Podcasts about Africa

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  • 26,152PODCASTS
  • 77,178EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 29, 2022LATEST
Africa

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    Best podcasts about Africa

    Show all podcasts related to africa

    Latest podcast episodes about Africa

    African Father in America
    Responsible Tourism In Africa

    African Father in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 56:25


    Travel In Africa is a weekly virtual event held every Wednesday at 11:00am PST on Clubhouse and YouTube to recruit One Vibe Experience participants and build a community of travel enthusiasts between Africa and the African Diaspora and connect them with the motherland through the One Vibe Experience, which is an opportunity for you to have a cultural exchange with the most beautiful people in the world.  Although part of the One Vibe Experience trip is “service”, we find that people come home with the feeling that “they” have been helped. Going on a trip definitely changes the way you look at the world. Africa has a way of cracking your heart wide open and often brings out your best self through connecting with others! You will have amazing fresh food from the farm to the table daily. You will experience singing, dancing, networking with other leaders, and live by the largest Lake in Africa and visit the world famous Masai Mara National Park. Sign up and you will be the first 100 to get access to One Vibe Experience customized travel packages that will be safe, slower, soulful, secluded, and sustainable. Experience Kenya in 2022 and beyond! A One Vibe Experience is the opportunity for Africans in the diaspora and people passionate about Africa to convene in Kisumu, Kenya to serve, connect and immerse themselves in the Kenyan culture. One Vibe Experience provides opportunities for you to spend time at Young Generation Centre where One Vibe Africa is based and also visit various parts of Kenya and have the opportunity to learn about Kenya as if you are a Kenyan!!  We are actively seeking participants, partners, and sponsors. If you want to join us in 2022 and 2023 please let us know through this link:  https://airtable.com/shroIq8rj3WdDrDmT #TravelGemsInAfrica #OneVibeExperience #MagicalKenya #Africa #Travel #Kenya #Kisumu #OneVibe 

    Irish Tech News Audio Articles
    UN – 71 Abuses Against Children in Warzones Daily

    Irish Tech News Audio Articles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 5:11


    Between 2005 and 2020, the United Nations have verified over 266,000 grave violations against children in war, however they say this is only a fraction of the violations believed to have occurred, says UNICEF in a new report. The verified cases have come from over 30 conflicts spanning through Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Between 2016 and 2021, the United Nations have verified an average of 71 grave violations against children daily. UNICEF's report, titled 25 years of children and armed conflict: Taking action to protect children in war, found that between 2005 and 2020, at least 104,100 children have been verified killed or maimed in war, more than 93,000 have been used as child soldiers, with at least 25,700 verified as abducted in warzones. Since 2005, there have been at least 13,900 verified attacks against schools and hospitals and over 14,900 denials of humanitarian access to children. “This report lays out in the starkest possible terms the world's failure to protect its children from grave violations during times of armed conflict,” said UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell. “Grave violations devastate children, families, and communities – and they tear at the fabric of society, making it even harder to restore and sustain peace, security, and stability. We must refuse to accept violations against children as an unavoidable outcome of war”, she added. Staggering amounts of sexual violence against children have also occurred, with at least 14,200 child victims of rape, forced marriage, and other forms of sexual exploitation. Many children suffer from more than one grave violation, abducted children and child soldiers having an increased risk of sexual violence. Girls are especially vulnerable to sexual violence and forced marriage in these contexts. The number of verified violations has jumped since 2005, surpassing 20,000 in one year for the first time in 2014 and reaching 26,425 by 2020. The increased number of conflicts in recent years, including the ongoing wars in Yemen, Afghanistan, Ukraine, and the Tigray region, have all demonstrated the extreme impact that war has on children. These violations were committed by state and non-state actors alike, with state actors responsible for at least 26% of violations, and non-state actors accounting for approximately 58%. The increase in non-state actors in conflict, along with a lack of accountability for non-stake actors, is a major concern surrounding children in warzones. Between 2005 and 2021, sustainable and concrete measures have been put in place to prevent the suffering of children in these circumstances, with 37 Action Plans signed in 17 conflict situations – 70% of those being signed by non-state actors. The ever-growing number of armed non-State actors, the development and employment of new means and methods of warfare, the use of improvised explosive devices and other explosive weapons, particularly in populated areas, are just some of the many factors contributing to the creation of unprecedented challenges for the protection of children in situations of armed conflict. The report's findings also showed those children at heightened risk of violations – children from backgrounds of poverty, refugees, and indigenous children. Boys accounted for 73% of victims of grave violations, particularly when it came to their use as child soldiers. However 98% of victims of grave sexual violence were girls. Almost 80% of all child casualties came from five conflicts, those in Afghanistan, Israel and Palestine, Syria, Yemen, and Somalia. The use of explosive weapons such as bombs or landmines were particularly dangerous to children. In 2020, explosives were responsible for at least 47% of children killed or maimed in war. Catherine Russell said: “UNICEF and our partners will not waver in our work to prevent grave violations against children. With more children affected by conflict, violence, and crises now than at any time since the Second Wor...

    The Whole Word Podcast
    [Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Mark 10 - Jesus, Marriage, Divorce and Adam and Eve

    The Whole Word Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 13:01


    Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Mark 10Divorce (v 1-12)The Little Children and Jesus (v 13-16)The Rich and the Kingdom of God (v 17-31)Jesus Predicts His Death a Third Time (v 32-34)The Request of James and John (v 35-45)Blind Bartimaeus Receives His Sight (v 46-52)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

    Moneyweb Crypto
    Botswana leads Africa in crypto regulation, but scams are swamping the system

    Moneyweb Crypto

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 21:03


    Keletso Thophego, country manager for crypto operator Yellow Card, explains how crypto scams have sucked millions of pula from citizens - one of the main reasons why the country is among the first in Africa to embrace crypto regulation.

    Simple English News Daily
    Wednesday 29th June 2022. World News. Today: Spain NATO meetings. Turkey Sweden Finland agreement. Ukraine shopping centre rescue. US Mexico

    Simple English News Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 7:52


    World News in 7 minutes. Wednesday 29th June 2022.Transcripts at send7.org/transcriptsToday: Spain NATO meetings. Turkey Sweden Finland agreement. Ukraine shopping centre rescue. US Mexico migrant deaths. Colombia riot. Peru protest. Pakistan vaccine attack.Start Up Rad.io: https://startuprad.io/Please leave a rating on Apple podcasts or Spotify.With Stephen Devincenzi and Khadija Tahir.Contact us at podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at speakpipe.com/send7If you enjoy the podcast please help to support us at send7.org/supportSEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells the most important world news stories in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories from every part of the world in slow, clear English. Whether you are an intermediate learner trying to improve your advanced, technical and business English, or if you are a native speaker who just wants to hear a summary of world news as fast as possible, join Stephen Devincenzi and Juliet Martin every morning. Transcripts can be found at send7.org/transcripts. Simple English News Daily is the perfect way to start your day, by practising your listening skills and understanding complicated stories in a simple way. It is also highly valuable for IELTS and TOEFL students. Students, teachers, and people with English as a second language, tell us that they listen to SEND7 because they can learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. We believe that the best way to improve your spoken English is to immerse yourself in real-life content, such as what our podcast provides. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. Whether it is happening in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas or Oceania, you will hear it on SEND7, and you will understand it. For more information visit send7.org/contact

    Monocle 24: Monocle on Design
    Fashion round-up

    Monocle 24: Monocle on Design

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:00


    We tour Europe for a men's fashion round-up, taking in Florence, Milan and Paris. Plus: we discuss a new book showcasing the craft cultures that have shaped fashion in Africa for centuries.

    The Best of the Money Show
    Nando's bright side to load shedding

    The Best of the Money Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 4:56


    Guest: Doug Place | Chief Marketing Officer of Nando's Africa, Middle East, and South Asia at Nando's Africa|  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Take as Directed
    Dr. Margaret Bourdeaux: “Meeting People Where They're at Is Very, Very, Very Powerful."

    Take as Directed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:12


    Dr. Margaret Bourdeaux, Research Director of the Global Public Policy and Social Change Program, Harvard School of Medicine, joins J. Stephen Morrison for Episode 142. Her mentor Dr. Paul Farmer, who recently passed, inspired her with his exhortation to “do hard things together” even when the odds are against you. Her project, the Covid Academy, is developing a locally-informed model for standardized health security outbreak investigation and response. Though the United States is deeply divided politically, Dr. Bourdeaux believes the situation is not as dire as it seems. Common sense can win. “I don't believe that Americans can't see reason on this”.

    Asylum Speakers Podcast with Jaz O'Hara: Stories of Migration
    42. THE JOURNEY Episode 2: The First 'Safe' Country

    Asylum Speakers Podcast with Jaz O'Hara: Stories of Migration

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 64:21


    Welcome back to Episode TWO of The Journey - a 6-part podcast series following migration routes from Africa, The Middle East and Ukraine, to northern Europe.People often ask me ‘Why don't refugees stay in the first safe country they land in? It's a comment I see a lot on social media and one I feel there is a lot of judgment and misinformation around. This episode is designed to answer exactly that. I'd like everyone who genuinely wonders about this question, to be able to listen to this and fully understand why a person's journey can go on to span many countries.We'll be hearing from six incredible women... both refugees and people working in the humanitarian space in countries like Turkey and Lebanon, that border Syria and other conflict zones….Our first stop in Turkey, the country which hosts the most refugees in the world. Here we visit Anne O'Rorke, an retired entrepreneur who left her home in Ireland to set up a community centre for Syrians in Turkey called Tiafi.Next up we head to Beirut where we hear from Dalal, who works for UNHCR, and my lovely friend Dara from Syrian eyes.The final stop is Egypt where you will hear from another four incredible women from Eritrea, South Sudan, Egypt and America about what life looks like for refugees here.It's a big and important episode. Remember to let me know your thoughts!To find out more about the organisations featured in this episode:https://tiafi.org/ https://www.syrianeyes.org/https://stars-egypt.org/To support this podcast:https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/thewwtjourneyTo buy our merch:https://theworldwidetribeshop.com/–Many of the people we spoke to along this journey are being supported by projects funded by Comic Relief. Thanks to donations from the UK public, Comic Relief's Across Borders programme has invested over £7 million in organisations supporting refugees and people seeking asylum along these routes. Find out more about Comic Relief's work and how to support it at comicrelief.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    WnlPodcasts – Word and Life Church
    26 June Bryan Pollen – His Loven

    WnlPodcasts – Word and Life Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    WnlPodcasts – Word and Life Church
    26 June Past. Basil Panayi – Souper Sunday – Part 1

    WnlPodcasts – Word and Life Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    https://woordenlewe.com/26-june-past-basil-panayi-souper-sunday-part-1/feed/

    WnlPodcasts – Word and Life Church
    26 Junie Past. Renald Barnard – Beter Saam – Deel 1

    WnlPodcasts – Word and Life Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
    WFS 335 - Fly Fishing in the Seychelles with Keith Rose-Innes - Bonefish, Permit, GT's

    Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 77:44


    Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/335 Presented By: FishHound Expeditions, LakeLady Custom Rods, Trxstle, Reyr Gear Sponsors: https://wetflyswing.com/sponsors Keith Rose-Innes, Director at Alphonse Fishing Company, takes us fishing in the Seychelles - one of the most sought-after fly fishing and eco-tourism destinations in the world. We discover some tips and tactics for catching giant trevally and permit - gears, flies, and setup. Keith tells us how the atolls were formed and how their habitats developed. Find out how they are being conserved and protected to keep the islands pristine, keep the species vibrant, and keep the poachers away. Keith also talks about the bar at Alphonse where everyone gathers in the evenings to share stories about their amazing day on the island, and he tells us why 80% of their guests return after a year or two. Jako Lucas, in a past episode, talked about Seychelles as one of his favorite places on earth, so today we dig more into it and find out why. Fishing in the Seychelles Show Notes with Keith Rose-Innes 05:10 - They have rainbows and brown in the streams near Johannesburg where Keith stays 06:10 - Lesotho is a country surrounded by South Africa. They've got big rivers there, big trout, and yellow fish. 06:40 - Conservationists in Africa are more focused on animals 08:30 - Keith has been going to Seychelles for 25 years and has been guiding there for about 23 years 09:30 - Keith describes how a volcano eruption formed corals that create the atolls 12:30 - Over the years, Seychelles has evolved from just fishing to an eco-tourism destination 15:00 - One of the big-draw cards in Seychelles is the Giant Trevally 17:30 - Permit numbers have gone up in the Pacific 18:50 - They got a catamaran boat called Quo Vadis 20:30 - The creation of a new fly called, Alphlexo has increased their takes on permit Photo courtesy of Alec Gerbec 23:15 - Keith uses either an 8 or 9 wt rod, not more than 10 wt line, and a 12-foot leader. 25:15 - They plan a week or 10 days ahead according to tides. Keith explains in detail. 28:30 - For pacific permit fishing, Keith uses a furled leader. He does a perfection loop on anything less than a 15-pound tippet. 30:10 - Keith talk about his tactics for fishing giant trevallies 35:30 - They use a waxed Cortland braided running line for Pacific permits 28:50 - Keith uses a Shilton Reels 39:40 - Giant trevallies swim alongside the sharks. They're one of the predators in the sea. 42:15 - For flies, they use surfers, poppers, nymphs, sempers, clausers, rush flies - they use a lot of different patterns but it's all about the size, color, and profile. Just believe in the fly. 45:20 - They started the Alphonse fishing company in September 2012 and they purchased Alphonse in August 2013. Blue Safari was launched in July 2018. 46:30 - Keith explains how they raise funds to protect the atolls in Seychelles and conserve the underwater habitats 47:50 - Keith talks about the bar at Alphonse where they gather in the evening and talk about their achievements for the day. The community there is so great that they get an 80% return rate. 51:00 - 40% of their guests come from the US 56:10 - Check out their website to learn more about the conservation programs they have going 57:30 - The best time of the year, weather-wise to come to Seychelles is October to May 59:40 - The cost per person is about 10-16k depending on the destination. Keith explains the logistics behind the price. 1:00:00 - Keith breaks down the transportation - how far and how long to get there 1:04:30 - Keith tells the story of when his boat parts got stolen which led to his old business shutting down. 1:07:30 - Jako Lucas is a regular on Seychelles. He was on the podcast at WFS 281. Keith tells the story of how they met. 1:11:20 - Keith is taking a trip to Norway this year Fishing in The Seychelles Conclusion with Keith So there you go.. Seychelles.. is the place to be. When I see pictures of the islands there, a song plays in the background.. "ooh baby do you know what that's worth? ooh heaven is a place on earth" That trip is definitely going on the bucket list. A bit pricey but totally reasonable and worth it. I should probably start saving to take my family there.. that vacation of a lifetime. Would be nice if we could get some promo rates though. Keith and the Alphonse atoll crew are doing some great stuff out there. If you want to connect with them, visit their website at alphonsefishingco.com or send them a DM on Instagram at @alphonsefishingco. Are you planning a trip this year? Where to next? Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/335

    Inside Geneva
    Drought and food insecurity

    Inside Geneva

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:19


    Millions of people are going hungry due to severe droughts in the Sahel and in East Africa. The Inside Geneva podcast looks at how the international community should help, now and in the future.Podcast host Imogen Foulkes is joined in this episode by climate and humanitarian experts.“Two boys, twins, they're one year old. They're severely malnourished, the children and the mother. And she walked 160 kilometres to reach an area where there is some food distribution,” says Rania Dagash, deputy regional director for Eastern and Southern Africa at UNICEF.Four consecutive rainy seasons have failed in the Horn of Africa. Climate experts say the next one could fail too.“We have observed decreases in rainfall over the last few years. We see a decreasing amount of rainfall from 2 to 7% per decade,” says Bob Stefanski, chief of the Agricultural Meteorology Division at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).The war in Ukraine has disrupted supply chains and sent the prices of food commodities up. Millions on the African continent, which relies heavily on imports, are on the brink of famine.“Could we imagine countries and regions actually fighting over access to water as water becomes more and more precious?” asks analyst Daniel Warner.

    Against The Odds
    Trapped on Mount Hood | Close Calls and Epic Adventures with Peter Stark | 6

    Against The Odds

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 46:19


    On this special episode, survival writer Peter Stark joins host Mike Corey for a wide-spanning conversation about adventure – why we're drawn to it and how it can push us to the edge. They'll discuss Stark's Outside Magazine article Frozen Alive, about what it feels like to succumb to hypothermia, as well as how to deal with risk in the wilderness, and exploring the blank spots on the map. They'll also swap stories about encounters with deadly mamba snakes in Africa.Listen early and ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/againsttheodds.Please support us by supporting our sponsors!Best Fiends - Download Best Fiends FREE on the Apple App Store or Google Play today.Peloton - Visit Onepeleton.com to learn about the Peloton app!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Growth Island
    #112: Patrick L. Kinney - The importance of clean air and what you can do

    Growth Island

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 38:35


    Is your air clean? Well, it depends on where you live and your personal environment. Patrick L. Kinney is here to shed some light on the topic. Patrick joined the School of Public Health faculty in January 2017 as the inaugural Beverly Brown Professor of Urban Health. He was trained as an air pollution epidemiologist at Harvard School of Public Health, and went to Boston University after two decades at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. In his time at Columbia, he showed how warming temperatures make air pollution like urban smog worse, and more harmful to populations. He led the development of an integrated modeling system to predict the air pollution health effects of climate change into the future. Working at the intersection of climate change, health, and policy, Kinney has conducted research from the South Bronx to China to rapidly growing cities throughout Africa. In this episode, we discuss:

    F&S Uncensored
    The Senator vs. The Crown

    F&S Uncensored

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 59:45


    On this week's episode, Simi and Feyikemi discuss about Burna Boy's situation, a Nigerian Senator getting arrested in the UK and Glamour Girls. They also put you on to their favourite shows and songs right now!Make sure you listen to the playlist - F&S Rotations Apple Music and Spotify, updated weekly.Send fan mail & enquiries to: contactfands@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter & Instagram

    Laser
    Psicologia in Africa

    Laser

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:35


    Technology Untangled
    World poverty: Is technology the great leveller?

    Technology Untangled

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:39


    Since 1990, the global rates of extreme poverty have gone from around 40% to around 10%, and ending World Poverty entirely by 2030 is one of the UN's Key Sustainable Development Goals, announced in 2015. However, progress is slowing, and 710 million people around the world still live in extreme poverty - currently earning below $1.90 per day. So how can technology help? In this episode, we'll be meeting some of the people and organisations aiming to eradicate poverty through the use of technology.The power of connectivityOne of the most important ways in which rural economies can grow and become more efficient and productive is to get access to communications technology. Isabelle Mauro is the Head of Information, Communications & Technology (ICT) Industries at the World Economic Forum. The WEF is the world body bringing together the public and private sectors, and has been pushing for greater co-operation between the public sector and telecoms providers to work on lifting developing communities out of hunger and poverty. The results speak for themselves: Research suggests a 10% improvement in mobile connectivity can add 1.5% to a country's GDP. The challenge is to provide a financial incentive for companies and Governments to reach out to poorer areas where the business case for connection might not be so obvious.Harnessing complex skills and technology for unconnected communitiesOne of the firms leading the charge to bring rural communities into the digital age is Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Brian Tippens is their Head of sustainability, and has been working closely with WEF and partners around the world to enable remote and disconnected communities to take advantage of HPE's experience in data and connectivity - particularly in encouraging skills sharing and industrial expertise among NGOs and other bodies. At the core of their philanthropic ambitions, however, is to allow and enable local communities to help provide their own solutions to their own problems, encouraging long-term, sustainable and useful programs of change to emerge.Getting educatedOne of the ways in which communities can be enabled to develop their own long-term solutions is through education and upskilling the population to take advantage of the opportunities offered by technology. Leading that charge is the Micro:bit Educational Foundation, which provides expandable, programmable micro-computers to schools around the world, alongside locally-led educational programs and learning resources. Gareth Stockdale is the organisations CEO and tells us that the democratisation of technology through enabling local participation is key to lifting people out of poverty, providing pathways to future skilled careers, and to enabling self-sufficiency among remote or impoverished communities. Whether it's educating children or upskilling adults to make the most of opportunities in their community and work in collaboration with international organisations, there's plenty being done to help end world poverty by 2030. Will it be enough? Time will tell. But the appetite seems to be real for long-lasting change.Key takeaways: Even small improvements to digital connectivity can have a lasting impact on local and national economic growth and resilience. Most people have the potential to get connected, and doing so can drastically improve lives in remote communities. The best way to lift the world out of poverty is through public-private partnerships which enable and upskill communities to create their own solutions and take long-term advantage of new technologies. Western organisations have a responsibility not to parachute in solutions, but to work on the ground with communities to enable them to make best use of the technology on offer, through collaboration and education. Links and resources:The UN Sustainable Development GoalsThe World Economic Forum's Edison AllianceTech Impact 2030 - How HPE is driving positive change through technologyThe micro:bit Educational FoundationThe impact of digital technology usage on economic growth in Africa - from the Elsevier Public Health Emergency CollectionBrian Tippens on LinkedInIsabelle Mauro on LinkedInGareth Stockdale on LinkedIn

    The Whole Word Podcast
    [Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Mark 09 - A Clear Description of Hell and How to Avoid It

    The Whole Word Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 13:02


    Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Mark 09The Way of the Cross (v 1)The Transfiguration (v 2-13)Jesus Heals a Boy Possessed by an Impure Spirit (v 14-29)Jesus Predicts His Death a Second Time (v 30-37)Whoever Is Not Against Us Is for Us (v 38-41)Causing to Stumble (v 42-50)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

