Podcasts about Central Intelligence Agency

National intelligence agency of the United States

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The Institute of World Politics
China Is Preparing for War, America Is Not with Mr. Gordon C. Chang

The Institute of World Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 80:23


This lecture is a part of the Annual Pearl Harbor Day Lecture Series and is presented in collaboration with IWP's China/Asia Program. Recorded live on November 29, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. About the Lecture Xi Jinping is not only implementing the fastest military buildup since the Second World War, but he is also mobilizing the Chinese people for war. He has just created a new war cabinet. He talks about war all the time. The American political and military establishments, however, are not taking Xi seriously, and in Washington, there is an evident lack of sense of urgency. This mismatch will have severe consequences. About the Speaker Gordon G. Chang is the author of The Great U.S.-China Tech War and Losing South Korea, booklets released by Encounter Books. His previous books are Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World and The Coming Collapse of China, both from Random House. Chang lived and worked in China and Hong Kong for almost two decades, most recently in Shanghai, as Counsel to the American law firm Paul Weiss and earlier in Hong Kong as Partner in the international law firm Baker & McKenzie. His writings on China and North Korea have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The National Interest, The American Conservative, Commentary, National Review, Barron's, and The Daily Beast. He is a columnist at Newsweek and writes regularly for The Hill. He has spoken at Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Penn, Princeton, Yale, and other universities and at The Brookings Institution, The Heritage Foundation, the Cato Institute, RAND, the American Enterprise Institute, the Council on Foreign Relations, and other institutions. He has given briefings at the National Intelligence Council, the Central Intelligence Agency, the State Department, and the Pentagon. He has also spoken before industry and investor groups including Bloomberg, Sanford Bernstein, Royal Bank of Scotland, and Credit Lyonnais Securities Asia. Chang has appeared before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. Chang has appeared on CNN, Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, CNBC, MSNBC, PBS, the BBC, and Bloomberg Television. He is a regular co-host and guest on The John Batchelor Show. Outside the United States, he has spoken in Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, Hong Kong, New Delhi, Seoul, Singapore, Tokyo, The Hague, London, Ottawa, Toronto, and Vancouver. He served two terms as a trustee of Cornell University. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18

Warfare
Origins of the CIA

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 37:07


2022 marks the 75th anniversary of the Central Intelligence Agency, more colloquially known as the CIA. While viewed today as one of the most advanced and powerful intelligence agencies in the world, the United States didn't always sit at the top of this list. Long before the CIA had been created, Great Britain, China, and even the Soviet Union had long standing intelligence agencies, aiding in matters of foreign affairs and espionage. So why was the United States so late to the intelligence game? And did this late arrival into espionage hinder the CIA's development and success?In the first episode of our new mini-series on the CIA, James is joined by Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist Tim Weiner, to talk about the history of this clandestine government organisation. From looking at the CIA's murky origins, to their post 9/11 purpose and their recent infiltration of the Kremlin, Tim takes us through the agency's tumultuous history.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - enter promo code WARFARE for 7 days free + 50% off your first three months' subscription. To download, go to Android or Apple store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Inside The War Room
Author, Military Historian, and Conflict Archaeologist James Stejskal

Inside The War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 36:26


Links from the show:* Direct Legacy: A Cold War Spy Thriller (The Snake Eater Chronicles)* Subscribe to the newsletterAbout my guest:James Stejskal, after 35 years of service with US Army Special Forces and the Central Intelligence Agency, is a uniquely qualified historian and novelist. He is the author of the definitive history: Special Forces Berlin Clandestine Cold War Operations of the US Army's Elite, 1956–1990 and Masters of Mayhem: Lawrence of Arabia and the British Military Mission to the Hejaz. Direct Legacy is his third novel. Get full access to Dispatches from the War Room at dispatchesfromthewarroom.substack.com/subscribe

Build a Business Success Secrets
The Life of a CIA Shadow Warrior with Ric Prado Author of Black Ops

Build a Business Success Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 67:37


Ric and Brandon talk about Ric's life escaping from Cuba, his career in the CIA, the book and a lot of other things not in the book that you''' enjoy.About Ric PradoEnrique “Ric” Prado is a paramilitary, counter-terrorism, and special/clandestine operations specialist, with a focus on international training operations and programs.  Mr. Prado is a twenty-four year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency where he served as an Operations Officer in six overseas posts.  He was Deputy Chief of Station and “Plank Owner” of the original Bin Ladin Task Force/Issues Station under Senior Analyst, Michael Scheuer, as well as Chief of Station in a hostile Muslim country.   He also served as Chief of Operations in the CIA's Counterterrorist Center (CTC) during the September 11th attacks, where Mr. Prado coordinated CIA/CTC's special operations (SPECOPS) activities with the National Security Council and FBI, as well as with elite U.S. military representatives from Delta Force and SEAL-Team Six, then detailed to CTC/CIA. Mr. Prado spent his first ten years at CIA as a paramilitary officer in Special Operations Group/Special Activities Division (SOG/SAD) which is CIA's “special operations force,” including 36 months of service in Central America as the first CIA officer living in the anti-Sandinista “Contra” camps, running counter-terrorism operations in Peru and the Philippines. Mr. Prado is now semi-retired but enjoys serving the “SPECOPS” Community as Subject Matter Expert (SME) at the SWCS' ASOTC (Advanced Special Operations and Techniques Course) and ASOT Managers Course, Dragon Warrior, Emerald Warrior, among others.CONNECT WITH USSign up for our NewsletterOver 17,200 listeners and countinghttps://edge.ck.page/bea5b3fda6EPISODE LINKS:Ric Prado's Book: Black Ops: The Life of a CIA Shadow WarriorBest price on Amazon here:https://amzn.to/3XM3NTyEDGE PODCAST INFO:Apple Podcastshttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/edge/id1522407349Spotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7a3WcnSn9PlvwwF5hn4p4SWebsitehttps://MyEDGEPodcast.comOther Great Podcasts From the Best Podcasts NetworkOn Business Podcasthttps://OnBusinessPodcast.comMARKETING Podcasthttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/marketing/id1653276478 Other Great Podcasts From the Best Podcasts NetworkOn Business Podcast On Business Podcast is an unscripted, brutally honest, candid, sometimes ugly, conversation about running businesses & successful companies, for aspiring entrepreneurs, current startups, or experienced business owners looking to elevate their business. https://OnBusinessPodcast.comMARKETING PodcastThe MARKETING podcast brings you marketing science, case studies that reveal successful marketing techniques and teach strategic marketing analysis where we model the data and turn it into financial forecasts so you have predictable revenue.Brandon can't promise you instant marketing success after each episode. But...he guarantees that you will find each MARKETING episode always reliable, always actionable, and always useful for your marketing efforts. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/marketing/id1653276478

Business RadioX ® Network
Tamela Blalock With NCBA CLUSA

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022


Tamela Blalock serves as the VP, of Cooperative Relations with the National Cooperative Business Association CLUSA International, where she enhances engagement and impact with the trade association among the cooperative leadership community. She has served several Washington institutions including the Central Intelligence Agency, Washington D.C. NFL Football Team, The Washington Post, and George Washington University. Prior […]

The Movements: A Podcast History of the Masses
Guatemala and Cuba #3 - ¡Patria o Muerte!

The Movements: A Podcast History of the Masses

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 228:36 Transcription Available


Fulgencio Batista has fled Cuba and the Cuban Revolutionaries are victorious. As Fidel Castro implements a revolution from above, the Latin American bourgeoisie and Central Intelligence Agency plot a destabilization campaign (modeled after the 1954 coup against Jacobo Arbenz).Guatemalan President Miguel Ydigoras Fuentes invites the CIA to establish anti-communist training camps in Guatemala. In the opening shots of the Guatemalan Civil War, anti-Castro Cubans piloting CIA B-26s bomb rebel soldiers in defense of the coup regime.Recalling his firsthand experience witnessing the CIA coup in Guatemala, Che Guevara takes a leading role in purging the Cuban Army of counter-revolutionaries. As the anti-Commmunist Cubans of Brigade 2506 prepare to invade the Bay of Pigs and roll back the Cuban Revolution,  Che and Fidel take measures to ensure that Cuba 1961 will not become Guatemala 1954.Prologue - November 13, 1960Chapter 1: Counter-Revolution in GuatemalaChapter 2: Cuba's Revolution From AboveChapter 3: Defending the Cuban RevolutionChapter 4: Yanqui TerrorChapter 5: The Bay of Pigsroyalty free music by Giorgio Di Campofreesoundmusic.euyoutube.com/freesoundmusicSupport the showSupport The Movements on Patreon Subscribe to the Podcast Apple Podcasts Google Spotify Stitcher Twitter @movementspod Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/movementspod)

The Freaky Deaky | Paranormal & The Unexplained
S3:E9 - Sidney Gottlieb: The C.I.A.'s Poisoner-In-Chief, MK Ultra & America's Quest For Mind Control

The Freaky Deaky | Paranormal & The Unexplained

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 60:51


Welcome back to The Freaky Deaky! In this weeks episode, Christian leads us down the Rabbit Hole of a relatively unknown man that earned the nickname America's Poisoner In Chief, Sidney Gottlieb. Gottlieb was an American chemist and spymaster who headed the Central Intelligence Agency's 1950s and 1960s assassination attempts and mind-control program, known as Project MKUltra, but that's just where things start.. — If you're enjoying the show, please take a second to leave us a 5-Star Review. It's the single best way to help us move up the charts and beat those pesky algorithms.    Have You Ever Experienced Something Paranormal? We want to hear your story! Use the email below to submit paranormal experiences, episode suggestions, or general feedback on ways we can improve the quality of the show: thegang@thefreakydeaky.com Official TFD Merch: TFD Merch   Subscribe to The Freaky Deaky on YouTube and Follow Us on Social Media For Photos, Video Shorts & Behind The Scenes Looks From Each Episode: YouTube: https://bit.ly/3goj7SP Instagram: https://bit.ly/2HOdleo Facebook: https://bit.ly/3ebSde6 TikTok: https://bit.ly/35lNOlu Website: The Freaky Deaky Podcast  

TNT Radio
Larry Johnson on The Joe Hoft Show - 23 November 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 53:42


GUEST OVERVIEW: Larry Johnson, who worked previously with the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. State Department's Office of Counter Terrorism, is a recognized expert in the fields of terrorism, aviation security, crisis and risk management.

TNT Radio
Larry Johnson on The Joe Hoft Show - 16 November 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 55:48


GUEST OVERVIEW: Larry Johnson, who worked previously with the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. State Department's Office of Counter Terrorism, is a recognized expert in the fields of terrorism, aviation security, crisis and risk management.

The Team House
CIA Deputy Director of the Counterterrorism Center | Darrell Blocker | Ep. 175

The Team House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 123:47


Darrell M. Blocker is a former American intelligence officer who served for 28 years with the Central Intelligence Agency. He held prominent positions including deputy director of the Counterterrorism Center (CTC), Chief of Africa Division, and Chief of Training at Camp Peary, Virginia, better known as "The Farm". Within the intelligence community, Blocker was known for participating in a number of semi-professional musical ensembles during his postings abroad. He retired in 2018 as the most senior black officer in the CIA's Directorate of Operations. Since 2019 Blocker has been chief operating officer of intelligence and advisory firm MOSAIC, and a contributor for ABC News. In November 2020, Fox News reported that president-elect Joe Biden had included Blocker among his shortlist of candidates to nominate for Director of the Central Intelligence Agency; in the end, the position went to William Burns. Today's Sponsor: SAP Gear (Stately Asset Protection)  https://SAPGEAR.com Veteran-owned company, Stately Asset Protection's retail store specializes in handmade and unique survivability products. Use the code “TEAM” for 15% off your order! https://SAPGEAR.com To help support the show and for all bonus content including: -2 bonus episodes per month  -Access to ALL bonus segments with our guests -Ad Free audio feed Subscribe to our Patreon!

