Podcasts about Data

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Best podcasts about Data

Show all podcasts related to data

Latest podcast episodes about Data

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders
Sara Menker and Hans Tung (Gro Intelligence and GGV Capital) - Turning Data into Action

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 57:28


Sara Menker is the founder and CEO of Gro Intelligence, which uses data, analytics, and forecasting models to inform companies involved in the agricultural supply chain and organizations impacted by climate change. Hans Tung is a managing partner at GGV Capital, focusing on early-stage investments across the global digital economy. In this conversation with Stanford adjunct lecturer Emily Ma, Menker and Tung discuss the skills, tactics and technologies needed to solve complex, systemic challenges.

Coffee with Butterscotch: A Game Dev Comedy Podcast

In this episode, we discuss the space in space, beat frequencies of randomness, psychological overhead, and celebrate the launch of Crashlands+ onto Apple Arcade. We've been hard at work building THE FABRICATOR, so let's talk about it – cold sweats, horrifying realizations, worry counters, and all! Punching into a new weight class requires a little bit of perspective. No questions this time, but there's always next week! To stay up to date with all of our buttery goodness subscribe to the podcast on Apple podcasts (apple.co/1LxNEnk) or wherever you get your audio goodness. If you want to get more involved in the Butterscotch community, hop into our DISCORD server at discord.gg/bscotch and say hello! Submit questions at https://www.bscotch.net/podcast, disclose all of your secrets to podcast@bscotch.net, and send letters, gifts, and tasty treats to http://bit.ly/bscotchmailbox. Finally, if you'd like to support the show and buy some coffee FOR Butterscotch, head over to http://moneygrab.bscotch.net.

Blazing Trails
Geeking out with Raj Seshadri, President of Data and Services at Mastercard

Blazing Trails

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 32:24


Not many people will admit that they “started their life as a geek,” but today's guest is more than proud of her STEM-focused beginnings. Joining the podcast is Raj Seshadri, a former Phd. physicist and the current President of Data and Services at Mastercard. Raj shares why she made a career jump from physics to business, and what she loves about the work she does today. She tells us how Mastercard champions the philosophy of “doing good while doing well,” what the company is investing in today to prepare their offices for the workforce of the future, and how they are using data to tease out insights and trends that would have otherwise gone unnoticed.

The Voicebot Podcast
Voice Shopping Data Deep Dive - Voicebot Podcast Ep 241

The Voicebot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:15


Today's episode breaks down some of the key findings from the Voice Shopping Consumer Adoption Report for 2021. Data presented goes back to 2018 and shows a rising trend in adoption. Learn about total users, total consumer interest, product categories, average voice shopping order size, demographic data around users and much more.  This episode features Bret Kinsella breaking down the data and discussing the implications for the voice and retail industries. There is a companion to this episode release on YouTube where you can view the charts referenced in the show. 

KERA's Think
Data can't replace our brains just yet

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 34:33


Anyone who's ever followed a map knows it's important to look up to understand the landscape. Chris Jones joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about our ever-increasing dependence on data rather than common sense or personal mastery, and why that could be hampering creativity and good ideas. His book is called “The Eye Test: A Case for Human Creativity in the Age of Analytics.”

MPR News Update
Waste water data indicates the COVID peak may already be here in the Twin Cities

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 5:16


Waste water data indicates the COVID peak may already be here in the Twin Cities. Mayo Clinic says it is also seeing signs of a plateau. This is an evening update from MPR News, hosted by Tim Nelson. Music by Gary Meister.

Selling With Social Sales Podcast
LinkedIn Prospecting Strategies and Trends with Alyssa Merwin, #197

