Podcasts about Nagasaki

Core city in Kyushu, Japan

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MacArthur Memorial Podcast
Black Snow: Curtis LeMay, The Firebombing of Tokyo, and the Road to the Atomic Bomb

MacArthur Memorial Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 39:41


Just after midnight on March 10, 1945, nearly three hundred American B-29s rained incendiary bombs down on the Japanese capital of Tokyo. The bombs created a nearly 2,800-degree inferno that killed more than 100,000 people and left a part of the city about the size of Manhattan nothing but ash. The attack was so horrifyingly effective that Major General Curtis LeMay, who directed the mission, said, “If we lose, we'll be tried as war criminals.” On September 22, 2022, the MacArthur Memorial hosted celebrated historian and Pulitzer Prize finalist James M. Scott for a presentation and book signing for his latest book: BLACK SNOW: Curtis LeMay, the Firebombing of Tokyo, and the Road to the Atomic Bomb. BLACK SNOW tells the complete story of the 1945 Tokyo firebombing. Drawing extensively on first-person interviews in the United States and with survivors in Japan, air force archives, and oral histories never before published in English (including the 5,000-page Japanese collection known as the Tokyo Air Raid Damage Records), Scott re-creates the bombing and what led to it, bringing to life the military, political, and moral debates that convinced American forces to shift from a policy of daylight precision bombing to low-altitude incendiary raids – a process that helped create the moral and strategic framework for the eventual use of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, September 22, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 452All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Lorenzo Ruiz and CompanionsLorenzo was born in Manila of a Chinese father and a Filipino mother, both Christians. Thus he learned Chinese and Tagalog from them, and Spanish from the Dominicans whom he served as altar boy and sacristan. He became a professional calligrapher, transcribing documents in beautiful penmanship. He was a full member of the Confraternity of the Holy Rosary under Dominican auspices. He married and had two sons and a daughter. Lorenzo's life took an abrupt turn when he was accused of murder. Nothing further is known except the statement of two Dominicans that “he was sought by the authorities on account of a homicide to which he was present or which was attributed to him.” At that time, three Dominican priests, Antonio Gonzalez, Guillermo Courtet, and Miguel de Aozaraza, were about to sail to Japan in spite of a violent persecution there. With them was a Japanese priest, Vicente Shiwozuka de la Cruz, and a layman named Lazaro, a leper. Lorenzo, having taken asylum with them, was allowed to accompany them. But only when they were at sea did he learn that they were going to Japan. They landed at Okinawa. Lorenzo could have gone on to Formosa, but, he reported, “I decided to stay with the Fathers, because the Spaniards would hang me there.” In Japan they were soon found out, arrested, and taken to Nagasaki. The site of wholesale bloodshed when the atomic bomb was dropped had known tragedy before. The 50,000 Catholics who once lived there were dispersed or killed by persecution. They were subjected to an unspeakable kind of torture: After huge quantities of water were forced down their throats, they were made to lie down. Long boards were placed on their stomachs and guards then stepped on the ends of the boards, forcing the water to spurt violently from mouth, nose and ears. The superior, Fr. Gonzalez, died after some days. Both Fr. Shiwozuka and Lazaro broke under torture, which included the insertion of bamboo needles under their fingernails. But both were brought back to courage by their companions. In Lorenzo's moment of crisis, he asked the interpreter, “I would like to know if, by apostatizing, they will spare my life.” The interpreter was noncommittal, but in the ensuing hours Lorenzo felt his faith grow strong. He became bold, even audacious, with his interrogators. The five were put to death by being hanged upside down in pits. Boards fitted with semi-circular holes were fitted around their waists and stones put on top to increase the pressure. They were tightly bound, to slow circulation and prevent a speedy death. They were allowed to hang for three days. By that time Lorenzo and Lazaro were dead. Still alive, the three priests were then beheaded. In 1987, Pope John Paul II canonized these six and 10 others: Asians and Europeans, men and women, who spread the faith in the Philippines, Formosa, and Japan. Lorenzo Ruiz is the first canonized Filipino martyr. The liturgical feast of Saint Lorenzo Ruiz and Companions is celebrated on September 28. Reflection We ordinary Christians of today—how would we stand up in the circumstances these martyrs faced? We sympathize with the two who temporarily denied the faith. We understand Lorenzo's terrible moment of temptation. But we see also the courage—inexplainable in human terms—which surged from their store of faith. Martyrdom, like ordinary life, is a miracle of grace. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

The Mystery Kids Podcast
Monday Mini: Incredible Story of Hiroo Onoda

The Mystery Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 5:02


The year 1945 marked the end of one of the greatest wars of our time, World War 2. The Allied forces won the war after Germany surrendered, and two atomic bombs were dropped by The United States over the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. Japan quickly surrendered after the second bomb was dropped. The war was over! But not everyone heard the news. This is the Incredible Story of Hiroo Onoda. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/themysterykidspodcast/message

Catholic News
September 12, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 2:59


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Pope Francis in his Angelus address on Sunday honored an Italian missionary sister who was killed by Islamist terrorists in Mozambique. Speaking from the window of the Apostolic Palace on September 11, the pope said: “In this moment of prayer, it is dear to me to remember Sister Maria de Coppi, Combonian missionary, killed in Chipene, Mozambique, where she served with love for almost 60 years.” “May her witness give strength and courage to Christians and all the people of Mozambique.” Sister Maria de Coppi was shot and killed last week as terrorists ransacked and burned the Catholic mission where she served in Mozambique's Diocese of Nacala. The Italian priests and sisters who served at the mission were able to evacuate 68 students who were living at the mission before the church, boarding houses, rectory, and school were destroyed in the five-hour attack on the night of September 6. Sister Maria was about to flee with the other missionaries when she turned back out of concern for the 12 female students who had stayed behind at the mission, according to the pontifical charity Aid to the Church in Need. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252263/pope-francis-honors-nun-killed-by-islamist-terrorists-in-mozambique A new report from the Religious Freedom Institute quantifies and analyzes the many reported incidents of violence against pro-life people and entities since May and offers recommendations for government officials on how to respond. The RFI concluded that conditions remain in place for more attacks against pro-life entities and people to occur in 2022 and into 2023. According to data compiled by CNA, at least 32 Catholic churches in the United States have been vandalized with a clear pro-abortion motive since the May leak, along with at least 50 pro-life pregnancy centers. Taking a broader view, the US Conference of Catholic Bishops has tracked some 164 total attacks against Catholic entities across 37 states and the District of Columbia since May 2020. The report recommends that pro-life organizations devote more resources to security and security training for staff and volunteers, invest in relationships with law enforcement agencies, and step up their insurance. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252249/report-assesses-threats-to-religious-pro-life-americans-following-overturn-of-roe-v-wade The political group CatholicVote is inviting Christians nationwide to pray a novena asking for Saint Michael's intercession amid the growing number of attacks targeting churches and pro-life pregnancy centers in the United States. The novena will begin on September 20 and conclude on September 29, the feast of the archangels. Catholics who “pledge to pray” online will receive access to the novena prayers and an email reminder each day to pray. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252258/catholicvote-to-hold-saint-michael-novena-in-defense-of-churches-pregnancy-centers Today, the Church celebrates Blessed Apollinaris Franco, a Spanish Franciscan who evangelized covertly in Japan in the 17th century and was burned at the stake by authorities in Nagasaki. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/blessed-apollinaris-franco-592