    Magnificent Midlife
    110 The joy of adventure with Alice Morrison

    Magnificent Midlife

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 55:51


    My guest Alice Morrison is an adventurer. She's the Indiana Jones for girls. She's done so many things that would test anyone's endurance. The Marathon des Sables, the Tour d'Afrique, she was the first woman to walk the full length of the Draa River in Morocco where she lives. She's trekked through the Sahara and completed the Everest Trail Race. She's written several books, and the most recent is Walking With Nomads. If you've ever wanted to go on a big adventure, this interview is for you! We talk about: Where Alice's love of Africa and the Middle East came from Alice's childhood and how it went from great freedom to rigid structure Alice's latest book and her love of expeditions What it's like traveling as a woman in the places Alice visits How English speakers can make friends better when traveling Why Alice practices Ramadan even though she's not Muslim What it's like living in a rural community in Morocco Coping with fear and the problems of Covid when it comes to traveling What it's like for Alice now traveling as an older woman How other cultures approach aging, especially for women How Alice has become a star on TikTok How to be adventurous in midlife And more! If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, share it and leave us a 5* review on iTunes or wherever you're listening. Order the ebook or audiobook (narrated by Rachel) versions of Rachel's book, Magnificent Midlife: Transform Your Middle Years, Menopause And Beyond at magnificentmidlife.com/book The paperback can be purchased on Amazon or other online retailers: UK version  US & Canada version Australia You can listen to other episodes and get the show notes to every podcast at magnificentmidlife.com/podcast. You'll find strategies, support, and resources to help make your midlife magnificent at magnificentmidlife.com. Check out Rachel's online Revitalize Experience, a 6-week intensive small group mentoring experience or find out about 1-1 Midlife Mentoring on your schedule. You can also join our monthly online Membership which is packed full of courses and workshops to help you get the messy stuff sorted, so you can thrive not just survive in midlife and beyond. Follow Rachel on: Facebook | Instagram | Linkedin | Twitter | Pinterest | Youtube | Tiktok  Recommended by the Sunday Times and Named #17 in the best 40 Women Over 50 podcasts globally by Feedspot

    The Learning & Development Podcast
    Lean and Problem-Driven L&D Powered By Automation With Gabe Gloege

    The Learning & Development Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 46:50


    With a backdrop of cuts in the L&D team at ETS, Gabe needed to re-evaluate how he could achieve the aims of the function. By refocusing on problems experienced within the organisation rather than learning to provide and applying the principles of lean, powered by automation, he achieved more than many L&D teams do with bigger teams. But how did ETS do this?  In this episode we explore what it means to run a lean, problem-driven L&D function, incorporating digital marketing principles and automation. KEY TAKEAWAYS CoVid forced Gabe to go from being client-focused to being problem-focused. Build and leverage client communities to find the expertise and input you need. Use people´s everyday work as a curriculum for growth. It ensures training is highly relevant and current. Find evergreen problems that affect the whole organisation e.g. manager development. Newsletters and short meetups that invite people to respond to what you are doing and share their current needs uncover problems and test your effectiveness. To automate processes Gabe uses Loop and MS Power Automate etc. He shares details of how in the episode. Be clear about what is on offer, ask tough questions to focus attention and help users to determine if that piece of training is what they need. Manage expectations. Drip feeding content in 10 to 15-minute bites via email, followed by a group meeting is highly effective. BEST MOMENTS 'I had to dig into my bag of lean tactics that I had developed, over the years. We went from being client-focused to problem-focused ' 'Figure out how to optimise your product and to optimise your understanding of the need in the marketplace. ' 'Hitch a ride on your day job is all about carving time out for conscious reflection.' 'If you get people together and get them talking, they will likely come up with a great solution ' VALUABLE RESOURCES The Learning And Development Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-learning-development-podcast/id1466927523 L&D Masterclass Series: https://360learning.com/blog/ Gabe Gloege Bio Gabe is Senior Director of Learning & Organizational Development at ETC and an advocate of modern, performance-oriented approaches to people development. You can follow and contact Gabe via: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gabegloege/ Twitter handle:@gabegloege LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gabegloege/ LI article on Lean L&D: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/what-lean-ld-gabe-gloege Description of "Hitch A Ride On Your Day Job": http://guide.cultivateme.xyz/pages/developing.html#hitch-a-ride-on-your-day-job ABOUT THE HOST David James  David has been a People Development professional for more than 20 years, most notably as Director of Talent, Learning & OD for The Walt Disney Company across Europe, the Middle East & Africa.  As well as being the Chief Learning Officer at 360Learning, David is a prominent writer and speaker on topics around modern and digital L&D.  CONTACT METHOD  Twitter:  https://twitter.com/davidinlearning/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidjameslinkedin/ L&D Collective: https://360learning.com/the-l-and-d-collective/ Blog: https://360learning.com/blog/ L&D Masterclass Series: https://360learning.com/blog/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Wild Times Podcast
    TWT #97 - The Casual Geographic King, @mndiaye_97 Joins!

    The Wild Times Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 84:57


    Joining The Wild Times Pod this week is the popular social media star Mamadou Ndiaye AKA @mndiaye_97 AKA  @Casual Geographic   AKA Hood Nature. Mamadou talks to Forrest, Patrick and Retep about how Mamadou got started on his social media journey, what it's like to be "the TikTok animal guy", Mamadou's bucket list animal experiences, and his new book coming out July 5th!   Preorder @mndiaye_97 new book now: https://www.amazon.com/100-Animals-That-Can-cking/dp/0316453773   Enjoy, brosteners! TWT #97 - The Breakdown 00:00 - Introducing iNat Chat, a new segment with Drew Kanes and Dom Allianelli 00:32 - Intro 1:02 - Introducing TWT & Mamadou (Casual Geographic, @mnyiaye_97, hood nature) 2:36 - How Mamadou and Forrest first met 3:00 - Who is Mamadou Ndiaye? 3:40 - How did Mamadou get started on TikTok? 6:00 - What was Mamadou's first animal video? 7:47 - How young people consume new media 9:00 - Forrest breaks down Mamadou's content 10:22 - Is Mamadou excited to be "the animal TikTok guy"? 11:27 - What it was like going to school for Mamadou 13:22 - National Geographic's The Last Tepui  14:45 - Mamadou's bucket list animal experiences 15:40 - Africa vs. Australia  17:38 - Will Mamadou be going into the field? 18:30 - Forrest's jaguar video in the Pantanal  20:44 - How Mamadou makes his videos 21:13 - The guys pitch Mamadou their TV show ideas 26:57 - Killing off Mitch the camera guy on Extinct or Alive 28:10 - Karen the Alligator  32:18 - Mamadou's most-watched videos 33:16 - Whales Spy Hopping 35:50 - Free Willy 5 37:48 - How Mamadou deals with haters 43:00 - Forrest's son is an animal 44:50 - Mamadou's new book! 48:05 - Forrest has a death wish  49:35 - Battle Royale!!! 1:03:54 - Battle Royale Recap 1:05:19 - Mamdou's socials 1:06:13 - iNat Chat teaser 1:07:05 - Outro iNat Chat #1  1:07:37 - Intro to iNat Chat 1:08:46 - Caecilians 1:12:47 - Jumping Spider 1:18:42 - Snowy Owl 1:24:00 - Outro Leave a review on iTunes Apple Podcast: https://thewildtimespodcast.com/itune...  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wildtimespod/  Official Website: https://thewildtimespodcast.com/  Info: https://thewildtimespodcast.com/info  Merch: https://thewildtimespodcast.com/merch  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wildtimespod  

    Tore Says Show
    Mon 27 Jun: Panic Mode - Freakouts - Med Data - Guilt Fear - Labor Crimes - Branch Four - Young Blood

    Tore Says Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 129:57


    The right people are scared, which means the truth is approaching. The MSM breaks down. Massive are the challenges to real faith. Having the citizen weapons to fight fraud. Why the governors met in 2019. Data is sent worldwide from private medical sources. Controlling people easily thru fear and guilt. Thought crimes and warped minds. It's all about narrative control. AFLCIO labor power, funding of the left, and complete systemic election fraud. How did they know all that? Every electronic machine is compromised. The real shadow government and the people in charge. Anti aging tech and human harvest. Collecting, consuming, studying and profiting from tissue, fluids and vanity. The reasons for today's Africa. It's modern science with golden blood. The Roerich family contributions. Our knowledge and faith will guide us, with history's help, safely into the future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Africa Today
    Mysterious deaths at a bar in South Africa

    Africa Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 32:15


    South African police investigate the mysterious deaths of twenty two young people in a bar in the city of East London. Also, Nigeria's Zamfara state tells residents to take up arms against kidnap gangs and violent attacks, but how will it work? And after the U.S Supreme Court's decision to overturn its own landmark ruling in 'Roe v Wade', should Africa care? Plus much more in this podcast.

