Podcasts about Soviet Union

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Communist state in Europe and Asia that lasted from 1922 to 1991

  • 3,308PODCASTS
  • 6,613EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
Soviet Union

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Soviet Union

Show all podcasts related to soviet union

Latest podcast episodes about Soviet Union

Even the Podcast is Afraid
CIA's Strange Animal Projects - Part I

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 42:36


Project MK-Ultra, the CIA's infamous human mind control project, wasn't the only thing that was going on in the ‘60s. In that decade, the U.S. government deployed nonhuman operatives–ravens, pigeons, even cats–to spy on Cold War adversaries. In part one of this two part series, we look at the Acoustic Kitty Project and the Pigeon Project.[FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/PodcastAfraidINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/PodcastAfraidYOUTUBE: https://tinyurl.com/3mwr54tbTIKTOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@podcastafraid[PATREON & KO-FI]Do you need more Even the Podcast is Afraid content, and would like to help support the show in the process? You can join our 'Elbow Deep Club' for just $5 per month and get exclusive content like ad-free & early access episodes, access to the after show, and more.PATREON: www.patreon.com/ordisstudiosYou can also leave us a small donation on KO-FI to help support the show & get your name in the credits of our TV Show + Access to out private Ordis Studios Discord Server for just $3!KO-FI: https://ko-fi.com/podcastafraid[WATCH OUR TV SHOW ON THE CRIME & CONSPIRACY NETWORK]TV NETWORK WEBSITE: https://www.podtv.live/DOWNLOAD APP: https://solo.to/etpiaDownload the PodTV app on your iOS, Android, Google Play, Amazon Appstore, ROKU, VIZIO, and more to watch our video podcast, EXCLUSIVE to the Crime & Conspiracy Network. Just search Crime & Conspiracy in your app store.[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Stephanie Kemmerer, researcher & writer for Even the Podcast is Afraid, conducted all the writing and research for this episode on the CIA's strange animal projects.Created, produced, & hosted by Jared OrdisCo-hosted by Nick Porchetta & Samantha VazquezEven the Podcast is Afraid is part of the Ordis Studios Podcast Network & an original Ordis Studios ProductionCopyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