Selling With Social Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 44:21


If the past 18 months have taught us anything, it's that virtual selling is here to stay. And, in order to master the new art of modern selling, sales leaders must tap into the prospecting power of the social selling tools at their disposal.  Because those sales reps that know how to personalize their outreach, engage prospects in meaningful conversations, and quickly identify the most pressing pain points, will have an unfair advantage well into the future. No one knows how to leverage social media to close deals better than my guest on this episode of the Modern Selling Podcast.  Alyssa Merwin is the global Vice President of LinkedIn Sales Solutions, one of the company's fastest-growing lines of business. In her role, Alyssa leads the global sales organization to help companies around the world engage with LinkedIn's community of nearly 800 million members, connecting buyers and sellers to support organizations' business objectives.   With more than 20 years of experience in the sales industry, Alyssa has a proven track record of achieving strong business results and managing high-performing teams. Since joining LinkedIn in 2011, she has held numerous leadership positions, and most recently served as Vice President of Sales Solutions for North America, during which time the business experienced tremendous growth.   Outside of LinkedIn, Alyssa is a member of the Sales Impact Academy's Advisory Board, an investor and advisor to Black Star Fund, and an investor in Stage 2 Capital. Prior to joining LinkedIn, Alyssa spent nine years at CEB, now Gartner, and held various sales positions during her tenure. When it comes to keeping the pulse on sales – what works and what trends to look out for – Alyssa's genius is truly unmatched. If you've been looking for proven strategies to get more “hellos” and make your prospecting more efficient and effective, then tune into this strategy-rich conversation with Alyssa. You'll walk away with at least 5 actionable LinkedIn prospecting strategies to use by the end of this episode – guaranteed! How has prospecting changed in a post-COVID world? Since early 2020, I've personally witnessed radical shifts in how sales organizations are both reaching out to their prospects AND how they're training their sales teams.  When you study the effectiveness of strategies like cold email outreach, it starts to paint a very different sales picture that all sales leaders must be aware of. In my research, I've found that the number of sales emails sent has increased by 60% since 2020, however, the response rates have plummeted over 30%. So, it's not just about having more touchpoints with your prospects. Selling in this new virtual environment is all about having the right touchpoints, that convey the right value and that address the right pain points. I asked Alyssa to share what she's seen as the sales leader of LinkedIn in terms of how the pandemic has reshaped the sales industry: “Virtual selling will be core to how we all go to market from here on out. We've found that 70% of people go through the entire sales process without ever talking to a salesperson. They're able to find the information they need, make the decisions that work best for them, and feel more productive as a result – all in this virtual space. Like many organizations have, we will continue to need to adapt and evolve in this particular environment. At best we are looking at a hybrid approach, but we have to recognize and accept the importance of virtual selling.” I couldn't agree more with Alyssa! As the world's largest digital sales training company, we're constantly reading the market to see how we can better position our courses, find new topics to offer, and ways to better engage our prospects and customers. Many sales organizations have tried to shift to this virtual selling space by sending more emails or making more cold calls. As Alyssa suggests in our conversation, the shift that's needed has to go well beyond just doing more of the same tactical sales strategies and really get at the heart of buyer intent. Join the full conversation to hear specifically what unique prospecting strategy Alyssa recommends using to get a response back on the first outreach. How can sales organizations take a buyer first approach? Today's modern buyer is well informed. They're well researched and they know what options are available to them even before they ever get on a sales call. That's why tailoring your sales process to your prospect is so important. From how you write your outreach messages, to identifying their pain points, to the way you speak about your offering – everything has to feel personalized. I was curious to get Alyssa's take on this “buyer first” approach and how she would recommend a sales organization go about implementing this model. Her insights are spot on, “We know that our buyers are getting further through the sales decision or the buying decision before we even walk in the door. There's just so much more information available – we can easily hop onto a website, we can look at a demo, we can reach out on LinkedIn. As sales leaders, we have to recognize this new playing field and truly get clear on how we have to show up differently. Part of that is getting smart about the industry, the company, the individual you're meeting with and do it in a very detailed way that puts them at the center of the conversation.” Taking this time to do the research is such a critical step that so many sales reps overlook.  That's why at Vengreso our sales team follows the “Three by Three” method before we ever reach out to a prospect. Want to hear what it is and how we use it to 10x our response rates?  Download the episode and pay particular attention around the 20-minute mark. What are the most important sales trends to watch? We have to move away from the “smile and dial” prospecting strategies of the past and start to build a new level of buyer engagement. I wanted to get Alyssa's expert opinion on the state of the sales industry and where she saw the focus shifting in 2022. The way she sees it, there are three emerging trends that sales leaders need to keep a pulse on: Data privacy and compliance. The level of sophistication of online sales tools is rapidly increasing, but so too is the need to protect consumer data and private information. Alyssa strongly recommends taking inventory of the sales enablement tools you're using now and making sure they're compliant with GDPR and other data privacy standards.  Buyer intent data. We have to move beyond just focusing on who to contact and how to contact them and fully understand the science of buyer intent. Knowing when and how best to engage your prospect, what buyer signals to look for, and where your buyer is in the process will make sellers much more effective going forward.  Digital referrals. With platforms like LinkedIn that give you incredible visibility into the connections in your network – mastering how to ask for a digital referral will continue to be an important skill to develop. It's by breaking through the sales noise with a personal touchpoint that will separate average sales reps from those who consistently exceed quota without having to send hundreds of cold emails to do it. This is just the tip of the sales iceberg that Alyssa shares in this episode.  Make sure you listen all the way until the end to hear the best digital referral process to follow. [Hint: We use it and it works wonders!]

Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques.
Make Numbers Count: How to Communicate Data Effectively

Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 17:02


“We have to make data emotional because emotions are what drive us to act,” says Chip Heath, a professor of organizational behavior and author of the new book, Making Numbers Count: The Art of Science of Communicating Numbers. In this interview with podcast host Matt Abrahams, Heath talks about ways that data and statistics can be used to illuminate — or obscure — our message. “A lot of people in the world don't understand numbers like the numbers people,” he says. “And there are a lot of untranslated numbers that float around in organizations and in society.” Heath suggests thinking about numbers like a foreign language we need to “translate” for our audience: “If we don't translate numbers into something that's more tangible, we're going to sacrifice in a big way.“ Think Fast, Talk Smart is a podcast produced by Stanford Graduate School of Business. Each episode provides concrete, easy-to-implement tools and techniques to help you hone and enhance your communication skills.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Middle Market Growth Conversations
Family Office Series Pt. 4: Make Your Data Work for You

Middle Market Growth Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 17:07


This episode is brought to you by RSM US, a leading audit, tax and advisory firm focused on the middle market. RSM develops multi-generational relationships with family offices by providing tailored advisory services to help sustain the family's vision in an evolving, digitally driven world. It's part of a five-part series highlighting issues relevant to family offices. **** This episode features a discussion about technology, and how it can be used to address common challenges within family offices, like disparate systems that don't communicate with each other, manual processes and more. Joining the podcast for this episode are Mike Johnson, RSM partner from the firm's Family Office Enterprise, and leader of the firm's family office technology efforts; and Lauren Demas, a principal with RSM who works on PartnerSight and FamilySight—a suite of offerings for single and multi-family offices. In the interview, Johnson and Demas talk about how integrated technology solutions can help family offices cope with the talent shortage, provide tailored data based on individual needs, and integrate data to make it work for the organization. The two also discuss FamilySight, including how its capabilities can be used by different roles within a family office. Plus, Johnson and Demas provide real-world examples of how family offices have used the platform to improve operations and outcomes for their organization. To learn more about RSM's family office advisory services, visit rsmus.com/familyoffice. **** The Middle Market Growth Conversations podcast is produced by the Association for Corporate Growth. To learn more about the organization and how to become a member, visit www.acg.org.

Movies, Films and Flix
MFF Data Episode - Analyzing Matthew McConaughey's Massive Jump in Reign of Fire

Movies, Films and Flix

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:47


Mark and Adam Hodgins (of the GoFigure YouTube show) talk about Matthew McConaughey's massive (and relatively pointless....but awesome) jump in Reign of Fire. Mark has written loads of funky data articles, and this new series looks to shine a light on them. Enjoy!