    The Leadership Hacker Podcast
    Beware False Tigers with Frank Forencich

    The Leadership Hacker Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 40:23


    Frank Forencich is an internationally-recognized leader in health and performance education. A Stanford University graduate in human biology and neuroscience, he has over 30 years teaching martial arts and neuro health education. Frank holds black belt in both Karate and Aikido. He's a multiple author, including the book, Beware False Tigers: Strategies and Antidotes for an Age of Stress. We can learn lot's from Frank, including: What are “False Tigers” and how to recognize them. The "primate's predicament" and "the state of the human-animal." How to notice the big stressors of our time - The real tigers? The consequences of high stress on business leaders? Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com   Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA   Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Frank below: Frank on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/frankforencich/ Frank's Books: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/507966.Frank_Forencich Frank on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ExuberantAnimal Frank on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/exuberant_animal/ Frank's Website: https://www.exuberantanimal.com     Full Transcript Below   Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   If ever you wonder what the relationship was with the animals in the Savannahs of Africa and our own emotional intelligence, you can find out today. Frank Forencich is an internationally recognized leader in health and performance education. Having studied human biology and neuroscience. He's dedicated his life to understanding the relationship we have with our brains. But before we had a chance speak with Frank, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: You'll know if you're a regular listener, there's always top tips and ideas to help you on your way. But we're going to flip that round today and look at things that we can avoid. So here are the five common mistakes that both young and experienced leaders make and how to avoid them. Number one, in properly delegating work, failing to properly delegate work is a number one, common leadership blunder, good leaders, hand out assignments, according to skills and interest. Don't assign a writing assignment to a developer and vice versa. You know, that just makes no sense, right? Another way to innovate and get results is to award certain work with those who volunteer for it. By taking a chance, you might discover unique skills from the person who least expect it. Number two, communicating poorly, feel like you're not providing enough feedback to your team. And it's time to revisit the lines of communication, make it a priority to have open communication, regardless of who it is. Reiterate this need to have weekly meetings, stress the importance of timely replies. Just as long as your team will answer, and you do the same. You can create a huge swell of energy that's positive. Overcommunication in a crisis is even more relevant, but the hack is to set out sometimes and set out some expectations of what it is you are intending to send and receive from your team. Number three, focusing too much on strategy and not enough on day-to-day tactics. Some leaders get blindsided by the alluring strategy rather than the day to day, but it's these everyday tactics require strong focus in order to arrive at your final solution in the first place. I used to call these BBCs or basic, but critical behaviors, things that you expect to see happen that are task driven and focused on outcomes. They're all people centric, and you're able to connect the dots to your strategy, but those daily basic routines help you on your longer journey. Number four, failing to balance a hands-off approach with micromanaging. Many leaders are either two hands off or they over manage. The optimum solution is to find the balance between the two and to help you get there, accountability and empowerment are the two triggers. Get your accountability and empowerment imbalance you create more leaders and high performance. Number five. Forgetting to teach, train, motivate, and reward. Ongoing training and learning and development is not only vital for the individual, but for the entire company. There are thousands of online seminars for pretty much any discipline, especially in things like digital, many are free. And for those that aren't, you might be able to pay them through relationships. Doesn't have to be a direct cost. And of course, the biggest learning comes from doing. The experiences you have that naturally occur across your organization. Sometimes helping people recognize that actually that is exactly what's happening. They are learning is part of that process. Next is motivation. Now you've pretty much worked out I would imagine that you can't actually motivate anybody, but you can create the right environment for those to be motivated in whether it be a senior group of people or junior staff. It's more important that you find those good old-fashioned things that are really important to them. Understanding their internal and intrinsic motivations will really help you connect the dots and the purpose of the work that they do. The things that make them tick. And it's a mistake, but many leaders just don't even ask, what is it that motivates you? And lastly, reward, if an employee excels, provides more bonuses, small gestures of thanks, doesn't have to be huge amounts of bonuses, but again, linked to intrinsic motivation can make a world of difference. And of course, it'll be different for everyone, but find out, ask a question, how do you like to be rewarded? And you'll also get some great data that you can rely on as a leader. Leadership mishap and blunder are an inevitability. We're going to do it. The most important thing is to learn from those blunders along the way. So as leaders, we can truly be in the service of our teams. That's been The Leadership Hacker News. And thank you to Rebecca, one of our listeners who encourage us to look at this from a different lens to flip the context and to look at this as a lesson learned activity, let's dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Frank Forencich is a special guest on today's show. He's an internationally recognized leader in health and performance education. He's a Stanford University graduate in human biology and neuroscience. As over 30 years, teaching martial arts and experience around health and education. Frank holds black belt in both karate and aikido and his many research trips across the world, including Africa, has helped him really get into and study the human origins and ancestral environment. And that's where he got his inspiration from his new book, Beware False Tigers: Strategies and Anecdotes for an Age of Stress. Frank, welcome to The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Frank Forencich: Delighted to be here. Steve Rush: So, I'm really intrigued at how you can get two black belts and two martial arts, as well as all of the experience you pull together. Frank Forencich: [Laugh]. Steve Rush: And written many books, Frank. So, I can't wait to get into the journey. Perhaps for our audience. You could just give us a little bit of the backstory as to how you've arrived to do what you do today? Frank Forencich: Right, well, I first became interested in the martial arts in my early twenties. And this was when I was an undergraduate at Stanford and I was studying human biology and I was fascinated with physicality and with movement. And I thought that there was something there that was very important. And as an educational experience, the martial art was just fantastic for me. It was a time to feel really focused. And I had a lot of really fantastic teachers. And at the same time, I had a professor in human biology who said, if you really want to understand the human animal, you have to go to Africa and study our history. And so, I took him up on that and little by little, all these various pieces started to come together. And later on, I studied athletic training and massage therapy and it's been a really exciting journey to look at the human body where it came from and how it functions. So, I've, been exceptionally lucky in this to have all these opportunities to do. Steve Rush: And many scholars that kind of walk in your path almost have gone to Africa into the Savannahs and have used that as a backdrop to really understand human behavior, as well as animal behavior, haven't they? Frank Forencich: Right, and I think it's so essential that we are involved in this because the modern world is kind of an illusion. We tend to believe that the world has always been the way it is now, and we've kind of parachuted into the modern world. But in fact, we have a history, and that history is deep and important. Steve Rush: And that history I suspect that you talk about is where we had no distractions. We were kind of in our original settings and that's how we were programmed physiologically to behave, right? Frank Forencich: Right, you can study the stuff directly. But I think for people who haven't studied it is to have a look at the movie. The Gods Must Be Crazy. And you might remember that one where, the first half of the movie, actually the first 20 minutes of the movie, they look at the lives of the Kalahari Bushman in South Africa. And they compare that to the modern, urban people living in Africa. And they really show the mismatch between our original experience and what we experience today. Steve Rush: So, some of our folk will be familiar with that fight or flight freeze and appease that comes with that physiological response to an environment. But the irony is, that what was created through our evolution to protect us and service in times of danger and need, actually, we now trigger for this, you know, being late for work or I'm behind on a Zoom meeting or something like that, right? Frank Forencich: Right, and that's sort of the irony. We've created a world, a modern world with a lot of comforts, but at the same time, we've created a lot of new and unique threats to our bodies and our lives and things like computer viruses and phishing attacks and all of these fine print sort of things didn't exist until recently. So now we have, you might say new tigers in camp. Steve Rush: Yeah, so hence the title of the book, right. Beware of False Tigers. Frank Forencich: Yes. Steve Rush: So, what was it that compelled you to write the book and tell us a little bit about it? Frank Forencich: Right, well, this goes back to my experience in massage school, because of course there was a lot of talk about stress and reducing stress. And the more I looked at that, the more I started to realize this is a major, major theme for the modern world. It's not just feeling a little bit anxious, or it's not just a threat to your own personal longevity or health. This is something that afflicts the entire human population now in a way that's historically unprecedented. Steve Rush: Right. Frank Forencich: So, this is a major theme for all of us. Steve Rush: Yeah, you call these tigers. How do you recognize tigers? Frank Forencich: [Laugh], well, we recognize them through the limbic system of our brain and our autonomic nervous system. And this is something that happens oftentimes below conscious radar. And we experience a feeling, a threat to our personal welfare. And then we get to try and interpret what that is. You know, the voice of stress is not always that articulate. And we may feel a threat to the organism, a threat to our welfare. And then we get to try and decode what that feeling is all about. So, it's an exercise in learning the world and an exercise in learning who we are. Steve Rush: And the whole notion of them being false tigers is, we're probably releasing the tigers unnecessarily? Frank Forencich: Right. Steve Rush: Would that be a kind of fair take on things? Frank Forencich: Right, it's always about perception. So, if you have an event in your life and you interpret it as a tiger, but maybe it's really not an actual threat to your life, then you're turning on your fight flight system. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: Unnecessarily, and if you only do that, occasionally, if you get it wrong, occasionally that's no big deal, but if you get it wrong consistently over the course of months and years, then that's going to degrade your health, but not just your health, but your cognition and your ability to function in the world. So, it has huge ripple effects across your entire life. Steve Rush: The one thing that struck me when I started reading your book, Frank is, why don't they teach us in high school? And why don't they teach us in, you know, kindergarten and junior and primary schools? Frank Forencich: Oh yeah. That's a big pet pave of mine because this is something that's so important to our ability to function. And yet we mostly ignore it. And the way I pitch this, I say, for the human animal, we have to have an understanding of what's dangerous in the world. And in the paleo, this was always obvious because everybody, even little children in your tribe, in your camp, would've known that carnivores and predators are dangerous and that wildfires are dangerous and fast flowing rivers are dangerous. That sort of thing, and danger, would've been palpable and easy to understand, but now we have all these new threats, and we don't educate for that. It's unlikely that any of your listeners have ever taken a course called what is dangerous. Steve Rush: That's right, yeah. Frank Forencich: But we should be doing that. And that would help us sort out genuine dangers from false dangers. And that would seem to be a fundamental part of human education now. Steve Rush: Yeah, I agree with you. So, within the book, you talk about a couple of things I'd love to unpick them with you. One of which is prime makes predicament. Frank Forencich: Yes. Steve Rush: Tell us about that? Steve Rush: Yes, what is the state of the human animal right now? And then there's of course controversy about all of this. But from my point of view, we are under such a high level of stress. A total stress burden that we're carrying around with us means that we have a population level predicament here. And some of the numbers are staggering. There's like 1 billion people in the world now who have in mental health problems.1 billion people in the world are living with chronic pain. That's like one out of eight. So those are huge red flags that the human animal is having trouble adapting to the modern world. And this gets back to mismatch this idea that we have. These ancient bodies trying to make a go of it in the modern world. Some people do pretty well with that mismatch. And some people adapt easily, but an enormous percentage of people are struggling with that challenge. And by and large, we aren't taking it seriously. Steve Rush: What's the root cause to that mismatch. Do you think? Frank Forencich: Well, it's kind of a byproduct of our intense creativity. We are really good at devising innovations and short-term solutions and the world becomes progressively more complicated ever since the industrial revolution. We've had this just escalating series of innovations that the human animal hasn't really had time to adapt to. All of this innovation has happened in the blink of an eye and boom. Now all of a sudden, we're in this new world. Steve Rush: Yeah, and if we kind of fast forward to, you know, the next 10 years. Thinking about the real stresses of our lives and our times and the real tigers, how do we kind of figure out what's real to us versus what we are fooling ourselves as false tigers? Frank Forencich: Right, well, I think the number one thing that we have to be doing right now is listening to the science and especially climate science that is without question, the alpha tiger on the planet right now, that is the biggest threat to human welfare, human civilization and our ability to have any kind of a future. So that is the tiger that we have to be working with right now. Steve Rush: Yeah, definitely. And it's, I guess you could call it a real tiger because we've got the evidence that comes with that. Frank Forencich: Yeah. Steve Rush: So much like in the paleo, we could see the, you know, the burning forest. We could see the rapids in the water. We can actually see that happening around us now. So, I guess it helps us make that awareness that it is a real tiger. How do you convince those who are maybe less aware that it is real? Frank Forencich: Oh, that's a great question. And what I'm seeing is a lot of frustration in the climate community among climate scientists who are saying, we need to convince people that this is real. There's a lot of frustration there. A breakaway group of climate scientists now have become activists. And they're saying the conventional channels really aren't working. So, I'm not sure what it is. I think it's going to take some shocks to the system that are going to make this obvious to more people. But right now, it's an uphill battle. Steve Rush: You used the word that I just want to explore, which is activist and activism. And I know that's something that you've been really passionate about, but people also get confused with the word, don't they? Because they see it as something that's aggressive and it's contrary. And actually, you have a very different spin on it. I wonder if you could just share that? Frank Forencich: [Laugh], right. Well, the book I'm currently writing is about activism from a martial arts perspective. Steve Rush: Okay. Frank Forencich: The idea here is that we are immersed in a world where their conflict is inevitable. And once again, we don't have much training for that at all. Our educational systems basically ignore that fact of conflict and we don't teach young people how to deal with that. So that's why there's so much angst, I think in people who are trying to make a difference, we basically don't know how. We don't know whether to be hard or soft in our various styles, whether to be linear or circular in the way we approach conflict. So, there's a lot of work to be done there, but I think activism is essential. There's plenty of research to show. It actually improves the quality of our health. When we act on things that we find meaningful, then the body tends to do better. Steve Rush: That's really interesting perspective too, isn't it? Frank Forencich: Mm-Hmm. Steve Rush: And it is that act on something that you're really passionate about, which kind of underpins that whole activism bit, I guess, that what you see in the press and on the TV of activists is usually the far end of, the extreme ends of where people have already been triggered and are probably overplaying that, right? Frank Forencich: Right, yes. And it's easy to focus on the spectacular acts of activism, but there's a lot of invisible activisms that's going on as well. And it may not be spectacular, but there's a lot of work that people are doing currently that is very important and may not be as dramatic. So, we need to keep that in mind as well. Steve Rush: Now, for many of the folk listening to this show, they'll be either leading teams or businesses or even leading themselves. And therefore, from their perspective, what do you see as the certain consequences of them not getting hold of this in terms of their managing their stress and their energy? Frank Forencich: Right, well, there's a whole list of consequences that come when people are under chronic stress. And one of the most interesting for me is called reversion to the familiar. And we all know this in our own personal lives, because if you're having a hard day, what do you want to do? You want to go home and sit in your living room, a place that's familiar to you and you want to read the same books you've always read. You want to watch the same movies that you've always seen. You want to eat the same foods. You want to go back to the familiar and for people who are leading teams, this is also important because maybe you need new ideas. Maybe you need creativity going forward to come up with solutions to the problems you're facing, but the stress, it inclines people to revert to what they already know. And that makes sense, and it's fine in moderation. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: The dose makes the poison here. So, if you go home at the end of a hard day and you revert to the familiar, that's good for you. But if you, do it all the time, you're never going to make any progress. Steve Rush: Ironically, it could even make the stress worse in the future because the gap between the intention and the act gets bigger, right? Frank Forencich: Right, exactly. And that's what we're seeing in the world of climate and ecosystem. Collapse is, that as the stress escalates, people are going to just double down on what they already know, and that's going to make solutions even more difficult to arrive at. Steve Rush: There is a notion too, isn't there. That stress is actually not a bad thing if you get the dose, right? Frank Forencich: Right, and the way I say it is that stress is a frenemy. Steve Rush: I like that. Frank Forencich: And it's a wonderful thing for the body and the mind, small doses of stress are good for us. And this is the job of the teacher, the coach, the therapist, and the leader in an organization is to be precise in how much stress we put people under. And we have yet to really do this in any kind of systematic way. But it's essential to remember that there's an inverse U-Shape curve to this. A little bit of stress is good. A little bit more stress is even better. And then of course there's a tipping point and a reversal where stress becomes bad. But this idea in the standard narrative, that all stress is bad, and that the ideal life is a stress-free life. That's not very helpful. Steve Rush: Is there another word we could switch out for stress? Because I think it actually has a word itself, it's probably unhelpful. Is there another word you might use that would kind of help us think about stress in a positive way? Frank Forencich: Right, and that's a good point because it's been worked so hard in the popular press. Everybody seems to think that they know what it is and it's kind of a pigeonhole problem, right. So, one workaround that I use there is, I talk about our encounter with novelty. So, a little bit of novelty is exciting and therapeutic, young children love novelty, right. And they seek it out. Young adults love novelty, more is better, up to a point. And so, you can think of stress of in the same terms. This is our encounter with novelty. A little bit is good. A little bit more is great. Too much novelty becomes toxic. Steve Rush: I love the reframe because as you've just alluded to, as soon as you mention the word, novelty, people are intrigued. They want to find out. They want to learn a bit more don't they? And that gives them that unconscious permission to dive in a bit deeper. Frank Forencich: Right, and it's an essential part of our creative process is to have that encounter with novelty. But there has to be limits. There has to be guidelines, and there has to be a recognition that you may be encountering too much novelty. And then you've got to take care of yourself. Steve Rush: Maybe you can just take us through some of your tried and tested methods for relieving, some of that stress or some coping mechanism solutions, call it what you will? Frank Forencich: Right, yeah. Well, I've got quite a list here, but the first one of course is to ask the question, is this a real tiger? Or is it not? And that, it seems such a simple approach, but it really works. And it's worked in my life where I'll be worrying about something, and something has dominated my consciousness. And then I take a step back and I say, okay, is this a real threat to my life? Is this a real threat to my future, my welfare? And if the answer is, yes, I have to take action. If the answer is no, I can safely let that thing go. So that's helpful. Steve Rush: That's really powerful, right. Because in that moment, you're able to pretty much evaluate that whole, is it a real threat or not? And therefore, unconsciously will trigger different chemical reactions in our mind, won't it? Frank Forencich: Right, right. And you can always revisit it. You can always reevaluate whether it's a genuine threat or not, but it is a powerful starting point. The other bit of advice that I give people is just to say, give yourself a break. I mean, this climate predicament that we're in, this level of mismatch that everyone is experiencing, this is universal across the planet. It's not just you, [laugh], that's experiencing this. And just knowing that in itself can be helpful. Steve Rush: And if I'm stressed out right now, I'm in the moment, I'm listening to you Frank. What would be the one thing that would enable me to kind of step out of that? Frank Forencich: The scanner prescriptions are quite good here. I mean, focusing on the breath is really good. And the other bit, I think that's really important is just slowing down. This is another part of a modern world. That's so difficult for us is, that a sense of urgency is very contagious among hyper social animals. So, if the people around you are in a big hurry, which is often the case, then that tends to rub off on us. And then we start speeding up as well. So, the reminder here is, whatever you're doing, slow down. Steve Rush: And in your experience, Frank, having traveled the world and worked in different locations, studying, not just humans, but also animals. Is there a blueprint we can look at in the animal kingdom that is replicated in how we behave as human sapien? Frank Forencich: Well, yes. And I had an insight into this when I visited a museum in the American Southwest, and it was a desert museum, and they had all the types of things that you would expect in a desert museum. But we walked around into a courtyard at the museum and there was a large cage there with a wild Jaguar, a wild Panther that had recently been captured. And this was an extraordinary thing to watch that this Panther was pacing back and forth in the cage and exhibiting what you might call hyperactivity or ADHD or whatever you want to call it. The animal was very anxious. And from a modern perspective, you might say, well, that animal was having some sort of a neurological problem or a lifestyle disease or some sort of anxiety disorder. But on the other hand, you look at that animal and say, no, that's an absolutely normal response to being incarcerated. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: And so, for me to look at animals in that kind of situation, and then to look at humans and this epidemic of depression and anxiety that people are experiencing now. I tell people, look, you are not diseased. If you are feeling this way, this is the normal response of a normal animal to these kinds of difficult surroundings. So that's a big stress reliever right there, because. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: Once you realize that your body is behaving the way a normal animal would behave, it's not you [laugh], it's your animal life. And so that I find very helpful. Steve Rush: You do a lot to help people get out of that environment, don't you? So, you use things like movement, your martial arts as an example of that. Just tell us a little bit about how some of those things can help. Frank Forencich: Right, well obviously getting outside is crucial and a lot more people are recommending this now, and it makes sense, but it's not just the experience of being outdoors. It's this psychological identification with nature that I think is what we really need to see as native people have done for a very long time now, this thing called nature is not other, it is actually itself. It is actually us. So, when you look at a forest or you look at the ocean, you look at some natural terrain, that is an extension of you. It's an extension of your body, the native people call this the long buy. So that is a very helpful way to look at this as well. The other part of your question there is, with the movement and the martial arts, this movement in a social setting and touching other human animals that has a very therapeutic effect as well, developing rapport with other people through the body that eases our sense of fear, and it makes us feel great. Steve Rush: Awesome. Really fascinating. I could spend all day picking your brains but. Frank Forencich: [Laugh]. Steve Rush: Unfortunately, we won't have the time. One of the things I would love to do now though, is just to turn the tables a little bit and dive into your brain, thinking about some of the things you've experienced from a leadership perspective over your 30 plus years in teaching leaders and others to get to grips with their human self, what would be your top three leadership hacks? Frank Forencich: Well, the first one, and I love this one because it's kind of counterintuitive, I say, treat people like animals. Steve Rush: [Laugh], right. Frank Forencich: And, for some people, this sounds so surprising. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: And so shocking because when we use that phrase, we were treated like animals. We tend to think that that was a bad thing. We were on the airplane, and they treated us like animals because that's, I guess, what we've done historically is, we've treated animals poorly, but I turn this thing upside down and I take a veterinary approach to leadership or teaching or coaching, any of these things, look at your people, your students, your clients, your patients as animals first and foremost. And if they're coming into your setting and they're already hyper stressed, now you've got to work with that. Maybe they need more stress. Maybe they need less, but you have to look at what their experience is right now. And that is a whole new domain I think of leadership because we have to look at the physical experience and the psychological experience that people are bringing to the setting. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: Now some people have suggested, well, we need to measure their cortisol levels and that would be a technical approach. But they, I think there's another approach there, it's just more humane and means listening better. Steve Rush: Yeah, love it. Frank Forencich: Other leadership hacks. The other one I like from the native and indigenous tradition is called contextual leadership. And this simply means that people are leaders, not across the board, in every situation, but in certain domains. So, you might be a really good leader on the hunt and people in your tribe would recognize that. But when you get back to camp, you might not be such a great leader at preparing food. You might not be such a great leader telling stories around the campfire. Other people are good at that. And this is part of the indigenous tradition that people say, well, you are a leader in this situation, but not in another one. And I think this is something that we can also take to heart and assign and invite people to become leaders in other roles. Steve Rush: Yeah, and if you think of yourself as an animal in a tribe or a pack, they all have their roles to play and that's good old fashioned, situational leadership, isn't it? Frank Forencich: Right, and I think in the modern world, we often get this wrong because we say, if a person is a good leader in one domain, then they must be a good leader in all things, but that's best crazy. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: And then the third leadership hack, I think is, just to recognize the power of story and this is so important because the stress response is driven by our perception and our interpretation of reality, which means there is a story body connection. There is a connection between story and the autonomic nervous system. And if we can change or reframe stories, then we can literally working with people's bodies and we need to be better storytellers. Steve Rush: Love those, their awesome. Thank you, Frank. So, the next part of the show we call Hack to Attack. So, this is typically where something hasn't gone well and maybe been catastrophic, but we've taken the opportunity to learn from it. And now is a force of good in our life or work. What would be your Hack to Attack? Frank Forencich: Right, well, looking back at my life and some of the mistakes I've made, I can trace some of this back to having a poor understanding of what's called the drama triangle. And you may have heard of this, is a popular theme in the world of psychotherapy and counseling, where therapists have recognized a common pattern. And that's when things aren't going well. We tend to describe ourselves as victims. And when we do that, then we typically blame perpetrators for our situation. And then we go in search of rescue. So those are the three points of the drama triangle. And this is a very popular thing [laugh] that people do. And it sucks us in, because we say I'm a victim. There must be a perpetrator out there somewhere. And so, we blame these people or governments or institutions for our unhappiness. And then we'd go looking for rescue from ideas or ideologies or substances, whatever it is. And when we get immersed in this drama triangle, things tend to spiral out control. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: So, the way out of the drama triangle, as most coaches and therapists recommend, they say, look, you have to be creative, stop blaming perpetrators, stop looking for rescue and start focusing on the creation that you want to do in the world. Steve Rush: Nice. Frank Forencich: And that took me some years to realize Steve Rush: [Laugh], it's nice. I like it a lot, yeah. So that last part I show Frank, we get to do with you is taking you on some time travel. You get to bump into yourself with 21 and you get to give yourself some advice. What do you think it might be? Frank Forencich: Yes, well, I would say to my 21-year-old self, that taking responsibility, and this goes back to the drama triangle. Taking responsibility is powerful because the more you take on the more meaningful life becomes. Steve Rush: Mm. Frank Forencich: And you don't have to just take responsibility for your own personal life. No, you take responsibility for the entire world. And so, for example, I didn't cause climate change, I don't cause racism or sexism or xenophobia or anything, but I do want to take responsibility for those things in the world and doing what I can. So that is a path towards meaning and that is a path towards fulfillment. And my 21-year-old self really would've benefited from that. Steve Rush: Yeah, mine too. I think [laugh], wise words. So, what's next for you then Frank, on your journey? Frank Forencich: Well, I'm really excited about this book about martial artistry and activism. The title is The Enemy is Never Wrong and I'm excited about the title because this is a teaching that I had from a martial art teacher some years ago. And he advised us to stop getting emotionally involved in the rightness or wrongness of our opponents. He said, look, whatever the enemy does is just what you have to work with. Don't get attached to any particular strategy or outcome. You have to just take the enemy as is, that's a good teaching there. And that's something that we can do as activists. Steve Rush: Yeah. Frank Forencich: So, I'm really excited about that title and that concept and that's where I'll be going for the next year. Steve Rush: Excellent, and I love that notion as well, because more often not, you can get so easily involved in the problem or the solution rather than just seeing it as it is, which when we wind it back to 1.1, being present and in the moment stops those false tigers, doesn't it? Frank Forencich: Yeah. Yeah. It's a powerful teaching, so. Steve Rush: Awesome, so how can our listeners get copies of many of your books and indeed find out a little bit more about the work you do beyond our conversation? Frank Forencich: Right, well, it's easy to remember the website. It's all there, it's exuberantanimal.com and if you type in exuberant animal, you'll get it. Steve Rush: Cool, and we'll put those any links you have to the various books and work you have in our show notes as well Frank. Frank Forencich: Nice, nice. Steve Rush: I've really enjoyed chatting. It's such a fantastic parallel to our world and your work has brought it into the world of business because it's a real thing. We all have tigers. Some of them and in fact more of them are probably more false than real. Frank Forencich: Right. Steve Rush: And just understanding them and being able to deal with those can help us become better leaders and better people to work with. So, thanks for sharing your information, Frank, and thanks for being on our community, on The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Frank Forencich: Oh yeah. It's been great fun. I've enjoyed It. Steve Rush: Thank you, Frank.   Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler their @leadershiphacker. Instagram you can find us there @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.