The J-Talk Podcast
JTET - J2 Round 34 / J3 Round 23 Review

The J-Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 100:28


Just in time for another big weekend of J2 & J3 football, the JTET machine whirrs back into action to review the most recent slate of lower-tier matches. This week, after a solo round-up of all of last weekend's J2 action (plus a bonus midweek game), Jon talked to Daniel Kuroda from the Nagasaki Blue & Orange Blog (https://nagasakiblueorange.wordpress.com) about the Kyushu-based side's recent form, and Play-Off chances. Jon and Daniel then preview the upcoming Round 35 matches, before handing over to Mike 'the Magic' Innes for all of the J3 news in 'J-Talk: Short Corner'. Hope everyone enjoys the (very long) show this week!  You can find Daniel on Twitter @NagaSapo_EN. Timecodes: Start to 22:00 - J2 Round 34 Review (plus Kanazawa v Nagasaki from Round 32) 22:00 to 01:03:15 - Nagasaki deep diving with Daniel 01:03:15 to 01:23:00 - J2 Round 35 Preview 01:23:40 to Finish - J3 news with Mike in 'J-Talk: Short Corner'

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Links For September 2022

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 22:01


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/links-for-september-2022 [Remember, I haven't independently verified each link. On average, commenters will end up spotting evidence that around two or three of the links in each links post are wrong or misleading. I correct these as I see them, and will highlight important corrections later, but I can't guarantee I will have caught them all by the time you read this.] 1: Fiber Arts, Mysterious Dodecahedrons, and Waiting On Eureka. Why did it take so long to invent knitting? (cf. also Why Did Everything Take So Long?) And why did the Romans leave behind so many mysterious metal dodecahedra? 2: Alex Wellerstein (of NUKEMAP) on the Nagasaki bombing. “Archival evidence points to Truman not knowing it was going to happen.” 3: @itsahousingtrap on Twitter on “how weird the [building] planning process really is” 4: Nostalgebraist talks about his experience home-brewing an image generation AI that can handle text in images; he's a very good explainer and I learned more about image models from his post than from other much more official sources. And here's what happens when his AI is asked to “make a list of all 50 states”:

Reasons to Believe Podcast
Mass Extinction & Enduring Life and Biochem Finite State Machines | Stars, Cells, and God ep23

Reasons to Believe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 53:03


Join Hugh Ross and Fazale “Fuz” Rana as they discuss new discoveries taking place at the frontiers of science that have theological and philosophical implications, as well as new discoveries that point to the reality of God's existence. Mass Extinction & Enduring Life The Chicxulub impact event occurred when an asteroid at least 10 kilometers in diameter struck the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico 66,038,000 years ago. The impact energy, equivalent to three billion times the combined energies of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, immediately ignited massive volcanic eruptions around the world. A new study shows that the impact resulted in huge amounts of sulfur aerosols ejected into and above the stratosphere. This ejection caused severe global cooling lasting for several years, which amplified the mass extinction of life. There is now no doubt that the Chicxulub impact event drove at least 75 percent of Earth's species to extinction. This mass extinction and the mass speciation event that quickly followed compensated for the Sun's increasing brightness. This paved the way for the introduction of the advanced plants and animals that would make global human civilization possible, and provided an example of God's creation activities described in Psalm 104:29–30. Biochemical Finite State Machines In June of 2021, a team of life scientists reported the discovery of the first-ever biochemical finite-state machine (FSM) when they characterized the gait of the single-celled ciliate Euplotes. This discovery makes it possible to present a revitalized Watchmaker argument for God's existence and fulfills the Watchmaker prediction. It also leads to a new way to view biochemical systems that has profound theological implications. In this episode Hugh and Fuz discuss these important topics. References: “Massive Perturbations to Atmospheric Sulfur in the Aftermath of the Chicxulub Impact,” Christopher K. Junium et al., https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2119194119   “A Unicellular Walker Controlled by a Microtubule-Based Finite State Machine,” Ben T. Larson et al., https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.02.26.433123 “Single-Celled Organism Has Evolved a Natural Mechanical Computer,” Michael Le Page, https://www.newscientist.com/article/2285141-single-celled-organism-has-evolved-a-natural-mechanical-computer/

Escuchando Documentales
Encubrimiento Atómico #documental #ArmamentoNuclear #Hiroshima #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 49:26


Encubrimiento atómico es el primer documental que explora los bombardeos de Hiroshima y Nagasaki de1945 desde la perspectiva, las palabras y las imágenes sorprendentes únicas de los valientes camarógrafos y directores que arriesgaron sus vidas filmando las secuelas irradiadas. Revela cómo este metraje histórico, creado por un equipo de noticieros japoneses y luego por un equipo de élite del Ejército de los EE. UU. (que filmó los únicos carretes en color), fue incautado, clasificado como ultrasecreto y luego enterrado por funcionarios estadounidenses durante décadas para ocultar los costos humanos completos. de los bombardeos mientras se desataba una costosa carrera armamentista nuclear. Mientras tanto, los productores del metraje hicieron esfuerzos heroicos para encontrar y exponer su impactante película, para revelar las verdades de los bombardeos atómicos que podrían detener la proliferación nuclear. Encubrimiento atómico representa, al menos en parte, la película que no se les permitió hacer, así como un homenaje a los documentalistas de todo el mundo.