People of Packaging Podcast
99 - Ed Garibian at Llumin is transforming how data can impact your manufacturing company

People of Packaging Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 25:36


LLumin provides operations software that dramatically reduces downtime and helps enterprises optimize the performance of their assets, streamlines the management of critical materials, and ensures compliance with regulations. Make sure you connect up with Ed on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ed-garibian-ceo-and-software-entrepreneur-89a9166/ Get your specright book at www.specright.com/book --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peopleofpackaging/support

SuperDataScience
SDS 541: Data Observability — with Dr. Kevin Hu

SuperDataScience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 68:03


In this episode, Kevin Hu joins the podcast to talk about founding and growing the data observability startup, Metaplane. Listen in to hear about his time in academia at MIT, his experience with Y Combinator, and his current routine as a technical founder. In this episode you will learn: • What is data observability? [4:35] • How to identify data quality issues? [8:56] • Kevin's PhD research on automating data science systems using machine learning [16:18] • Why Kevin launched Metaplane [28:50] • The pros and cons of an academic career relative to the start-up hustle [31:57] • Kevin's experience in Y-Combinator accelerator [39:50] • The software tools he uses daily as a CEO [50:54] • What Kevin looks for in data engineer hires [56:13] Additional materials: www.superdatascience.com/541

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

CarrotCast | Freedom, Flexibility, Finance & Impact for Real Estate Investors
EP 308: The Analytics, Data, and Numbers You Should Be Tracking to Gain Consistency in Your Business w/ Greg Helbeck [Republish]

CarrotCast | Freedom, Flexibility, Finance & Impact for Real Estate Investors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:17


In the first episode with Greg Helbeck we talked about negotiations, raising margins, and the questions he always asks his leads when talking about their property. A lot of his deals are done remotely, which makes it even more important that he stay on top of his analytics. Today we will be diving into what you should be tracking, how you should be tracking it, and who you should be comparing yourself to. (Hint: it's not other people.) Take the Energy Audit at [https://carrot.com/energy] Full Show Notes & More Episodes at CarrotCast.com Mentioned in This Episode:  by Ray Dalio: https://www.principles.com/ by Darren Hardy: https://bit.ly/383CdrS by Dan Kennedy: http://www.nobsbooks.com/  

Newbie Star Trek
NST: TNG - The Price - Season 3, Episode 8

Newbie Star Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 121:05


The Price! Negotiations begin over a suspect wormhole that honestly should've been vetted a lot more thoroughly before negotiations ever even began! At the same time, the Ferengi crash the party, Georgi and Data risk their lives traveling through the wormhole, and Deanna Troi gets creeped on SUPER hard by some weird Southern guy! In our discussion, Ricardo uncovers a foot fetish conspiracy within the ranks of the TNG crew, and Sara brings her perspective towards potentially deeper meanings of all the skeeziness going on! Could TNG ever get any more sexually uncomfortable to watch? Tune in to find out!    Head on over to JerkyGent (http://jerkygent.com?afmc=4y&utm_campaign=4y&utm_source=leaddyno&utm_medium=affiliate) and use offer code NEWBIE to get 30% off your first subscription box of delicious jerky!   Ask us a question at contact@newbiestartrek.com and we may answer it on the podcast!    Intro theme song: Earl Grey (Hot!) by Nathan Tang  "What happened during this airdate?" song: Around the Sun by Nathan Tang    Catch our other projects (Fugitive Frames Film Podcast, Fugitive Games YouTube channel, etc.) at www.fugitiveframes.com! 

Discover Your Talent–Do What You Love | Build a Career of Success, Satisfaction and Freedom
1050. A Day in the Life of a Non-Traditional Learning Advisor, with Sravan Ankaraju

Discover Your Talent–Do What You Love | Build a Career of Success, Satisfaction and Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 39:10


Sravan Ankaraju's twenty-five years in the field of data science and innovation provided him with a robust understanding of the intersections between technology and the economy. In 2015, Sravan co-founded Divergence Academy, where is he responsible for the vision and business development for industry-focused technology education. Divergence Academy offers immersive programs in data science, cybersecurity, and cloud computing.

IT Visionaries
Safeguarding Data in App Development with Jedidiah Yueh, the Founder and CEO of Delphix

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 37:21


Developing enterprise apps quickly is essential for business success, and securing data during the development process is imperative too. Jedidiah Yueh, the Founder and CEO of Delphix, suggests that though not as many people are talking about securing data in the app development process, they should be. Even more so, he argues they must secure this data or face huge consequences. Main TakeawaysSomething People Need to Talk About: Talking about data security is all the rage. But according to Yueh, securing development data is not discussed as much. Yueh contends that this lack of attention creates security vulnerabilities that bad actors can exploit. He believes that automated platforms built on zero trust principles can mitigate such risks.Out With the Old in With the New: The old way of testing apps in development involved a group of people all helping to gather production data and then copy that to the development territory. Of course, with so many hands in the process, the data was not very secure. Now, a platform, like Delphix, can make that process automatic; therefore, more secure. Setting Loftier IT Goals: Yueh argues that IT leaders are not setting high enough goals in terms of developing products quickly enough. In a conversation about his book, “Disrupt or Die,” he explains that the rate of acceleration is much faster than the typical business cycle so leaders must adapt the pace of their goals accordingly.IT Visionaries is brought to you by the Salesforce Platform - the #1 cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience. Build connected experiences, empower every employee, and deliver continuous innovation - with the customer at the center of everything you do. Learn more at salesforce.com/platform

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
Zero to $15k/mo in 12 Months, Data Automation Tool Now Raising $1.2m on $10m

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 16:01


No code platform for data & workflow automation

Expert Edge Podcast
Facebook Ads That Convert w/ Alvaro Berrios

Expert Edge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 36:02


This week on the Expert Edge Podcast I chatted with Alvaro Berrios, Facebook Ads Master - (seriously, he's a weapon). He shows us how to adapt to the ever-changing Facebook Ads landscape and really get the most out of your marketing efforts in 2022. Alvaro gives IMMEDIATE insight into managing your facebook budgets and really using your dollars wisely. Let's make every cent you invest matter! Every... Single...Penny! … Yup. Join us as we unpack the latest on Facebook Ads and how Data will be the #1 thing you need to be ALL IN for this year.  In this episode you'll discover:   The #1 hack to help you understand the algorithms of Instagram & Facebook.. And therefore get more regular exposure to your target audience. The secret to creating the highest converting ads...with almost no effort How to get the foundations of analytics right (without losing sleep)...trust me, I need a full 8 hours. Also, make sure to hit the "Subscribe" button so you don't miss an episode! Love this podcast? Write a review and give it a 5 star rating! I would love to hear from you. For all the show notes and links: https://www.expertedgepodcast.com/blog/episode95 If you're interested in Sell From Stage Academy® make sure to join the waitlist here: https://sellfromstageacademy.com/ Connect with Colin on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/colinboyd/ Check out Colin's Virtual Studio Setup and checklist: https://colinboyd.co/virtualstudio/ Click on the link below to connect with Alvaro Berrios to help you get started on your Facebook Ads journey. https://colinboyd.co/alvaro    