    Par Jupiter !
    James BKS

    Par Jupiter !

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 50:13


    durée : 00:50:13 - Par Jupiter ! - par : Charline Vanhoenacker, Juliette ARNAUD - Bonjour la France Inter ! Aujourd'hui, Charline Vanhoenacker et Juliette Arnaud reçoivent l'auteur, compositeur et producteur de musique James BKS pour son premier album Wolves of Africa qui sortira le 8 juillet. - invités : James BKS - James BKS : artiste de hip hop - réalisé par : François AUDOIN

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
    Cyberwarfare Report, Week Of Jun. 27, 2022. Theresa Payton Reporting.

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 4:42


    According to an article from The Washington Examiner, the Gallium hacking group – which has suspected ties to the Chinese government – has expanded its target list to include governments and organizations in Asia, Europe, and Africa. In this episode, host Hillarie McClure is joined by Cyberwarfare Correspondent Theresa Payton to discuss how much of a threat this is, how China's cyberwarfare tactics differ from Russia's, and more. • For more on cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com

    Par Jupiter !
    Wolves of Africa de James BKS

    Par Jupiter !

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 7:51


    durée : 00:07:51 - La chronique d'André Manoukian - par : André Manoukian - André Manoukian a découvert James BKS et c'est une révélation.

    Nessun luogo è lontano
    Il G7, il vertice Nato e il mondo che verrà

    Nessun luogo è lontano

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


    Oggi ci siamo recati a Schloss Elmau, dove è in corso il vertice dei paesi G7. Tra i vari temi affrontati, i leader hanno lanciato un ambizioso piano per le infrastrutture, il quale diventerebbe un contraltare alla "Nuova Via della Seta" promossa dal Presidente cinese Xi Jinping. Ne abbiamo parlato con Sergio Nava, giornalista di Radio24. Le ripercussioni della guerra sono molto forti in Africa, dove si teme possa scoppiare una vera e propria carestia. È credibile il piano annunciato dai leader del G7? Ne abbiamo parlato con Edwin Ikhuoria, direttore esecutivo della Ong ONE in Africa. Inoltre, le grandi organizzazioni sovranazionali tornano importanti sulla scena internazionale. Che cosa potrà scaturire da queste prove di nuove alleanze? Ne abbiamo parlato con Vittorio Emanuele Parsi, direttore dell'Alta Scuola di Economia e Relazioni Internazionali. Infine, siamo andati a Melilla, dove si sta verificando una crisi migratoria che il leader spagnolo e quello marocchino hanno cercato di arginare attraverso il dispiegamento delle forze di sicurezza. Ne abbiamo parlato con Juan Luis Espinosa, giornalista di El Faro de Melilla.

    Kevin Kietzman Has Issues
    Pelosi Push Says it All, Rocker Moving to England Over Roe, Millions Switching to GOP, LeBron Name Change Coming

    Kevin Kietzman Has Issues

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 55:11


       Nancy Pelosi pushed new Congresswoman Mayra Flores' daughter at a photo op, treating the little girl like a dog.  This move says it all.    The lead singer of rock band Green Day says he's moving to England over the SCOTUS decision on abortion.  Just one problem for this knucklehead, he hasn't compared England's abortion laws to California's where he lives.  What a fool.     Over a million Dems have re-registered as Republicans this year and it's all over the country.  The loudest alarm bell is in the suburbs.  Uh oh.    The Royals lose two of three and will be on a unique Peacock streaming event this Sunday, the Stanley Cup is held high by Colorado, Kaepernick had a workout described as a "disaster" and LeBron James is going to have to rename his new company because the name he picked is wildly offensive..... in Africa!  Wait until you hear this translation.

    Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
    DC10 St. Augustine of Hippo (part 2) – The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunson

    Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:51


    St. Augustine of Hippo (part 2) - From Pope Benedict's audience: After his Baptism, Augustine decided to return to Africa with his friends, with the idea of living a community life of the monastic kind at the service of God. However, while awaiting their departure in Ostia, his mother fell ill unexpectedly and died shortly afterwards, breaking her son's heart. Having returned to his homeland at last, the convert settled in Hippo for the very purpose of founding a monastery. In this city on the African coast he was ordained a priest in 391, despite his reticence, and with a few companions began the monastic life which had long been in his mind, dividing his time between prayer, study and preaching. All he wanted was to be at the service of the truth. He did not feel he had a vocation to pastoral life but realized later that God was calling him to be a pastor among others and thus to offer people the gift of the truth. He was ordained a Bishop in Hippo four years later, in 395. Augustine continued to deepen his study of Scripture and of the texts of the Christian tradition and was an exemplary Bishop in his tireless pastoral commitment: he preached several times a week to his faithful, supported the poor and orphans, supervised the formation of the clergy and the organization of mens' and womens' monasteries. In short, the former rhetorician asserted himself as one of the most important exponents of Christianity of that time. He was very active in the government of his Diocese - with remarkable, even civil, implications - in the more than 35 years of his Episcopate, and the Bishop of Hippo actually exercised a vast influence in his guidance of the Catholic Church in Roman Africa and, more generally, in the Christianity of his time, coping with religious tendencies and tenacious, disruptive heresies such as Manichaeism, Donatism and Pelagianism, which endangered the Christian faith in the one God, rich in mercy. And Augustine entrusted himself to God every day until the very end of his life: smitten by fever, while for almost three months his Hippo was being besieged by vandal invaders, the Bishop - his friend Possidius recounts in his Vita Augustini - asked that the penitential psalms be transcribed in large characters, "and that the sheets be attached to the wall, so that while he was bedridden during his illness he could see and read them and he shed constant hot tears" (31, 2). This is how Augustine spent the last days of his life. He died on 28 August 430, when he was not yet 76. We will devote our next encounters to his work, his message and his inner experience. The post DC10 St. Augustine of Hippo (part 2) – The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom with Dr. Matthew Bunson appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

    Durags and Boatshoes
    Ep 197 Of Durags & Boatshoes

    Durags and Boatshoes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 55:11


    Summer Jam Buffalo shooting and manifesto https://www.npr.org/2022/06/15/1105226662/buffalo-payton-gendron-federal-hate-crime BBCAfrica story on Chinese antiBlack racism in Africa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0DJlSqlmEw Border patrol has a coin to commemorate the Haitian violation from last year https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article262498842.html#storylink=cpy Selling Hope Like Dope: Trans swimmer banned https://www.news24.com/you/celebs/international/caitlyn-jenner-backs-new-policy-banning-trans-women-from-womens-swimming-competitions-20220622 Clarence Thomas... https://www.newsweek.com/how-clarence-thomas-finally-triumphed-30-year-battle-against-roe-v-wade-1718448 Hold This L: Jake Gardner parents https://www.ketv.com/article/federal-judge-dismisses-lawsuit-jake-gardner-family/40167410 Not all heroes wear capes: EGOT Jennifer Hudson https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/pop-culture-news/jennifer-hudson-earns-egot-tony-producing-strange-loop-rcna33199 Diddy pledging a million to Howard and to Jackson State https://www.hotnewhiphop.com/kanye-west-presents-diddy-with-lifetime-achievement-award-at-bet-awards-news.154171.html Health Over Wealth: A quote from Jim Rohn

    Edtech Insiders
    Connecting Education and Employment in the Middle East and Africa with Andrew Baird of EFE

    Edtech Insiders

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 41:43


    Andrew Baird is the President & CEO of the global hub of Education For Employment (EFE-Global). Andrew brings to EFE more than twenty-five years of experience in advancing private sector-led strategies to create inclusive employment and livelihoods around the world - including in several countries where EFE operates. He is a strong advocate for women's economic employment, and promoting entrepreneurship. He co-founded the Global Center for Youth Employment, a membership-based organisation devoted to developing collective solutions to the challenges of youth employment. He has held leadership positions in a range of organisations in the field and home offices of RTI International, Making Cents International, and the Peace Corps. For those interested in engaging with EFE as a mentor, or lending their expertise to the youth EFE serves, reach out at info@efe.org. To discuss edtech solutions to address the youth employment and education challenges faced in the MENA, reach out to abaird@efe.org.Recommended ResourcesMiddle East Focus, a podcast by the Middle East Institute

    Stay Grounded with Raj Jana
    237. Stephan “Steve” Little: Changing The World With A Mantra

    Stay Grounded with Raj Jana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 46:58


    “You have the power to manifest anything you want, you just have to put it out there. If you can put it out there and feel it as if it's occurred, it's on its way, it's going to happen.”My conversation with Steve Little - AKA “The Activator” was the catalyst for some amplified personal growth this month. Steve is the CEO and managing partner of Zero Limits Ventures, a M&A advisory, investment banking, and consulting firm. Steve has been an entrepreneur for 45 years. He sold his first business when he was just 15 for $250k. Since then, Steve has architectured 6 nine-figure tech exits and led the M&A teams for 9 tech acquisitions. Steve is also massively purpose-driven who generously gives his time and money to a wide range of global initiatives including Younglife Africa (which you'll hear about in the episode). What I loved most about Steve is the way he integrates energetics into the way he operates in business. Steve reminded me that there are unconscious forces that create our reality every day. As you'll hear in the episode, Steve takes ownership of his own energetic blueprint by continuously doing the inner work to clear his system of what's no longer aligned. “So my experience has been: the clearer I can be, the easier this is.”Tune in now to hear Steve and I explore: Steve's story of supporting AIDS orphans in Africa. Working with the foremost authority of the Hoʻoponopono ancient Hawaiian healing method. Self-forgiveness. Cleaning up what's within you. How to create your dream life on a piece of paper. Finding the balance between leaning back & leaning in. Why you need to continue to seek. What Steve does when things aren't working. The Starbucks story of universal timing. And more…“Inspiration is the universe's pathway to communicate to you.”I love meeting people who are so bold about the role that energy and spiritual conviction play in creation. In this episode, Steve shares some of the practices that have allowed him to co-create with the universe along with stories that provide proof that the universe is always communicating with you. Be sure to listen out for the conversation about efforting. It's towards the end of the episode. It's one of the most potent things I've heard for a while and it's set me up for a strong month. (I'll share more in my June reflection episode). Contact Info:About SteveLinkedInTwitter We thrive on your feedback, so if you've enjoyed this show, please rate us and leave us a review. And don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode again. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Mimi and Netta’s DIY (Do It Yoself)
    Summaries of an African Experience

    Mimi and Netta’s DIY (Do It Yoself)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 22:54


    On this episode I sit down with my friend and lover and we talk all things Africa… well not all things but lots of things about Africa, the culture, the cops and a little bit about abortion… I commend him for stepping on the mic. More gems will be dropped hopefully as I stay around Africa. Thanks for listening

    On the Brink with Andi Simon
    319: Becca Powers Vaughn—There Is An Inner Command Center Inside Of You. Ready To Take Control?