Dad Bod History
DBH 68 - Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Necessary Evil or Unjustified Atrocity?

Dad Bod History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 76:09


#History #Hiroshima #Nagasaki #AtomicBomb #worldwarii #EnolaGayJake, Eric, Jeff, and Cameron discuss the issue of the decision to drop the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, whether it was justified, necessary, and whether or not the Japanese would have surrendered in different circumstances.Hit that

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily
Monday 22 August

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 40:00


James Rodgers and Alice Sherwood discuss the Moscow car bomb attack and its effect on Russia's psyche; terrorism charges against Imran Khan and how to deal with troublesome former leaders; and Nagasaki's Huis Ten Bosch theme park is put up for sale. Plus: keeping the Ukrainian railways running in wartime.

20 & Go
Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

20 & Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 20:01


Rich and Dunk have twenty minutes to discuss the terrifying Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The J-Talk Podcast
J-Talk: Extra Time J2 MD31 & J3 MD20

The J-Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 68:11


James Taylor and Jon Steele bring the noise with another action-packed weekend in J2. They discussed surprise wins for lowly Ryukyu at Nagasaki and Omiya at Sendai, as well as Machida's victory over JEF United. James rounded up the rest of the action, and then Jon and James looked ahead to matchday 32. Mike Innes rounds up the goalfests from J3 round 20 in J-Talk: Short Corner.   00:00-12:08 Nagasaki v Ryukyu 12:09-22:39 Sendai v Omiya 22:40-29:15 JEF v Machida 29:16-38:15 J2 MD31 roundup 38:16-45:05 J2 MD32 preview 45:06 to end Short Corner

BFBS Radio Sitrep
NATO ‘ready to intervene' in Kosovo

BFBS Radio Sitrep

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 29:48


The EU is hosting crisis talks, trying to prevent a new conflict between Serbia and Kosovo.NATO's KFOR mission, including British troops, still has a UN peacekeeping mandate in Kosovo but what could trigger their intervention?Has the balance of power shifted in favour of Ukraine, as Russia takes two significant hits in annexed Crimea? A former Commanding General of the US Army Europe gives us his assessment.And the incredible story of British, Dutch and Australian prisoners of war who survived the Nagasaki atomic bomb, little more than a mile from where it landed.

Blowout - Blowout Podcast Network
Riding The Torus - Ep 111 - The Bomb pt 1

Blowout - Blowout Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 97:48


On Episode 111, Eric and Josh begin a discussion about the development of the atomic bomb, The Manhattan Project, and the ultimate deployment of "Little Boy" and "Fat Man" on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. Please send your questions, comments, corrections and hate mail to RidingTheTorusPod@gmail.com You can find Eric's research notes for every episode here: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1syBwRsJ3b3YnOlUCXXFEEUpgF0NODLL2 Also! If you enjoy the Riding The Torus theme song, you can now download it for FREE from the Bueno Tornado bandcamp page. Here is the link: http://buenotornado.bandcamp.com/track/riding-the-torus-theme Hosts: Eric Beal - twitter.com/ericbealart Josh Campbell - twitter.com/josh_campbell

Historical Hysteria
57. The Myth of the Atom Bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima

Historical Hysteria

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 15:02


The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were a necessary evil to end the war, they are what finally compelled the Japanese to surrender... right?

Multipolarista
After nuking Japan, US gov't lied about radioactive fallout as civilians died

Multipolarista

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 18:22


After dropping two atomic bombs on Japan in August 1945, top US government officials lied to the media and Congress, claiming there was "no radioactive residue" in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that Japanese reports of deaths due to radiation were "propaganda," that civilians did not face "undue suffering," and that it was "a very pleasant way to die." VIDEO: https://youtube.com/watch?v=Cu4KnCPjwys Report on US-backed fascism in Japan and Shinzo Abe: https://multipolarista.com/2022/07/09/fascism-japan-shinzo-abe-empire

Walter Edgar's Journal
Black snow: SC author chronicles desparate measures taken to end WWII fighting in the Pacific

Walter Edgar's Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 51:19


Seven minutes past midnight on March 10, 1945, nearly 300 American B-29s thundered into the skies over Tokyo. Their payloads of incendiaries ignited a firestorm that reached up to 2,800 degrees, liquefying asphalt and vaporizing thousands; sixteen square miles of the city were flattened, and more than 100,000 men, women, and children were killed.In his book, Black Snow - Curtis LeMay, the Firebombing of Tokyo, and the Road to the Atomic Bomb, Charleston author James M. Scott tells the story of this devastating operation, orchestrated by Major General Curtis LeMay, who famously remarked: “If we lose the war, we'll be tried as war criminals.”James Scott talks with Walter Edgar about the development of the B-29, the capture of the Marianas for use as airfields, and the change in strategy from high-altitude daylight “precision” bombing to low-altitude nighttime incendiary bombing. Most importantly, the raid represented a significant moral shift for America, marking the first-time commanders deliberately targeted civilians which helped pave the way for the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki five months later.

FRIGHT SCHOOL
215 - We Already BEEN Woke (w/ Brennan) - Godzilla (1954)