Inside The War Room
To Catch a Spy

Inside The War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 62:50


What is it like to catch a spy? We bring on James Olson, who served for over thirty years in the former Directorate of Operations of the Central Intelligence Agency, to chat about catching spies. Oh, and we chatted about JFK too…Links from the show:* To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence* Bush school at TAMU* Subscribe to the newsletterAbout my guest:Professor James Olson received his law degree from the University of Iowa. He is a professor of the practice at the Bush School, where he teaches courses on intelligence and counterintelligence. He served for over thirty years in the Directorate of Operations of the Central Intelligence Agency, mostly overseas in clandestine operations. In addition to several foreign assignments, he was Chief of Counterintelligence at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Professor Olson has been awarded the Intelligence Medal of Merit, the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal, the Donovan Award, and several Distinguished Service Citations. He is the recipient of awards from the Bush School and the Association of Former Students for excellence in teaching. Professor Olson is the author of Fair Play: The Moral Dilemmas of Spying and To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence. Prior to his career in the CIA, he served in the US Navy, where he attained the rank of lieutenant commander. Get full access to Dispatches from the War Room at dispatchesfromthewarroom.substack.com/subscribe

The Capital Stack
Les Craig of Next Frontier Ventures on transitioning from CIA to VC, Sharky VCs, and Investing with a Regional Focus Investments Thesis

The Capital Stack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 41:32


Today, David is talking to Les Craig. Les joined Next Frontier Capital in 2017. During that time, he has led the investments and serves on the board of Special.tv, S2 Corporation, Bandwango, EveryoneSocial, and Gravwell.Before joining NFC, Les served as the Executive Director of the Montana State University Innovation Campus. In less than 16 months, he successfully built a partnership between a private developer, the MSU Office of Research and Economic Development, and the MSU Alumni Foundation to develop a 42-acre Research Park in Bozeman, MT, focused on technology and research commercialization.Les moved to Montana because of MSU's national search to hire a Director for the Blackstone LaunchPad, a campus-based entrepreneurship program funded by the Blackstone Charitable Foundation. In February 2015, Les became the Director of MSU's Blackstone programming, where he passionately mentored and encouraged students, alumni, and faculty to pursue entrepreneurial careers. In the Summer of 2016, Les received funding from the Small Business Administration to launch 406 Labs, Montana's first accelerator program. The program ran its first cohort in the Fall of 2016 and is strategically positioned to focus on preparing MSU's highest potential technologies and founders for growth and scale.In 2014, Les Co-founded The Twenty, a data science services company based in Bethesda, MD, which operates a high-profile network of senior mathematicians and computer scientists focused on specialized project-based work for clients ranging from start-ups to publicly traded companies and even government organizations.Before The Twenty, Les Co-founded RedOwl Analytics, a software product company that built a platform for identifying trends and anomalies in the digital trail of corporations to combat insider threats and mitigate risk in financial services, cyber security, and US government spaces. RedOwl was acquired by Forcepoint (Raytheon) in August 2017.Previously, Les served as a Technical Operations Officer at the Central Intelligence Agency, receiving specialized training in telecommunications and computer network operations.Before his time at the CIA, Les was a member of the professional staff of the National Security Technology Department at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab. He led an Operations Research team developing powerful predictive and geospatial analytic products to make battlefield decisions related to the counter-improvised explosive device fight in Iraq and Afghanistan.While on active duty, Les served on multiple special operations task forces and was an Aide-de-camp to a senior intelligence professional on General Stanley McChrystal's staff at the Joint Special Operations Command.Les is grateful for the opportunity to raise his family in Montana with his amazing wife, Anne Meree, and three beautiful children – Max, Emi, and Hunter.What You'll Learn:Military to Entrepreneurship to InvestingFirst Experience Raising Venture Capital as a FounderCash Burn After RaiseUnderstanding the Concept of “Founder Friendly”Investor/ Founder Relationship StrategyStrategy changes from Fund I to Fund IIRegional and Nationwide InvestingPotential of Underserved MarketsFavorite Quote:“If a founder has clear what I need to see, I get to a NO. I will have a 30 min call with that founder and say here is why we got to a...

TNT Radio
Larry Johnson on The Joe Hoft Show - 08 November 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 55:46


On today's show we get an update on the war in Ukraine/Russia conflict. GUEST OVERVIEW: Larry Johnson, who worked previously with the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. State Department's Office of Counter Terrorism, is a recognized expert in the fields of terrorism, aviation security, crisis and risk management.

Sinocism
Sinocism Podcast #5: 20th Party Congress and US-China Relations with Chris Johnson