    On the Brink with Andi Simon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 31:12


    Hear how to harness your inner CEO and prioritize your happiness  Are you the CEO of your life? What does that mean? In this podcast, I bring to you Becca Powers Vaughn. Her story, like those of so many women, is in part about discovering your own self-worth, in part realizing that you should not let others define who you are, and in part turning your purpose into something to benefit others. But this podcast is not just for women. Men, listen carefully. Becca's message is as relevant for you as it is for women. Why? So you can help women thrive in your personal and your professional life. A wise woman with a lot to teach us. Watch and listen to our conversation here Much to learn from Becca's “aha” moment She says it was not a very pretty moment, but one in which she had to stop the “blame and complain” game. If you are doing something like Becca was doing—blaming others for your limits or your difficulties—it is a good time to listen to this podcast and discover yourself. Becca also has a great book you should dig into: Harness Your Inner CEO: Rise Into Passion, Prosperity, and Empowerment. Three things that help empower women to become the best they can be: Look in the mirror and tell your mind that you are a beautiful woman. Your mind does exactly what it thinks you want it to do. So, what do you want it to do? I am serious. What do you want to feel, see and think so you can serve yourself? Your story is what holds you back, until you craft a story that opens doors for you. It is a good time to rethink you. How to get in touch with Becca Contact her via LinkedIn, Twitter, her website www.beccapowers.com or email her at Beccapowers1313@gmail.com. Also check out her portfolio: linktr.ee/beccapowers1313 Want to know more about taking care of yourself and being CEO of your life?  Blog: You Can Find Joy And Happiness In Turbulent Times! Podcast: Meg Nocero—Can You Feel Joy As You Rethink Your Life? Podcast: Stuck or Stalled? The Time is Right to Rethink Your Journey Additional resources for you My award-winning second book: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business My award-winning first book: On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Simon Associates Management Consultants    Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Good morning. Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon, your host and your guide. And remember, my job is to get you off the brink. I don't want you stuck there, nobody's going to be stalled. What we need to do is help you. And I say these words very intentionally to help you see, feel and think in new ways so that you can change. And you know, your brain hates change. Sometimes it hates me for telling you you should change. But you also know that things aren't always exactly the way you want them to be but somehow the habits take over and your mind does exactly what it thinks you want it to do. Now we've got to change. So I have today a wonderful woman, Becca Powers Vaughn, and you're going to love listening to Becca's story. I have a hunch it may reflect many of our own stories. And then we're going to talk about things that matter to all of us, like how we change our balance and our work life? How do we really find success? What does that mean? Remember, we're meaning makers. Humans don't have any intrinsic value, so what is success? Are you there? Are you going? Is it a journey? Becca, thank you for joining me today. Becca Powers Vaughn: Yes, thank you for having me. Andi Simon: Tell the listener who is Becca, what's your journey, and then we'll talk about your book. Her book is Harness Your Inner CEO: Rise Into Passion, Prosperity, and Empowerment. We'll talk a little bit about that. But so many other things that she's learned as she's been on this journey. So, who is Becca? Becca Powers Vaughn: So I will introduce myself in the form of a story because I think that it'll help the listeners get a really good idea of where we're going to go with this conversation as well. A little bit about me. So my story starts on the bathroom floor, as far as wanting to help other women. And I'm going to explain that more in just a second. So I'm a 20-year career tech sales executive. I've worked for companies like Cisco, Dell and others. And in the course of my journey, I have sacrificed a lot. I am a mother of four. I have an 18-year-old and a 20-year-old and then an 18- and 20-year-old stepson and stepdaughter. My husband and I have raised a blended family for 12 years. In the pursuit of it all, I didn't have much work-life balance in some of those days. But I remember back in 2013, I was a regional sales manager for Dell. And as a leader, and you might relate to this Andi, hearing your podcast...I've listened to quite a few. But I have a firm belief that people need to come before profits. And while I was a sales leader at Dell, I got recruited by a company that had a very similar philosophy. And I wanted to jump at that opportunity. So I left Dell and in the process of resigning, my VP of sales at the time heard me say all this and said, instead of rejecting me or accepting me, he's like, "Becca, you are the CEO of your life and I'm so proud of you." Right, yeah. So at that moment, I was very empowered. I went into this new career and what ended up happening in this new new career is that I wasn't an exact fit. My leadership style was very different. And what I found out is that in not being fully accepted, because my style was different, instead of coming to terms with that myself, and questioning whether this is a fit for me or not, I stayed committed to this belief. And in doing so, even though it was noble and I think a lot of listeners can maybe relate to this, even though it was a noble cause before profits, what I was really doing was sacrificing my well-being in pursuit of this big thing that I thought was super important. And after three years of doing that, I ended up overextending myself, way too much to the point of extreme exhaustion. And at that point of extreme exhaustion, it was one night after a really bad day at work again, three years into this role, I put the kids to bed, doing all the things. I go to take my makeup off, and I fell to the floor with fatigue. And I always say, it was in my most powerless moment that I came in touch with my power. Andi Simon: You sound like Arianna Huffington, who discovered that self care isn't the afterthought. It has to be tough though, and I am laughing out loud because I remember trying to get my tenure and developing pneumonia so bad that it took me six months to get my health back. Why do we do this to ourselves? What did you discover? Becca Powers Vaughn: Well, I discovered that, and I have the goosebumps as you say that because this is exactly what I showed up to talk about. And I'm so glad there's a relationship going on. Because I think the reason that we do that is because we care, especially as women, we're very servant-based. We are used to taking care of multiple things. And so it's very natural for us to almost abandon ourselves in the pursuit of the things that we think are important to us. And I think that is a really important part of the message, because we beat ourselves up a lot as women. And it's like, Oh, how could I have done that? Or how can I not have seen that? And really, at the end of the day, how did I get on the bathroom floor? I got here because I cared? Yes, not because I didn't care. Andi Simon: I'm curious about when you got off the bathroom floor, which you clearly did, did you have that epiphany that said, Enough, I'm going someplace else, or did you push on and do it better, or changed within your life-work balance, or what was your epiphany? Becca Powers Vaughn: So my epiphany on the bathroom floor is going to tie into the beginning of the story when my VP told me I was the CEO of my life. I'm sitting there on the bathroom floor crying, in a state of powerlessness and brokenness. And then all of a sudden, I remember giving an exhale, like as if I was praying or calling out for help, I don't know, like, I can't power through another day. I just remember thinking this to my head, like, I don't know what to do. I'm feeling powerless. I don't know what to do. And all of a sudden, I call it my instant miracle, that conversation came back to my forefront. And I remember, it was almost like a whisper: "Becca, you are the CEO of your life." And I started giggling actually. I'm like, on the bathroom floor. And this moment of being a complete mess. And my emotions were telling me. It's okay to laugh. I started laughing at myself. And I'm like, Well, if I'm the CEO of my life, I shouldn't be crying on the bathroom floor. I have a lot more power than I think I do. So I rose off the bathroom floor a different woman than the one that went down. And that's how I came up with the title of the book, Harness Your Inner CEO, because it was about harnessing that energy. I'm the CEO of my life. I've got to look at my finances, I've got to look at my spiritual self. I've got to look at my emotional self, mental self, my physical self, and I'm responsible for it all. Andi Simon: So let me clarify, I didn't hear the title til you just said it. It's harnessing. I like that. Take charge because now you can begin to visualize, and we're visualizers, what it is that you have learned. But you want others to see that we're going to take charge of our total being, not a little, a whole thing. Please continue. Becca Powers Vaughn: That gave me the goosebumps again. I love this conversation. So yes. So then I was going to tie back into both the things we talked about: success without sacrifice and work-life balance. What I realized about work-life balance is, it really wasn't obtainable in the way that it was being fed to me by the media, and social and work environments and things along those lines. And then there was a way that I could go about success. It was more of a question, but I knew it was possible. And like, is there a way to go about chasing my success? Because there's a lot of things I love about my career, actually. But can I chase success without sacrifice? And so those became two themes that I really explored and got it out within myself. Andi Simon: And in the process, did you go on a journey? I'm asking because in my book, Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business, several of the women went off on journeys at that catalytic moment when what they were doing wasn't good. But what they wanted to do wasn't clear. And those journeys, whether they took them through Africa or Europe or wherever with a backpack, or taking time to think and wonder.  What did you find? Becca Powers Vaughn: Yes, so I did go on a journey. So my journey was about two years long, but what I think is unique about my journey is, I stayed exactly in my life. I was a mom and my kids were in middle school at the time. I didn't have time to go on sabbaticals or anything like that. But I realized I could go on a sabbatical within myself. And that's exactly what I did. So I did start evaluating whether that job was a fit or not. And as I started asking myself questions and understanding, I think one practical tip I can give listeners is that our bodies are going to tell us what's a fit. When things feel good, we feel relaxed, we feel butterflies, we get excited. When things aren't a fit, and we're still questioning, maybe it is, maybe it isn't, we're using logic to make it okay, our bodies will tell us. I've got a pain in my shoulder. I'm having headaches every night. And once I realized that those signs from my body were really symptoms of things not being a fit, I just kept exploring things that made me feel better. And I ended up in a new job a few months later. The one part I want to share before we pause and go back into conversation is that for me, I had to leave my own way. And what I mean by that is, I technically demoted myself. I went back to outside sales, to some sales professional. And in that, in that one move, I increased my income. I started having success without sacrifice. I found what work-life balance was for me. I was able to put down my phones and emails and dedications by 5:30. I ended up getting a sales territory for the Florida Keys because I'm in South Florida, and I had to drive down to the keys every three weeks. And now I had water on both sides of me with dolphins jumping in the water. Andi Simon: Your visual is so powerful because I truly believe there's a path through life, a little serendipity, but a lot of self-awareness, to your point. We decide with the heart and the eyes, not the head. And so if the audience hears about what you do, and how you do it, and it doesn't feel good every morning, you wake up without a smile on your face, you're on the wrong path. And you can stay on that line and keep pushing it. And Becca could tell you she could have, but there's something in your physical, emotional, human, being. You know how they talk about the gut. There really is a gut that's connected to what you're doing. Did you go searching for that? Or a job? Or did it find you? Becca Powers Vaughn: Thank you for asking that question because I get again the goosebumps. It is a very powerful thing when we finally stop powering through. Maybe it's surrender. That word was always kind of a complicated concept for me to fully grasp. But I do know that that's what happened in my moment on the bathroom floor the next day. And that's like, I have a saying: Admit when things are wrong or just admit when things aren't going right. The next morning, I called one of my work best friends. I was like, Jessie, I just need to tell you that this isn't working. And I ended up on the bathroom floor last night, but I'm empowered today. And the next thing I know, within four hours, she calls me with a job lead to the company I ended up leaving for. And so yes, it just fell into my lap within hours, within 24 hours. Andi Simon: But are we different from the rest of the world? Or are we just paying attention to it differently? I'm convinced that serendipity is one of your best resources. And sometimes you don't really know why something has happened, but you do know that something is happening. And