Sinocism
Omicron in the mail; Rate cut and GDP data; Stalled population growth; Corruption; Davos

Sinocism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


The annual Spring Festival migration officially started today, expectations are for the most trips since 2019, even though there are growing numbers of areas with cases of Omicron. Omicron though does seem to behave differently in PRC, as there are no new announced cases in Shanghai or Beijing, even though the initial infected individuals visited many spots in each city before being detected.

The TNC Podcast
Can Norwich City survive in the Premier League?

The TNC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 58:58


Get 20% off Lacons here - https://bit.ly/3Bywmb8 Jack and Chris return for the latest episode of the TNC Podcast discussing a crucial win in the Premier League for Dean Smith's side. Could this be the turning point in the season? PROUDLY BACKED BY: - Mortgage Advice Bureau: https://www.mortgageadvicebureau.com/ - Lacons: https://lacons.co.uk/ - Marine Power: https://www.marinepowerltd.co.uk/ - Eastern Voice & Data: https://www.easternvoicedata.co.uk/ - Busseys: https://www.busseys.co.uk/ - The Big C: http://www.big-c.co.uk/ - Gasway: http://www.gasway.co.uk/ - Credo Asset Finance: https://www.credoassetfinance.com/ - Hoffer & Webb LLC: https://hofferwebb.com/ - Oliver Hill Coaching: https://hillcoachingcompany.co.uk/

Private Equity Technology Podcast
Episode 52 - West Monroe Data Diligence with Doug Laney

Private Equity Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 28:51


Our guest this episode is Doug Laney, Data & Analytics Innovation Fellow at West Monroe and author of "Infonomics: How to Monetize, Manage, and Measure Information as an Asset for Competitive Advantage". Doug discusses why "Data Diligence" should be added to your ever-growing list of diligences and opportunities for monetizing the data that exists within your organization. Links: + Doug Laney: https://www.linkedin.com/in/douglaney/ + Infonomics: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075QM8P2T

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Insights and Innovation with Intelligent Pharmacy Data | The Future of Pharmacy by Omnicell

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 25:14


Insights and Innovation with Intelligent Pharmacy Data You can't manage what you can't see. When pharmacy leaders at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital made their medication inventories visible through intelligent data solutions, they were able to make better decisions for their patients, their processes, and their balance sheet.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Things Have Changed
Food, Fuel, Rent... Why is Everything Getting More Expensive?

Things Have Changed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:12


Throughout 2021, a lot has changed. But one thing has been constant: Inflation.  As COVID still continues to take a toll on global supply chains, we're also seeing the most significant changes in prices across multiple industries all of last year. Just in THC alone, we talked about everything from house prices hitting all-time highs to grocery bills skyrocketing.In December, a 7% rise in annual inflation capped a year of soaring prices—the fastest pace in nearly 40 years. Let's dive into the numbers here:Fuel/Energy/GasGasoline prices, over a 12 month period rose by about 50%Europe saw a steep increase, where over the course of the year,  wholesale gas prices rose by more than 400%, breaking every previous peacetime record. Now this was largely due to the reliance of Europe to Russia    AutosPrices of used cars and trucks soared 37.3% in December from a year earlier.A shortage of semiconductor chips and Covid-19-related manufacturing shutdowns crimped auto production, winnowing the supply of new autos.Home & RentRent is up a staggering 17.8% over the last year (largest annual increase ever)Home prices up 19% (also largest annual increase ever). So true 'inflation' rate is much higher than 7%. And we can point the finger to the Fed here, as house prices are actually inflated by the Fed purchasing mortgages and other assets, and the Fed's money, making its way through the economy.As prices rise, affordability concerns arise across the globe. In the episode the THC crew are diving into where exactly prices have been rising and how each one of us can avoid paying a premium on everything!Our Previous Inflation Coverage that goes into greater detail:Lumber Prices Have Been Surging. Could Other Commodities Follow Suit?Should We Brace for Upcoming Inflation?Getting Fed up With InflationThink Twice Before Buying a New Home This YearSupport the show (https://www.thc-pod.com/)

Star Trek The Next Conversation
TNC "Homeward" (TNG S713)

Star Trek The Next Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 135:18


Matt and Andy discuss how much of a dick Worf's brother is when he shows up on the Enterprise to violate the Prime Directive in some insane ways. Picard isn't happy and Data doesn't seem to care. Episode discussion begins at 1:01:23

Future of Mobility
#85 – Shiva Bhardwaj | Pitstop – Predictive Maintenance & Unlocking the Power of Data