FRIGHT SCHOOL

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 69:20


Welcome back to Fright School! We welcome back to the show friend and Godzilla fan Brennan Klein! Joe and Brennan take on High School Musical The Musical The Series. That's a mouthful. We also chat about the CATS ballroom reimagining. This week it's all about the King of the Monsters, GODZILLA! We chat about the direct artistic response to nuclear fallout, Godzilla as a consequence and victim of war, and the palpable real horror echoed in the cinematography of the film. Brennan also breaks down his favorite films out of the 36 Godzilla films we have so far. Recommended Reading/Viewing: Official trailer GOJIRA (GODZILLA) (1954) ‘Godzilla' was a metaphor for Hiroshima, and Hollywood whitewashed it by Kimmy Yam The true story you probably don't know behind 'Godzilla' came from the devastation after Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings by Nathaniel Lee Join our Patreon for access to exclusive content! Sign up for The Fright School Reader our NEW monthly newsletter! Check out our TEEPUBLIC offerings for all of your Fright School Supplies!! FOLLOW US! Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkTree EXTRA CREDIT: WE KNOW PODCASTING! There would be no Fright School without the incomparable assistance of one Matt Kelly. Now you can benefit from his and co-founder of WE KNOW PODCASTING Chris Fafalios' 25+ years of combined experience to take your show to the next level. They want to share their experience with you, giving you a leg up on the competition. In a world of run-of-the-mill podcasts, you can stand out from the crowd with a professional and engaging show! Fright School Recommended Texts: Creepy Bitches: Essays On Horror From Women In Horror by Alyse Wax, Rebekah McKendry, PhD. and more! Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror by Robin R Means Coleman The Horror Genre: From Beelzebub to Blair Witch by Paul Wells Men, Women, and Chain Saws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film by Carol J. Clover Monsters in the Closet: Homosexuality and the Horror Film by Harry Benshoff The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror by David J. Skal Projected Fears by Kendall R. Phillips Support FRIGHT SCHOOL by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/fright-school Find out more at https://fright-school.pinecast.co This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Speaking of Writers
Barrett Tillman- When the Shooting Stopped: August 1945

Speaking of Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 12:47


Speaking of Writers Part 1 of a series on Victory in Japan Day (VJ Day 8/15/45). August 15, 1945 officially marked the end of World War II, but in fact conflict continued throughout the month. This fascinating title from Barrett Tillman explore the final weeks of the war, until the shooting finally stopped. In the 44 months between December 1941 and August 1945, the Pacific Theater absorbed the attention of the American nation and military longer than any other. Despite the Allied grand strategy of “Germany first,” after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. especially was committed to confronting Tokyo as a matter of urgent priority. But from Oahu to Tokyo was a long, sanguinary slog, averaging an advance of just three miles per day. The U.S. human toll paid on that road reached some 108,000 battle deaths, more than one-third the U.S. wartime total. But by the summer of 1945 on both the American homefront and on the frontline there was hope. The stunning announcements of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9 seemed sure to force Tokyo over the tipping point since the Allies' surrender demand from Potsdam, Germany, in July. What few understood was the vast gap in the cultural ethos of East and West at that time. In fact, most of the Japanese cabinet refused to surrender and vicious dogfights were still waged in the skies above Japan. This fascinating new history tells the dramatic story of the final weeks of the war, detailing the last brutal battles on air, land and sea with evocative first-hand accounts from pilots and sailors caught up in these extraordinary events. Barrett Tillman then expertly details the first weeks of a tenuous peace and the drawing of battle lines with the forthcoming Cold War as Soviet forces concluded their invasion of Manchuria. When the Shooting Stopped retells these dramatic events, drawing on accounts from all sides to relive the days when the war finally ended and the world was forever changed. Barrett Tillman is a professional author and speaker with more than 40 nonfiction books as well as novels to his credit. His first book, published in 1976, remains in print today as do most of his subsequent titles. He holds seven awards for history and literature including the 1996 Tailhook Association Lifetime Achievement Award and third place in the US Naval Institute Prize in 2009. Tillman has appeared in more than a dozen documentaries including The History Channel's Dogfights. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steve-richards/support

Speaking of Writers
John Willis- Nagasaki: The Forgotten Prisoners

Speaking of Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 11:07


Speaking of Writers Part 3 of a series on Victory in Japan Day (VJ Day 8/15/45. This is one of the most remarkable untold stories of the Second World war. At 11.02 am on an August morning in 1945 America dropped the world's most powerful atomic bomb on the Japanese port city of Nagasaki. The most European city in Japan was flattened to the ground 'as if it had been swept aside by a broom'. More than 70,000 Japanese were killed. At the time, hundreds of Allied prisoners of war were working close to the bomb's detonation point, as forced labourers in the shipyards and foundries of Nagasaki. These men, from the Dales of Yorkshire and the dusty outback of Australia, from the fields of Holland and the remote towns of Texas, had already endured an extraordinary lottery of life and death that had changed their lives forever. They had lived through nearly four years of malnutrition, disease, and brutality. Now their prison home was the target of America's second atomic bomb. In one of the greatest survival stories of the Second World War, we trace their astonishing experiences back to bloody battles in the Malayan jungle, before the dramatic fall of Fortress Singapore, the mighty symbol of the British Empire. This abject capitulation was followed by surrender in Java and elsewhere in the East, condemning the captives to years of cruel imprisonment by the Japanese. Their lives grew evermore perilous when thousands of prisoners were shipped off to build the infamous Thai-Burma Railway, including the Bridge on the River Kwai. If that was not harsh enough, POWs were then transported to Japan in the overcrowded holds of what were called hell ships. These rusty buckets were regularly sunk by Allied submarines, and thousands of prisoners lived through unimaginable horror, adrift on the ocean for days. Some still had to endure the final supreme test, the world's second atomic bomb. The prisoners in Nagasaki were eyewitnesses to one of the most significant events in modern history but writing notes or diaries in a Japanese prison camp was dangerous. To avoid detection, one Allied prisoner buried his notes in the grave of a fellow POW to be reclaimed after the war, another wrote his diary in Irish. Now, using unpublished and rarely seen notes, interviews, and memoirs, this unique book weaves together a powerful chorus of voices to paint a vivid picture of defeat, endurance, and survival against astonishing odds. John Willis, author of Nagasaki: The Forgotten Prisoners, is one of Britain's best known television executives. He is a former Director of Programmes at Channel 4 and Director of Factual and Learning at the BBC. He was Vice-president of National Programs at WGBH Boston. In 2012 he was elected as Chair of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). He is currently Chair of Mentorn Media, producers of Question Time for BBC and he also chairs the Board of Governors at the Royal Central School for Speech and Drama. He divides his time between London and Norfolk. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steve-richards/support

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, August 14, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsTwentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 120All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe“I don't know what's going to become of you!” How many parents have said that? Maximilian Mary Kolbe's reaction was, “I prayed very hard to Our Lady to tell me what would happen to me. She appeared, holding in her hands two crowns, one white, one red. She asked if I would like to have them—one was for purity, the other for martyrdom. I said, ‘I choose both.' She smiled and disappeared.” After that he was not the same. He entered the minor seminary of the Conventual Franciscans in Lvív--then Poland, now Ukraine-- near his birthplace, and at 16 became a novice. Though Maximilian later achieved doctorates in philosophy and theology, he was deeply interested in science, even drawing plans for rocket ships. Ordained at 24, Maximilian saw religious indifference as the deadliest poison of the day. His mission was to combat it. He had already founded the Militia of the Immaculata, whose aim was to fight evil with the witness of the good life, prayer, work, and suffering. He dreamed of and then founded Knight of the Immaculata, a religious magazine under Mary's protection to preach the Good News to all nations. For the work of publication he established a “City of the Immaculata”—Niepokalanow—which housed 700 of his Franciscan brothers. He later founded another one in Nagasaki, Japan. Both the Militia and the magazine ultimately reached the one-million mark in members and subscribers. His love of God was daily filtered through devotion to Mary. In 1939, the Nazi panzers overran Poland with deadly speed. Niepokalanow was severely bombed. Kolbe and his friars were arrested, then released in less than three months, on the feast of the Immaculate Conception. In 1941, Fr. Kolbe was arrested again. The Nazis' purpose was to liquidate the select ones, the leaders. The end came quickly, three months later in Auschwitz, after terrible beatings and humiliations. A prisoner had escaped. The commandant announced that 10 men would die. He relished walking along the ranks. “This one. That one.” As they were being marched away to the starvation bunkers, Number 16670 dared to step from the line. “I would like to take that man's place. He has a wife and children.” “Who are you?” “A priest.” No name, no mention of fame. Silence. The commandant, dumbfounded, perhaps with a fleeting thought of history, kicked Sergeant Francis Gajowniczek out of line and ordered Fr. Kolbe to go with the nine. In the “block of death” they were ordered to strip naked, and their slow starvation began in darkness. But there was no screaming—the prisoners sang. By the eve of the Assumption, four were left alive. The jailer came to finish Kolbe off as he sat in a corner praying. He lifted his fleshless arm to receive the bite of the hypodermic needle. It was filled with carbolic acid. They burned his body with all the others. Fr. Kolbe was beatified in 1971 and canonized in 1982. Reflection Father Kolbe's death was not a sudden, last-minute act of heroism. His whole life had been a preparation. His holiness was a limitless, passionate desire to convert the whole world to God. And his beloved Immaculata was his inspiration. Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe is a Patron Saint of: Addicts Recovery from drug addiction Learn more about Saint Maximilian Kolbe! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Saints & Feasts
August 14: Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe, Priest and Martyr

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 7:41


August 14: Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe, Priest and Martyr1894–1941Memorial; Liturgical Color: RedPatron Saint of prisoners, drug addicts, journalists, and the pro-life movementPrisoner 16670 was tough, immersed in God, and ready when the moment cameSaints are made, not born. Even more so martyrs. Maximilian Kolbe was so impressive a man that he may have been canonized even if that oh-so-brief, oh-so-intense, my-life-for-his exchange in the grim prison yard of Auschwitz had not led to his martyrdom. Baptized as Raimund, from a young age Kolbe felt the call to self-sacrificing holiness. When he was a boy of twelve, the Virgin Mary came to him in a vision and held out two crowns for him to choose from: one white for a life of purity, and one red for martyrdom. The pre-teen Maximilian responded to his Lady: “I choose both.”Maximilian, along with his older brother, entered a local Franciscan seminary as a teen. When he was just eighteen, his superiors sent him to study in Rome, where he earned doctorates in philosophy and theology summa cum laude. He was ordained a priest in 1918 and the next year returned to the new, post-World War I country of Poland. For the next twenty plus years, Father Maximilian powered his way through life. He taught in a Franciscan seminary. He started an immense publishing house which printed devotional materials promoting the Army of the Immaculate. He founded a new Franciscan monastery, which rapidly grew into one of the largest in Poland. And in 1930 he became a missionary to the Far East. He went to China, had little success, and so went on to Japan, where he founded a monastery near Nagasaki. He also started a publishing house in India. In 1936 he returned to Poland due to ill health. But he didn't stop. He continued to manage various Marian publications, which were widely circulated, and even procured a radio license and began broadcasting from his own monastery radio station. As he immersed himself in the thousands of details of these varied apostolates, Father Kolbe maintained a disciplined life of prayer, mortification, and daily Mass.After the Germans invaded Poland in September 1939, Kolbe's apostolates were curtailed. He organized a hospital at the monastery and, along with the reduced community of brothers, gave shelter to refugees, including about 2,000 Jews. He was arrested by the Germans in 1939 and held for almost three months. He was pressured, but refused, to sign a document recognizing his German ancestry (Kolbe's father was an ethnic German) in exchange for more food rations and better treatment. In February 1941, German SS men came and shuttered his monastery. Kolbe and four other friars were arrested, though twenty other brothers offered themselves in their stead. In May 1941, Kolbe was transferred to the heavy labor division of Auschwitz for the last act of his life.He carried out his priestly ministry as best he could in the hell of Auschwitz and endured severe beatings for it. In July, just two months after he arrived, a prisoner escaped from the camp. As both deterrent and reprisal, the head of the camp ordered ten men to be starved to death in the escapee's place. The victims were chosen at random from a prisoner roll call. One of the unfortunate chosen, a married man named Francis, begged for mercy: "My wife! My children!" What followed this desperate pleading was profound, left an indelible impression on all who witnessed it, and is packed with an almost liturgical character.Perhaps remembering his childhood vision of the Virgin, and perhaps inspired that the chosen man shared the name Francis with the founder of his religious order, Kolbe removes his cap and slowly emerges from the bedraggled group of prisoners. A filthy, striped rag of a uniform is draped over his skeletal frame. He is barefoot. But he has dignity. There are no frivolous men in Auschwitz. He speaks directly to the commanding officer in German: “I want to take his place.” Kolbe's bearing must command respect, because, according to an eye-witness, the officer responds to him using the formal “You.” “Warum wollen Sie für ihn sterben?”—“Why do you Sir want to die for him?” “Because he has a wife and children.” “What is your profession?” “I am a Catholic priest.” A few moments of silence and then “Gut.” “Good” or “Right.”After two weeks of no food or water in a bunker, a guard injected carbolic acid into the arm of the indestructible Kolbe on August 14. His body was cremated the next day. His ashes floated from the smokestack over the gray wasteland of Auschwitz on August 15, the Feast of the Assumption. He, a priest, became what he offered. Like Saint Polycarp of old, burned like bread at the stake, Kolbe's life ended in a liturgical doxology where his own body became the bread of sacrifice.First-class relics of Saint Maximilian exist only because his Franciscan barbers thought he was a saint. They saved hairs from his head and beard without his knowledge. The man whose life he saved, Francis Gajowniczek, lived for another fifty-three years, to the age of 93, dying in 1995. He was present in Rome when Pope Saint John Paul II, who lived just an hour from Auschwitz in 1941, canonized his fellow Pole Saint Maximilian Kolbe in 1982.Saint Maximilian Kolbe, you were prepared to be generous in your last moments by a long life of sacrifice, humility, and devotion. May we so prepare ourselves day in and day out, so that when a moment of heroic generosity presents itself, we will respond like you.