Sinocism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 59:34


Episode Notes:A discussion recently concluded 20th Party Congress and what to expect ahead in US China relations. I'm pleased to welcome back Chris Johnson, CEO of Consultancy China Strategies Group, Senior Fellow at the Asia Society Policy Institute Center for China Analysis and former Senior China analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency. This is the 7th Party Congress that Chris has analyzed professionally.Links:John Culver: How We Would Know When China Is Preparing to Invade Taiwan - Carnegie Endowment for International PeaceTranscript:Bill: Welcome back to the very occasional Sinocism podcast. Today we are going to talk about the recently concluded 20th Party Congress and what to expect ahead in US China relations. I'm pleased to welcome back Chris Johnson, CEO of Consultancy China Strategies Group, Senior Fellow at the Asia Society Policy Institute Center for China Analysis and former Senior China analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency. This is the 7th Party Congress that Chris has analyzed professionally. So we have a lot of experience here to help us understand what just happened. Chris, welcome back and thanks for taking the time.Chris: My pleasure. Always fun to be with you, Bill.Bill: Great. Well, why don't we jump right in. I'd like to talk about what you see as the most important outcomes from the Congress starting with personnel. What do you make of the leadership team from the central committee to the Politburo to the Standing Committee and what does that say about.Chris: Yeah, well, I, think clearly Xi Jinping had a massive win, you know, with personnel. I think we see this particularly in the Politburo Standing Committee, right, where on the key portfolios that really matter to him in terms of controlling the key levers of power inside the system. So we're talking propaganda, obviously, Uh, we're talking party bureaucracy, military less so, but security services, you know, these, these sort of areas all up and down the ballot he did very well.So that's obviously very important. And I think obviously then the dropping of the so-called Communist Youth League faction oriented people in Li Keqiang and Wang Yang and, and Hu Chunhua being  kind of unceremoniously kicked off the Politburo, that tells us that. He's not in the mood to compromise with any other  interest group.I prefer to call them rather than factions. Um, so that sort of suggests to us that, you know, models that rely on that kind of an analysis are dead. It has been kind of interesting in my mind to see how quickly though that, you know, analysts who tend to follow that framework already talking about the, uh, factional elements within Xi's faction, right?So, you know, it's gonna be the Shanghai people versus the Zhijiang Army versus the Fujian people. Bill: people say there's a Tsinghua factionChris: Right. The, the infamous, non infamous Tsinghua clique and, and and so on. But I think as we look more closely, I mean this is all kidding aside, if we look more closely at the individuals, what we see is obviously these people, you know, loyalty to Xi is, is sort of like necessary, but not necessarily sufficient in explaining who these people are. Also, I just always find it interesting, you know, somehow over. Wang Huning has become a Xi Jinping loyalist. I mean, obviously he plays an interesting role for Xj Jinping, but I don't think we should kid ourselves in noting that he's been kind of shunted aside Right by being pushed into the fourth position on the standing committee, which probably tells us that he will be going to oversee the Chinese People's Consultative Congress, which is, you know, kind of a do nothing body, you know, for the most part. And, um, you know, my sense has long been, One of Xi Jinping's, I think a couple factors there with Wang Huning.Sinocism is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.One is, you know, yes, he is very talented at sort of taking their very, uh, expansive, um, theoretical ideas and coming up with snappy, um, snappy sort of catchphrases, right? This is clearly his, um, his sort of claim to fame. But, you know, we had that article last year from the magazine, Palladium that kind of painted him as some sort of an éminence grise or a Rasputin like figure, you know, in terms of his role.Uh, you know, my sense has always been, uh, as one contact, put it to me one time. You know, the issue is that such analyses tend to confuse the musician with the conductor. In other words,  Xi Jinping.  is pretty good at ideology, right? And party history and the other things that I think the others had relied on.I think the second thing with Wang Huning is, um, in a way XI can't look at him I don't think, without sort of seeing here's a guy who's changed flags, as they would say, right? He served three very different leaders, Jiang Zemin, Hu Jintao, and now Xi , um, and, and continued on and I think at some level, uh, and we look at the rest of the appointments where it appears that, uh, loyalty was much more important than merit.Um, where that's also a question mark. So there's those issues I think on the Politburo. You know, you mentioned the, the Tsinghua clique it was very interesting. You had shared with me, uh, Desmond Shum of Red Roulette fame's Twitter stream sort of debunking, you know, this, this Tsinghua clique and saying, well, it turns out in fact that the new Shanghai Municipal Party Secretary Chen Jining can't stand Chen Xi, even though, you know, they both went to Tsinghua and were there at the same time and so on.Um, you know, who knows with Desmond Shum, but I think he knows some things, right? And, and, and it just a reminder to us all, I think, how little we understand right, about these relationships, especially now, uh, with Xi's concentration of power. And also a situation where we've had nearly three years of covid isolationBill: Right. And so it's really hard to go talk to people, even the fewer and fewer numbers, people who, who know something and can talk. Back to the standing committee. I, I think certainly just from friends and contacts the biggest surprise you know, I think, uh was Li Keqiang and Wang Yang not sticking around. And as that long explainer said without naming them they were good comrades who steps aside for the good of the party in the country,Chris: Because that happens so often,Bill: whatever that means. Um, but really the, the bigger surprise was that, oh, Cai Qi showing up. Who I think when you look at the standing committee, I think the general sense is, okay, the, these people are all, you know, not, they're loyal, but they're also competent, like Li Qiang, Chris: Right, Bill: The likely new premier number two on the standing committee is pretty competent. The Shanghai lockdown, disaster aside, Cai Qi on the other hand, was just, looks more like, it's just straight up loyalty to Xi. I think he was not really on anybody's short list of who was gonna make it on there. And so, it does feel like something happened, right?Chris: Yeah. Well, um, a couple things there. I think, um, one, let's start with the. The issue you raised about the economic team cuz I think that's actually very important. Um, you know, I, at some level, sometimes I feel like I'm sort of tiring my, of my role as official narrative buster or a windmill tilter.Uh, whether, whether it's pushback from Li Keqiang or the myth of the savior premier as I was calling it, which, uh, we didn't see, or that these norms actually aren't very enduring and it's really about power politics. I, I think I'm kind of onto a new one now, which is, you know, Xi Jin ping's new team of incompetent sycophants.Right? That's kind of the label that's, uh, come out in a lot of the takes, uh, since the Congress. But to your point, I mean, you know, Li Qiang has run the three most important economic powerhouses on China's east coast, either as governor or as party chief. Right. He seems to have had a, a good relationship with both.Private sector businesses and, and foreign, you know, people forget that, you know, he got the Tesla plant built in Shanghai in a year basically. Right. And it's, uh, responsible for a very significant amount of, of Tesla's total input of vehicles. Output of vehicles. Excuse me. Um, likewise, I hear that Ding Xuexiang, even though we don't know a lot about him, uh, was rather instrumental in things.Breaking the log jam with the US uh, over the de-listing of Chinese ADRs, uh, that he had played an important role in convincing Xi Jinping it would not be a good idea, for example, to, uh, you know, we're already seeing, uh, sort of decoupling on the technology side. It would not be a good idea to encourage the Americans to decouple financially as well. So the point is I think we need to just all kind of calm down, right? And, and see how these people perform in office. He Lifeng, I think is perhaps, you know, maybe more of a question mark, but, But here too, I think it's important for us to think about how their system worksThe political report sets the frame, right? It tells us what. Okay, this is the ideological construct we're working off of, or our interpretation, our dialectical interpretation of what's going on. And that, I think the signal there was what I like to call this fortress economy, right? So self-sufficiency and technology and so on.And so then when we look at the Politburo appointments, you can see that they align pretty closely to that agenda, right? These people who've worked in state firms or scientists and you know, so on and forth.Bill: Aerospace, defenseChris: Yeah, Aerospace. Very close alignment with that agenda. I'm not saying this is the right choice for China or that it even will be successful, I'm just saying it makes sense, you know,Bill: And it is not just sycophants it is actually loyal but some expertise or experience in these key sectors Chris: Exactly.  Yeah, and, and, and, and of interest as well. You know, even people who have overlapped with Xi Jinping. How much overlap did they have? How much exposure did they have? You know, there's a lot of discussion, for example, about the new propaganda boss, Li Shulei being very close to Xi and likewise Shi Taifeng.Right? Uh, both of whom were vice presidents at the party school when, when Xi also was there. Um, but remember, you know, he was understudy to Hu Jintao at the time, you know, I mean, the party school thing was a very small part of his portfolio and they were ranked lower, you know, amongst the vice presidents of the party school.So how much actual interaction did he have? So there too, you know, I think, uh, obviously. , yes these people will do what Xi Jinping wants them to do, but that doesn't mean they're not competent. On Cai Qi, I agree with you. I think it's, it's, it's difficult. You know, my speculation would be a couple of things.One, proximity matters, right? He's been sitting in Beijing the last five years, so he is, had the opportunity to, uh, be close to the boss and, and impact that. I've heard some suggestions from contacts, which I think makes some. He was seen as more strictly enforcing the zero Covid policy. Right. In part because he is sitting in Beijing than say a Chen Min'er, right.Who arguably was a other stroke better, you know, candidate for that position on the Politburo standing committee. And there, you know, it will be interesting to see, you know, we're not sure the musical chairs have not yet finished. Right. The post party Congress for people getting new jobs. But you know, for example, if Chen Min'er stays out in Chongqing, that seems like a bit of a loss for him.Bill: Yeah, he needs to go somewhere else if he's got any hope of, um, sort of, But so one thing, sorry. One thing on the Politburo I thought was really interesting, and I know we've talked about offline, um, is that the first time the head of the Ministry State Security was, was. Promoted into the Politburo - Chen Wenqing.  And now he is the Secretary of the Central Political Legal Affairs Commission, the party body that oversees the entire security services system and legal system. and what do you think that says about priorities and, and, and where Xi sees things going?Chris: Well, I think it definitely aligns with this concept of Xi Jiping's of comprehensive national security. Right. We've, we've seen and heard and read a lot about that and it seems that the, uh, number of types of security endlessly proliferate, I think we're up to 13 or 14Bill: Everything is National Security in Xi's China.Chris: Yeah. Everything is, is national security. Uh, that's one thing I think it's interesting perhaps in the, in the frame of, you know, in an era where they are becoming a bigger power and therefore, uh, have more resources and so on. You know, is that role that's played by the Ministry of State Security, which is, you know, they have this unique role, don't they?They're in a way, they're sort of the US' Central Intelligence Agency and, and FBI, Federal Bureau of Investigation combined, and that they do have that internal security role as well, but, They are the foreign civilian anyway, uh, foreign intelligence collection arm. So perhaps, you know, over time there's been some sense that they realized, yes, cyber was great for certain things, but you still need human intelligence.Uh, you know, we don't know how well or not Chen Wenqing has performed, but you know, obviously there, this has been a relentless campaign, you know, the search for spies and so on and so forth. Um, I also think it says something about what we seem to be seeing emerging here, which is an effort to take what previously were these, you know, warring, uh, administrative or ministerial factions, right, of the Ministry of Public Security MPS, the MSS, uh, and even the party's, uh, discipline watchdog, the, uh, Central Commission on Discipline inspection, you know, in an effort to sort of knit those guys into one whole.And you know, it is interesting.Chen wending has experience in all three of those. He started off, I think as a street cop. Um, he did serve on the discipline inspection commission under, uh, Wang Qishan when things were, you know, really going  in that department in the early part of, Xi's tenure and then he's headed, uh, the Ministry of State Security.I think, you know, even more interesting probably is. The, uh, formation of the new secretariat, right? Where we have both Chen Wenqing on there and also Wang Xiaohong as a minister of Public Security, but also as a deputy on the CPLAC, right? And a seat on the secretariat. And if we look at the, um, The gentleman who's number two in the discipline inspection, uh, space, he was a longtime police officer as well.So that's very unusual. You know, uh, his name's escaping me at the moment. But, um, you know, so in effect you have basically three people on the Secretariat with security backgrounds and, you know, that's important. It means other portfolios that might be on the secretariat that have been dumped, right? So it shows something about the prioritization, uh, of security.And I think it's interesting, you know, we've, we've often struggled to understand what is the National Security Commission, how does it function, You know, these sort of things. And it's, it's still, you know, absolutely clear as mud. But what was interesting was that, you know, from whatever that early design was that had some aspect at least of looking a bit like the US style, National Security Commission, they took on a much more sort of internal looking flavor.And it had always been my sort of thought that one of the reasons Xi Jinping created this thing was to break down, you know, those institutional rivalries and barriers and force, you know, coordination on these, on these institutions. So, you know, bottom line, I think what we're seeing is a real effort by Xi Jinping to You know, knit together a comprehensive, unified, and very effective, you know, stifling, really security apparatus. And, uh, I don't expect to see that change anytime soon. And then, you know, as you and I have been discussing recently, we also have, uh, another Xi loyalist Chen Yixin showing up as Chen Wenqing's successor right at the Ministry of State SecurityBill: And he remains Secretary General of the Political and Legal Affairs Commission too.Chris: Exactly. So, you know, from, from a, a sheet home where Xi Jinping five years ago arguably had very loose control, if at all, we now have a situation where he's totally dominant. Bill: I think the, the official on the Secretariat, I think it's Liu Jinguo.Chris: That's the one. Yes. Thank you. I'm getting old…Bill: He also has, has a long history of the Ministry of Public Security system. Um, but yeah, it does, it does seem like it's a, it's a real, I mean it, I I, I don't wanna use the word securitization, but it does like this is the indication of a, of a real, sort of, it just sort of fits with the, the general trend  towards much more focus on national security. I mean, what about on the, the Central Military Commission? Right? Because one of the surprises was, um, again, and this is where the norms were broken, where you have Zhang Youxia, who should have retired based on his age, but he's 72, he's on the Politburo he stays as a vice chair of the CMCChris: Yep. Yeah, no, at, at, at the rip old age of 72. It's a little hard, uh, to think of him, you know, mounting a tank or something  to go invade Taiwan or whatever the, you know, whatever the case may be. But, you know, I, I think here again, the narratives might be off base a little bit, you know, it's this issue of, you know, well he's just picked, you know, these sycophantic loyalists, He's a guy who has combat experience, right?And that's increasingly rare. Um, I don't think it's any surprise that. That himself. And, uh, the, uh, uh, gentleman on the CMC, uh, Li, who is now heading the, um, Joint Chiefs of Staff, he also has Vietnam combat experience, not from 79, but from the, uh, the border incursions that went on into the80s. Um, so it's not that surprising really.But, but obviously, you know, Zhang Youxia is very close to Xi Jinping, their father's fought together, right? Um, and they have that sort of, uh, blood tie and Xi is signaling, I want, uh, I. Political control and also technologically or, or, um, you know, operationally competent people. I think the other fascinating piece is we see once again no vice chairman from the political commissar iatside of the PLA.I think that's very interesting. You know, a lot of people, including myself, were betting that Miao HuaWould, would, would get the promotion. He didn't, you know, we can't know. But my sense is in a way, Xi Jiping is still punishing that side of the PLA for Xu Caihou's misdoings. Right. You know, and that's very interesting in and of itself.Also, it may be a signal that I don't need a political commissar vice chairman because I handle the politicsBill: And, and, and he, yeah. And in this, this new era that the, the next phase of the Xi era, it, it is, uh, everybody knows, right? It's, it's all about loyalty to Xi.Chris: we just saw right, uh, today, you know, uh, yet, yet more instructions about the CMC responsibilities, Chairman, responsibility systems. Bill: Unfortunately they didn't release the full text but it would be fascinating to see what's in there.Chris: And they never do on these things, which is, uh, which is tough. But, um, you know, I think we have a general sense of what would be in it, . But, but even that itself, right, you know, is a very major thing that people, you know, didn't really pick up. Certain scholars, certainly like James Mulvenon and other people who are really good on this stuff noticed it. But this shift under Hu Jintao was a CMC vice chairman responsibility system. In other words, he was subletting the operational matters certainly to his uniformed officers, Xi Jinping doesn't do thatBill: Well, this, and here we are, right where he can indeed I mean, I, I had written in the newsletter, um, you know, that she had, I thought, I think he ran the table in terms of personnel.Chris: Oh, completely. Yeah.Bill: And this is why it is interesting he kept around folks like Wang Huning, but we'll move on. The next question I had really was about Xi's report to the party Congress and we had talked, I think you'd also, um, you've talked about on our previous podcasts, I mean there, there seems to be a pretty significant shift in the way Xi is talking about the geopolitical environment and their assessment and how they see the world. Can you talk about a little bit?Chris: Yeah, I mean, I think definitely we saw some shifts there and, uh, you know, you and I have talked a lot about it. You know, there are problems with word counting, right? You know, and when you look at the thing and you just do a machine search, and it's like, okay, well security was mentioned 350 times or whatever, but, but the, you know, in what context?Right. Um, and, uh, our, uh, mutual admiration society, the, uh, the