Future of Mobility

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 50:30


Shiva Bhardwaj is the Founder and CEO at Pitstop, who is disrupting the automotive industry by unlocking vehicle data to create a more efficient, safer, and cleaner future. Key topics in this conversation include The keys to effective predictive maintenance Examples of how effective use of data can help fleet owners Maximizing vehicle uptime Determining whether data can be trusted Links Show notes: http://brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/shivabhardwaj Shiva's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shivabhardwaj/?originalSubdomain=ca Pitstop website: https://pitstopconnect.com/fleet/?utm_source=futurem Shiva's Bio: Shiva Bhardwaj is the Founder and CEO at Pitstop. While earning a degree in Electrical & Computer Engineering from UWaterloo, Shiva spent time working at NVIDIA and Blackberry. Shiva started his entrepreneurship journey by inventing ShockLock which brought a safe, simple and cost-effective hardware solution to the automotive world. His largest and most recent accomplishment is Pitstop, a predictive maintenance platform for the automotive industry founded in 2015. It has since secured investments from Sensata, Verizon, Ripple Ventures & BDC to name a few and is partnered with some of the biggest players in the industry. Pitstop's proprietary algorithm - a unique blend of embedded automotive domain knowledge, time-series data, AI technology and machine learning - provides customers with the ability to gain insight from their data in order to save costs, reduce downtime and recalls and increase safety. Shiva has also been recognized as the Vaughan Entrepreneur of the Year & SEMA 35 Under 35. About Pitstop: Pitstop is disrupting the automotive industry by unlocking vehicle data to create a more efficient, safer, and cleaner future. Combining multiple data sources with leading AI and ML technology, Pitstop generates actionable insights for customers to improve overall operations by reducing costs, GHG emissions and increasing safety. Future of Mobility: The Future of Mobility podcast is focused on the development and implementation of safe, sustainable, and equitable mobility solutions, with a spotlight on the people and technology advancing these fields. linkedin.com/in/brandonbartneck/ brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/ Music credit: Slow Burn Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

You too can learn Thai
70: New Year's Gift (4) - Learn Thai grammar, words and sentences with detailed explanation.

You too can learn Thai

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 30:14


Donate: https://anchor.fm/learnthai/support The payment is processed by Anchor which is part of Spotify, so your info is safe :) Data of supporters who started in August 2021 are lost... I'll be grateful if you start again. Nan's books: https://viewauthor.at/khrunan *** Facebook: www.facebook.com/youtoocanlearnthai YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/YoutoocanlearnThai Amazon affiliate links: Use our link to go to Amazon homepage before you shop. USA: https://amzn.to/37OqSN3 UK: https://amzn.to/3dOdIU8 France: https://amzn.to/3wvTAfR Japan: https://amzn.to/348UD99 Merch (shirts and phone grips): USA: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1EZF44ILW1L5N UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/hz/wishlist/ls/14ESIQA0SZ5LL Germany: https://www.amazon.de/hz/wishlist/ls/219DDRPHY347Y --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/learnthai/support

The Artists of Data Science
Data Science Happy Hour 64 | 14JAN2022

The Artists of Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 79:44


Watch the video of this episode: https://youtu.be/nLf0_0I6uvU Resources: https://abseil.io/resources/sweatgoogle.2.pdf https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6783119648565141771 https://services.google.com/fh/files/misc/practitionersguidetomlopswhitepaper.pdf https://theartistsofdatascience.fireside.fm/andy-hunt https://www.benjerry.co.uk/flavours/flavour-graveyard/rainforest-crunch Don't forget to register for regular office hours by The Artists of Data Science: http://bit.ly/adsoh Register for Sunday Sessions here: http://bit.ly/comet-ml-oh Listen to the latest episode: https://player.fireside.fm/v2/eac-KT9/latest?theme=dark The Artists of Data Science Social links: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/HarpreetSahotaTheArtistsofDataScience Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/datascienceharp Facebook https://facebook.com/TheArtistsOfDataScience Twitter: https://twitter.com/datascienceharp

Data Engineering Podcast
Automated Data Quality Management Through Machine Learning With Anomalo

Data Engineering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 62:30


Data quality control is a requirement for being able to trust the various reports and machine learning models that are relying on the information that you curate. Rules based systems are useful for validating known requirements, but with the scale and complexity of data in modern organizations it is impractical, and often impossible, to manually create rules for all potential errors. The team at Anomalo are building a machine learning powered platform for identifying and alerting on anomalous and invalid changes in your data so that you aren't flying blind. In this episode founders Elliot Shmukler and Jeremy Stanley explain how they have architected the system to work with your data warehouse and let you know about the critical issues hiding in your data without overwhelming you with alerts.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1847: Democratizing Data Science for Predictive, Real-Time Personalization

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 31:45


In 2022 (and beyond), personalization is more important than ever. There is no room for broad, generalized marketing. Instead, customers crave and expect personalized experiences that subtly enable them to discover and find products they actually want. Data science is a powerful way to take personalization to the next level. However, it's not always readily accessible or actionable without engineers or data scientists. Breinif is a personalization platform on a mission to democratize data science by finding ways to make predictive capabilities accessible to non-technical, yet data-driven marketing teams. Breinify's AI solution enables enterprise marketers to deliver predictive personalization in real-time and build more meaningful customer experiences. The platform blends traditional machine learning with temporal AI to predict a consumer's future interests, needs, and behaviors. The algorithms enable dynamic segmentation and fully individualized personalization, which minimizes the manual involvement required from marketing and tech teams while producing top-tier results. As a result, customers such as BevMo!, Duraflame, Nike, and Petsmart have experienced astronomical ROI, including millions in the new revenue and significant increases in CRM growth using the company's platform. Diane Keng, co-founder, and CEO of Breinify, talks about democratizing data science, predictive personalization, and trends in this space to watch out for in 2022.

FreightCasts
Value of data in reducing freight emissions EP24 Net-Zero Carbon

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 24:52


Brad Benbow, Business Growth Investments at Ardagh Glass, makes his second appearance on Net Zero Carbon to join host Tyler Cole in a discussion of how shippers can better utilize  data to design emissions out of their supply chain. Through network design simulations and electrifying the first touch in freight, Ardagh is making real progress toward its corporate sustainability initiatives.Follow Net-Zero Carbon on Apple PodcastsFollow Net-Zero Carbon on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts
THE ALL MARINE RADIO HOUR: the December DOD “Extremist Data” + Ukraine + and can the Navy embrace “A Warfighting Imperative”?