Random Badassery
No Comfort in Broken Music

Random Badassery

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 0:41


I think I’ve always wanted to be a more anal person than I actually am. I’ve tried to be the person who puts every task immediately into an app, schedules it, and adds the perfect emoji (the important part.) I allowed myself to obsess over minimalism and Marie Kondo, trying to transform my home into the clean white soulless void of an Apple store. I feel in love with the ideas of Zettlekasten and Roam Research where every fart and hiccup in my brain is meticulously connected to all the others like a perfect meth-smoking spider’s web. I wanna meditate every day, take clod showers, get in my reps, nail my macros, and hustle hustle hustle. I want to use footnotes. But honestly, I just don’t give that much of a fuck about any of it. My real life is a maelstrom of monotony and chaos. I spend my days reading books, scribbly sloppy notes on paper, and hoping I can read them when I sit down to right one of these posts. I count days by how many clean pairs of underwear I have left until I’m forced to do laundry. My living space leans more towards piles than it does toward organization. My analytical mind is easily distracted by emotion, novelty, cartoons, and hormones.Oh well. That’s who I am. I improve what I can, and move along with the rest.As I write this I’m watching the screen saver on my Apple TV as it shows slow-motion drone footage of people on a beach and carnival rides on a pier (likely Santa Monica.) I hate the way it makes me feel. I look at it and I don’t see tomorrow. I don’t think “I can’t wait to go to the beach again.” I look at it and I see the past. I see something lost. I see a world that feels like something we may never make our way back to. I’m sure you feel it too. It’s not every day, but it’s there: the part of our brain that wonders if hugging, and crowded festivals, and movie theaters will ever feel normal again. Or will the trepidation and caution forever follow us?Oh well. That’s life. Improve what we can, and move along with the rest.“there’s a gun in the room”I’m sure you noticed the audio file above. I’m sure some of you thought it was a podcast. I wonder how many of you were unable to scroll onward without clicking it first. I would have.I’ve been playing my guitar a lot recently, and have been sending 1-2 minute little pieces to my friend Johnny (who will probably be the first person to open this and read it. Hi Jon.) I went down a rabbit hole for an hour the other day looking at looping pedals until it hit me: “I have an iPhone.” So I’ve been screwing around with laying guitar pieces in Garageband for iOS.The audio above is one of those pieces. I like playing with dissonance—which can come across as jazz. I think to some degree it does here, which is why I tried to play with the timing in each guitar line (of which there are five,) and make it feel a little broken and discombobulating. In the lead line, I even threw in a bend (which is more blues than jazz.) And the keys for each line are different. I wanted to see how they would weave together, going in and out of harmony.All of this was going through my head but don’t get the idea that I was sitting and planning out every note. I’ve always been more instinctual than technical. I think the reason I’ve never been the kind of guitar player who can sit down and strum an Eagles song or solo like Slash is that music is more of an experiment for me. “What happens is if do this and do this?” This often leads to awful results (the song above might be an example of that to you.) It’s not about writing songs, it’s about exploration. It’s curiosity not product. Charlie Kaufman not Aaron Sorkin.Almost everybody knows by now how much I love the Rolling Stones, but I’ve never been interested in making music that sounds like the Stones (in fact I’ve never even bothered to learn how to play any of their songs.) My own music always veers more towards Sonic Youth, John Cage, Captain Beefheart, Harry Partch, everything post-punk, and The Velvet Underground. Somehow, even I forgot about that.I intend to explore my weirdo nature more. Expect more broken music.the velvet undergroundSpeaking of music, I finally sat down and watched the Apple TV+ documentary on The Velvet Underground. I loved it. It’s exactly what I needed. I’m glad Todd Haynes was the one who directed this. The standard music documentary format would have been very un-Velvet Underground. I can think of no better director than Haynes whose first film was the Karen Carpenter story told via Barbie dolls. His use of split-screen here makes sure that nothing ever feels standard or boring (especially at the beginning where he uses Warhol’s copious footage of the band members staring non-stop into the camera.)La Monte Young & John Cale were creating drones (referring to long musical notes, not the flying quad-copters that watch you when you’re naked in the swimming pool.)We found that the most stable thing we could tune to was the 60 cycle hum of the refrigerator because 60 cycle hum was, to us, the drone of western civilization. — John CaleI’ve long been fascinated by the drone of the microwave often harmonizing my voice to it as I waited for something to cook.I looked up La Monte Young but couldn’t find any recordings of him. I did find Noël Akchoté playing guitar arrangements of some of his compositions.The bass line for “The Ostrich” by The Primitives (basically Lou Reed, John Cale, and some friends) sounded really familiar.Then I placed it. It seems Sebadoh borrowed it for “Flame.”christineI read Christine by Stephen King. I’m a latecomer when it comes to King. Before this year the only thing by him I had ever read was On Writing. Having read The Shining earlier this year and now having read Christine, I think I’ve discovered what makes King such a tremendous writer. He does the work. Stephen King comes up with the most ridiculous concepts (teenage nerd falls in love with a dilapidated car which over time possesses him,) yet rather than descending into camp, he accepts the concepts. He doesn’t criticize the ideas, he embraces them and embodies them. “If this was real, what would it look like.” He fills the books with so much character and detail that even the most absurd concepts become legitimate.the righteous mindI read The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt. Here are some key points:People bind themselves into political teams that share moral narratives. Once they accept a particular narrative, they become blind to alternative moral worlds.We have intuition (the elephant) and reasoning (the rider.) The rider is not in control like a pilot is over a plane; the rider serves mostly to understand the actions of the elephant. Our reason writes the story of our intuitive action. Rather than appealing to someone’s reasoning (as we normally do,) we should find a way to appeal to their intuition. Lead the elephant and the rider comes along.The foundations of morality:care/harmliberty/oppressionfairness/cheatingloyalty/betrayalauthority/subversionsanctity/degradationThe liberal foundation favors care, liberty, and fairness with care being the most favored. The libertarian foundation favors liberty & fairness with liberty being the most favored. The conservative foundation favors all six equally.Nonetheless, if you are trying to change an organization or a society and you do not consider the effects of your changes on moral capital, you’re asking for trouble. This, I believe, is the fundamental blind spot of the left. It explains why liberal reforms so often backfire, and why communist revolutions usually end up in despotism. It is the reason I believe that liberalism—which has done so much to bring about freedom and equal opportunity—is not sufficient as a governing philosophy. It tends to overreach, change too many things too quickly, and reduce the stock of moral capital inadvertently. Conversely, while conservatives do a better job of preserving moral capital, they often fail to notice certain classes of victims, fail to limit the predations of certain powerful interests, and fail to see the need to change or update institutions as times change.media biasAfter reading all of these political books I’ve been thinking a lot about the inherent biases of our media sources. In the process, I discovered this tremendous website called Media Bias / Fact Check. You can look up any media source and it will show you it fits on the left/right spectrum as well as the factual/not factual spectrum.Personally, I like to get differing perspectives (without dipping into extremism and outright falsehoods.) Some of my favorite media sources are: Reuters: least biased / very high factualThe Economist: least biased / high factualThe Christian Science Monitor: least biased / high factual Newsweek: left-center / high factual Business Insider: left-center / high factual Texas Monthly: left-center / high factual The Wall Street Journal: right-center / mostly factualThe Spectator World: right-center / mostly factualReason: right-center (libertarian) / high factualbtwI had intended to write a bunch more but this is so long already. I think I will post a supplemental in a few days. If I continue writing as much as I have been lately, then this may become ongoing (no promises.)debatable ideasDebatable Ideas is a weekly curation of the ideas that stand out to me from the week. That can mean something I see truth in, something worth contemplating, something questionable, something I'm bothered by, something ridiculous, something that I think is false, or something that will make you shake your phone like you caught a snake while waiting in line at Starbucks. It's up to you to decide what you think—and politely discuss in the comments.The ideas are numbered for easy reference. addition, if you run across any fascinating, horrifying, insane, bonkers, and entertaining ideas, please direct me to them in the comments.Judaism was the foundation of my childhood. As a child, I attended Jewish day school and Jewish summer camp and regularly celebrated Shabbat and the Jewish holidays. Some of my most enduring childhood memories are at the Shabbat dinner table, where my parents and their friends would discuss world affairs and important societal issues. There were always multiple viewpoints expressed. My mother is a rabbi, and my parents always taught us that such disagreements were the essence of living Jewishly—to argue, as the rabbis taught, for the sake of heaven. Jew vs. JewInformation vacuums are common in breaking-news events in the social-media era. In the early moments after a mass shooting or a natural disaster, or in the unknown moments after the polls close but before votes are tabulated in an election, there is a higher demand for definitive information than there is supply. These moments offer propagandists, trolls, pundits, politicians, journalists, and anyone else with an internet connection the opportunity to fill that vacuum with … something. It’s a treacherous situation, where rumor, speculation, and disinformation have the power to outpace verified information. Traditional breaking-news events tend to have a short half-life but, as we’ve found with COVID coverage, information gaps can last weeks or months. Sometimes, the definitive information we want (when will the pandemic end?) is basically unknowable, or too hard to pin down. The Omicron Information VacuumThe collapse is inevitable: Virtually every world power that ever existed has eventually declined, failed, and disappeared. The Soviet Union had survived for nearly 70 years, the British Empire for more than 400, and ancient Egypt for almost 30 centuries. But even though the land of the pharaohs was long crowned with success, its decline and destruction were unstoppable. History tells us it’s not a question of whether a world power will eventually be destroyed but rather a question of when. Secrets and Lies That Brought Down Empires // Ideas and Discovery Magazine - Dec 2021In other words, pretty minimal changes to get a tractor working on Mars. So if you want to imagine the future in ten years, picture a big Martian construction site busy with people in spacesuits driving John Deere tractors around. It is, in other words, frontier work. The aesthetics of human space colonization is Firefly, or the grit of the original Star Wars, not the sleek bureaucratic competence of Star Trek. NASA and SpaceX are establishing the first Martian city by 2030 Get full access to Graphorrhea at cahall.substack.com/subscribe