China Media project, uh, I thought they did an excellent piece on that sort of saying, Remember, it's the words that go around the buzzword that matter, you know, just as much. But what we can say unequivocally is that two very important touchstones that kind of explain their thinking on their perception of not only their external environment, but really kind of their internal environment, which had been in the last several political reports, now are gone. And those are this idea of China's enjoying a period of strategic opportunity and this idea that peace and development are the underlying trend of the times. And, you know, on the period of strategic opportunity, I think it's important for a couple reasons. One, just to kind of break that down for our listeners in a way that's not, you know, sort of, uh, CCP speak, , uh, the, the basic idea was that China judged that it's external security environment was sufficiently benign, that they could focus their energies on economic development.Right? So obviously that's very important. I also think it was an important governor, and I don't think I've seen anything out there talking about its absence in this, uh, political report on this topic, It was a, it was an important governor on sort of breakneck Chinese military development, sort of like the Soviet Union, right?In other words, as long as you were, you know, sort of judging that your external environment was largely benign, you. Didn't really have a justification to have a massive defense budget or to be pushy, you know, in the neighborhood, these sort of things. And people might poo poo that and sort of say, Well, you know, this is all just rhetoric and so on. No, they actually tend to Bill: Oh, that's interesting. Well, then that fits a little bit, right, Cuz they added the, the wording around strategic deterrence in the report as well  which is seen as a, you know, modernizing, expanding their nuclear forces, right?Chris: Exactly, right. So, you know, that's, uh, an important absence and the fact that, you know, the word, again, word searching, right. Um, strategic and opportunity are both in there, but they're separated and balanced by this risks and challenges, languages and, and so on. Bill: Right the language is very starkly different. Chris: Yeah. And then likewise on, on peace and development. This one, as you know, is, is even older, right? It goes back to the early eighties, I believe, uh, that it's been in, in these political reports. And, uh, you know, there again, the idea was sort of not only was this notion that peace and economic development were the dominant, you know, sort of trend internationally, globally, they would be an enduring one. You know, this idea of the trend of the times, right? Um, now that's missing. So what has replaced it in both these cases is this spirit of struggle, right? Um, and so that's a pretty stark departure and that in my mind just sort of is a real throwback to what you could call the period of maximum danger for the regime in the sixties, right? When they had just split off with the Soviets and they were still facing unremitting hostility from the west after the Korean War experience and, and so on. So, you know, there's definitely a, a decided effort there. I think also we should view the removal of these concepts as a culmination of a campaign that Xi Jinping has been on for a while.You know, as you and I have discussed many times before, from the minute he arrived, he began, I think, to paint this darker picture of the exterior environment. And he seems to have always wanted to create a sort of sense of urgency, certainly maybe even crisis. And I think a big part of that is to justifying the power grab, right? If the world outside is hostile, you need, you know, a strongman. Bill: Well that was a lot of the propaganda going into the Party of Congress about the need for sort of a navigator helmsman because know, we we're, we're closest we have ever been to the great rejuvenation, but it's gonna be really hard and we need sort of strong leadership right. It was, it was all building to that. This is why Ci needs to stay for as long as he wants to stay.Chris: and I think we saw that reflected again just the other day in this Long People's Daily piece by Ding Xuexing, right, Where he's talking again about the need for unity, the throwback, as you mentioned in your newsletter to Mao's commentary, there is not to be lost on any of us you know, the fact that the Politburo standing committee's. Uh, first field trip is out to Yan'an, right? I mean, you know, these are messages, right? The aren't coincidental.Bill: No, it, it is. The thing that's also about the report that's interesting is that while there was, speaking of word counts, there was no mention of the United States, but it certainly feels like that was the primary backdrop for this entire discussion around. So the, the shifting geopolitical, uh, assessments and this broader, you know, and I think one of the things that I, and I want to talk to as we get into this, a little bit about US China relations, but is it she has come to the conclusion that the US is implacably effectively hostile, and there is no way that they're gonna get through this without some sort of a broader struggle?Chris: I don't know if they, you know, feel that conflict is inevitable. In fact, I kind of assume they don't think that because that's pretty grim picture for them, you know? Um, but I, I do think there's this notion that. They've now had two years to observe the Biden administration. Right? And to some degree, I think it's fair to say that by certain parties in the US, Xi Jinping, maybe not Xi Jinping, but a Wang Qishan or some of these characters were sold a bit of a bag of goods, right?Oh, don't worry, he's not Trump, he's gonna, things will be calmer. We're gonna get back to dialogue and you know, so on and so forth. And that really hasn't happened. And when we look at. Um, when we look at measures like the recent, chip restrictions, which I'm sure we'll discuss at some point, you know, that would've been, you know, the, the wildest dream, right of certain members of the Trump administration to do something that, uh, that's that firm, right? So, um, I think the conclusion of the Politburo then must be, this is baked into the cake, right? It's bipartisan. Um, the earliest we'll see any kind of a turn here is 2024. I think they probably feel. Um, and therefore suddenly things like a no limits partnership with Russia, right, start to make more sense. Um, but would really makes sense in that if that is your framing, and I think it is, and you therefore see the Europeans as like a swing, right, in this equation. This should be a great visit, right, for Chancellor Scholz, uh, and uh, I can't remember if it was you I was reading or someone else here in the last day or so, but this idea that if the Chinese are smart, they would get rid of these sanctions on Bill: That was me. Well, that was in my newsletterChris: Yeah. Parliamentary leaders and you know, Absolutely. Right. You know, that's a no brainer, but. I don't think they're gonna do it , but, but you know, this idea definitely that, and, and when they talk in the political report, you know, it, it's, it's like, sir, not appearing in this film, right, from Money Python, but we know who the people who are doing the bullying, you know, uh, is and the long armed jurisdiction and , so on and so forth and all, I mean, all kidding aside, I think, you know, they will see something like the chip restrictions effectively as a declaration of economic war. I don't think that's going too far to say that.Bill: It goes to the heart of their sort of technological project around rejuvenation. I mean, it is, it is a significant. sort of set of really kind of a, I would think, from the Chinese perspective aggressive policies against them,Chris: Yeah, and I mean, enforcement will be key and we'll see if, you know, licenses are granted and how it's done. And we saw, you know, already some, some backing off there with regard to this US person, uh, restriction and so on. But, but you know, it's still pretty tough stuff. There's no two ways aboutBill: No, and I, I wonder, and I worry that here in DC. You know, where the mood is very hawkish. If, if people here really fully appreciate sort of the shift that's taking, that seems to be taking place in Beijing and how these actions are viewed.Chris: Well, I, I think that's a really, you put your hand on it really, really interesting way, Bill, because, you know, let's face it really since the Trump trade war started, right? We've all analysts, you know, pundits, uh, even businesses and government people have been sort of saying, you know, when are the Chinese gonna punch back? You know, when are they going to retaliate? Right? And we talk about rare earths and we talk about Apple and TeslaBill: They slapped some sanctions on people but they kind of a jokeChris:  And I guess what I'm saying is I kind of worry we're missing the forest from the trees. Right. You know, the, the, the work report tells us, the political report tells us how they're reacting. Right. And it is hardening the system, moving toward this fortress economy, you know, so on and so forth. And I wanna be real clear here, you know, they're not doing this just because they're reacting to the United States. Xi Jinping presumably wanted to do this all along, but I don't think we can say that the actions they perceive as hostile from the US aren't playing a pretty major role in allowing him to accelerate.Bill: Well, they called me. Great. You justifying great Accelerationist, right? Trump was called that as well, and, and that, that's what worries me too, is we're in. Kind of toxic spiral where, where they see us doing something and then they react. We see them do something and we react and, and it doesn't feel like sort of there's any sort of a governor or a break and I don't see how we figure that out.Chris: Well, I think, you know, and I'm sure we'll come to this later in our discussion, but you know, uh, yes, that's true, but you know, I'm always deeply skeptical of these inevitability memes, whether it's, you know, Thucydides trap or, you know, these other things. Last time I checked, there is something called political agency, right?In other words, leaders can make choices and they can lead if they want to, right? They have an opportunity to do so at in Bali, and you know, we'll have to see some of the, you know, early indications are perhaps they're looking at sort of a longer meeting. So that would suggest maybe there will be some discussion of some of these longstanding issues.Maybe we will see some of the usual, you know, deliverable type stuff. So there's an opportunity. I, I think one question is, can the domestic politics on either side allow for seizing that opportunity? You know, that's an open.Bill: Interesting. There's a couple things in the party constitution, which I think going into the Congress, you know, they told us they were gonna amend the Constitution. There were expectations that it, the amendments were gonna reflect an increase in Xi's power, uh, things like this, this idea of the two establishments, uh, which for listeners are * "To establish the status of Comrade Xi Jinping as the core of the Party's Central Committee and of the whole Party"* "To establish the guiding role of Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for the New Era"The thinking, and I, I certainly believe that, I thought that they would write that in. There was some talk that, uh, Xi Jinping Thought the longer version would be truncated to just Xi Jinping thought. that possibly he might get, a, a sort of another title like People's Leader. None of those happened. One thing that did happen, What's officially translated by the Chinese side in English as the two upholds- “Uphold the 'core' status of General Secretary Xi Jinping within the CC and “Uphold the centralized authority of the Party” those were written in. And so the question is, was there some kind of pushback or are we misreading we what mattered? And actually the two upholds are more important than the two of establishes.Chris: Well, I, and I think it, this may be a multiple choice answer, right? There might be elements of all the above in there. Uh, you know, I think it is important that he didn't get the truncation to Xi Jinping thought. You have to think that that was something he was keen on. In retrospect, it may be that it was something akin. I've always felt, you know, another thing that was on the table that didn't happen was reestablishing the party chairmanship. My view had always been he was using that largely as a bargaining chip. That, you know, in some ways it creates more trouble than it's worth you. If you're gonna have a chairman, you probably have to have vice chairman and what does that say about the succession? I mean, of course he could have, you know, a couple of geezers on there.  as vice chairman too. , But I, my view was always is he was holding that out there to trade away. Right. You know, at, at the last minute. Um, maybe that's what happened with Xi Jinping thought. I don't know.You know, uh, there have been some media articles, one of which, You and I were discussing yesterday from, uh, the Japanese, uh, publication Nikkei, you know, that suggested that, you know, the elders had, this was their last gasp, right? So the Jiang Zemins and the Zeng Qinghongs and Hu Jinataos, so on. Um, I'm a little skeptical of that. It is possible. Uh, but, um, I, I'd be a little skeptical of that. You know, it's, it's not at all clear that they had any kind of a role, you know, even at Beidaihe this year and so on, Jiang Zemin didn't even attend the Party Congress so clearly, you know, he must be pretty frail or he thought it was not with his time. You know, a little hard to say, but, you know, I kind of struggle with the notion that, you know, the 105 year old Song Ping gets up on a chair or something and starts,  starts making trouble. Right. You know, uh, the poor man's probably lucky if he stays awake during the meeting. Bill: One question, and again, because of the, just, you know, how much more opaque Chinese politics are than the really I think they've ever been. Um, but just one question. It mean, is it possible, for example, that you know, it's more important to get the personnel done. It's more, and then once you get your, you stack the central committee, you get the politburo, you get the standing committee, that these things are sort of a next phase.Chris: yeah, it's entirely possible and, and I think it, it, it does dovetail with this idea that, you know, another reflection from both the political report and the lineup in my mind, is Xi Jinping is a man in a hurry. Right? And he's kind of projected that, as you said, the great accelerator since he arrived.But I think he sees this next five years is really fundamental, right in terms of breaking through on these chokepoint technologies as they call them. You know, these sort of things. And so maybe therefore having the right people in place to handle, you know, uh, speedier policy, execution, you know, was more important.Likewise, I mean, he's sort of telegraphing, He's gonna be around for a while, right? No successor, no visible successor anywhere. Bill: A successor would need likely need five years on the standing committee. So we're looking at ten more years.Chris: Yes, exactly. And so there will be time. The other thing is, um, Xi Jinping is a, is a sort of determined fellow, right? You know, so of interest, even before the 19th Party Congress, I'd been hearing very strong rumors that the notion of lingxiu was out there, that he was contemplating it, right? And so then we see the buildup with, uh, Renmin lingxiu and so on and so forth.And, you know, it didn't happen clearly at the 19th. It didn't happen. But it doesn't mean it won't, you know, at some point. And I think it's really important also to think about, you know, We just saw a pretty serious, um, enterprise of the, you know, quote unquote norm busting, right? So what's to say that mid-course in this five years, he doesn't, uh, hold another sort of extraordinary conference of party delegates like them, Deng Xiaoping did in 1985, right, to push through some of these. You never know, right? In other words, these things don't necessarily have to happen. Just at Party Congresses. So my guess is, you know, this isn't over yet. Uh, but you know, at some level, given how the system was ramping up with those articles about Navigator and the people's leader stuff and so on, you know, that's usually a tell, and yet it didn't happen. And, and so something interesting there. Bill: now they're in the mode of, they're out with these sort of publicity, propaganda education teams where they go out throughout the country and talk about the spirit of the party Congress and push all the key messaging. Um, you know, so far none of those People's leader truncation have happened in that, which is I think an area where some people thought, Well, maybe that could sort of come after the Congress.Chris: What is interesting is it's all two establishments all the time in those discussions, so that's been very interesting since it didn't make it into the, uh, into the document. I guess the other thing is, At some level, is it sort of a distinction without a difference? You know, I, I haven't done the work on this to see, but my guess is short of, you know, the many times they've just junked the entire constitution and rewritten it, this is probably the most amendments there have been, you know, in the to at one time. You know, to the 1982 constitution, and most of them are his various buzzwords. Right. Um, and you know, I think you've been talking about this in the newsletter, there may very well be, uh, something to this issue of, you know, which is the superior thought two establishments or to upholds/safeguards?Bill: and even if the two establishes were superior and then it didn't go in, then somehow it will be theoretically flipped to what got in the ConstitutionChris: I mean, I guess the, the, the thing though where we, it's fair to say that maybe this wasn't his ideal outcome. To me, there's been a very clear and you know, structured stepwise approach on the ideology from the word go. Right? And the first was to create right out of the shoot, this notion of, you know, three eras, right?The, Mao period, Deng  and those other guys we don't talk about it anymore, period.  and Xi Jinping's new era, right? And then that was. You know, sort of crystallized right at the 19th Party Congress when you know, Xi Jinping thought for horribly long name went into the Constitution. And so, you know, the next step kind of seemed like that should be it.And as we've discussed before, you know, if he's able to get just Thought, it certainly enhances his ability to stay around for a very long time and it makes his diktats and so on even more unquestionable. But you know, you can say again, matter of prioritization. With a team where there's really no visible or other opposition, does it really matter? You know, in other words, no one's gonna be questioning his policy ideas anyway.Bill: Just an aside, but on  his inspection, the new standing committee will go on group trip right after the Party Congress and the first trip sends key messages. And group went to Yan'an, you know, they went, they went to the caves. Um, and you know, in the long readout or long CCTV report of the meeting, the visit, there was a section where the tour guide or the person introducing some of the exhibits talked about how the, the famous song, the East Is Red was,  by a person, written by the people sort of spontaneously, and it w it definitely caused some tittering about, well, what are they trying to signal for?You know, are we gonna be seeing some  Xi songs? there's some kind of really interesting signaling going on that I don't think we quite have figured out how to parse Chris: My takeaway on all this has been, I, I need to go back and do a little more book work on, you know, what was, what was the content of the seventh party Congress? What were the outcomes? I mean, I have the general sense, right? Like you, I immediately, you know, started brushing up on it. But, you know, Xi delivered a, an abridged work report. Right, A political report, which is exactly what Mao did then. I mean, in other words, they're not kidding around with the parallelism here. The question is what's the message?Bill: Just for background, at the visit last week to Yan'an, and the first spot that was in the propaganda was the, the, site of the seventh party Congress which is where…to be very simplistic, the seventh party was really moment, you know, as at the end of the Yan'am rectification came in, it was the moment where sort of Mao fully asserted his dominance throughout the system. Mao Thought etc. Right? The signaling, you could certainly, could certainly take a view that, you know, he doesn't do these things by coincidence, and this is. This is signaling both of, you know, can through anything because they, livedin caves and ended up beating the Japanese and then won the Civil War. You know this, and we can, and by the way, we have a dominant leader. I mean, there are ways, again, I'm being simplistic, but the symbolism was not, I think one that would, for example, give a lot of confidence to investors, which I think is, you know, one, one of the many reasons we've seen until the rumors earlier this week, a, pretty big selloff in the, in the Hong Kong and manland stock markets rightChris: most definitely. And I think, you know, this is the other thing about, about what I was trying to get at earlier with, uh, forest and trees, right? You know, in other words, . Um, he's been at this for a while too. You know, there's a reason why he declared a new long march right in depths of the trade war with Trump.Bill: And a new historical resolution, only the third in historyChris: Yeah. And they have been stepwise building since then. And this is the next building block.Bill: The last thought, I mean, he is 69. He's. 10 years younger than President Joe Biden. He could go, he could be around for a long timeBill: well just quickly, cause I know, uh, we don't have that much more time, but I, you say anything about your thoughts on Hu Jintao and what happened?My first take having had a father and a stepfather had dementia was, um, you know, maybe too sympathetic to the idea that, okay, he's having some sort of a senior cognitive moment. You know, you can get. easily agitated, and you can start a scene. And so therefore, was humiliating and symbolic at the end of the Communist Youth League faction, but maybe it was, it was benign as opposed to some of the other stuff going around. But I think might be wrong so I'd love your take on that.  