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 84:28


Three retired Marine Infantry Officers — Colonel Will Costantini, Colonel Jeff Kenney & Major Tim Lynch join host Mike McNamara for an hour of current events discussion every Friday here on ALL MARINE RADIO. TODAY'S TOPICS: Mar's Forbes Article: U.S. Troops Are Not Terrorists: Parsing The Violent Extremist Numbers, by Mark Cancian DOD Report on […]

The Thomas Green Podcast
Taking Action With Alfie Whattam

The Thomas Green Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 37:46


#TakingAction With Alfie WhattamConnect with Alfie:https://linktr.ee/alfiewhattam https://twitter.com/alfiegwhattam https://youtube.com/c/AlfieGWhattam Connect with EMS: Need some help? http://ethicalmarketingservice.com Books: http://ethicalmarketingservice.com/book Want to be a guest?  https://ethicalmarketingservice.com/guest/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EMS_Worthing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ethicalmarketingservice Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomas-green-18655b97/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ethicalmarketingservice/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/emservice/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ethicalmarketingservice Pricing: https://ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/c/EthicalMarketingService Apple Podcasts: https://www.ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk/apple Spotify: https://www.ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk/spotify Stitcher: https://www.ethicalmarketingservice.co.uk/stitcher Alfie's Bio:Alfie Whattam is the National Lead for the Hays Software Development business across the UK and Ireland.Alfie is also responsible for managing the Hays Development, Data, and Cyber Security permanent businesses in London.Prior to leadership, Alfie was based in ANZ, and was awarded the #1 Biller (IT Perm), across all of Australia and New Zealand (in both 2018 and 2019), out of several hundred technology recruitment consultants.Alfie is also the Author of the book ‘Trust in Alfa'. Available in Waterstones, Amazon, Kindle, and Audible Now.In addition, Alfie is also a highly experienced Speaker, with expertise across Business, Technology, and Recruitment. Alfie is available now for Live Events, Panel Discussions, Podcast Interviews, and more.

Fit Rx
Data Doesn't Lie! The Truth Surrounding the Pandemic

Fit Rx

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 84:49


Dr. Eric Snyder, PhD is a researcher and administrator.  Dr. Amy Cerato, PhD is a professional civil engineer and researcher.  After researching the data surrounding the pandemic, they realized it was not consistent with the narrative we keep hearing.  Together they have documented their findings which you can find on www.igniteliberty.net and is titled Pineapple on Mars. Dr. Lydia Dennis, DO who has been on the front lines treating COVID from the beginning joins in our conversation. In this episode, we discuss:1. World Death rates and CV-19 Infection Fatality Rates2. Death Coding, Inflation and Upcharges3. Masking the Science4. PCR Testing: A Chain Reaction of False Diagnostics5. Why Stop the Healing? Suppressing Successful Treatment Protocolswww.igniteliberty.net/pineapple-on-mars

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News.. New G7 data, Lingo sensors, COVID & Diabetes studies and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 5:51


Every week "In the News..." brings you the top stories and headlines around the diabetes community. Top stories this week include: a Dexcom G7 data update, Abbott announces new Lingo sensors to measure ketones and more, it's 100 years since the first insulin shot, Lilly Diabetes discontinues T1D Everyday Magic and an ultra releases diabetes data to a medical journal -- Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EST Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription Below  Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. All sources linked up where you're watching and at Diabetes-Connections dot com when this airs as a podcast. XX Looking to get organized? Check out my new guide with top tips to clear your diabetes clutter. Everything from how to start to where to donate and how to keep it from taking over your house. Head over to diabetes-connections dot com to organize your diabetes supplies! XX Some new information about Dexcom's upcoming G7, which has been submitted to the US FDA and in Europe. Latest clinical study show the MARD of the G7 is 8.2 for adults, compared to 9 for the G6. MARD is the Mean absolute relative difference and the lower the better here. G7 was even lower, 8.1 for kids. This is close to the same results they talked about last summer, but the group in the trial was bigger. G7 is expected to get approval in Europe this quarter and likely in the US much later this year. Our last longer format interview episode is with Dexcom's CEO and we go in depth on this. https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/dexcom-ceo-touts-unprecedented-performance-of-g7-in-clinical-trial-awaits-fda-decision/?fbclid=IwAR3G5_Fu9fhPfR0M3FzgCNCsFYmo4gDRDy5nJySgxt56mMVJgrpUsVQedis https://investors.dexcom.com/static-files/0c3012e2-40f4-4046-a962-85e6b421d490 XX Two COVID and diabetes studies I want to talk about.. the first showing that more children are being diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes after getting COVID. This study looked at databases of people under 18 starting in March 2020 and going for 18 months. There are a LOT of questions here.. including whether post-COVID type 2 diabetes will actual be a temporary or chronic condition. Which leads us to the other study.. this one of adults, in almost 4-thousand covid patients, just under half developed high blood sugar levels, including many who were not previously diabetic. These researchers say a lot of the patients here were in their 30s and 40s, no sign of diabetes before COVID.. and the levels of glucose in their blood were incredibly high, sometimes more than twice the level that indicates diabetes. These patients still had high levels of C-peptide, which shows that they were still producing insulin. The theory here is that something is disrupting the fat cells. But the researchers admit they are just at the beginning of figuring this out. It's this latter study and others like it that seem to be showing that there really is something different about COVID and blood glucose. I saw a lot of people dismissing the children's study with, well, any virus can cause T1D.  I'm glad these researchers are digging into what's going on. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/coronavirus-covid-diabetes-fat-cells-blood-sugar https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/07/health/kids-covid-diabetes-cdc.html XX Abbott unveils plans for a new line of consumer bio-wearable sensors that will collect a broader range of biological readings to help users optimize their exercise and nutrition regimens and overall health. Called “Lingo”- which are still under development and aren't intended for medical use— they are based on the existing Freestyle Libre diabetes monitoring technology. We're talking about glucose, ketones, lactate and alcohol. Interesting to me that these were shown at the Consumer Electronics Show and not a medical conference, but Abbott is up front that these are basically for athletes and not for people with diabetes or those who need to make medical decisions based on the sensors. We'll see which of these makes it off the drawing board. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/abbott-ceo-ford-unveils-lingo-line-sports-biosensors-based-diabetes-monitoring-tech XX Another divestment for Lilly Diabetes – last week we told you they were doing away with their Journey Medals for diaversaries.. they have since announced that T1D everyday magic is no more. This was a partnership between Lilly and Disney that was a blog and a place for recipes and the home of those Coco books, the cute monkey with diabetes who hangs out with Mickey & Minnie Mouse. As of today you can still get digital versions of the books via the website but we'll see how long that lasts. Full disclosure: I wrote for them a couple of times – and was paid by them – glad I saved those columns. https://www.t1everydaymagic.com/thank-you-for-sharing-the-magic/ XX Interesting news from an amazing athlete with type 1. We told you that Sebastien Sasseville biked across Canada this summer. He previously went up Mt Everest and did a brutal race across the Sahara. Now, all the data on his blood sugar during that recent ride has been published. It's in the Journal of Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism. Sasseville wore the Tandem and Dexcom Control IQ system during the ride.. the article is about how using that kind of automated insulin delivery system can help ultra athletes with diabetes.   https://dom-pubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dom.14629?fbclid=IwAR2JLTn9dGJu43have5EMqXkWlENuDgPFDQq6RrsbY7TJyRJV0aERsDxYbo XX This week marks 100 years since the first person received a shot of insulin. Canadian teenager Leonard Thompson got that life saving injection on January 11, 1922. Of course, this was via Dr. Frederick Banting and his team.. Thompson was drifting in and out of a diabetic coma and weighed only 65 pounds. He was 14 years old. The first shot was found to be impure and didn't work. But they were able to fix the problem and administer a second purer shot. Thompson only lived to age 27 but his actions helped save so many lives. https://www.healthline.com/diabetesmine/diabetes-care-joslin-100-years-first-human-insulin-shot#A-century-of-Joslin XX Before I let you go, as I mentioned earlier, the podcast this week is an update from Dexcom. CEO Kevin Sayer answers your questions about the G7 and lots more. Listen wherever you get your podcasts or if you're listening to this as on a podcast app, just go back an episode. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Safety in numbers: crowdsourcing data on nefarious IP addresses