if you can pause for a moment, and you have your house, you have your family, you know you have your husband, you have all these things going right, what's wrong? You want to say something? Becca Powers Vaughn: I'm nodding my head just because it was the pause. As women, I think we power through life as well. Women, I think one of our superpowers is our resilience and our ability to even set powerful intentions for ourselves, even though we can be going through hell. And just like the next day is, I got this, I'm going to show up as my best self. And it was in doing that too many times that I actually got stuck. And it was that power of the pause that allowed me to reevaluate everything. Andi Simon: It is interesting because we don't know where we're going but we do know as women who are aspirational, and career-minded, whatever that means. We could never be simply a stay-at-home mom. I had two daughters. They were 14 months apart. And three weeks after each of them, I was back in the classroom. I mean, that wasn't the way one should do it. But we are very intentional in some ways but not reflective in others. And I got my tenure. And I've been the EVP of a bank and I've been successful in my business for 20 years. But along the way, there have been aha moments like you have. For our listeners, think carefully about the aha moment the pandemic has offered you. I often preach: Never waste a crisis. This is not one that I would have ever anticipated or encouraged to find us, but don't waste it. Because if nothing else, on your bathroom floor, you have a moment now to really rethink the things that you're doing and how you're doing them. I'm seeing the Great Resignation, which is because people are back to work, and they're fine, but they just moved around in jobs. They also were catalysts for employers. You said, People before profits. What happened is the employees said, Us before you. Maybe there's a message here? So as you're moving along your own journey, where are you now? Where are you going? Becca Powers Vaughn: So that's an interesting question, because definitely life has unfolded. For me, in the most beautiful, magical, and to your point, unexpected ways. So after my two year journey of reestablishing what was important to me, reprioritizing, my career took off. In my highest position, I was an Operational Sales Director with 110 people under me and a $500 million annual number. What I realized is that it wasn't defining success. For me, success meant, I did like making money, but I also liked making an impact. And so I started finding roles that I felt I was able to deliver that impact, and they varied and the title. I realized that title was more something that fulfilled my ego rather than fulfilled my satisfaction. So I started chasing fulfillment and impact. As a result, I started making more money. As a result of feeling like I'm making an impact, and feeling more fulfilled, I started having what we want to call work-life balance. I had more passion in me. So even though I think I was working about the same hours, probably 40 to 50 hours a week, what I found is that my work changed. I started doing podcasts. I set times to make time to write a book. People are like, How do you write a book? You work full time, you've got kids, you got all this? Yeah, it mattered. And it happened. And it happened with ease. And it was quite delightful, actually. So where am I now? I am going back to Cisco. I was with Cisco for two years. And they recently recruited me back and I'm happily going back. I loved working there. Going as a Strategic Sales Lead and Solution Evangelist, which puts me in that place of impact and fulfillment. I'm sitting down to write my second book. I am starting my own podcast soon. And I'm vacationing and enjoying my life and just kind of able to have more without doing so much. It's a weird place to be. Andi Simon: But on the other side, nobody could tell you that. And while I do a lot of executive coaching, at the end of the day, we ask more questions, and we need help. Because if you can find the solution yourself, it's not a good solution. And if you're trying to do something someone else said we should do and imagining what those words mean, that means you have to be reflective, intentional, and willing to make a detour. Because we're on a journey or pathway, a ChangeMap. Sometimes the detours come up and you don't really know why they're there. But it's okay to make a left turn to try, or a right turn to see what's over there and taste. As you're looking at your next book and the current book, what have you discovered that you can help the listener learn from, or are there some illustrations that you want them to remember? People remember stories. Is there a story other than you being on the bathroom floor, which is a great story. And the things you're thinking about next, some stories to share? Becca Powers Vaughn: Well, one of the things is because I've been a corporate gal for 20 years, I really wanted to impact and explore burnout, but more so because that's really what happened. I ended up burnt out on the bathroom floor. So being an excavation artist and explorer, I wanted to understand what got me there. And I'm also a life coach. I had a Kundalini teacher so I've got some more hands. I do this and it's wanting to really kind of understand what's causing the Great Resignation. Why are people fed up? What's going on and all of that? So as I started serving people, this is a very interesting thing. I was like, Okay, what I understand about life coaching is that we overcompensate when we're trying to hide something. And so what is happening on an employee level that's causing this feeling of complete exhaustion? And what I came to understand is that I call it the unders in the overs, an employee first and they might not even be able to put their finger on it, but they're going to feel these unders. This means that somewhere in the organization, they are feeling undervalued, underappreciated, underpaid, underrecognized. Think feelings like that. And when these feelings go unaddressed, it starts triggering our deepest wounds, which is, I don't matter, I'm not safe, I'm not worthy, I'm not valuable. And when those feelings are triggered, we go into overcompensation, which in a work environment looks like overextending, overcommitting, overworking, overstressing and overwhelming. Those types of things. So that's really where I want to help people understand where this is coming from, because helping the individual understand it is really important. But I also want to help corporations understand it. I have been at Fortune 500s almost my entire career and I can say that they care. They just don't know how to do things. And so they're offering yoga classes and things that are very surface. But at the end of the day, if they knew their employees didn't feel valuable, they could do something to make them feel more valuable. So I know that was a longer answer, but I really geeked out on that day. Andi Simon: But let's dig into that. Because if only they could actually make you feel like you mattered is what you said. And all of the tactical-practical surface stuff is there. It's always fascinating to me because the HR person works really hard to get that yoga class and nobody comes, or the Weight Watchers to arrive. And you know, "I thought that's what people wanted to do was lose weight." So their solution had nothing to do with the person's actual behavior. The disconnect in HR is fascinating. But having said that, the company itself is the problem, not the human resource person. And the company doesn't understand that unless you spend time getting to know them, and show them that it matters that you're working here as an employee. That conversation is essential, not after the fact that you're ready to leave. You know, we work really hard on exit strategy and exit conversations. Why don't we do retention? Why don't we learn more about what your career is about? It's interesting. I've been working with an accounting firm for five years now. And one of the suggestions I made after one of our leadership training sessions was, Have you had one-on-ones with these very important people? And the partner said, No. I said, Well do it. They want to be loved. That it isn't that they are making good money, they're not money motivated a bit. But at the end of the day, they work really, really hard during the tax season. And they don't need a party, they need someone to say thank you. They need someone to simply say, You really do matter to us, what matters to you, and how do I help you? Sometimes they hear and sometimes they don't. Sometimes it resonates, and sometimes it doesn't. But unless you reach out, you have vulnerability there because people will find another place. They'll begin to think that all work is simply tactical and practical, and I never matter. And then I'll just hop around. What do you think? Becca Powers Vaughn: I think you're really onto something as far as how you're understanding what's going on. I would say that even from a survey perspective, I've surveyed about 1000 people right now, and 88% feel undervalued, underappreciated. I set it so you had to have some combination, but at least to hit the 88% score. I had said it so that you have to at least get to know. And that means 88% of the workforce is experiencing at least two unders. Andi Simon: My last thought is that people are living their emotions. And so if we stay on the tactical, practical, logical side, you're missing what matters to them. And humans want to hug. I mean, at the end of the day, they want to belong. They want to feel well. And the thing that you found was, I want to be harnessing my own interest. Do they want to be in charge? They want to feel they have some control, and that all of this has come out of the pandemic. Big time. I'm not sure of the message, I must confess, I work with too many CEOs of marketing companies and the guys don't quite get it. They're trying to figure it out. And I say that, because mostly guys are guys, but they don't quite understand that it isn't a position to hold. It's a life to live. And those are very different feelings. We're almost approaching the end of our wonderful time together. And you've enjoyed yourself, I know I have as well. A couple of things you don't want the audience to forget, because they often remember the ending better than the beginning. But your story is great. Becca Powers Vaughn: So coming right off of our conversation is, You matter. Number one, you matter. Number two, it's okay to prioritize yourself, especially as a woman. Consider yourself at least as much as you're considering other people, places and things. Those are two, do you want three? Andi Simon: No, I'll add your third. And then yeah, I will expand your third. We had a program on self care. And it's not going right now but I'll bring it back. It's a 30-day challenge to take care of you. And it's an app, and I love the app. I just can't do it right this second. But I'm going to be bringing it back about when your podcast goes live. But I find that people feel guilty about taking care of themselves. And the other thing I learned is that the guys who sign on, sign off, but the women stay in and want to keep it going. So something is going on in this world of being a woman where it feels guilty to take care of yourself. You're the last on the to-do list. You don't work out because there's no time. And so we flip it around. So the first thing you're going to do in the morning is, for you, what is that going to be? Take a walk, now sit quietly on the deck and have a cup of coffee. Take that time, it's okay. And the research is fascinating. You know, women CEOs of lots of companies say to me, Because I don't take care of myself, the stress levels rise. I said, Well, you know when you take care of yourself, the stress levels from the oxytocin and serotonin rise and cortisol drops. Your brain is telling you something. To your point, it hurts when you're not happy. Where can our listeners find your book? Becca Powers Vaughn: You can find it on Amazon and just type in the Amazon search Harness Your Inner CEO and it will come right up. And it's under Becca Powers. Andi Simon: We'll have that all in our podcast blog. I'm going to say goodbye to our great listeners and to Becca because we've had such a great conversation. My hunch is we'll be back and do this again when our next books come out. That's going to be a catalytic moment for her to get the next book done and my next book is going to come out. So we will all be on, talking about our books. My book is going to be about 100 Women who are trailblazers, transforming the world for women. And I do think this is a time for women to seize the moment and not waste a pandemic crisis because it's our time to lead. Now, with that in mind, thank you all for coming. You know, you've launched us into the top 5% of podcasts globally. I'm honored! I will tell you it's a pleasure. As you discovered, I love doing podcasts and sharing them. And the only thing I will advertise on here is us. We are corporate anthropologists and we help companies and the people inside them change. And often you don't want to change so my job is to help you love change. Make it your friend. And you can, because as you listen to Becca, you don't want to be on the bathroom floor wondering what am I doing with my life? So how do you see, feel and think in new ways? And as far as coaches, Becca is a life coach. I'm an executive coach, but we both try and help you see things through a fresh lens. My books,On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights and Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business, are both on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and booksellers everywhere. AndRethink just won an award from Axiom as a 2022 Bronze Best Business Book in the women and business category, so thank you. It's really an honor and a privilege to have both of my books be award winners, which means I'm an award winner. I don't think I write to be an award winner, I write to help people see, feel and think in new ways. Reach me at info@Andisimon.com and come along for the ride. Let's have a good journey together. It's been such fun. Goodbye.