Chris: Well, I, I think, you know, I, I kind of shared your view initially when I watched the, uh, I guess it was an AFP had the first, you know, sort of video that was out there and, you know, he appeared to be stumbling around a bit. He definitely looked confused and, you know, like, uh, what we were discussing earlier on another subject, this could be a multiple choice, you know, A and B or whatever type scenario as well.We don't know, I mean, it seems pretty well established that he has Parkinson's, I think the lead pipe pincher for me though, was that second longer one Singapore's channel, Channel News Asia put out. I mean, he is clearly tussling with Li Zhanshu about something, right. You know that that's. Yes, very clear. And you know, if he was having a moment, you know, when they finally get him up out of the chair and he seems to be kind of pulling back and so on, you know, he moves with some alacrity there,  for an 80 year old guy. Uh, I don't know if he was being helped to move quickly or he, you know, realized it was time to exit stage.Right. But I think, you know, as you said in your newsletter, I, we probably will never know. Um, but to me it looked an awful lot like an effort by Xi Jinping to humiliate him. You know, I mean, there was a reason why they brought the cameras back in at that moment, you know? Unless we believe that that just happened spontaneously in terms of Hu Jintao has his freak out just as those cameras were coming back in the stone faces of the other members of the senior leadership there on the rostrum and you know, Wand Hunting, pulling Li Zhanshu back down kind of saying basically, look buddy, this is politics, don't you don't wanna, that's not a good look for you trying to care for Hu Jintao. You know, I mean obviously something was going on, you know? No, no question. Bill: Right. And feeds into  the idea that Hu Chunhua, we all expected that he at least be on the Politburo again, and he's, he's off, so maybe something, something was going Chris: Well, I, I think what we know from observing Xi Jinping, right? We know that this is a guy who likes to keep people off balance, right? Who likes to keep the plate spinning. He, this is definitely the Maoist element of his personality, you know, whether it's strategic disappearances or this kind of stuff. And I think it's entirely plausible that he might have made some last minute switches right, to, uh, the various lists that were under consideration that caused alarm, you know, among those who thought they were on a certain list and  and no longer were.Bill: and then, and others who were smart enough to realize that if he made those switches, they better just go with it.Chris: Yeah, go along with it. Exactly. I mean, you know, in some ways the most, aside from what happened to Hu Jintao, the, the most, um, disturbing or compelling, depending on how you wanna look at it, part of that video is when Hu Jintao, you know, sort of very, um, delicately taps Li Keqiang on the shoulder. He doesn't even look at it, just keeps looking straight ahead. Uh, and that's tough. And as you pointed out in the newsletter and elsewhere, you know, how difficult must have that have been for Hu Jintao's son Hu Haifeng, who's in the audience watching this all go on? You know, it's, uh, it's tough. Bill: And then two two days later attends a meeting where he praises Xi to high heaven.Chris: Yeah, exactly. So, so if the darker narrative is accurate, I guess one thing that concerns me a bit is, as you know, well, I have never been a fan of these, uh, memes about comparing Xi Jinping to either Stalin or Mao in part because I don't see him as a whimsical guy. They were whimsical people. I think because of his tumultuous upbringing, he understands the problems with that kind of an approach to life, but this was a very ruthless act. If that more malign, you know, sort of definition is true and that I think that says something about his mentality that perhaps should concern us if that's the case. Bill: It has real implications, not just for domestic also potentially for its foreign policy.Chris: Absolutely. I mean, what it shows, right to some degree, again, man in a hurry, this is a tenacious individual, right?  if he's willing to do that. And so if you're gonna, you know, kick them in the face on chips and, you know, things like that, um, you should be taking that into consideration.Bill: And I think preparing for a more substantive response  that is more thought out and it's also, it happened, it wasn't very Confucian for all this talk Confucian definitely not. and values. One last question, and it is related is what do you make of this recent upsurge or talk in DC from various officials that PRC has accelerated its timeline to absorb Taiwan, because nothing in the public documents indicates any shift in that timeline.Chris: No. Uh, and well, first of all, do they, do they have a timeline? Right? You know, I mean, the whole idea of a timeline is kind of stupid, right? You don't, if you're gonna invade somewhere, you say, Hey, we're gonna do it on on this date. I mean, 2049. Okay. Bill: The only timeline that I think you can point to is is it the second centenary goal and, and Taiwan getting quote unquote, you know, returning Taiwan to the motherland's key to the great rejuvenation,Chris: Yeah, you can't have rejuvenation without it. Bill: So then it has to be done by 2049. 27 years, but they've never come out and specifically said 27 years or 2049. But that's what No. that's I think, is where the timeline idea comes from.Chris: Oh yes, definitely. And, and I think some confusion of. What Xi Jinping has clearly set out and reaffirmed in the political report as these important, um, operational benchmarks for the PLA, the People's Liberation Army to achieve by its hundredth anniversary in 2027. But that does not a go plan for Taiwan make, you know, And so it's been confusing to me trying to understand this. And of course, you know, I, I'm joking, but I'm not, you know, if we, if we listen now to the chief of naval operations of the US Navy, you know, like they're invading tomorrow, basically.My former colleague from the CIA, John Culver's, done some very, you know, useful public work on this for the Carnegie, where he sort his endowment, where he sort of said, you know, look, there's certain things we would have to see, forget about, you know, a D-day style invasion, any type of military action that, that you don't need intelligence methods to find out. Right. You know, uh, canceling, uh, conscription, demobilization cycles, you know, those, those sort of things. Um, we don't see that happening. So I've been trying to come to grips with why the administration seems fairly seized with this and and their public commentary and so on. What I'm confident of is there's no smoking gun you know, unlike, say the Russia piece where it appears, we had some pretty compelling intelligence. There doesn't seem to be anything that says Xi Jinping has ordered invasion plans for 2024, you know, or, or, or even 2027. Um, so I'm pretty confident that's not the case. And so then it becomes more about an analytic framework. And I, from what I can tell, it's seems to be largely based on what, uh, in, you know, the intelligence community we would call calendar-int.. calendar intelligence. In other words, you know, over the next 18 months, a lot of stuff's going to happen. We're gonna have our midterm elections next week. It's pretty likely the Republicans get at least one chamber of Congress, maybe both.That would suggest that things like the Taiwan Policy Act and, you know, really, uh, things that have, uh, Beijing's undies in a bunch, uh, you know, could really come back on, uh, the radar pretty forcibly and pretty quickly. Obviously Taiwan, nobody talks about it, but Taiwan's having municipal elections around the same time, and normally that would be a very inside Taiwan baseball affair, nobody would care. But the way that KMT ooks like they will not perform, I should say,  in those municipal elections. They could be effectively wiped out, you know, as a, as a sort of electable party in Taiwan. That's not a good news story for Beijing.And then of course we have our own presidential in 2024 and Taiwan has a presidential election in 24 in the US case.I mean, look, we could end up with a President Pompeo, right? Or a President DeSantis or others who. Been out there sort of talking openly about Taiwan independence and recognizing Taiwan. And similarly, I think whoever succeeds, uh, President Tsai in Taiwan, if we assume it will likely be a a, a Democratic Progressive party president, will almost by definition be more independence oriented.So I think the administration is saying there's a lot of stuff that's gonna get the Chinese pretty itchy, you know, over this next 18 month period. So therefore we need to be really loud in our signaling to deter. Right. And okay. But I think there's a risk with that as well, which they don't seem to be acknowledging, which is you might create a self-fulfilling prophecy.I mean, frankly, that's what really troubles me about the rhetoric. And so, for example, when Secretary Blinken last week or the before came out and said  Yeah, you know, the, the, the Chinese have given up on the status quo. I, I, I've seen nothing, you know, that would suggest that the political report doesn't suggest. Bill: They have called it a couple of times  so-called status quo.Chris: Well, Fair enough. Yeah. Okay. That's, that's fine. Um, but I think if we look at the reason why they're calling it the so-called status quo, it's because it's so called now because the US has been moving the goalposts on the status quo.Yeah. In terms of erosion of the commitment to the one China policy. And the administration can say all at once, they're not moving the goal post, but they are, I mean, let's just be honest.Bill: Now, and they have moved it more than the Trump administration did, don't you think?Chris: Absolutely. Yeah. Um, you know, no president has said previously we will defend Taiwan  multiple times. Right. You know, um, and things like, uh, you know, Democracy, someone, I mean, this comes back also to the, the framing, right, of one of the risks I think of framing the relationship as democracy versus autocracy is that it puts a very, uh, heavy incentive then for the Biden administration or any future US administration to, you know, quote unquote play the Taiwan card, right, as part of said competition.Whereas if you don't have that framing, I don't think that's necessarily as automatic. Right? In other words, if that's the framing, well Taiwan's a democracy, so we have to lean in. Right? You know? Whereas if it's a more say, you know, straight realist or national interest driven foreign policy, you might not feel that in every instance you've gotta do that,Bill: No, and and I it, that's an interesting point. And I also think too that, um, I really do wonder how much Americans care, right? And, and whether or not we're running the risk of setting something up or setting something in motion that, you know, again, it's easy to be rhetorical about it, but that we're frankly not ready to deal withChris: Well, and another thing that's interesting, right, is that, um, to that point, Some of the administration's actions, you know, that are clearly designed to show toughness, who are they out toughing? You know, in some cases it feels like they're out toughing themselves, right? I mean, obviously the Republicans are watching them and so on and all of that.Um, but you know, interesting, uh, something that came across my thought wave the other day that I hadn't really considered. We're seeing pretty clear indications that a Republican dominated Congress after the midterms may be less enthusiastic about support to Ukraine, we're all assuming that they're gonna be all Taiwan support all the time.Is that a wrong assumption? You know, I mean, in other words, Ukraine's a democracy, right? And yet there's this weird strain in the Trumpist Wing of the Republican party that doesn't wanna spend the money. Right. And would that be the case for Taiwan as well? I don't know, but you know, the point is, I wonder if the boogieman of looking soft is, is sort of in their own heads to some degree.And, and even if it isn't, you know, sometimes you have to lead. Bill: it's not clear the allies are listening. It doesn't sound like the Europeans would be on board withChris: I think very clearly they're not. I mean, you know, we're about to see a very uncomfortable bit of Kabuki theater here, aren't we? In the next couple of days with German Chancellor Sholz going over and, um, you know, if you, uh, read the op-ed he wrote in Politico, you know, it's, it's painful, right? You can see him trying to, uh, Trying to, uh, you know, straddle the fence and, and walk that line.And, and obviously there are deep, deep divisions in his own cabinet, right? You know, over this visit, the foreign minister is publicly criticizing him, you know, and so on. So I think this is another aspect that might be worrisome, which is the approach. You know, my line is always sort of a stool, if it's gonna be stable, needs three legs, right.And on US-China relations, I think that is, you know, making sure our own house is in order. Domestic strengthening, these guys call it, coordinating with allies and partners, certainly. But then there's this sort of talking to the Chinese aspect and through a policy, what I tend to call strategic avoidance, we don't.Talk to them that much. So that leg is missing. So then those other two legs need to be really strong. Right. Um, and on domestic strengthening, Okay. Chips act and so on, that's good stuff. On allies and partners, there seems to be a bit of an approach and I think the chip restrictions highlight this of, look, you're either for us or against us.Right? Whereas I think in, you know, the good old Cold War I, we seem to be able to understand that a West Germany could do certain things for us vis-a-vis the Soviets and certain things they couldn't and we didn't like it and we complained, but we kind of lived with it, right? If we look at these chip restrictions, it appears the administration sort of said, Look, we've been doing this multilateral diplomacy on this thing for a year now, it's not really delivering the goods. The chips for framework is a mess, so let's just get it over with and drag the allies with us, you know? Um, and we'll see what ramifications that will have.Bill: Well on that uplifting note, I, I think I'm outta questions. Is there anything else you'd like to add?Chris: Well, I think, you know, something just to consider is this idea, you know, and maybe this will help us close on a more optimistic note. Xi Jinping is telling us, you know, he's hardening the system, he's, he's doing this fortress economy thing and so on. But he also is telling us, I have a really difficult set of things I'm trying to accomplish in this five years.Right? And that may mean a desire to signal to the us let's stabilize things a bit, not because he's having a change of heart or wants a fundamental rapprochement, so on and so forth. I don't think that's the case, but might he want a bit of room, right? A breathing room. Bill: Buy some time, buy some spaceChris: Yeah, Might he want that? He might. You know, and so I think then a critical question is how does that get sorted out in the context of the negotiations over the meeting in Bali, if it is a longer meeting, I think, you know, so that's encouraging for that. Right. To some degree. I, I, I would say, you know, if we look at what's just happened with the 20th party Congress and we look at what's about to happen, it seems with our midterms here in the United States, Who's the guy who's gonna be more domestically, politically challenged going into this meeting, and therefore have less room to be able to seize that opportunity if it does exist.Exactly. Because I, I think, you know, the, the issue is, The way I've been framing it lately, you know, supposedly our position is the US position is strategic competition and China says, look, that's inappropriate, and we're not gonna sign onto it and forget it.You know, my own view is we kind of have blown past strategic competition where now in what I would call strategic rivalry, I think the chip restrictions, you know, are, are a giant exclamation point, uh, under that, you know, and so on. And my concern is we're kind of rapidly headed toward what I would call strategic enmity.And you know, that all sounds a bit pedantic, but I think that represents three distinct phases of the difficulty and the relationship. You know, strategic enmity is the cold, the old Cold War, what we had with the Soviets, right? So we are competing against them in a brass tax manner across all dimensions. And if it's a policy that, you know, hurts us, but it hurts them, you know, 2% more we do it, you know, kind of thing. I don't think we're there yet. And the meeting offers an opportunity to, you know, arrest the travel from strategic rivalry to strategic enmity. Let's see if there's something there/Bill: And if, and if we don't, if it doesn't arrest it, then I think the US government at least has to do a much better job of explaining to the American people why we're headed in this direction and needs  to do a much better job with the allies cuz because again, what I worry about is we're sort of heading down this path and it doesn't feel like we've really thought it through.You know, there are lots of reasons  be on this path, but there's also needs to be a much more of a comprehensive understanding of the, of the costs and the ramifications and the solutions and have have an actual sort of theory of the case about how we get out the other side of this in a, in a better way.Chris: Yeah, I think that's important. I want to be real, um, fair to the administration. You know, they're certainly more thoughtful and deliberative than their predecessor. Of course, the bar was low, but, um, you know, they, they seem to approach these things in a pretty. Dedicated and careful manner. And I think they really, you know, take, take things like, uh, looking at outbound investment restrictions, you know, my understanding is they have been, you know, seeking a lot of input about unintended consequences and so on. But then you look at something like the chips piece and it just seems to me that those in the administration who had been pushing for, you know, more there for some time, had a quick moment where they basically said, look, this thing's not working with multilaterally, Let's just do it, you know? And then, oh, now we're seeing the second and third and other order consequences of it. And the risk is that we wind up, our goal is to telegraph unity to Beijing and shaping their environment around them as the administration calls it. We might be signaling our disunity, I don't know, with the allies, and obviously that would not be a good thingBill: That's definitely a risk. Well, thanks Chris. It's always great to talk to you and Thank you for listening to the occasional Sinocism podcast. Thank you, Chris.Chris: My pleasure. Sinocism is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit sinocism.com/subscribe