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 25:55


You can find Philippe on Twitter here and learn more about CrowdSec here.They recently put together a list of the IP addresses trying to exploit the new Log4j vulnerability.For a prescient view of today's cybersecurity challenges, Humeau recommends John Brunner's classic 1975 sci-fi novel, The Shockwave Rider.

The Artists of Data Science
Telling Your Data Story | Scott Taylor

The Artists of Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 64:41


Scott Taylor: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottmztaylor/ https://www.metametaconsulting.com Watch the video of this episode: https://youtu.be/LZHB6wcAUdg Memorable Quotes from the Episode: [00:26:52] "... if the Data science community worked more closely with the Data management community, I think we can, you know, let's stamp out wrangling or at least munching. Let's stamp out munching at least in our lifetime, since so many of those issues that people spend time on could be solved in the Data management side of the house. They may even have that data. I don't know how many times I learned at DB even at DB, where people were just like kind of starting over looking at something, it's like, you know, there's an existing list somewhere." Highlights of the Show: [00:01:29] Guest Intro [00:03:42] Where'd you grow up? What was it like there? [00:05:07] How did you get education in the United Nations School? [00:07:06] How how did you get into Data? [00:07:54] What was the first job you had? [00:09:52] How did you end up learning about "Data"? [00:12:56] What are the four Cs you talk about in your book? [00:13:37] How have databases transformed from the time you started working on it? [00:29:31] What would be the first thing you do to help your organization start on a path to creating a Data strategy? [00:46:02] Random Round [00:46:07] It's one hundred years in the future. What do you want to be remembered for? [00:47:22] When do you think the first video to hit one trillion views on YouTube. Will happen and what will it be about? [00:48:41] So what are you currently reading? [00:48:57 What's something that you watch recently? [00:50:36] What about music? What do you got on repeat? [00:51:15] What makes you cry? [00:56:10] What talent would you show off in a talent show? [00:58:28] What are you interested in that most people haven't heard of? [00:58:43] What's your earliest memory? Don't forget to register for regular office hours by The Artists of Data Science: http://bit.ly/adsoh Register for Sunday Sessions here: http://bit.ly/comet-ml-oh Listen to the latest episode: https://player.fireside.fm/v2/eac-KT9/latest?theme=dark The Artists of Data Science Social links: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/HarpreetSahotaTheArtistsofDataScience Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/datascienceharp Facebook https://facebook.com/TheArtistsOfDataScience Twitter: https://twitter.com/datascienceharp

The Agile World with Greg Kihlstrom
#209: Data and the Citizen Experience with Jerry Power, I3 Systems

The Agile World with Greg Kihlstrom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 29:19


Today we're going to talk about the citizen experience, and how a more holistic view of data utilizing the internet of things (or IoT) can improve how the public sector is able to provide services and a better experience to individuals. To help me discuss this topic, I'd like to welcome Jerry Power, CEO of I3 Systems and Co-Founder of the I3 Consortium.

Environment China
Data Center Flexibility and Renewables - with Zhang Sufang, Ye Ruiqi, and Katerina Simou

Environment China

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 31:08


In today's episode of Environment China, host Anders Hove hosts a special, work-related talk with Ye Ruiqi (Angel) of Greenpeace East Asia, Prof Zhang Sufang of North China Electric Power University, and Katerina Simou of the German Energy Agency (dena) about the topic of data centers, which are having an increasing effect on the environment and climate due to their rapidly rising energy consumption. In this episode, we talk not only about how data center operators are trying to go green (a topic we discussed with Angel on Environment China back in November 2019), but also the related topic of flexibility. Data center flexibility is potentially important because it enables data centers to modulate their load to better meet the needs of the grid, which in turn would enable greater uptake of renewable energy such as wind and solar. Since data centers in China are now considered one of the energy-intensive industries subject to the Dual Control policies—which limit energy consumption and energy intensity of production—data centers are already facing pressure to become more efficient. In the future, China's carbon neutrality policies will undoubtedly push data centers to adopt renewable energy to support their growing energy loads—which, in turn, will require more flexible operations. In this podcast, Anders and his guests discuss their joint research of data center flexibility in China and Europe. The research was performed under the Sino-German Energy Transition Project, which is implemented by GIZ on behalf of the German Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate, in partnership with the China National Energy Administration, and German and Chinese implementation partners including the report's lead author, dena. The research includes interviews with industry experts and companies on topics such as time-shifting of data and cooling loads, real-time geographic shifting of loads, the pros and cons of relocating data centers to colder climates for greater cooling efficiency, and using on-site energy storage to participate in power markets. They also discuss whether the many obstacles data center operators currently see to becoming more flexible are likely to be overcome—and what policies would help. Links: “China 5G and Data Center Carbon Emissions Outlook 2035,” Greenpeace East Asia, 2021, at  https://www.greenpeace.org/eastasia/press/6608/electricity-consumption-from-chinas-digital-sector-on-track-to-increase/. “Clean Cloud 2021, Greenpeace East Asia, 2021, at https://www.greenpeace.org/static/planet4-eastasia-stateless/2021/04/03a3ce1a-clean-cloud-english-briefing.pdf.