Documentales Sonoros
Mordaza atómica

Documentales Sonoros

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 49:26


Esta película apasionante y profundamente conmovedora revela la historia completa de cómo las imágenes impactantes del sufrimiento humano, filmadas en Hiroshima y Nagasaki después de los bombardeos atómicos de 1945, estuvieron ocultas por Estados Unidos durante décadas al ser calificadas de alto secreto.

Subject to Change
A nuclear exchange

Subject to Change

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 76:53


I chatted to Battleship Bean and John Shilling about nuclear war. We discussed the wonderful Dr Strangleove and tried to unpick some of the realities of a nuclear war. How powerful are modern weapons?  Would they knock out electrical systems world wide?  Would such a war result in nuclear winter?A book I mentioned in the podcast and which I recommend (though Bean is not a fan) is Command and Control by John Schlosser. Bean himself has written several articles on the subject on his excellent blog:https://www.navalgazing.net/Nuclear-Weapon-Destructivenesshttps://www.navalgazing.net/Nuclear-Strategyhttps://www.navalgazing.net/Nuclear-WinterI'm uploading this on the anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing and am very much hoping that that and the bombing of Nagasaki on 9 August is the last we see of these things.

The Shortwave Report
The Shortwave Report August 12, 2022

The Shortwave Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 29:00


This week's show features stories from Radio Deutsche-Welle, Radio Havana Cuba, NHK Japan, and George Galloway. http://youthspeaksout.net/swr220812.mp3 (29:00) From GERMANY- The heat waves and drought in Europe have left rivers, a major route for transporting goods, historically shallow. Israeli forces killed more than 40 Palestinians, including children, in what it termed a pre-emptive strike. From CUBA- The UN Special Rapporteur on Occupied Palestine said the Israeli air raids were illegal and irresponsible. Cuba experienced the worst fire in its history at a fuel depot in Matanzas and was aided in suppression by Mexico and Venezuela. Death Valley in California received a years worth of rainfall in 3 hours, and Iran recorded its hottest ever August temperature of 130 degrees F. Then a Viewpoint on UN Secretary-General Guterres who warned that today humanity is just one miscalculation away from nuclear annihilation. From JAPAN- Monday was the 77th anniversary of the US destroying the city of Nagasaki and 70,000 people with an atomic bomb. The WHO says that Japan again has topped the list of new recorded Covid cases for the third week in a row. The Chinese government has released a White Paper outlining a peaceful reunification of Taiwan. In response to Nancy Pelosi's controversial visit, Chinese military drills to intimidate Taiwan extended past Sunday- they finally pulled troops back on Wednesday. From GEORGE GALLOWAY- George interviewed Chinese journalist Li Jing Jing about the anger Chinese citizens felt toward the Pelosi visit to Taiwan, the history of the US agreeing to the One China principle, and global agreement that Taiwan is part of China. Li goes on to say the visit was an intentional provocation by the US to start a war and attempt to militarily occupy the island, giving the US control the Indo-Pacific region.

Community Voz
CV S9 Ep 4 Migration Makes Us Stronger pt 2: A Vigil and Action at City Hall

Community Voz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 64:16


On August 5th, 2022 dozens of community groups and allies gathered at City Hall in Bellingham for a vigil in honor of Honesto Silva Ibarra and to show support for a city-funded Immigrant Resource Center. During the previous month, immigrant families and allies folded thousands of origami butterflies in recognition of the anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and in solidarity with the continued struggle of immigrant detention and deportation. Following the vigil at city hall, community went into the building and strung the strands of butterflies up as gift to city hall, symbolizing unity and solidarity. We have asked that city hall keep the butterflies on display until after Artwalk on September 3rd, but have received no confirmation that they will. If you live in Bellingham, go see the installation at City Hall before it is gone!Songs in this episode:Sukuyaki by SelenaSacar la Voz by Ana Tijouxphoto credit: Lorenzo HuertaSupport the show

The John Batchelor Show
#Nagasaki: 77 years later: US POV. Charles Pellegrino, author, "Last Train from Hiroshima."

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 12:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Nagasaki: 77 years later: US POV.  Charles Pellegrino, author, "Last Train from Hiroshima."  https://www.amazon.com/Last-Train-Hiroshima-Survivors-MacRae/dp/0805087966/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

The John Batchelor Show
#Nagasaki: 77 years later: Japan POV. Charles Pellegrino, author, "Last Train from Hiroshima."