Rethink Podcast with Jim Burgen (Audio)
Human Trafficking, Porn, and Why Your Kids are at Risk with Nic McKinley | Ep 320

Rethink Podcast with Jim Burgen (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 64:13


As an Operative who served as a Country Chief for a Special Unit within the CIA, Nic witnessed not only the epidemic of child trafficking within illicit markets, but also the unrealized opportunity to apply his understanding and training to influence this global crisis. As Nic began to work with experts to better understand the problem in the United States, he found it impossible to turn a blind eye. As a result, DeliverFund was officially established as a 501c3 in October 2014 and our counter human trafficking organization, focused on ending sex slavery in the United States got to work.Nic spent 11 years in US Special Operations as an Air Force Pararescueman prior to being recruited to the Central Intelligence Agency. Due to his highly specialized training and experience in both special and intelligence operations, Nic has a firm understanding about these illicit, illegal markets and has the highest levels of training to effectively combat them.Links: Website: https://deliverfund.orgThe War Against Human Trafficking: https://youtu.be/brpLMVY-wxAThe Rethink podcast aims to inspire men to step up and challenge them to take a leap of faith to become better people. Join us weekly as we Rethink what it means to be a man in today's world and discuss tangible ways to chase after authentic manhood by having real conversations with real people about real things.Join the conversation in the comments below! ⬇️ SUBSCRIBE and get notified when a new episode drops. ⬇️https://www.youtube.com/c/RethinkPodcastwithJimBurgen?sub_confirmation=1Have an idea for future episodes? Email us rethink@flatironschurch.comTwitter: @JimBurgenhttps://twitter.com/JimBurgenFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/jim.burgenInstagram: @JimBurgenhttps://www.instagram.com/jimburgen/Website:https://www.jimburgen.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - THORNTON "TD" BARNES - Former CIA Contractor Talks Area 51 and the Truth About UFOs

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 48:33


Thornton D. "TD" Barnes, author and entrepreneur, grew up on a ranch at Dalhart, Texas. He graduated from Mountain View High School in Oklahoma and embarked on a ten-year military career. He served as an Army intelligence specialist in Korea and then continued his education while in the US Army, attending two and a half years of missile and radar electronics by day and college courses at night. Barnes deployed with the first combat Hawk missile battalion during the Soviet Iron Curtain threat before attending the Artillery Officer Candidate School, where an injury ended his military career. During his extensive professional career, Barnes was a field engineer at the NASA High Range in Nevada for the X-15, XB-70, lifting bodies and lunar landing vehicles; working on the NERVA project at Jackass Flats, Nevada. He was a member of a special projects team at Area 51 for the Central Intelligence Agency. Barnes later formed a family oil and gas exploration company, drilling and producing oil and gas and mining uranium and gold. Barnes is currently the CEO of Startel, Inc., a landowner, and is actively mining a quarry for landscape rock and gold in Nevada. He is the president of Roadrunners Internationale, an association of Area 51 veterans, and is the executive director of the Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame. Two National Geographic Channel documentaries feature Barnes: Area 51 Declassified and CIA--Secrets of Area 51. Numerous documentaries on the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, the Travel Channel and others also feature him. The Annie Jacobsen book Area 51 Declassified documents his career. Barnes lives in Henderson, Nevada.

TNT Radio
Larry Johnson on The Joe Hoft Show - 01 November 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 55:38


On today's show we discuss the Paul Pelosi incident in San Francisco and an update on the war conflict in Ukraine/Russia. GUEST OVERVIEW: Larry Johnson, who worked previously with the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. State Department's Office of Counter Terrorism, is a recognized expert in the fields of terrorism, aviation security, crisis and risk management.

Encounters: A Paranormal Experience
Project MK Ultra: A 'Home Grown' American Conspiracy for Supremacy

Encounters: A Paranormal Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 48:01


Today on Encounters, Amanda and Dakota are joined by Encounter's own "Mistress of Conspiracies", Natalie to discuss Project MK-Ultra. The CIA and United States Government has a multitude of secret skeletons in the closet but one of the largest "worst kept secret" of the CIA could be the MK-Ultra Projects. From  Super Soldiers to Mind Control, Project MKUltra was an illegal human experimentation program designed and undertaken by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. We believe the intent was to develop procedures and identify drugs that could be used in interrogations to weaken individuals and force confessions through brainwashing and psychological torture, but how much further does that rabbit hole go? Join Amanda, Dakota, and Natalie today and find out! Stay Spooky!   Intro: Strange Stuff by Matt Harris Additonal Music & Audio: *Ice Demon by Kevin MacLeod    *Ice Demon by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200061   Artist: http://incompetech.com/   YouTube video MK-Ultra: The shocking Cold War experiments hidden by the CIA - BBC REEL

TNT Radio
Larry Johnson on The Joe Hoft Show - 25 October 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 55:45


On today's show we discuss the Ukraine/Russia conflict escalation. GUEST OVERVIEW: Larry Johnson, who worked previously with the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. State Department's Office of Counter Terrorism, is a recognized expert in the fields of terrorism, aviation security, crisis and risk management.

Oilfield 360 Podcast
Episode #47: Mike Pompeo

Oilfield 360 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 63:50


On a recent flight out of Washington, DC en route to Houston, Greg Davis and David de Roode shared a conversation (at approximately 40,000') with a mechanical engineer, an American veteran, attorney, businessman, patriot, diplomat, former 3x Congressman from Kansas, former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and former 70th United States Secretary of State: Mike Pompeo. While they couldn't record everything discussed on this two- and half-hour plane ride, they offer you roughly an hour of solid discussion. The importance of a strong energy policy is consistent throughout the conversation touching on a number of current events surrounding CONUS, Mexico, Ukraine, Russia, China, Iran, North Korea, Taiwan and Europe. They also discussed the former Secretary's book on pre-sale now, "NEVER GIVE AN INCH", available the January 24th, 2023.

TNT Radio
Larry Johnson on The Joe Hoft Show - 19 October 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 55:42


GUEST OVERVIEW: Larry Johnson, who worked previously with the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. State Department's Office of Counter Terrorism, is a recognized expert in the fields of terrorism, aviation security, crisis and risk management.

Speaking to Influence
Ep 126: Jennifer Ewbank, Deputy Director for Digital Innovation at the Central Intelligence Agency: Building Trust in Leadership & Technology

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 37:37


Clarity and candor are the cornerstones of any great conversation, but for the CIA they are the critical link between information and policymakers. This week Jennifer Ewbank shares how her role in Digital Innovation at the CIA helps carry technical conversations for stakeholders across the agency, breaking down barriers and building trust at all levels. In this conversation Laura and Jennifer discuss understanding the pressure stakeholders are under, getting out of your way to create change, and the role of cybersecurity in leadership.   Here are a few things you'll learn during this conversation: How to be an authentic leader and develop trust within a team Why imposter syndrome is a leadership issue among women and men How proving yourself can cause barriers instead of partnerships Strategies for assessing and conveying the risks of a message Jennifer's best advice for learning a new language   During the 24-Hour Influence Challenge, Jennifer encourages you to create allies by sharing information. You can do this by choosing a busy day on your calendar and taking a moment after each engagement to think about what you learned and who could benefit from that information.   About Jennifer Ewbank: Jennifer Ewbank is the Deputy Director of CIA for Digital Innovation, responsible for accelerating the development and integration of digital and cyber capabilities across all of CIA's mission areas, to include enterprise information technology, cyber security, cyber operations and analysis, data strategy and artificial intelligence, open source collection, and reporting, as well as building the digital acumen of the CIA workforce through training and education. As the Agency's de facto Chief Digital Officer, Ms. Ewbank oversees the Digital C-Suite roles of Chief Information Officer, Chief Information Security Officer, and Chief Data Officer.   A career federal government official, Ms. Ewbank has 35 years of experience, initially as a Foreign Service Officer with the State Department, and more recently with the CIA, primarily in the Directorate of Operations, where she has held key leadership positions and served the bulk of her career abroad, to include four tours as Chief of Station. In one of Ms. Ewbank's previous leadership roles, she was responsible for leading CIA's engagement with the US private sector and academia.    You can connect with Jennifer in the following ways: Jennifer's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-ewbank The CIA's LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/central-intelligence-agency   You can listen to The Langley Files here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-langley-files-a-cia-podcast/id1645885248   To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/VocalImpactProductions Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Iran Watch Listen
Has Iran Become the Master of its Drone Destiny?

Iran Watch Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 52:13


In this episode of Iran Watch Listen, we sat down with Dan Gettinger and Adam Rawnsley, both experts on Iranian drones and drone technology. We discussed the current state of Iran's capabilities, Iran's growing ambitions to become a drone exporter, and whether tighter sanctions and export controls could hinder its progress. The conversation took place on September 15 and was hosted by John Caves, Senior Research Associate at the Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Arms Control, and John Krzyzaniak, a Research Associate at the Wisconsin Project. Expert Bios Dan Gettinger is the Director of Publications and Communications at the Vertical Flight Society. Before that he was the founder and co-director of the Center for the Study of the Drone at Bard College where he authored the Drone Databook.  Adam Rawnsley is a reporter at Rolling Stone and a Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. His work focuses on the intersection of technology and security, and he's been doing in-depth investigations into Iranian drone proliferation for about a decade.  Related Resources The Drone Databook, Dan Gettinger, Center for the Study of the Drone, 2019. Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles: Current Types, Ordnance and Operations, Dan Gettinger, 2021. “The Clues Hidden in the Drones that Attacked Saudi Arabia,” Adam Rawnsley, Daily Beast, 2019. “Inside the U.S.-Iran Drone War,” Adam Rawnsley, Daily Beast, 2019. “Remotely Piloted Vehicles in the Third World: A New Military Capability,” U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, 1986. Evolution of UAVs Employed by Houthi Forces in Yemen, Conflict Armament Research, 2020.

The PA Path Podcast
Season 3: Episode 44 - An Interview with Josef Burwell, MS, PA-C

The PA Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 53:23


In honor of National Coming Out Day and National PA Week we speak with Josef Burwell, MS, PA-C about his path to becoming a PA, his mission work around the world, and his transition to becoming a male while working with the Central Intelligence Agency as a PA.

SPYCRAFT 101
Killing Castro: The Unlikely Alliance between the CIA and the Mob with Thomas Maier

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 63:54


 This week, Juston sits down with Thomas Maier. Thomas is an author and award-winning investigative journalist, having worked at NewDay since 1984. He has also written several historical books, including When Lions Roar about the Churchills and the Kennedys, and Masters of Sex, which was produced as a series on Showtime for four years. His latest book, Mafia Spies, details the inside story the inside story of the relationship between several senior figures in organized crime in the early 1960s and members of the Central Intelligence Agency who wanted Fidel Castro dead, as well as their unlikely and temporary alliance.Connect with Thomas:thomasmaierbooks@gmail.comConnect with Spycraft 101:Check out Justin's latest release, Covert Arms, here.spycraft101.comIG: @spycraft101Shop: spycraft-101.myshopify.comPatreon: Spycraft 101Find Justin's first book, Spyshots: Volume One, here.Download the free eBook, The Clandestine Operative's Sidearm of Choice, here.Support the show

Shaping Opinion
Andrew Bustamante: Inside the World of Covert Intelligence

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 76:24


Former covert CIA intelligence officer and U.S. Air Force combat veteran Andrew Bustamante joins Tim to talk about his life as a CIA operative, the lessons he's learned, and we get some insights into the world of the CIA. Today, Andrew is a Fortune 10 corporate advisor, and he's the man behind the EveryDay Spy self-improvement program, and the host of the EveryDay Espionage podcast. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Andrew_Bustamante_Episode_auphonic.mp3 Before we talk to our guest, you need to know some things about America's intelligence infrastructure. The United States of America has a vast intelligence community. To manage it all, the United States Intelligence Community, or IC, is an actual group of organizations that work separately and collectively to conduct intelligence activities that are supposed to support the nation's foreign policy and national security interests. Member organizations include the intelligence agencies, military intelligence, civilian intelligence, and analysis offices within federal executive departments. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence oversees the Intelligence Community. That director reports directly to the President of the United States, who as commander in chief is also the chief of all intelligence operations. The list of member organizations is a familiar one. The Department of Homeland Security, the National Security Agency or NSA, and of course, the Central Intelligence Agency or the CIA. One of the more common points of confusion when it comes to the intelligence community is where the CIA's responsibilities end, and where the FBI's begin. And vice versa. The FBI is part of the Department of Justice. It is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States. It is the federal government's principal law enforcement agency.  As part of the Department of Justice, the FBI reports to the Attorney General of the United States and the Director of National Intelligence. Again, the FBI's focus is domestic. The CIA is a civilian foreign intelligence service. It was created by President Harry Truman right after World War II. It is charged with gathering, processing, and analyzing information relevant to national security. That information can come from around the world. The CIA is not responsible for spying on American citizens. Though should American citizens be involved with any potential foreign threat, they could find themselves under the microscope of the CIA. Unlike the FBI, which is focused on domestic security, the CIA has no law enforcement function and is officially mainly focused on overseas intelligence gathering. The mysteries surrounding the work of the CIA has been the stuff of books, of Hollywood movies and TV shows. In the news media, it's been the stuff of legend. You never know what's really true or not.  That question was my starting point when I had the chance to sit down with former CIA operative Andrew Bustamante. Links EveryDay Spy (website) EveryDay Espionage Podcast (Apple) Why Nations Go to War, by John Stoessinger (Amazon) Sun Tzu's Art of War (Amazon) Former CIA Agent Explains How He Made Targets Fall For Him, Lad Bible About this Episode's Guest Andrew Bustamante Andrew is a self-declared “improvement junkie; a former covert CIA intelligence officer, US Air Force combat veteran, and Fortune 10 corporate advisor.”  He is the man behind the EveryDay Spy program for self-development. It's an integrated education and training platform that teaches international espionage tactics that benefit everyday life. He's also the creator and host of the EveryDay Spy podcast. The mental, physical, and social spy skills CIA gave me have helped me accomplish everything I've set my mind to achieve,” he says. “The same can be true for you if you are willing to listen, learn and train with me. I believe all people can learn to master their mind,

The Lawfare Podcast
Chatter: The People Side of Intelligence with Darrell Blocker

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 72:10 Very Popular


Darrell Blocker retired from the Central Intelligence Agency in 2018 after serving as an operations officer and manager in many countries, especially within Africa. His self-described lack of success recruiting assets during early assignments nevertheless taught him important lessons about the intelligence business, about how people work, and about himself; later tours of duty gave him the chance to make up for lost time by excelling at the job while also getting shot at and even gaining minor fame as the lead singer in an African jazz band. Blocker left CIA service as one of the most senior black officers in the Agency's history—and he was reportedly on President Biden's shortlist to become the director of the CIA. Now, he's involved in several creative projects in Hollywood.On this episode of Chatter, David Priess chatted with Blocker about his career and his activities since retirement. They discussed getting spy stories told on film, growing up as an Air Force brat, understanding the Pledge of Allegiance, stumbling early in an intelligence career, appreciating the operational environment in Africa, growing from mistakes, accepting lessons from 360-degree feedback, performing on stage in a jazz band, singing the national anthem, being considered as a CIA director, enhancing the CIA's interactions with the media, learning about the benefits of fictional representations of Hollywood's take on intelligence, and more.Chatter is a production of Lawfare and Goat Rodeo. This episode was produced by Cara Shillenn of Goat Rodeo. Podcast theme by David Priess, featuring music created using Groovepad.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Breaking Battlegrounds
Mike Pompeo on Protecting America on the World Stage

Breaking Battlegrounds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 43:42


This week on Breaking Battlegrounds, Chuck and Sam are joined by former Secretary of State and former CIA Director Mike Pompeo. Later in the show, Brian Domitrovic calls in to talk about Biden's inflation.-Michael R. Pompeo served as the 70th Secretary of State of the United States, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and was elected to four terms in Congress representing the Fourth District of Kansas. He is a distinguished fellow at Hudson Institute, where he focuses on promoting U.S. national security, technological leadership and global engagement.Mike graduated first in his class from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1986. He served as a cavalry officer in the U.S. Army, leading troops patrolling the Iron Curtain, rising to the rank of Captain. Mike left the military in 1991 and then graduated from Harvard Law School, having served as an editor of the Harvard Law Review.Up next was almost a decade leading two manufacturing businesses in South Central Kansas – first in the aerospace industry and then making energy drilling and production equipment. These two companies made real stuff and provided high – quality jobs for hundreds of hard-working Kansans.In 2010, Mike watched government grow too big and decided to run for Congress. He won and was re-elected three more times to represent South Central Kansas – the heartland of America. Despite being an outsider and fairly junior, Mike played important roles on the House Benghazi and House Intelligence Committees, working to keep our soldiers and diplomats safe and America more secure.Becoming America's most senior spy, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, was Mike's next chance to champion American values. He improved collection and operations and made sure that American leaders had the best information in the world to make decisions that impacted the lives of every American and the generations behind us.President Donald Trump saw that good work and decided to make Mike America's 70th Secretary of State. As our nation's most senior diplomat in the Trump Administration and President Trump's chief negotiator, Mike helped to craft U.S. foreign policy based on our nation's founding ideals that put America First. America became a massive energy exporter and a force for good in the Middle East with real peace cemented in the Abraham Accords. Mike placed special emphasis on renewing alliances with key allies, including India, Japan, Australia, and South Korea. He also led a return to America's founding principles and a focus on every human life being worthy and the protection of the unborn. The largest human rights gatherings ever held at the State Department occurred under his leadership.Mike's time at the State Department marked the end of naïve engagement with the Chinese Communist Party, pulling back the curtain shielding the egregious acts of the CCP that threaten American jobs and freedoms. He focused efforts on calling out and punishing perpetrators of attacks on basic human dignity in places like Cuba and Venezuela, North Korea, Iran, Nigeria, China and elsewhere. Mike also led a team that executed America's largest ever global repatriation effort in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.Married to Susan, Mike and his wife have one son, Nick. The Pompeos dedicated many volunteer hours to their home church — including teaching 5th grade Sunday School and Mike's time as a church Deacon. The Pompeos also volunteered on numerous educational, fine arts and local government programs and projects. Nick's Dad also went undefeated as a coach of his son's 3 on 3 team in summer league. Mike and Susan's two retrievers, Sherman and Mercer, each named after important American generals, are patriots too!-Brian Domitrovic is the Richard S. Strong Scholar at the Laffer Center in Nashville. He is the author or editor of six books including the standard history of supply-side economics, "Econoclasts" (2009). His forthcoming book, “Taxes Have Consequences,” co-authored with Art Laffer and Jeanne Sinquefield, recounts how the income tax's top rate has determined the fate of the American economy since it was first adopted in 1913. -Connect with us:www.breakingbattlegrounds.voteTwitter: www.twitter.com/Breaking_BattleFacebook: www.facebook.com/breakingbattlegroundsInstagram: www.instagram.com/breakingbattlegroundsLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/breakingbattlegrounds This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit breakingbattlegrounds.substack.com

Colors: A Dialogue on Race in America
EP. 121 | Harriet Tubman statue unveiled at the CIA

Colors: A Dialogue on Race in America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 47:33


A statue of iconic Black American intelligence pioneer, Harriet Tubman was unveiled recently at the Central Intelligence Agency. Her 3X great grand-niece Tina Wyatt and CIA museum director Robert Byers talk about the significance.

Watching America
Nathalia Holt: Wise Gals--The Spies Who Built the CIA and Changed the Future of Espionage

Watching America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022


You might not know about four women who helped develop the Central Intelligence Agency in the Cold War era. That's a testament to their skill; they were spies. Bestselling author Nathalia Holt reveals their stories in her latest book, “Wise Gals: The Spies Who Built the CIA and Changed the Future of Espionage.” In this episode of Watching America, we hear about groundbreaking agents Adelaide Hawkins, Mary Hutchison, Eloise Page, and Elizabeth Sudmeier, and how Holt researched their histories. nathaliaholt

The Lawfare Podcast
The US, China, and Semiconductors

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 37:14 Very Popular


The United States is looking to curb China's advanced computing and chip production capabilities by using the so-called Foreign-Direct Product Rule to prevent companies globally from selling certain advanced computing chips to Chinese buyers without a U.S. government license. To understand the background, the details, and the implications of this, Lawfare publisher David Priess sat down with Martijn Rasser, senior fellow and director of the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security. Martijn also served as a senior intelligence officer and analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency and a senior adviser in the office of the Secretary of Defense. They talked about the nature of the semiconductor industry, what a Foreign-Direct Product Rule is and what it can do, whether the Commerce Department is well positioned to do what's proposed, the tension of working with allies versus going it alone, and the precedent of U.S.-led actions against Huawei.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Chatter
The People Side of Intelligence with Darrell Blocker

Chatter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 71:25


Darrell Blocker retired from the Central Intelligence Agency in 2018 after serving as an operations officer and manager in many countries, especially within Africa. His self-described lack of success recruiting assets during early assignments nevertheless taught him important lessons about the intelligence business, about how people work, and about himself; later tours of duty gave him the chance to make up for lost time by excelling at the job while also getting shot at and even gaining minor fame as the lead singer in an African jazz band. Blocker left CIA service as one of the most senior black officers in the Agency's history--and he was reportedly on President Biden's shortlist to become the Director of the CIA. Now, he's involved in several creative projects in Hollywood.David Priess chatted with Blocker about his career and his activities since retirement. They discussed getting spy stories told on film, growing up as an Air Force brat, understanding the pledge of allegiance, stumbling early in an intelligence career, appreciating the operational environment in Africa, growing from mistakes, accepting lessons from 360-degree feedback, performing on stage in a jazz band, singing the national anthem, being considered as a CIA director, enhancing the CIA's interactions with the media, learning about the benefits of fictional representations of Hollywood's take on intelligence, and more.Chatter is a production of Lawfare and Goat Rodeo. This episode was produced by Cara Shillenn of Goat Rodeo. Podcast theme by David Priess, featuring music created using Groovepad. Among the works mentioned in this episode:The TV series CondorThe TV series HomelandThe Pledge of AllegianceThe Star-Spangled Banner Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
God's Cold Warrior: The Life and Faith of John Foster Dulles w/ John D. Wilsey

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 69:32


On this edition of Parallax Views, a previously unpublished conversation with John D. Wilsey, associate professor of church history at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, about his book God's Cold Warrior: The Life and Faith of John Foster Dulles. In past episodes, John Foster Dulles and his brother Allen Dulles have been discussed critically for their role in 20th century U.S. foreign policy. John Foster Dulles served as a Secretary of State and his brother Allen Dulles was a Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Both were major figures in the Cold War and were crusaders against communism. Previous Parallax Views guests such as Andrew Bacevich, Greg Poulgrain, and, most notably, Stephen Kinzer, who wrote The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, have all been extremely critical of the Dulles legacy. John D. Wilsey, although sharing many of those criticisms, was interested in examining John Foster Dulles from a different angle. Namely the role of Dulles' faith in his endeavors as a diplomat and Cold Warrior. Specifically, what was the influence of Protestant Christianity on John Foster Dulles? In this conversation we delve into the theological framework that informed the ways Dulles thoughts about diplomacy and his view that Soviet communism was an existential threat to the U.S. We delve into the ways in which diplomat George Kennan found Dulles' framework and the religious influence on it to be dangerous and Manichean in nature. We also look at the way in which Dulles believed that the Church would play an important role in the fight against Soviet communism. Other issues covered include moral law and Christianity, the early life of John Foster Dulles, Christian nationalism (a subject that Wilsey has written extensively on), the view of the Cold War as a Manichean battle between good and evil, the paradoxes and contradictions of Dulles' thought and diplomacy, Protestant liberalism, the Federal Council of Churches, WWII, the Cold War and the threat of nuclear annihilation, Dulles as product of his time, U.S. covert wars during the Cold War, comparing and contrasting Martin Luther King and John Foster Dulles (Wilsey devotes a whole chapter to this in his book American Exceptionalism and Civil Religion: Reassessing the History of an Idea), and much, much more. Those looking for a conversation about whether Dulles was right or wrong in his views may be disappointed by this conversation. Wilsey's book is ultimately a religious biography of Dulles rather than a critical look at his role in foreign policy. However, I believe it nonetheless sheds light on Dulles and his thinking regardless where one stands on his whether his influence on U.S. foreign policy was positive or negative.

A Republic, If You Can Keep It
The Final Stretch (Guest: Rep. Elissa Slotkin)

A Republic, If You Can Keep It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 43:38


As we speculated in last week's podcast, Donald Trump spent most of his two-hour diatribe in Macomb County talking about … Donald Trump, dedicating about 5% of his speech to actually supporting the BIg Lie believers leading the GOP state ticket. Also in the political headlines this week: longtime Republican powerbroker Bob LaBrant calls this year's GOP ticket “the most unqualified state-level ticket in recent Michigan history” as he actively supports the entire Democratic statewide slate; the state Legislature takes a small step towards a less chaotic election with bipartisan support for making the counting of Absentee Ballots more timely; and the rhetoric is becoming more heated from opponents of the the Voting Rights and Reproductive Freedom ballot proposals. Early voting has begun and the battleground races in Michigan have the attention of the nation. Four of Michigan's 13 congressional districts are considered tossups.We'll talk with one of the candidates in that spotlight: mid-Michigan two-term Representative Elissa Slotkin. Representative Slotkin defied the political odds in 2018, ousting Republican Congressman Mike Bishop even as Donald Trump was winning in her congressional district. She was reelected in 2020, again in a district carried by Trump, downing challenge Paul Junge. Slotkin was raised on the family farm in Holly. She has been in public service since graduating with a Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University. After graduate school she was recruited into the Central Intelligence Agency. Fluent in Arabic and Swahili, she served three tours in Iraq as a CIA analyst. During the George W. Bush administration, she worked on the Iraq portfolio for the National Security Council. During Barack Obama's presidency, she worked for the State Department and the Department of Defense. Slotkin was acting assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs from 2015 to 2017. In Congress she is recognized as an expert on national security issues, and also for her ability to work across party lines as a member of the bipartisan Problem-Solvers Caucus. ________________________________________________ This week's podcast is underwritten by Practical Political Consulting and EPIC-MRA. We thank them for supporting "A Republic, If You Can Keep It."  

North Korea News Podcast by NK News
What the CIA knows (and doesn't know) about North Korea – Ep. 255

North Korea News Podcast by NK News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 56:47


North Korea is one of the hardest targets for U.S. intelligence, and the country's border closure since 2020 has only increased the difficulty. State propaganda remains one of the only ways to learn about the regime and what's happening in the country. A former analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency, Soo Kim has been working to understand the Kim Jong Un regime for over a decade. This week, she joins the NK News Podcast about her time at the CIA and what the U.S. government knows — and doesn't know — about North Korea. She talks about hierarchies in Pyongyang, what Kim Jong Un prioritizes, what the next decade may look like on the Korean Peninsula and more. Soo Kim (@mllesookim) is a policy analyst at the RAND Corporation focused on national security and policy issues in the Indo-Pacific. About the podcast: The North Korea News Podcast is a weekly podcast hosted by Jacco Zwetsloot (@JaccoZed) exclusively for NK News, covering all things DPRK — from news to extended interviews with leading experts and analysts in the field, along with insight from our very own journalists.

Game of Crimes
69 - Guy Hargreaves and Operation: Trip to Oz - A Missile Silo and LSD

Game of Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 177:08


Guy Hargreaves worked at Dallas PD and the Central Intelligence Agency before landing at DEA - the Drug Enforcement Administration. One of the strangest cases ever to happen at DEA involved the world's largest LSD lab hidden inside a decommissioned nuclear missile silo in the small town of Wamego, nestled in the Flint hills of north central Kansas. Taking out the lab reduced nationwide supply by over 90%. Follow the Yellow Brick Road and take a journey to Operation: Trip to Oz.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

History Extra podcast
The CIA: everything you wanted to know

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 55:47 Very Popular


Why was the CIA formed? Who were the key players in the agency's history? And what was its most significant scandal? Seventy five years on since the United States' Central Intelligence Agency was formed, Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones takes on listener questions on the history of the CIA for our ‘Everything you wanted to know' series. (Ad) Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones is the author of A Question of Standing: The History of the CIA (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fa-question-of-standing%2Frhodri-jeffreys-jones%2F9780192847966 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Tech Talks
Security of industrial systems with Jim Tiller and former CIA CISO Robert Bigman

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 46:19


Security Bytes is a podcast from the Tech Talks stable (Nash Squared). Jim Tiller, Group CISO, talks to leading figures in the industry as we step into the darker side of tech... In this episode of Security Bytes Jim's guest is Robert Bigman. Robert, the former Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at the Central Intelligence Agency. Robert is the president of 2BSecure Inc., which provides security consulting services to government and organizations around the world, and brings interesting insights to ICS and IoT security.

The Engel Angle
What you never knew about the Central Intelligence Agency

The Engel Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 51:00


Former Marine and CIA employee Nicholas Reynolds joins The Engel Angle to talk to Mac about his new book, "Need to Know: World War II and the Rise of American Intelligence." Reynolds is a CIA historian and former curator at the CIA Museum. How did the CIA start, what was its original function, and is it still an effective agency? That, and Mac admits that even though he hates stuff, he has too much of it.

Eyewitness History
"I Was In The Central Intelligence Agency, As An Analyst, Instructor And Supervisor For 15 Years, From 1989 To 2014"

Eyewitness History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 51:38


Jim Horacek served as an analyst, supervisor, and instructor in the Central Intelligence Agency from 1999-2014. A specialist in the ethnic conflicts that broke out after the break-up of the Soviet Union, his first assignment in the Agency was as an analyst in the Caucasus and Central Asia Group. After 9/11, he volunteered to join the newly created Office of Terrorism Analysis within the Counterterrorism Center (CTC). As an executive assistant in the CTC front office in 2002, he worked on both the internal and external reviews of the events of 9/11 and witnessed the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI's Counterterrorism Analysis group. He then became one of the first analysts to follow the terrorist network that would become known as ISIS, with its founder Abu Mus'ab al-Zarqawi, and he served as a senior analyst in the Iraq Group during the height of Operation Iraqi Freedom. From 2006-2008, he served as a supervisor in both the CTC Weapons of Mass Destruction Group and the National Counterterrorism Center's CBRN Counterterrorism Group. After a tour as a leadership and management instructor in the Sherman Kent School for Intelligence Analysis, he became one of the CIA's representatives to US Strategic Command in Bellevue, Nebraska in 2011. Jim resigned from the CIA in 2014 in order to accept a position as a manager in Nebraska Medicine's Project Management Office. In 2019, he became the lead project manager charged with opening the Nebraska Medicine-UNMC Global Center for Health Security. Jim returned to US Strategic Command in 2021, where he now works as a Sr. Deterrence Analyst in the Plans and Policy Directorate.