Data Skeptic
The Great Australian Prediction Project

Data Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 25:19


Data scientists and psychics have at least one major thing in common. Both professions attempt to predict the future. In the case of a data scientist, this is done using algorithms, data, and often comes with some measure of quality such as a confidence interval or estimated accuracy. In contrast, psychics rely on their intuition or an appeal to the supernatural as the source for their predictions. Still, in the interest of empirical evidence, the quality of predictions made by psychics can be put to the test. The Great Australian Psychic Prediction Project seeks to do exactly that. It's the longest known project tracking annual predictions made by psychics, and the accuracy of those predictions in hindsight. Richard Saunders, host of The Skeptic Zone Podcast, joins us to share the results of this decadal study. Read the full report: https://www.skeptics.com.au/2021/12/09/psychic-project-full-results-released/ And follow the Skeptics Zone: https://www.skepticzone.tv/  

Life Over Coffee with Rick Thomas
Ep. 389 Comprehensive Data-Gathering Is Crucial to Help Victims

Life Over Coffee with Rick Thomas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 30:00


Shows Main Idea – Helping the victims of abuse cannot be like looking down a tube, excluding comprehensive, peripheral data-gathering. You must believe the victim so much that you want to investigate every possible option to find the whole truth about the abuse so that you can serve the offended and offender in the best possible ways. In this episode, Rick talks about two ways to investigate abuse situations—the inverted and comprehensive belief models and why the latter is the wisest way to help victims. Show Notes: https://rickthomas.net/podcast/ep-389-comprehensive-data-gathering-is-crucial-to-help-victims/ Will you help us so we can continue to provide free content to the world? You can become a supporting member here rickthomas.net/recurring-membership/ Or you can make a one-time or recurring donation(s) here https://rickthomas.net/donations/

Daily Tech Headlines
Austrian Data Watchdog Rules Google Analytics Violates GDPR – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


The Austrian Data Protection Authority rules that Google Analytics violates GDPR, Telsa removes references to a 2022 production date for the Cybertruck from its website, and Nigeria lifts its ban on Twitter. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a month here. A special thanks toContinue reading "Austrian Data Watchdog Rules Google Analytics Violates GDPR – DTH"

Squawk on the Street
Markets & Inflation Data Day 2, Fed Vice Chair Nominee Heads to the Hill, VP Harris on COVID Test "Urgency", Delta Beats, and TPG's IPO: The Biggest of 2022

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 43:41


Inflation once again on center stage: Carl Quintanilla, David Faber and Mike Santoli focused on market reaction to a tamer-than-expected Producer Price Index for December -- as well as growth stocks vs. value. The anchors also discussed Fed Vice Chair nominee Lael Brainard's prepared testimony on inflation ahead of her confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill. Carl, David and Mike reacted to Vice President Kamala Harris' comments to NBC's "Today" show -- she estimates COVID-19 tests for all Americans will go out next week, calling the move "a matter of urgency" for the White House. Cowen internet analyst John Blackledge joined the program to discuss his 2022 ad tech outlook as well as why he downgraded Snap. Also in focus: Delta posting better-than-expected fourth-quarter results despite the omicron variant spread, private equity firm TPG going public with the biggest IPO of 2022 so far, and AMC CEO Adam Aron unloading $7 million more of his company's shares -- but tweeting that he's finished selling.

BjjBrick Podcast- BJJ, Jiu-Jitsu, MMA, martial arts, no-gi and good times!
BjjBrick Quick 149 Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Data Map

BjjBrick Podcast- BJJ, Jiu-Jitsu, MMA, martial arts, no-gi and good times!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 6:31


Support this podcast on https://www.patreon.com/BjjBrick

Tony Katz + The Morning News
Let's Be Rational And Look At COVID Data

Tony Katz + The Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 5:52


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Content Is Profit
E230. Andrea Tagliaferro: Data Economy & The Role of Content On A Funded Tech Startup!

Content Is Profit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 50:03


Every social media user has probably wondered, “how are the big tech companies using my data?”Today we bring back our good friend, Andrea Tagliaferro, to share about her experience working with a new tech company that wants to give the power of the algorithm back to you.We had a lot of questions regarding data economy, app monetization, marketing a tech startup, and much more.Some of these conversation #GoldenBoulders were:

Auto Insider
We're Running Out of New Cars in 2022 (New Inventory Data) | Episode 78

Auto Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 33:56


Today on Daily News You Can Use, Ray & Zach discuss the latest new car inventory data. There are many cars that you might be interested in that you literally can't get your hands on. Why? Because inventory levels are so low right now! Ray and Zach also discuss the cost to own an electric car, and the data there is very interesting.

The Highwire with Del Bigtree
ICAN SUES CDC FOR COVID VACCINE DATA

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 7:42


ICAN has filed another lawsuit against the CDC, this time for withholding data from the ‘V-Safe' Covid-19 vaccine safety tracking system.#AaronSiri #VSafe #CDCLawsuits #ICANVSafeSuit

The Tom Woods Show
Ep. 2040 With Omicron, Supreme Court's Data Is Worthless

The Tom Woods Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 31:18


After a brief overview of my recent trip to St. John (U.S. Virgin Islands) and COVID stuff I witnessed there, I turn to the Supreme Court: not the Sotomayor nonsense, which you already know about, but the excellent amicus brief co-authored by Tom Woods Show guest Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford.