be able to appreciate the value of what you see in there with all those scenarios because in this book, every chapter, I created a scenario of what a real-life monitoring system or what you need to do looks like. So, being that I have those premonitions, I know that whenever it came to, you know, to share with the world what I know in monitoring, what I've learned in monitoring, I took a [unintelligible 00:12:26]. And then secondly, as this opportunity for me to start telling the world about the things I learned, and then I also learned while writing the book because there are certain topics in the book that I'm not so much of an expert in things, like big data and all that.I had to also learn; I had to take some time to do more research, to do more understanding. So, I use CloudWatch, okay? I'm kind of good in CloudWatch, and also, I also had to do more learning to be able to disseminate this information. And also, hopefully, X-Ray some parts of monitoring and different services that people do not really pay so much attention into.Corey: What do you find that is still the most, I guess, confusing to you as you take a look across the ecosystem of the entire CloudWatch space? I mean, every time I play with it, I take a look, and I get lost in, “Oh, they have contributor analyses, and logs, and metrics.” And it's confusing, and every time I wind up, I guess, spiraling out of control. What do you find that, after all of this, is a lot easier for you, and what do you find that's a lot more understandable?Ewere: I'm still going to go back to the containers part. I'm sorry, I'm in love containers. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's fair. Containers are very popular. Everyone loves them. I'm just basically anti-container based upon no better reason than I'm just stubborn and bloody-minded most of the time.Ewere: [laugh]. So, pretty much like I said, I kind of had experience with other monitoring tools. Trust me, if you want to configure proper container monitoring for other tools, trust me, it's going to take you at least a week or two to get it properly, from the dashboards, to the login configurations, to the piping of the data to the proper storage engine. These are things I talked about in the book because I took monitoring from the ground up. I mean, if you've never done monitoring before, when you take my book, you will understand the basic principles of monitoring.And [funny 00:14:15], you know, monitoring has some big data process, like an ETL process: extraction, transformation, and writing of data into an analytic system. So, first of all, you have to battle that. You have to talk about the availability of your storage engine. What are you using? An Elasticsearch? Are you using an InfluxDB? Where do you want to store your data? And then you have to answer the question of how do I visualize the data? What method do I realize this data? What kind of dashboards do I want to use? What methods of representation do I need to represent this data so that it makes sense to whoever I'm sharing this data with. Because in monitoring, you definitely have to share data with either yourself or with someone else, so the way you present the data needs to make sense. I've seen graphs that do not make sense. So, it requires some level of skill. Like I said, I've [unintelligible 00:15:01] where I spent a week or two having to set up dashboards. And then after setting up the dashboard, someone was like, “I don't understand, and we just need, like, two.” And I'm like, “Really?” [laugh]. You know? Because you spend so much time. And secondly, you discover that repeatability of that process is a problem. Because some of these tools are click and drag; some of them don't have JSON configuration. Some do, some don't. So, you discover that scalability of this kind of system becomes a problem. You can't repeat the dashboards: if you make a change to the system, you need to go back to your dashboard, you need to make some changes, you need to update your login, too, you need to make some changes across the layer. So, all these things is a lot of overhead [laugh] that you can cut off when you use things like Container Insights in CloudWatch—which is a feature of CloudWatch. So, for me, that's a part that you can really, really suck out so much juice from in a very short time, quickly and very efficiently. On the flip side, when you talk about monitoring for big data services, and monitoring for a little bit of serverless, there might be a little steepness in the flow of the learning curve there because if you do not have a good foundation in serverless, when you get into [laugh] Lambda Insights in CloudWatch, trust me, you're going to be put off by that; you're going to get a little bit confused. And then there's also multifunction insights at the moment. So, you need to have some very good, solid foundation in some of those topics before you can get in there and understand some of the data and the metrics that CloudWatch is presenting to you. And then lastly, things like big data, too, there are things that monitoring is still being properly fleshed out. Which I think that in the coming months and years to come, they will become more proper and they will become more presentable than they are at the moment.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The problem I've always had with dashboards is it seems like managers always want them—“More dashboards, more dashboards”—then you check the usage statistics of who's actually been viewing the dashboards and the answer is, no one since you demoed it to the execs eight months ago. But they always claim to want more. How do you square that?I guess, slicing between what people asked for and what they actually use.Ewere: [laugh]. So yeah, one of the interesting things about dashboards in terms of most especially infrastructure monitoring, is the dashboards people really want is a revenue dashboards. Trust me, that's what they want to see; they want to see the money going up, up, up, [laugh] you know? So, when it comes to—Corey: Oh, yes. Up and to the right, then everyone's happy. But CloudWatch tends to give you just very, very granular, low-level metrics of thing—it's hard to turn that into something executives care about.Ewere: Yeah, what people really care about. But my own take on that is, the dashboards are actually for you and your team to watch, to know what's going on from time to time. But what is key is setting up events across very specific and sensitive data. For example, when any kind of sensitive data is flowing across your system and you need to check that out, then you tie a metric to that, and in turn alarm to it. That is actually the most important thing for anybody.I mean, for the dashboards, it's just for you and your team, like I said, for your personal consumption. “Oh, I can see all the RDS connections are getting too high, we need to upgrade.” Oh, we can see that all, the memory, there was a memory spike in the last two hours. I know that's for you and your team to consume; not for the executive team. But what is really good is being able to do things like aggregate data that you can share.I think that is what the executive team would love to see. When you go back to the core principles of DevOps in terms of the DevOps Handbook, you see things like a mean time to recover, and change failure rate, and all that. The most interesting thing is that all these metrics can be measured only by monitoring. You cannot change failure rates if you don't have a monitoring system that tells you when there was a failure. You cannot know your release frequency when you don't have a metric that measures number of deployments you have and is audited in a particular metric or a particular aggregator system.So, we discovered that the four major things you measure in DevOps are all tied back to monitoring and metrics, at minimum, to understand your system from time to time. So, what the executive team actually needs is to get a summary of what's going on. And one of the things I usually do for almost any company I work for is to share some kind of uptime system with them. And that's where CloudWatch Synthetics Canary come in. So, Synthetic Canary is a service that helps you calculate that helps you check for uptime of the system.So, it's a very simple service. It does a ping, but it is so efficient, and it is so powerful. How is it powerful? It does a ping to a system and it gets a feedback. Now, if the status code of your service, it's not 200 or not 300, it considers it downtime.Now, when you aggregate this data within a period of time, say a month or two, you can actually use that data to calculate the uptime of your system. And that uptime [unintelligible 00:19:50] is something you can actually share to your customers and say, “Okay, we have an SLA of 99.9%. We have an SLA of 99.8%.” That data should not be doctored data; it should not be a data you just cook out of your head; it should be based on your system that you have used, worked with, monitored over a period of time so that the information you share with your customers are genuine, they are truthful, and they are something that they can also see for themselves.Hence companies are using [unintelligible 