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 8:10


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Nagasaki: 77 years later: Japan POV. Charles Pellegrino, author, "Last Train from Hiroshima."  https://www.amazon.com/Last-Train-Hiroshima-Survivors-MacRae/dp/0805087966/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast
The Steffan Tubbs Show 8-9-22 Hr 2

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 44:27


Our popular guest Stephen Kelly - the "nuke expert" joins us in-studio for the hour. The U.S. Navy intelligence man discusses the history of the nuclear bomb and what happened over Nagasaki 77 years ago today. What did President Truman know in 1945? A terrific hour of radio. Find out more about the Colorado Aviation Historical Society at www.coahs.org See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy
West Coast Cookbook and Speakeasy - Smothered Benedict Wednesdays 10 Aug 22

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 63:28


West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy is Now Open! 8am-9am PT/ 11am-Noon ET for our especially special Daily Specials, Smothered Benedict Wednesdays!Starting off in the Bistro Cafe, “there is no uprising” for Trump after the FBI search, but the media continues to distort the reaction of a tiny number of Trump's followers.Then, on the rest of the menu, companies are increasing investment as Biden signed the CHIPS and Science Act boosting the US semiconductor industry; Ramsey County, Minnesota settled a racial discrimination suit against the Sheriff's Office for running a ‘whites only jail' to guard Derek Chauvin; and, the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup playoffs will take place without any of the golfers who defected to the Saudi-funded Bone Saw Invitational Series.After the break, we move to the Chef's Table where the United States is returning thirty “looted Bronze Age antiquities” to Cambodia; and, Nagasaki paid tribute to the victims of the US atomic bombing seventy-seven years ago yesterday, August 9.All that and more, on West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy with Chef de Cuisine Justice Putnam.Bon Appétit!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"To those of us who believe that all of life is sacred every crumb of bread and sip of wine is a Eucharist, a remembrance, a call to awareness of holiness right where we are. I want all of the holiness of the Eucharist to spill out beyond church walls, out of the hands of priests and into the regular streets and sidewalks, into the hands of regular, grubby people like you and me, onto our tables, in our kitchens and dining rooms and backyards.” -- Shauna Niequist "Bread and Wine: A Love Letter to Life Around the Table with Recipes"~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Show Notes & Links:https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2022/8/10/2115605/-West-Coast-Cookbook-amp-Speakeasy-Daily-Special-Smothered-Benedict-Wednesdays

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast
The Steffan Tubbs Show 8-9-22 Hr 4

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 44:52


We recap the "something smells fishy" Trump raid. They hate him. They've lied. But we discuss Donald Trump is not above the law. It's National Book Lovers Day - great suggestions of non-fiction come in via calls and texts. We pay respects to David McCullough with sound and his words and wrap with a BBC look at Nagasaki, Japan August 9, 1945.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fate of Fact
August 9th: Atomic Bomb Dropped on Nagasaki

Fate of Fact

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 6:56 Very Popular


On August 9, 1945, the second atomic bomb is used against Nagasaki. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

StarTalk Radio
Nuclear Winter with Ann Druyan and Brian Toon

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 58:54 Very Popular


Are advanced civilizations doomed to destroy themselves? Neil deGrasse Tyson and Chuck Nice explore the Cold War, The Drake Equation, and nuclear winter hypothesis with producer of Cosmos and Carl Sagan's widow Ann Druyan and atmospheric scientist Brian Toon. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/nuclear-winter-with-ann-druyan-and-brian-toon/Photo Credit: United States Department of Energy, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

History Daily
The Bombing of Nagasaki

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:07 Very Popular


August 9, 1945. Three days after the first atomic bomb falls on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, the U.S. drops a second bomb on Nagasaki.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tout un monde - La 1ere
Nagasaki, l'autre ville irradiée

Tout un monde - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 4:29


Cellini and Dimino
Beyond the Goatee (8-9-22)

Cellini and Dimino

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 14:14


Elton John to the Grateful Dead.  Wayne Gretzky to the Leaning Tower of Pisa.  It's another eclectic adventure as Chris Dimino takes you BEYOND THE GOATEESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KPFA - Flashpoints
Remembering One of Humanity's Worst Catastrophes: The US Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

KPFA - Flashpoints

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 59:57


World War II On Topic
FDR, Harry Truman, & the Manhattan Project with Clifton Truman Daniel and Paul Sparrow

World War II On Topic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 62:24


Today's episode is brought to you by the Museum's Jenny Craig Institute for the Study of War and Democracy and The Media & Education Center.   We are going back to 2020, when Dr. Ed Lengel, then the Museum's Senior Director of Programs, hosted a webinar with President Harry Truman's grandson - Clifton Truman Daniel -  and Paul Sparrow, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum Director.   They presented Roosevelt's and Truman's roles in the Manhattan Project  and the dramatic race for atomic power.    The Manhattan Project's success would have been impossible without President Roosevelt's committed leadership, and President Truman's decision to employ the weapons.   This culminated in the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6th and 9th, 1945.    If you would like to view the original conversation, you can see it here: https://youtu.be/9f67sx2moBE

Accent of Women
Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Accent of Women

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


77 years ago, on the 6th and 9th of August, the USA military dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The two bombings killed around 175,000 people with another 90,000 dying by the end of the year due to radiation injuries.Some 5 years after these bombings, a global anti-nuclear armaments campaign emerged and in 2007, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) was founded. In 2017, they won the Nobel Prize for peace, for their work towards global nuclear disarmament. One of the people that accepted the award was a woman named Setsuko Thurlow – a survivor of the bombing in Hiroshima. In 2019 she gave a speech at Harvard Law School.

The Bryan Suits Show
Hour 1: Car thievery

The Bryan Suits Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 37:30


Reflecting on the anniversary of the United States dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Senate passes so-called “inflation reduction act”. Joe Kent about to overtake Jaime Herrera Beutler in Washington's 3rd district primary. // Narcan vending machines are becoming popular in some cities. // Data shows more than 30 cars per day are being stolen in Pierce County. Repeat offenders continue to wreak havoc in the pacific northwest region.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bobs Your Uncle Podcast
Faith and Belief: Ted Lasso and Richmond vs Hebrews BYU Podcast 1.24

Bobs Your Uncle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 18:09


Ted Lasso and Peter Pan have this notion of 'belief' down pretty well. For Ted it's the Richmond Football Club; for Peter Pan it's about saving Tinkerbell from disappearance. What is faith anyway? And does it matter? Bob takes this one on alone.Amanda McInnes is Bob's travel agent and you want to reach out to her to plan your next big trip or cruise. Contact her on bit.ly/amanda365Historical marker of the week-- this date in history--- includes Pisa and Jerry Garcia, Charles Manson and Sharon Tate, and Nagasaki ...and Bob's daughter!Support the show

Warfare
Nagasaki: Friendly Fire

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 34:01


Warning: The events recounted in this episode may be distressing to some listenersAt 11.02 am on August 9 1945, America dropped the world's most powerful atomic bomb on Nagasaki. The Japanese port city was flattened to the ground 'as if it had been swept aside by a broom', with over 70,000 people killed. At that time, hundreds of Allied prisoners of war were working close to the bomb's detonation point, as forced labourers in the shipyards and foundries of Nagasaki. Having survived four years of malnutrition, disease, and brutality, they now faced the prospect of the US dropping its second atomic bomb on their prison home.In this episode James is joined by John Willis, whose new book Nagasaki: The Forgotten Prisoners paint a vivid picture of defeat, endurance, and survival against astonishing odds.Edited by Aidan Lonergan.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Just Another History Podcast
Episode 26 (Hiroshima and Nagasaki: The worlds first atomic bombings)

Just Another History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 25:49


Join Evan for a discussion on the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during WW2. This discussion will include a background, the events, and the aftermath. Join us and prompt your own discussion on the most destructive events of the Second World War. Follow us on Instagram @just_another_history_podcast for information on upcoming episodes and to let your voice be heard via questions and polls that are posted regularly. We sincerely hope that you enjoy!

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 27:44 Very Popular


On August 6 and 9, 1945, US B-29 bombers, dropped their nuclear bombs on the two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing hundreds of thousands and consigning millions to disease and genetic defects. The accepted wisdom in the U.S. since has been that dropping the bombs on these Japanese cities was the only way to end World War II without an invasion of Japan that would have cost hundreds of thousands of American and perhaps millions of Japanese lives.Gar Alperovitz is a historian, political economist, activist and writer. A critic of the bombings, Gar joins Dan on the podcast to discuss how the decision to use the atomic bomb was wrapped up in atomic diplomacy: that the U.S. used nuclear weapons to intimidate the Soviet Union in the early stages of the Cold War. To mark the anniversary, we also dug back into the archives to bring you the human story at the heart of the tragedy - Hirata San, a survivor of the Hiroshima attacks, shares his experiences of the bombing.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
Hiroshima: A Survivor's Story

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 33:43


Warning: The events recounted in this episode may be distressing to some listenersKeiko Ogura was just eight years old on August 6 1945 when her home city of Hiroshima was destroyed by the US in the first atomic bomb attack in history.Almost 150,000 people lost their lives in that first bombing, which was followed three days later on August 9 by the destruction of Nagasaki, in which around half that number perished. Japan surrendered shortly thereafter, drawing a close to the Second World War.Those who survived the a-bombs are known as hibakusha, and Keiko - as a storyteller for the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation - is among the most prominent. In this incredible episode, James is joined by Keiko herself to learn her riveting story of survival against all odds.Produced and sound designed by Elena Guthrie. Edited by Aidan Lonergan.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

English Learning for Curious Minds | Learn English with Podcasts
#286 | The Atomic Bomb Part 3: The Aftermath

English Learning for Curious Minds | Learn English with Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 20:05


Part three of our three-part mini-series on The Atomic Bomb.Ever since the atomic bomb was dropped, people have been asking whether it was actually necessary.In this episode, we'll explore the arguments for and against the use of atomic weapons in World War II, and look at how this has changed the world we live in. Recap of the journey to dropping the bombs on Hiroshima & Nagasaki The American reasons for dropping the bomb “It seems to be the most terrible thing ever discovered, but it can be made the most useful…” Arguments against dropping the bomb on Hiroshima & Nagasaki #1: Drop a demonstration bomb somewhere else #2: Japan would have surrendered without a bomb #3: The use of atomic weapons is ethically unacceptable American counterarguments The scientists who were against dropping the atomic bomb Post-war theories about why the atomic bomb was used Was Japan really close to surrendering? Nuclear proliferation since 1945 Full transcript, subtitles and key vocabulary available on the website: https://www.leonardoenglish.com/podcasts/atomic-bomb-aftermath---You might like:

New Books Network
America's Chernobyl, Part 1: Living in a Poison Town

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 53:12


In this episode of Cited: What it means to live in a place where your home can give you cancer. Richland, Washington is a company town that sprang up almost overnight in the desert of southeastern Washington. Its employer is the federal government, and its product is plutonium. The Hanford nuclear site was one of the Manhattan Project sites, and it made the plutonium for the bomb that devastated Nagasaki. The official history is one of scientific achievement, comfortable houses, and good-paying jobs. But it doesn't include the story of what happened after the bomb was dropped -- neither in Japan, nor right there in Washington State. In part one of this Cited two-parter we tell the largely-forgotten story of the most toxic place in America. This episode was produced before Darts and Letters existed, when Cited Media was all about a documentary series called Cited. —————————-SUPPORT THE SHOW—————————- You can support the show for free by following or subscribing on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or whichever app you use. This is the best way to help us out and it costs nothing so we'd really appreciate you clicking that button. If you want to do a little more we would love it if you chip in. You can find us on patreon.com/dartsandletters. Patrons get content early, and occasionally there's bonus material on there too. ——————-ABOUT THE SHOW—————— For a full list of credits, contact information, and more, visit our about page. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

KPFA - Flashpoints
Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki as the World Moves Dangerously Close to a 21st Century Nuclear Conflagration

KPFA - Flashpoints

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 59:59


The Big Travel Podcast
140. Gallery Director Simon Martin; Art History in Venice, Artistic Depictions of Hiroshima, Graced by the Dalai Lama but Knocked Out in Delhi

The Big Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 51:17


A teenage trip around the galleries of Italy sparked a life-long love for the arts, and as soon as he could Simon Martin, art historian, author and the director of Pallant House Gallery, returned. After a ‘Swallows and Amazons' childhood he's studied in the most prestigious institutions in Venice, been knocked out in a train station in Delhi, experienced an inexplicable rush of energy when being touched by the Dalai Lama, curated exhibitions in Japan, explored visual artists' response to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, enjoyed artistic surprises in Copenhagen, researched and many books and much more.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ridiculous History
Tsutomu Yamaguchi: The World's Only (Recognized) Double Atomic Bomb Victim

Ridiculous History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 36:51 Very Popular


On August 6th, 1945, Mitsubishi engineer Tsutomu Yamaguchi was finally heading home from a three month assignment in Hiroshima... until the United States dropped an atomic bomb over the city. Miraculously, he survived the bombing and made his way home to Nagasaki -- where he once again witnessed, and survived, an atomic bomb. Tune in to learn more about Tsutomu Yamaguchi's harrowing journey, as well as his life after surviving not one, but two separate atomic bombs. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.