00:20:19] like status page to know what's going on from time to time whenever there is an incident and report back to their customers. So, these are things that executives will be more interested in than just dashboards, [laugh] dashboards, and more dashboards. So, it's more or less not about what they really ask for, but what you know and what you believe you are going to draw value from. I mean, an executive in a meeting with a client and says, “Hey, we got a system that has 99.9% uptime.”He opens the dashboard or he opens the uptime system and say, “You see our uptime? For the past three months, this has been our metric.” Boom. [snaps fingers]. That's it. That's value, instantly. I'm not showing [laugh] the clients and point of graphs, you know? “Can you explain the memory metric?” That's not going to pass the message, send the message forward.Corey: Since your book came out, I believe, if not, certainly by the time it was finished being written and it was in review phase, they came out with Managed Prometheus and Managed Grafana. It looks almost like they're almost trying to do a completely separate standalone monitoring stack of AWS tooling. Is that a misunderstanding of what the tools look like, or is there something to that?Ewere: Yeah. So, I mean by the time those announced at re:Invent, I'm like, “Oh, snap.” I almost told my publisher, “You know what? We need to add three more chapters.” [laugh]. But unfortunately, we're still in review, in preview.I mean, as a Hero, I kind of have some privilege to be able to—a request for that, but I'm like, okay, I think it's going to change the narrative of what the book is talking about. I think I'm going to pause on that and make sure this finishes with the [unintelligible 00:21:52], and then maybe a second edition, I can always attach that. But hey, I think there's trying to be a galvanization between Prometheus, Grafana, and what CloudWatch stands for. Because at the moment, I think it's currently on pre-release, it's not fully GA at the moment, so you can actually use it. So, if you go to Container Insights, you can see that you can still get how Prometheus and Grafana is presenting the data.So, it's more or less a different view of what you're trying to see. It's trying to give you another perspective of how your data is presented. So, you're going to have CloudWatch: it's going to have CloudWatch dashboards, it's going to have CloudWatch metrics, but hey, this different tools, Prometheus, Grafana, and all that, they all have their unique ways of presenting the data. And part of the reason I believe AWS has Prometheus and Grafana there is, I mean, Prometheus is a huge cloud-native open-source monitoring, presentation, analytics tool; it packs a lot of heat, and a lot of people are so used to it. Everybody like, “Why can't I have Prometheus in CloudWatch?”I mean—so instead of CloudWatch just being a simple monitoring tool, [unintelligible 00:22:54] CloudWatch has become an ecosystem of monitoring tool. So, we got—we're not going to see cloud [unintelligible 00:23:00], or just [unintelligible 00:23:00] log, analytics, metrics, dashboards, no. We're going to see it as an ecosystem where we can plug in other services, and then integrate and work together to give us better performance options, and also different perspectives to the data that is being collected.Corey: What do you think is next, as you take a look across the ecosystem, as far as how people are thinking about monitoring and observability in a cloud context? What are they missing? Where's the next evolution lead?Ewere: Yeah, I think the biggest problem with monitoring, which is part of the introduction part of the book, where I talked about the basic types of monitoring—which is proactive and reactive monitoring—is how do we make sure we know before things happen? [laugh]. And one of the things that can help with that is machine learning. There is a small ecosystem that is not so popular at the moment, which talks about how we can do a lot of machine learning in DevOps monitoring observability. And that means looking at historic data and being able to predict on the basic level.Looking at history, [then are 00:24:06] being able to predict. At the moment, there are very few tools that have models running at the back of the data being collected for monitoring and metrics, which could actually revolutionize monitoring and observability as we see it right now. I mean, even the topic of observability is still new at the moment. It's still very integrated. Observability just came into Cloud, I think, like, two years ago, so it's still being matured.But one thing that has been missing is seeing the value AI can bring into monitoring. I mean, this much [unintelligible 00:24:40] practically tell us, “Hey, by 9 p.m. I'm going to go down. I think your CPU or memory is going down. I think I'm line 14 of your code [laugh] is a problem causing the bug. Please, you need to fix it by 2 p.m. so that by 6 p.m., things can run perfectly.” That is going to revolutionize monitoring. That's going to revolutionize observability and bring a whole new level to how we understand and monitor the systems.Corey: I hope you're right. If you take a look right now, I guess, the schism between monitoring and observability—which I consider to be hipster monitoring, but they get mad when I say that—is there a difference? Is it just new phrasing to describe the same concepts, or is there something really new here?Ewere: In my book, I said, monitoring is looking at it from the outside in, observability is looking at it from the inside out. So, what monitoring does not see under, basically, observability sees. So, they are children of the same mom. That's how I put it. One actually needs the other and both of them cannot be separated from each other.What we've been working with is just understanding the system from the surface. When there's an issue, we go to the aggregated results that come out of the issue. Very basic example: you're in a Java application, and we all know Java is very memory intensive, on the very basic layer. And there's a memory issue. Most times, infrastructure is the first hit with the resultant of that.But the problem is not the infrastructure, it's maybe the code. Maybe garbage collection was not well managed; maybe they have a lot of variables in the code that is not used, and they're just filling up unnecessary memory locations; maybe there's a loop that's not properly managed and properly optimized; maybe there's a resource on objects that has been initialized that has not been closed, which will cause a heap in the memory. So, those are the things observability can help you track. Those are the things that we can help you see. Because observability runs from within the system and send metrics out, while basic monitoring is about understanding what is going on on the surface of the system: memory, CPU, pushing out logs to know what's going on and all that.So, on the basic level, observability helps gives you, kind of, a deeper insight into what monitoring is actually telling you. It's just like the result of what happened. I mean, we are told that the symptoms of COVID is coughing, sneezing, and all that. That's monitoring. [laugh].But before we know that you actually have COVID, we need to go for a test, and that's observability. Telling us what is causing the sneezing, what is causing the coughing, what is causing the nausea, all the symptoms that come out of what monitoring is saying. Monitoring is saying, “You have a cough, you have a runny nose, you're sneezing.” That is monitoring. Observability says, “There is a COVID virus in the bloodstream. We need to fix it.” So, that's how both of them act.Corey: I think that is probably the most concise and clear definition I've ever gotten on the topic. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you view about these things—and of course, if they want to buy your book, we will include a link to that in the [show notes 00:27:40]—where can they find you?Ewere: I'm on LinkedIn; I'm very active on LinkedIn, and I also shared the LinkedIn link. I'm very active on Twitter, too. I tweet once in a while, but definitely, when you send me a message on Twitter, I'm also going to be very active.I also write blogs on Medium, I write a couple of blogs on Medium, and that was part of why AWS recognized me as a Hero because I talk a lot about different services, I help with comparing services for you so you can choose better. I also talk about setting basic concepts, too; if you just want to get your foot wet into some stuff and you need something very summarized, not AWS documentation per se, something that you can just look at and know what you need to do with the service, I talk about them also in my blogs. So yeah, those are the two basic places I'm in: LinkedIn and Twitter.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:28:27]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Ewere: Thanks a lot.Corey: Ewere Diagboya, head of cloud at My Cloud Series. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment telling me how many more dashboards you would like me to build that you will never look at.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

New Books Network
Cecelia Lynch, "Interpreting International Politics" (Routledge, 2014)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:58


Interpreting International Politics (Routledge, 2014) is a short and lively account of how international relations was founded and developed as an interpretivist discipline, and why it matters that it was. Its author, Cecelia Lynch, joins this episode of New Books in Interpretive Political and Social Science to discuss the interplay between interpretivist philosophies and realist, critical and feminist traditions in studies of international politics; the epistemological stakes for IR scholars embarking on new projects; and, the book's location at a nexus between substantive questions, conceptual articulations, and ethical reflections about the role of the researcher in the study of international politics. Rather than a guide for how to interpret international politics and relations, this is a book that encourages researchers who feel a kinship or have an aesthetic inclination towards interpretive methods to identify and work with the rich materials that their discipline offers for robust and trustworthy interpretive social science. This episode is the fourth featuring books in the Routledge Series on Interpretive Methods. The others are Interviewing in Social Science Research (Fujii), Elucidating Social Science Concepts (Schaffer), and Interpretive Research Design (Schwartz-Shea and Yanow). Listeners to this episode might be interested to check out the Critical Investigations into Humanitarianism in Africa blog, which Cecelia Lynch co-edits. To download or stream episodes in this series, please subscribe to our host channel: New Books in Political Science. Nick Cheesman is a fellow in the Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University, and a committee member of the Interpretive Methodologies and Methods group and convenor of the Interpretation, Method, Critique network. He co-hosts the New Books in Southeast Asian Studies channel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Cecelia Lynch, "Interpreting International Politics" (Routledge, 2014)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:58


Interpreting International Politics (Routledge, 2014) is a short and lively account of how international relations was founded and developed as an interpretivist discipline, and why it matters that it was. Its author, Cecelia Lynch, joins this episode of New Books in Interpretive Political and Social Science to discuss the interplay between interpretivist philosophies and realist, critical and feminist traditions in studies of international politics; the epistemological stakes for IR scholars embarking on new projects; and, the book's location at a nexus between substantive questions, conceptual articulations, and ethical reflections about the role of the researcher in the study of international politics. Rather than a guide for how to interpret international politics and relations, this is a book that encourages researchers who feel a kinship or have an aesthetic inclination towards interpretive methods to identify and work with the rich materials that their discipline offers for robust and trustworthy interpretive social science. This episode is the fourth featuring books in the Routledge Series on Interpretive Methods. The others are Interviewing in Social Science Research (Fujii), Elucidating Social Science Concepts (Schaffer), and Interpretive Research Design (Schwartz-Shea and Yanow). Listeners to this episode might be interested to check out the Critical Investigations into Humanitarianism in Africa blog, which Cecelia Lynch co-edits. To download or stream episodes in this series, please subscribe to our host channel: New Books in Political Science. Nick Cheesman is a fellow in the Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University, and a committee member of the Interpretive Methodologies and Methods group and convenor of the Interpretation, Method, Critique network. He co-hosts the New Books in Southeast Asian Studies channel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Earth Wise
Global Light Pollution

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 2:00


Light pollution is excessive or obtrusive artificial light. It's a consequence of industrial civilization.  Too much artificial light can cause a host of problems, including disrupting ecosystems, causing adverse health effects, and wasting energy.  According to a new study led by researchers from the University of Exeter in the U.K., global light pollution has increased […]

Push Talks
Push 15 SPECIAL: National Women's Small Business Month! Breaking Barriers

Push Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:06


Welcome to Push Talks Podcast! We went over our 15 mins of motivational messaging this month due to National Women's Small Business Month! Its worth it!! Join us this week as we welcome Assistant Commission Anisa Hajimumin: Many African diaspora have taken the leap and returned to their homeland to be an advocate for a better change. After being appointed as a minister, Anisa made her way back to Somalia despite the barriers in her position that was typically a male-dominated role. She faced many challenges but did not give up because of her foresight to help the future generations of her homeland. Join me this Friday as I welcome Anisa to share her story and help encourage breaking barriers in political participation and that the sky's the limit for women! To find out more about Push Talks Podcast and your Push Strategist, visit:Push Strategist WebsiteFind Anisa on twitter at @Anisa_Hajimumin Follow Push Talks Podcast for past episodes and follow your Push Strategist Ose Sesay to help you push towards your purpose! InstagramFacebookYouTubeLinkedInPssss...Don't get to take a moment and write us a review on Apple Podcast and subscribe to our YouTube Channel (Push Talks Podcast).Did you miss our Pep Rally in 2020? We are planning stages for late 2021! Sign up for Push Insiders group so you receive all the details on our website!© 2021 Push Strategist LLC. All rights reserved. Music by ℗  2021 Jerne Music Group. All rights reserved

Health Check
Henrietta Lacks Legacy

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:41


Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 from a virulent cervical cancer. A sample of those cancer cells was taken at the time and the way they behave has changed medical science forever – contributing to everything from the polio vaccine to drugs for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. As the WHO give a posthumous award Claudia discusses how the Henrietta Lacks legacy raises issues of global health equity. Plus with a Malaria Vaccine given a historic green light by the WHO to protect children in Africa, what are the distribution difficulties in countries which carry the greatest burden of disease? And what’s behind the low rate of Covid-19 vaccinations in Taiwan? We hear from one resident about why she’s chosen to have a home-grown Medigen vaccine which hasn’t yet completed all its clinical trials – and another who wants to wait for an alternative. Scientists say that trials about to start in Paraguay should show whether it stimulates enough immunity to protect people in the way the AstraZeneca vaccine does. Presenter: Claudia Hammond Producer: Erika Wright (Picture: Henrietta Lacks, after whom HeLa cells are named, standing outside her home in Baltimore, USA. Photo credit: Getty Images.)

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Dashed Dreams: The Tokyo Olympics, Sex Testing and Biology

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 65:53


Leading up to the recent Tokyo Olympics. athletes Annet Negesa of Uganda and Maximila Imali of Kenya both had their Olympic dreams crushed because of rules set by the track and field global governing body, World Athletics. They are just two—of many—elite women athletes who have been told their natural testosterone levels, if not lowered through medication or surgery, disqualify them from competition at the highest levels of sport. Join us for an in-depth conversation about intersex biology and the history of sex testing in women's athletics ahead of the Tokyo Olympics. About the Speaker In February 2021, Eliza Anyangwe became the editor of As Equals, CNN's ongoing gender inequality project. She began her career working for nongovernmental organizations Action Against Hunger and then the Pesticide Action Network, where she was Organic Cotton Officer, but has spent more than a decade in media, working for The Guardian, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, and most recently The Correspondent, where she was managing editor. The Guardian Opinion series she commissioned and wrote for, a "Week in Africa," was longlisted for a One World Media award. In 2016, Eliza founded The Nzinga Effect, a media project focused on telling the stories of African and Afro-descendant women, and delivered that work through partnerships with organizations such as The Serpentine Galleries and The British Council. In 2018 she was awarded a development reporting grant by the European Journalism Centre to tell stories about the African women breaking taboos and carving out space to talk about sex and sexuality.  Eliza has written for The Independent, Financial Times, Al Jazeera and Open Democracy; has appeared on broadcast programs, including "Newsnight," "BBC World Service," PRI's "The World," and the podcast "Our Body Politic"; and has spoken at events, among them SXSW, D&AD Festival, The Google News Initiative Summit, the International Journalism Festival, Africa Utopia, The Web We Want Festival and the Next Einstein Forum. Eliza is a contributing author to Africa's Media Image in the 21st Century, published by Routledge. SPEAKERS Eliza Anyangwe Journalist; Editor, As Equals, CNN Gender Inequality Project; Twitter @elizatalks; Instagram @Elizatookthis Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Twitter @msmichellemeow—Co-Host John Zipperer Producer and Host, Week to Week Political Roundtable; Vice President of Media & Editorial, The Commonwealth Club—Co-Host In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 4th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

theAnalysis.news
The Agribusiness Alliance for a Green Revolution Failed Africa

theAnalysis.news

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:26


Research by Tim Wise (GDAE-Tufts University) is conclusive and fully resonates with claims by Africa's biggest grassroots movement, the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa: the corporate capture of food systems should be rejected. Donors and government funding must shift to agroecology. This is an interview hosted by Lynn Fries of GPEnewsdocs.

Trend Lines
In Afghanistan and Beyond, Qatar Flexes Its Diplomatic Muscle

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:45


With its rich natural gas reserves and strategic location, the Gulf monarchy of Qatar has long played an important role in regional and global diplomacy that belies its small size. It has mediated or facilitated a number of sensitive negotiations, including the talks that led to the peace agreement the United States signed in February 2020 with the Taliban. Since then, and even after the Taliban overthrew the internationally backed government in Kabul this summer, officials in Doha have continued to exercise influence in Afghanistan. Qatar's diplomatic efforts have not always been smooth sailing, however. For more than three years, it had to weather a blockade that was imposed on the country by a group of countries led by neighboring Saudi Arabia and the UAE, fellow members of the Gulf Cooperation Council. That embargo was only lifted in January of this year. Today on Trend Lines, Annelle Sheline, a research fellow in the Middle East program at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft, joins WPR's Elliot Waldman to discuss the unique role that Qatar plays in the Middle East and in the broader Islamic world, as well as the complicated dynamics in the region that it must navigate as it does so. If you would like to request a full transcript of the episode, please send an email to podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com. Relevant Articles on WPR:  Long-Delayed Elections Will Be a Key Test for Qatar—and the Gulf   After the Qatar Boycott, Can the GCC Come Together?   As Qatar Readies for the 2022 World Cup, Migrant Workers Continue to Die   Saudi Arabia's Economic Ambitions Could Fuel Gulf Rivalries Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

The Critical Hour
The Resurgence of Coups and Imperialist Intervention in Africa

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:58


Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss Africa. Dr. Horne analyzes the resurgence of coups and imperialist intervention in Africa. Recent events may show that the US empire and the French imperialists are on the move again in the resource-rich continent.

234 Essential
Empathy

234 Essential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 99:04


Episode shownotes: Prices of food have skyrocketed(7:47), debtors should pay their loans(20:20), and it's intrusive to call customers on social media apps(50:40). Big Brother Naija was boring(59:51), Gulder Ultimate Search should have chosen a better representative for the show(1:06:29). Sex tape etiquette (1:13:42).For fan mail: fanmail@234essential.comFor ads: info@visualaudiotimes.comSubscribe for Newsletter: https://bit.ly/234newsletter234 Essential on Twitter234 Essential on Instagram

Green Light with Chris Long
Keyshawn Johnson On Jon Gruden's Resignation. MNF Recap. MMA Fighter Justin Wren On Fighting, Podcasting & Living In The Congo.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 99:51


(1:41) - Hello, Layup Line, eBay Opportunities and Runaway Dogs. (11:14) - MNF Recap, Lamar's Excellence, MVP Talk and Carson Wentz Can't Catch a Break. (19:57) - Chris and Dr. Fax Talk Jon Gruden's Emails and Impact on Raiders and the NFL. (37:03) - Keyshawn Johnson Talks Gruden's Resignation, Personal History with Gruden, Outlook for Raiders and Keyshawn's Book "The Forgotten First: Kenny Washington, Woody Strode, Marion Motley, Bill Willis, and the Breaking of the NFL Color Barrier." (1:00:34) - Justin Wren on MMA Career, Living in the Congo Among the Mbuti Pygmy Tribe, Climbing Kilimanjaro, Providing Clean Water in Africa and Starting a Podcast. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. http://bit.ly/chalknetwork Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Integrative Cancer Solutions with Dr. Karlfeldt
A Singer With Throat Cancer Finding Options with Buddy Hyatt

Integrative Cancer Solutions with Dr. Karlfeldt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:54


Today on Integrative Cancer Solutions I am joined by Buddy Hyatt.  Buddy Hyatt is a former member of TOTO the rock group from the 80's with such hits as Rosanna, Hold the Line, Africa. He's worked with Lee Greenwood, Randy Travis, Mickey Gilley, Lynn Anderson, Jessica Andrews, JoDee Messina, Tracey Lawrence, and many others. Buddy has been recording in Nashville on music row for 30 years as a session piano player, producer, and songwriter. So you can imagine how devastated he was when he was diagnosed with Throat cancer.  His initial doctor was dead set on doing a treatment for his throat that could have ultimately left him without a voice box.  A musician without a voice box was unacceptable for Buddy so he began his search to find alternatives.Buddy was told he had 4 years to live and so he has been determined to actually live for each of those years and truly love every minute of it. Cancer is probably one of the most dreadful words in the dictionary. Yet almost 50 % of us have been or will be faced with the diagnosis. Suddenly you are faced with sifting through a mountain of information to figure out how to survive this dreadful disease for the sake of yourself, your children and grandchildren. Many have decided against the orthodox treatment as the only option, because you've seen friends and family members who contracted cancer and followed their doctor's recommendations, only to die within a year or two suffering the devastating effects of chemo and supposedly pinpointed radiation.Integrative Cancer Solutions was created to instill hope and empowerment. Other people have been where you are right now and have already done the research for you. Listen to their stories and journeys and apply what they learned to achieve similar outcomes as they have, cancer remission and an even more fullness of life than before the diagnosis. Guests will discuss what therapies, supplements, and practitioners they relied on to beat cancer. Once diagnosed, time is of the essence. This podcast will dramatically reduce your learning curve as you search for your own solution to cancer. For more information about products and services discussed in this podcast, please visit www.integrativecancersolutions.com. To learn more about the cutting-edge integrative cancer therapies Dr. Karlfeldt offer at his center, please visit www.TheKarlfeldtCenter.com.

Duck Season Somewhere
A Thriving South Africa Game Management Industry

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 63:28


Most of South Africa can be described similarly to parts of South Texas: sprawling, brush-covered properties teaming with game animals managed under endless miles of high-fence. While watching a sporty dove and rock pigeon shoot, professional game manager Weynand De Jager describes the arduous undertakings required in reconciling herd numbers with habitat availability, and an enormous industry of supplying venison and game animal by-products worldwide. What do game managers like Weynand do? What's cull hunting, how's it differ from sport hunting, how's it implemented and by whom? Why does Ramsey claim he might have "found his calling if this GetDucks thing doesn't work out"? How heavily is this industry regulated, how quickly are game processed, meat wagons filled? What becomes of all that meat,  what animal parts are used? How important is game farming to wildlife conservation in South Africa?  Chalk this one up to really cool stuff learned on long drives between hunts, took me way out of my feather-covered wheelhouse and was too good not to share.   Related Topics: GetDucks South Africa Duck Hunting Combo   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com   Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy GunDog Outdoors Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys GetDucks USHuntList   It's really duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com

What Am I Doing Here? with Mike Reiss
Episode 31: KILIMANJARO! PART 2

What Am I Doing Here? with Mike Reiss

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 13:53


Mountain climbing, whitewater rafting and other stupid dangerous things.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

upside
[614 Startups] Sam Baddoo of Fleri

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:20


On this episode, Elio interviews Sam Baddoo, Founder of Fleri. Fleri helps immigrants protect the people who matter most back home with health insurance. Every year immigrants in the Diaspora send billions of dollars to Africa oftentimes to pay for healthcare. Without direct insight into how the funds are being spent and whether adequate treatment is being provided, immigrants are left to worry about whether the money they are sending will contribute to their loved ones wellbeing.Fleri is changing that by allowing immigrants to purchase health insurance for the loved ones creating a win-win-win-win situation for the policyholder, patient, doctors and insurance companies. First, the policyholder knows that they are providing access to high-quality healthcare for their loved one and they can see what treatments have been received. Next, the patient has access to vetted physicians and receives care in clinically sound facilities. The doctors are able to treat patients with the ability to pay thereby providing capital for infrastructure investment and finally, insurance companies have the premiums to build robust networks and offer more affordable plan options.Fleri is building a commercial solution to what has been an intractable problem in the developing world by creating a robust healthcare insurance ecosystem with incentives for all stakeholders.Subscribe to 614 StartupsFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

5 Minutes in Church History with Stephen Nichols
Church History Makers with Ken Mbugua

5 Minutes in Church History with Stephen Nichols

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:00


By God's grace, biblical preaching and theological book publishing are on the rise in the African continent. On this episode of 5 Minutes in Church History, Rev. Ken Mbugua joins Dr. Stephen Nichols to share why he is hopeful about the future of the church in Africa. Read the transcript: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/church-history-makers-with-ken-mbugua/ A donor-supported outreach of Ligonier Ministries. Donate: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/donate/

Sheppard Mullin's Nota Bene
Africa Q4 Check In: The Emergence of Africa's Competition Regimes and Public Interest Merger Conditions in South Africa with Primerio's Andreas Stargard

Sheppard Mullin's Nota Bene

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:40


We catch up with our African expert Andreas Stargard of Primerio  on our fourth quarter geopolitical check in.  We learn the latest on the antitrust law in South Africa and how the public interest standard contributes to the marketplace, including updates on Kenya, COMESA and Competition Authority of Kenya, and recent anti-corruption efforts and the broader economic developments in the marketplace. A co-founding senior member of Primerio, a business advisory firm helping companies do business within Africa from a global perspective, Andreas Stargard is legal, strategic, and business advisor to companies and individuals across the globe. He focuses on antitrust and competition advice, white-collar counseling, contract dispute and negotiation, and resolution of global business disputes, including cartel work, corruption allegations and internal investigations, intellectual property, and distribution matters.  Andreas also advises clients on corporate compliance programs that conform to local as well as global government standards, and has handled key strategic merger-notification questions, including evaluation of filing requirements, avoidance strategies, cross-jurisdictional cooperation, and the like. What We Discussed in This Episode: What's happened in Q3 and what's on the horizon for Q4 for African businesses? What impact will the Burger King case decision have on the African antitrust markets and public interest regimes? How has the public interest standard been viewed in other countries? What's the latest with Kenya and COMESA and what does it mean for broader economic development in the continent? What are recent anti-corruption efforts throughout the African markets and how do foreign investors affect that? What other unpredictable impacts has COVID-19 had on the global economy? Contact Information: Africa Antitrust & Competition News and Analysis blog  Primerio website Andreas's bio 

The China in Africa Podcast
China's Role in Zambia's Unfolding Debt Crisis

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:27


Zambia owes at least 18 Chinese creditors $6.6 billion, nearly twice as much as previously stated, according to a new report published by the China-Africa Research Initiative (CARI) at Johns Hopkins University. And that figure may be even higher as it doesn't account for penalties accrued by various Zambian borrowers who've fallen behind in their payments.While these latest findings confirm Zambia indeed has a very serious Chinese debt problem, the CARI report, however, details why the situation there is actually very different from that of other African countries that are also struggling to repay Chinese loans.The report's two authors, CARI Director Deborah Brautigam and Senior Research Assistant Yinxuan Wang join Eric & Cobus from Washington to discuss their findings and explain why Zambia is an outlier when it comes to Chinese debt in Africa.SHOW NOTES:China-Africa Research Initiative: How Zambia and China Co-Created a Debt "Tragedy of the Commons" by Deborah BrautigamChina-Africa Research Initiative: Zambia's Chinese Debt in the Pandemic Era by Deborah Brautigam and Yinxuan WangJOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque JOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectYour support of this podcast helps to keep the show on the air. Thank you!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Africa Daily
Is Africa's space age ready for blast off?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:31


South Africa launched the continent's first satellite in 1999. Since then, African countries have launched more than 40 more into orbit. And over the next five years, there are plans to triple that number. So, why is there such a scramble to put satellites in space? And how will they benefit people back on Earth? Host: Karnie Sharp (@KarnieSharp) Guest: Pontsho Maruping #AfricaDaily

Unbroken: Healing Through Storytelling
60: Trapped By the System with Allister Frost

Unbroken: Healing Through Storytelling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:03


Allister Frost has worked in IT all of his life and started his first business at 17 years old.  He is currently working with a few start-ups and mentoring their founders.He has worked for many corporates both as a contractor and employee, most recently at Microsoft. He is proud to have worked with a talented team designing m-pesa, which is a successful micro finance platform used by millions (mainly in Africa) and considers this to be one of his greatest contributions so farOn the show we discuss being misdiagnosed with bipolar and schizophrenia and was detained in a mental health facility and the impact that had on him.It was something I knew little about, but he says cases of misdiagnosis are common. Often leading to life changing conditions such as PTSD for those trapped, forcibly drugged, threatened, assaulted by those responsible for their care and their inactions, often due to the many complex pressures of the job imposed by those at the highest levels Some key points from our interview:·        How he realises that he had a choice in how he reacted to what happened to him and chose to stay positive·        How he was arrested under the mental health act by the Police who considered he was a risk to himself due to misinformation ·        How the more he spoke up about being misdiagnosed they thought that his paranoia feelings were actually part of his condition, and he was delusional·        How he's passionate about sharing his story to help others despite being warned not to do so Connect with Allister on LinkedIn www.qbain.com And you can read more about the campaigns about misdiagnosis here www.NHSLives.comwww.StatutoryInquiry.com

The News Junkie
100 Tacos

The News Junkie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 153:04


TUESDAY 10/12/21: Jon Gruden resigns as an NFL coach after offensive e-mails surface. Shawn is invited to Africa, but is not sure he wants to endure the flight length. Smash Mouth's lead singer announces his retirement after video of a cringe performance gets attention. A woman on TikTok reveals her worst first date.

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast
120. Leaving the Cult of Wokeness | Africa Brooke

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 70:08


This episode was sponsored by Super Speciosa Kratom. Go to https://superspeciosa.com/mp enter the code MP for 20% off. In this episode, Mikhaila hosts Dr. Jordan B. Peterson and Africa Brooke. Africa shares her experience with writing her viral article. She offers some insight on how to be conscious of one's actions and finding their authentic voice. In addition to discussing wokeness, they also delve into politics in connection to religion, in-group preference, and accepting other perspectives. Check out how Africa was influenced by Dr. Peterson in this episode. Africa Brooke is a London-based Consultant and Mindset Coach that wrote a letter entitled: "Why I'm leaving the cult of wokeness", which has been read by over four million people. Africa aims to help people restore their dignity and define their values and boundaries as entrepreneurs or any individuals who require a mindset rewire. If you enjoyed this, be sure to subscribe! Why I'm Leaving the Cult of Wokeness - https://ckarchive.com/b/d0ueh0h67mpd Find more Africa Brooke on her website: https://AfricaBrooke.com/ Follow her Instagram account: https://Instagram.com/AfricaBrooke ———————————— Follow Me On ———————————— Audio - https://linktr.ee/mikhailapeterson Twitter - https://twitter.com/MikhailaAleksis Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/mikhailapeterson Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/mikhailapetersonpodcast Lion Diet - https://linktr.ee/liondiet Telegram - https://t.me/mikhailapeterson ———————————— Show Notes ———————————— [0:00] Intro [03:16] "Why I am leaving the cult of wokeness.", an excerpt from a viral article read by Mikhaila. [04:19] Africa Brooke's background. [06:15] The start of Africa's letter and its impact. [07:10] Africa's beliefs before writing this letter. [09:28] How Africa realized her actual values. [16:15] Africa's experience and reaction with people doubting her. [22:51] What drove Africa Brooke to write the letter. [25:20] Suggestions on switching directions when you know your decision is wrong. [27:43] The idea that all white people are racist and in-group preference. [35:25] When politics becomes a religion. [39:17] Listening to different people's views. [40:41] How Africa reflected on her voice. [48:20] When Africa started listening to Dr. Peterson. [51:26] Dr. Peterson and Marvel Comics. [53:03] Africa's personal consequences post-viral letter. [59:24] The acknowledgment of the positive responses from her letter. [01:05:23] Wrap Up. Find Africa Brook on Instagram @AfricaBrooke and on her website AfricaBrooke.com #MikhailaPeterson #AfricaBrooke #JordanPeterson #Wokeness #Racism

KEXP Song of the Day
Susana Baca - Sorongo

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:46


Susana Baca - "Sorongo" from the 2021 album Palabras Urgentes on Real World Records. Singer, musicologist, writer, three-time Latin Grammy winner, and a former Minister of Culture in her native Peru, Susana Baca has been a treasure to the Peruvian people for five decades now. A champion of the revival of Afro-Peruvian music, Baca's latest album “Palabras Urgentes,” is an enthralling 10 song set that pays homage to the heritage and tradition of those that once fought for a better world and features production by Snarky Puppy's Michael League.  The record's lead single and our Song of the Day, “Sorongo,” is Baca's take on a song by salsa composer Tite Curet Alonso. Alonso was a prolific writer, originally from Puerto Rico, who penned more than 2,000 songs in a thirty year career and “Sorongo” was first released by his friend Rafael Cortijo Y Su Bonche in the late 1960s. More recently the song was recorded by Calle 13 (who also collaborated with Susana Baca on the Latin Grammy-winning song “Latinoamerica.”) “Within ‘Sorongo', one can find intuition, strength, feeling and enunciation,” says Baca of the song. “I spent many nights trying to find the right way of singing ‘Sorongo'… in the end it is only with the presence of the musicians that accompanied me that it found vitality. I am sure that Sorongo' is faith found at the crossroad between feelings and rhythm.” Michael League added: “Sorongo is a very interesting track because of its history with Calle 13 and because it's a powerhouse track on a record that doesn't really have powerhouse tracks. This is like a freight train and stands apart from the rest of the record in that way but Susana was really, really adamant about feeling Africa in Sorongo, so we made a lot of really interesting decisions during the recording process about textures and sounds and structure to make you feel the connection between the sugar fields in Peru and the African roots of the people who were enslaved and working them.” Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
4921 BEING GOOD SUUUCKS! Freedomain Call In

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 137:44


www.freedomain.comHi Stefan,This is the most difficult message I have ever had to write, but after being a listener of yours for 4 years now I finally have to accept that there is both continuity and a cause to the endless failures that seem to shape my life thus far. I have an ACE score of 7, although I do believe that special consideration should be given to the context of the abuse, in my case this would surely increase my score.Violence, incest, abandonment, neglect, torture and betrayal are all major themes in my family history. Each time I listen to a freedomain call-in show a light is shone on to either a suppressed or repressed memory of mine, and it becomes increasingly clear that I am actively, perhaps subconsciously refusing to succeed in life. Most importantly, I am beginning to understand why no one has ever intervened to stop my self destruction, and even more terrifying is that their existence depends on my destruction.I am a British born West African male in my early 30s. I am tall, handsome, intelligent, charismatic, athletic and curious, but despite these gifts I have nothing of value to show for my time on this earth. I have bounced around from one addiction to another, from recreational drug use to sugar binges. I suffer from insomnia, chronic overthinking and crippling self doubt. I have never loved or been loved, but most disturbing to me is that I have never been loving to myself. I have dropped out of university twice, college three times, and procrastination has been my only consistent friend. After many years of inaction I am now afraid to dream, because each failure I add to my internal resume gradually erodes my sense of self worth and efficacy.As a child I would curse God for creating me and forcing me into existence, I thought it was a sick joke that he would make me live a life of suffering. I often wished I could snap my fingers and end my own life. I had no real friends, we were discouraged from socialising outside of the immediate family, it was school, home and church.My earliest memories were of being beaten by mother with the heel of her winter boot, being abruptly sent to live with an old woman relative in west Africa, and not seeing either my mother or father for months after that, all without any explanation at all! I have never had an intimate conversation with my mother, I have no memory of ever being hugged by her, I often wonder if she could mention 2 things that I enjoy doing. I have a memory of being woken up in the middle of the night by my mother and told to scrub my body in the shower with a soap from west Africa that had been prayed on and that would remove any evil curses. I could go on and on Stefan.The true darkness of my family and childhood is buried deep, and even to think about it is to risk too much. The perpetrators and victims have families of their own now and this is why I haven't contacted you before today. I feel as though I am trapped in a cult of secrecy and shame. I truly believe that the victims in my family are quietly and politely dying inside as we look at each other for permission to cry out! But of course , there will never be permission. I am frozen in time, frozen by shame, frozen by fear, Frozen. Help Please Stefan.I am currently studying for a master's degree so I can be available at anytime of day and on any day of the week.My questions is, why haven't I been able to start a life of my own? And what must I do to escape the gravity of the past?Thank you Stefan.