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

It's been 30 years since the Soviet Union fell. With the dismantling of communism, the US became the sole superpower. Market economies and liberal democracies became the new norm. But, Russia has once again reverted to old habits. Russia is an authoritarian superpower and one of the West's principal antagonists. What is in Russia's imminent future? What will Russia look like in ten years? Will Putin ever leave?  Altamar hosts Peter Schechter and Muni Jensen are joined by Julia Ioffe, former Moscow correspondent for The New Yorker and Foreign Policy and an outspoken voice on Russia, to help us understand where Russia goes in the next decade. Altamar's ‘Téa's Take' by Téa Ivanovic delves into Russia's youth and the Kremlin's repression of young “new Communists.”

The Bryan Hyde Show
2021 December 2 The Bryan Hyde Show hour two

The Bryan Hyde Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 42:27


We all have bad habits. My least favorite bad habit is that I swear. After reading Annie Holmquist's latest essay on pushing the pause button on profanity, my resolve to do better is renewed. The idea that the U.S. is becoming more like the former Soviet Union while Russia is reclaiming its Christian heritage is a difficult thought for some to consider. Anthony Esolen points out some of the hard truths about how our enemies wait as we destroy ourselves. Like most people who aren't looking for an excuse to riot and run feral, I was relieved when Kyle Rittenhouse was acquitted. There are some lessons to be learned from his experience and one of the biggest ones is outlined by attorney George Parry, who warns Kyle--and the rest of us--about the dangers that he still faces. This essay by Margaret Anna Alice is going to make some folks SUPER uncomfortable. It made me hold my breath, and I actually agree with most of what she says in it. Check out her letter to an agree-to-disagree relative about why she's willing to speak out, even if it makes people squirm and look away. Monticello College Lifesaving Food (use the coupon code "HYDE" at checkout for a 25% discount) The Heather Turner Team at Patriot Home Mortgage HSL Ammo Sewing & Quilting Center Govern Your Income

Free To Choose Media Podcast
Episode 152 – The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited: Phase 3 (Podcast)

Free To Choose Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021


In today's podcast, when President Kennedy was confronted by the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, he formed an executive committee to assist him in deciding on a course of action. Twenty years later, Professor Richard Neustadt interviewed General Maxwell Taylor to reflect on Taylor's key role on that committee and in the Cuban Missile Crisis. Here is “The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited: Phase 3.”

History Unplugged Podcast
Kim Philby: The KGB Mole Who Nearly Became the Leader of Britain's MI6

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 41:15


Kim Philby—the master British spy and notorious KGB double agent—had an incredible amount of influence on the Cold War. He became the mentor, and later, mortal enemy, of James Angleton, who would eventually lead the CIA. Philby was also in the running at one point to lead MI6, which would have made the Cold War very different.Philby's life and career has inspired an entire literary genre: the spy novel of betrayal. Philby was one of the leaders of the British counter-intelligence efforts, first against the Nazis, then against the Soviet Union. He was also the KGB's most valuable double-agent, so highly regarded that his image is on the postage stamps of the Russian Federation even today.To delve into Philby's life is today's guest, Michael Holzman, author of the new book “Spies and Traitors: Kim Philby, James Angleton, and the Friendship and Betrayal that Would Shape M16, the CIA, and the Cold War.”Before he was exposed, Philby was the mentor of James Jesus Angleton, one of the central figures in the early years of the CIA who became the long-serving chief of the counter-intelligence staff of the Agency.James Angleton and Kim Philby were friends for six years, or so Angleton thought. Then they were enemies for the rest of their lives. This is the story of their intertwined careers and a betrayal that would have dramatic and irrevocable effects on the Cold War and US-Soviet relations, and have a direct effect on the shape and culture of the CIA in the latter half of the twentieth century.Spanning the globe, from London and Washington DC, to Rome and Istanbul, Spies and Traitors gets to the heart of one of the most important and flawed personal relationships in modern history.

Aria Code
P.S. I Love You: Renée Fleming Sings Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 50:57


Saying “I love you” for the first time takes courage, especially when you don't know the response you'll get. But being open with your emotions and putting yourself out there can change you in unexpected ways. In Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, it's the 16-year-old Tatyana who pins her heart on her sleeve. Young and naive, but also fiercely confident, she pours out her feelings for the visiting Eugene Onegin in one night of impassioned love-letter-making. His answer defines the rest of her life, and the course of the opera.  Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore Tatyana's famous Letter Scene and what it tells us about Tchaikovsky, Russian society, and the nearly universal experience of unrequited love. Soprano Renée Fleming is one of the most acclaimed singers of her generation, singing across genres from classical to Broadway to jazz and more. Of all the roles she's performed, the shy and soulful Tatyana is the one she relates to best. She loves the Letter Scene because it allows her to act out the intense emotions of a teenager who's fallen in love for the very first time.  Dr. Philip Ewell is a professor of music theory at Hunter College of the City University of New York, where he specializes in Russian music, 20th-century music, race studies in music, and more. He trained as a cellist in Russia during and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, and has spent seven years total living there. He loves to teach Eugene Onegin to his Russian opera seminar through the lens of Avril Lavigne's “Sk8er Boi.” (Trust him, it works!)  Tim Manley is a writer, illustrator, storyteller, and educator. He performed his story “I Need You To Know” with The Moth in 2015, where he now leads storytelling workshops. He found that opening up about his feelings in front of an audience transformed his life. Tim also created the web series The Feels, which was nominated for an Emmy. He is currently working on a young adult novel.

The John Batchelor Show
Venera-D to Venus from Roscosmos and NASA. David Grinspoon @DrFunkySpoon, Planetary Science Institute

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 8:55


Photo:  Venera-D (Венера-Д) . . . is a proposed Russian space mission to Venus that would include an orbiter and a lander to be launched in 2029. The orbiter's prime objective is to perform observations with the use of a radar. The lander, based on the Venera design, would be capable of operating for a long duration (≈3 h) on the planet's surface. The "D" in Venera-D stands for dolgozhivushaya, "long lasting" in Russian. Here:  Artist's concept of the Venera-D spacecraft approaching clouds-veiled Venus. This shown configuration was only one of several designs envisioned at the conclusion of the project's definition phase in September 2009. A ball-shaped capsule containing the main lander can be seen at the top, with four mini-capsules carrying atmospheric balloons attached just below it. Individual entry capsules for each balloon would allow deployment of scientific sensors over much wider regions of the planet then would be possible if they were all released from a single descent vehicle.* Venera-D to Venus from Roscosmos and NASA. David Grinspoon @DrFunkySpoon, Planetary Science Institute https://news.am/eng/news/673487.html David Grinspoon , astrobiologist; Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute; was the former inaugural Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology.  .. *Venera-D will be the first Venus probe launched by the Russian Federation (the earlier Venera probes were launched by the former Soviet Union). Venera-D will serve as the flagship for a new generation of Russian-built Venus probes, culminating with a lander capable of withstanding the harsh Venusian environment for more than the 11⁄2 hours logged by the Soviet probes. The surface of Venus experiences average temperatures of 462° Celsius (864 Fahrenheit), crushing 90 bar (89 atm; 1,300 psi) pressures, and corroding clouds of carbon dioxide laced with sulfuric acid. Venera-D will be launched on an Angara A5 rocket.

The Shaun Tabatt Show
720: Rick Renner - Why God Used an Unlikely Man Like Me

The Shaun Tabatt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:25


A teacher nicknamed him Stupid for an entire school year…job-placement counselors told him to steer clear of college due to his academic ineptitude…friends shied away from him because of his love for the arts…even those closest to him were mystified by his early passion for the Bible and his lack of interest in sports.   And the enemy used it all to torment him daily for years.    But Rick Renner was no misfit, as his young mind had been told. He not only marched to the beat of a different drummer from a very young age — he was marching to the rhythm of God's unique calling on his life. It was a call to full-time ministry that drew him through the confusing mire of opposing voices and dream thieves to Soviet lands on the other side of the world — to places where his love for the arts was “normal,” but most importantly, to places that had been spiritually dry and devoid of the Bible for decades, where the people welcomed him and his family with open arms. Rick's intellectual “ineptitude” was also refuted when he studied Greek in college and went on to become a foremost teacher of New Testament Greek in the international Christian community. Having begun the first Christian television network in the former Soviet Union; produced daily TV teaching programs that air around the world; and written more than 50 books on topics ranging from Church history and spiritual warfare to events concerning the last days, Rick's story is as unlikely as they come. Whether you realize it or not, you have an unlikely story too. And you don't have to be wise, powerful, or prestigious to live the dream of fulfilling your divine destiny. In fact, these aren't the best characteristics for submitting your resumé to God. Instead, give Him your weakness and your willingness and just watch your own story of “unlikely” unfold. Resources mentioned in this episode: Unlikely: Our Faith-Filled Journey to the Ends of the Earth Find out more at  Renner.org. The Shaun Tabatt Show is part of the Destiny Image Podcast Network.

Gone Medieval
Ibn Fadlan: The Real 13th Warrior

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:00


Ibn Fadlan might be familiar to many based on modern-day renditions from films such as The 13th Warrior. Ibn Traveled from Bagdad to Russia, journaling his encounters and cultural observations. Amazingly his manuscripts were preserved, but what do we know about him? In this episode, Cat is joined by historian Tonicha Upham who specialises in Arab Sources. Tonicha delves into the life, text, and impact of Ibn Fadlan's. From translations, the Soviet Union, and even Nazi-occupied Norway. How has Ibn's legacy been kept alive? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads
658: JFK: Connecting the Dots PT. 4

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 46:50


EPISODE #658 JFK: CONNECTING THE DOTS PT. 4 Richard welcomes a renowned JFK Assassination researcher who discusses Lee Harvey Oswald's alleged visit to Mexico City in September 1963. The day after Kennedy's assassination, the CIA claimed they had photographs and taped telephone conversations of Oswald in Mexico City trying to obtain the necessary documents that would allow him to return to the Soviet Union. Further, the CIA claimed to have a recording of a telephone conversation between Oswald and Valery Kostivkov, a KGB assassin who was stationed at the Soviet consulate in Mexico City. Conveniently, this information was not passed on to the FBI in Dallas prior to the murder of JFK. It was given to the Warren Commission who would then use this and other evidence to conclude Oswaldand Oswald alone was responsible for Kennedy's murder. However, DiEugenio reveals that despite the fact that both the Soviet and Cuban Consulates in Mexico City were heavily monitored by the FBI and the CIA, no reliable evidence was every presented proving Oswald was there. Guest:  James DiEugenio is one of the foremost researchers into the major assassinations of the 1960's. His first book: Destiny Betrayed, was an in depth look at the Garrison investigation. In 1993 he co-founded both Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination, and the following year: the Coalition on Political Assassinations . Along with Lisa Pease he co-edited COPA's journal: Probe Magazine from 1993-2000, and later assisted in a compilation of the Probe articles which was published as The Assassinations. In response to Vincent Bugliosi's Reclaiming History and associated film Parkland, DiEugenio published Reclaiming Parkland, a critique of Bugliosi's methodology, evidence, and findings in the Kennedy Assassination.   Jim was a guest commentator on the anniversary issue of the film "JFK" re-released by Warner Brothers in 2013.  Most recently, Jim wrote the screenplay for  Oliver  Stone's latest film, JFK Revisited: Through the Looking Glass. ​BOOKS: Destiny Betrayed Reclaiming Parkland The Assassinations: Probe Magazine on JFK, MLK, RFK, and Malcolm X The JFK Assassination SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS Life Change and Formula 13 Teas All Organic, No Caffeine, Non GMO!  More Energy!  Order now, use the code 'unlimited' to save 10% on all non-SALE items, PLUS... ALL your purchases ships for free!!! C60EVO -The Secret is out about this powerful anti-oxidant. The Purest C60 available is ESS60.  Buy Direct from the Source.  Buy Now and Save 10% – Use Coupon Code: EVRS at Checkout! Strange Planet Shop - If you're a fan of the radio show and the podcast, why not show it off?  Greats T-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, and more.  It's a Strange Planet - Dress For It! BECOME A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER FOR LESS THAN $2 PER MONTH If you're a fan of this podcast, I hope you'll consider becoming a Premium Subscriber.  For just $1.99 per month, subscribers to my Conspiracy Unlimited Plus gain access to two exclusive, commercial-free episodes per month. They also gain access to my back catalog of episodes. The most recent 30 episodes of Conspiracy Unlimited will remain available for free.  Stream all episodes and Premium content on your mobile device by getting the FREE Conspiracy Unlimited APP for both IOS and Android devices... Available at the App Store and Google Play.

Moms in Prayer Podcast
Episode 181- Travel the World Through Prayer Russia & Albania with Kathie Arnold

Moms in Prayer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:11


“Whatever story God is writing in your life be available and be ready to say yes.” Today Stacy continues her conversation with wonderful mom of four, grandma to fourteen, and founder of an international sewing ministry, Kathy Arnold.  Listen in Kathie shares her amazing adventures with the Lord as she took His hand and stepped out of her comfort zone.   From a small town in South Dakota to traveling the world sharing Moms in Prayer and the love of Jesus in ministry through Come and Sew Ministries International, CASMI.  This is one beautiful God story after another. About our Guest: Kathie Arnold always had a passion for mission, yet she never imagined or planned anything like CASMI.  It just came out of her life story!    Kathie and her husband Steve were married in 1972, supported missions, raised 4 children, and now have 14 grandchildren.  Kathie and their oldest daughter went on their first mission trip to the former Soviet Union in 1991.  Upon returning home from that trip, Kathie began a sewing school from their home. Ten years after that first mission trip, Steve and Kathie were asked by another ministry to use their life experiences to return to Russia, to investigate how to bring the gospel to orphans through sewing classes in state-run orphanages. They saw a need, were encouraged to go forward, and in 2003 CASMI became an official not-for-profit 501(c)(3).  Steve and Kathie make their home in Texas and continue to share the love of Jesus through CASMI. Links: https://www.comeandsew.org/ https://momsinprayer.org/give/ https://momsinprayer.org/new-to-moms-in-prayer/ https://momsinprayer.org/join-a-group To give to the ministry of Moms in Prayer: Support Our Mission | Moms In Prayer International             Moms in Prayer International- www.MomsInPrayer.org

Cops and Writers Podcast
043 KGB Secret Agent Jack Barsky, Spying In America During The Cold War (Part One)

Cops and Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 54:04


I have a treat for you guys today! On today's show, we have former KGB Agent Jack Barsky. This is part one of a two-part episode; part two will air on December 5, 2021. Jack was a KGB agent who was embedded in the United States as a spy for the Soviet Union during the height of the cold war. Jack was illegally inserted and assimilated into the United States carrying out covert missions as a KGB agent while keeping his cover as a bicycle delivery boy, college student, and eventually computer programmer for a large corporation. He also juggled two families complete with a wife and children in the United States, and East Germany. Jack is now a public speaker, author of “My Secret Life and Tangled Allegiances As A KGB Spy In America”, a devoted family man and American citizen. He has been featured on many news shows including 60 Minutes and was the technical advisor for the hit T.V. series, The Americans. In today's episode you will learn:·      Jack explains the quote, “Caution is a spy's best friend, paranoia is his enemy.” and how this applies to everyday life.·      How his childhood growing up in war-torn East Germany helped him later in his life as a spy for the KGB.·      How a bright college kid on track to becoming a college professor wound up being a spy for the KGB.·      How Jack Barsky kept his job and training with the KGB a secret from friends and family, including his mother. ·      What special spy training and equipment Jack was given, or not given before he illegally entered the United States as a spy for the KGB. All of this and more on today's episode of the Cops and Writers podcast.Visit Jack Barsky at his website!Listen to Jack's podcast, The Agent!Enjoy the Cops and Writers book series.Please visit the Cops and Writers website.If you have a question for the sarge, hit him up at his email.Come join the fun at the Cops and Writers Facebook groupSupport the show (https://patreon.com/copsandwriters)

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture
(Bonus) Analysis of "Tear Down this Wall" Speech

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021


(Bonus) "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall", also known as the Berlin Wall Speech, was a speech delivered by United States President Ronald Reagan in West Berlin on June 12, 1987. Reagan called for the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, to open the Berlin Wall, which had separated West and East Berlin since 1961. The name is derived from a key line in the middle of the speech: "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" Though Reagan's speech received relatively little media coverage at the time, it became widely known after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. In the post-Cold War era, it was often seen as one of the most memorable performances of an American president in Berlin after John F. Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech of 1963.

Robots For Eyes Podcast
Eps 280. The Kim Dynasty Part 1 – The Making of North Korea

Robots For Eyes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 136:39


After a generation of Japanese rule, intimidation and political schemes, in 1945 when the Japanese empire collapsed, the peninsula of Korea was split in two and taken over by the Soviet Union to the north, and the USA to the south. To the north communism took effect and Stalin enrolled a guerrilla fighter named Kim Il Sung to take charge! To the south capitalism, and well we all know how that went. In part one we talk in depth about Kim Il Sung's rule and actions on the people of North Korea! FB/IG @robotsforeyespodcast podbelly.com retrovague.com suikerapparel.com robotsforeyespodcast.com  

StarDate Podcast

Mars has many ways to “get” a visiting probe. It's cold, it's dry, and its air is thin, for example. But the biggest threat is dust storms. In fact, a giant storm may have doomed the first object to hit the Martian surface. Mars 2 was dispatched by the Soviet Union in May of 1971. It consisted of an orbiter and a lander. They arrived at Mars 50 years ago today. But a massive dust storm was under way. It covered the entire planet. Only the tops of a few tall mountains peeked above it. An American spacecraft, Mariner 9, had entered orbit around Mars a couple of weeks earlier. It was designed to be flexible. So when scientists saw that Mars was hidden from view, they waited a couple of months to begin its work. Mars 2 and a sister mission, Mars 3, didn't have that flexibility. They were programmed to dispatch their landers shortly before they arrived at Mars, and those instructions couldn't be changed. So the Mars 2 lander dropped into that massive dust storm on November 27th, 1971. And things didn't go well. The landing system malfunctioned, and the parachute didn't open — perhaps influenced by the dust storm. So the Mars 2 lander crashed — the first human artifact on the surface of Mars. The orbiter continued its mission, but it didn't see much through the dust. It did obtain important readings on the Martian atmosphere and magnetic and gravitational fields — adding to our then-meager knowledge of the Red Planet.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Cold War Conversations History Podcast
The Cold War handshake in the heavens - the Apollo-Soyuz mission (210)

Cold War Conversations History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 72:49


On 17 July 1975 the first manned international space mission, carried out jointly by the United States and the Soviet Union. Millions of people around the world watched on television as a United States Apollo module docked with a Soviet Union Soyuz capsule. The project, and its memorable handshake in the heavens, was a symbol of détente between the two superpowers during the Cold War, and it is generally considered to mark the end of the Space Race.Unthinkable only years earlier the Apollo–Soyuz mission was made possible by the thaw Soviet-US relations. According to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, "The Soviet and American spacemen will go up into outer space for the first major joint scientific experiment in the history of mankind. They know that from outer space our planet looks even more beautiful. It is big enough for us to live peacefully on it, but it is too small to be threatened by nuclear war.”Our guest is Cold War Conversations favourite, author Stephen Walker, the author of Beyond: The Astonishing Story of the First Human to Leave Our Planet and Journey into Space.Buy the book here and support CWC UK https://amzn.to/3wOBZRI US https://amzn.to/30vgsld Do check out our two previous episodes with Stephen.  Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode172/ and the Forgotten Cosmonaut here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode192/I'm asking listeners to support my work and enable me to continue recording these incredible stories. If you become a monthly supporter via Patreon, you will get the sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history.Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If you can't wait for next week's episode do visit our Facebook discussion group where guests and listeners continue the Cold War Conversation. Just search Cold War Conversations in Facebook.I am delighted to welcome Stephen Walker back to our Cold War conversation…There's further information here.  https://coldwarconversations.com/episode210/Thank you very much for listening. It is really appreciated – goodbye.Looking for a Xmas gift for the Cold War aficionado in your life? Do check out loads of gift ideas including our wide range of CW themed mugs at our store. More info here https://rdbl.co/3kv7lYk Have a look at our store and find the ideal gift for the Cold War enthusiast in your life? Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/store/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/coldwarpod)

PBS NewsHour - World
Former head of Saudi intelligence recounts America's longstanding ties to Afghanistan

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 8:05


It's been three months since the U.S. withdrew its forces from Afghanistan, but America's involvement there didn't begin after Sept. 11, 2001. It began decades earlier, after the Soviet Union invaded that country in 1979 and the U.S. began working with Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to counter its rival's influence. Nick Schifrin spoke with one of the key architects and partners in that effort. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Former head of Saudi intelligence recounts America's longstanding ties to Afghanistan

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 8:05


It's been three months since the U.S. withdrew its forces from Afghanistan, but America's involvement there didn't begin after Sept. 11, 2001. It began decades earlier, after the Soviet Union invaded that country in 1979 and the U.S. began working with Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to counter its rival's influence. Nick Schifrin spoke with one of the key architects and partners in that effort. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle
How do Russians feel about the Soviet Union 30 years later?

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:39


DJ Igor doesn't bemoan the Soviet Union. He says that Russia is conservative and needs the iron fist of someone like Putin, instead of democracy. He believes that Russia has no place in Europe and should go its own way.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
U.S. MidEast Policy Was Never About Democracy w/ Juan Cole/A ‘Play‘ Cold War? w/ Mike Swanson

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 79:49


On this edition of Parallax Views, we have another double feature. First up, a 45 minute conversation with Juan Cole, proprietor of the Informed Comment blog and a noted commentator and scholar on the modern Middle East, unpacking a recent New York Times article by Max Fischer about a study indicating that U.S. allies are driving much of the world's democratic decline. In a recent piece for the Informed Comment blog, Prof. Cole argues that U.S. foreign policy, particularly in the Middle East, has never, in reality, about Democracy promotion and that the rise of authoritarian regimes allied to the U.S. like Saudi Arabia are the fruits born from a grand strategy that prioritized "oil, absolutism, and anti-communism" during the Cold War. In this regard we discuss the Iran coup of 1953 as well as the U.S.'s seeking to obtain cheap petroleum for European allies during the Cold War and how this relates to the relationship between countries like the U.S., Saudi Arabia, and Syria. We also delve rather deeply into other issues that informed this period in the history of U.S. foreign policy like distrust of Arab nations and specifically Arab Nationalism, President Dwight Eisenhower's "two-pronged approach" to dealing with anti-colonial movements, U.S. foreign policy and Egypt's Gamal Abdel Nasser, post-Cold War U.S. foreign policy and the recession of anti-communist concerns in that policy after the fall of the Soviet Union, the "War on Terror" and Islamic fundamentalism as the new enemy, Islamophobia and U.S. ally France's illiberal after the 2015 ISIL attacks in Paris, U.S. foreign policy depends on who the enemy is, examples of U.S. not supporting Democracy during the War on Terror, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak and the Arab Spring revolts in the Obama era, the military coup d'état in Egypt in the Obama years and U.S. aid, the Bush administration and the Iraq War, Saudi Arabia  and oil, OPEC, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), gulf monarchies and the coup in Tunisia, gas prices, Saudi Arabia and 9/11 (Juan has a different take than previous guests of the program), the death of Jamal Khashoggi and how it embarrasses the U.S., Biden as harder on Saudi Arabia in rhetoric but not in action, the Asia Pivot and the relationship between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia, thinking in Washington that the Middle East isn't a fruitful place to put much foreign policy focus on, electric cars as a death knell for the Saudi economy, U.S. and Saudi Arabia's relationship with Iran, and more! Then, Mike Swanson of Wall Street Window, and author of the book The War State and Why the Vietnam War (also, as a full disclosure, a sponsor of Parallax Views), to discuss a fascinating New York Times article on the Biden administration's posture towards China and Washington's concerns over hearing "echoes of the '50" when it comes to the question of a New Cold War. We also discuss National Security Advisor's emphatic comments about how we are in competition with China rather than a "New Cold War". Mike believes that Washington may be hoping for a "play" Cold War with China rather than a full-on Cold War. This would benefit certain political actors, due to China being an issue of bipartisan interest to many voters, and the military-industrial complex. Due to the nature of the global economy and the reliance the U.S. has on China and vice-versa, Mike believes a full-on New Cold War is unlikely. We also discuss the recent nuclear submarine deal involving the U.S., Australia, and England as well as the breakdown between communications between the U.S. and China during the Trump Presidency, Trump's trade war with China and China's confusion over it, the blockades against that the U.S. and U.S.S.R. launched against each other and why that is unlikely to happen between the U.S. and China, Philip Zelikow's CFR report seeking to foment a strategy to avoid a hot war with China, Col. Lawrence Wilkerson's comments about a Pentagon war game simulation involving Taiwan and China, Biden walking back comments about being willing to commit troops to support Taiwan if necessary, the use of the term "industrial policy" in the NYT article, keeping tensions afloat while avoiding a full-on Cold War and how that would benefit the military-industrial complex, the War on Terror and the Asia Pivot, the risks of escalation and tension with China, the arms race, concern over a future nuclear arms race, and more in this brisk 25-minute conversation with Mike Swanson. "Biden Administration Has Told China It Needs A Play Cold War, But Doesn't Want A Real One" by Michael Swanson - Wall Street Window 11/19/21

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads
655: JFK: Connecting the Dots Pt. 2

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:48


EPISODE #655 JFK: CONNECTING THE DOTS PT. 2 In the second of a continuing series, Richard and a renowned JFK assassination researcher focus on the the life of Lee Harvey Oswald beginning in the late 1950s when he enlisted in the United States Marines, his posting at the highly secretive Atsugi Air Base in Japan and the bizarre circumstances surrounding his sudden defection to the Soviet Union in 1960. Guest:  James DiEugenio is one of the foremost researchers into the major assassinations of the 1960's. His first book: Destiny Betrayed, was an in depth look at the Garrison investigation. In 1993 he co-founded both Citizens for Truth about the Kennedy Assassination, and the following year: the Coalition on Political Assassinations . Along with Lisa Pease he co-edited COPA's journal: Probe Magazine from 1993-2000, and later assisted in a compilation of the Probe articles which was published as The Assassinations. In response to Vincent Bugliosi's Reclaiming History and associated film Parkland, DiEugenio published Reclaiming Parkland, a critique of Bugliosi's methodology, evidence, and findings in the Kennedy Assassination.   Jim was a guest commentator on the anniversary issue of the film "JFK" re-released by Warner Brothers in 2013.  Most recently, Jim wrote the screenplay for  Oliver  Stone's latest film, JFK Revisited: Through the Looking Glass. ​BOOKS: Destiny Betrayed Reclaiming Parkland The Assassinations: Probe Magazine on JFK, MLK, RFK, and Malcolm X The JFK Assassination SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS Life Change and Formula 13 Teas All Organic, No Caffeine, Non GMO!  More Energy!  Order now, use the code 'unlimited' to save 10% on all non-SALE items, PLUS... ALL your purchases ships for free!!! C60EVO -The Secret is out about this powerful anti-oxidant. The Purest C60 available is ESS60.  Buy Direct from the Source.  Buy Now and Save 10% – Use Coupon Code: EVRS at Checkout! Strange Planet Shop - If you're a fan of the radio show and the podcast, why not show it off?  Greats T-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, and more.  It's a Strange Planet - Dress For It! BECOME A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER FOR LESS THAN $2 PER MONTH If you're a fan of this podcast, I hope you'll consider becoming a Premium Subscriber.  For just $1.99 per month, subscribers to my Conspiracy Unlimited Plus gain access to two exclusive, commercial-free episodes per month. They also gain access to my back catalog of episodes. The most recent 30 episodes of Conspiracy Unlimited will remain available for free.  Stream all episodes and Premium content on your mobile device by getting the FREE Conspiracy Unlimited APP for both IOS and Android devices... Available at the App Store and Google Play.

New Books in History
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

American History Tellers
Traitors | Nightmover | 4

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:04


On June 13, 1985, Aldrich Ames packed up six pounds of top secret documents into a plastic bag and walked out the door of the CIA headquarters. He drove to lunch, where he gave the documents to a Soviet diplomat. They contained the identities of America's most important spies within the Soviet Union.Not long after, the Soviets told Ames that $2 million had been set aside for him. Ames had become the highest-paid American spy of the Cold War, and his betrayal would soon prove disastrous.That fall, the CIA was mystified by a string of mysterious disappearances. The agency's best assets within the Soviet Union were vanishing, never to be heard from again. But it would be years before investigators uncovered the mole within their ranks.Sleep Number-Robinhood-See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture
(Bonus) Biography of President John F Kennedy

Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


(Bonus) John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from 1961 until his assassination near the end of his third year in office. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president concerned relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba. A Democrat, Kennedy represented Massachusetts in both houses of the U.S. Congress prior to his presidency. 

Moms in Prayer Podcast
Episode 180 - Travel the World Through Prayer Australia & Russia with Kathie Arnold

Moms in Prayer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:22


“Please Lord, give me strength to be your missionary and live for you every day.” You will be amazed how God answered this prayer from the heart of a young college student the night she gave her heart to Jesus.  Who was this college student? Our dear Moms in Prayer sister, Kathie Arnold!  Today Stacy welcomes this wonderful mom of four and grandma to fourteen to the podcast.  Listen in as Kathie shares her journey from a small town in South Dakota to traveling the world sharing Moms in Prayer and the love of Jesus through the ministry she co-founded with her husband, Come and Sew Ministries International, CASMI.  Only God could write a story like this! About our Guest: Kathie Arnold always had a passion for mission, yet she never imagined or planned anything like CASMI.  It just came out of her life story!    Kathie and her husband Steve were married in 1972, supported missions, raised 4 children, and now have 14 grandchildren.  Kathie and their oldest daughter went on their first mission trip to the former Soviet Union in 1991.  Upon returning home from that trip, Kathie began a sewing school from their home. Ten years after that first mission trip, Steve and Kathie were asked by another ministry to use their life experiences to return to Russia, to investigate how to bring the gospel to orphans through sewing classes in state-run orphanages. They saw a need, were encouraged to go forward, and in 2003 CASMI became an official not-for-profit 501(c)(3).  Steve and Kathie make their home in Texas and continue to share the love of Jesus through CASMI. Links: https://www.comeandsew.org/ https://momsinprayer.org/give/ https://momsinprayer.org/new-to-moms-in-prayer/ https://momsinprayer.org/join-a-group To give to the ministry of Moms in Prayer: Support Our Mission | Moms In Prayer International             Moms in Prayer International- www.MomsInPrayer.org

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1821: Jerry Hendrix #Unbound: Naval primacy. The complete, forty-minute interview, March 23, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:01


Photo: First Barbary War: U.S. schooner Enterprise capturing the Tripolitan polacca corsair Tripoli, 1 August 1801. From a drawing (circa 1878) by Captain William Bainbridge Hoff, U.S. Navy, in the collection of the Navy department. @Batchelorshow Jerry Hendrix #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview, March 23, 2021 To Provide and Maintain a Navy: Why Naval Primacy Is America's First, Best Strategy, Hardcover – December 19, 2020 by Henry J Hendrix https://www.amazon.com/Provide-Maintain-Navy-Americas-Strategy/dp/0960039198 The national conversation regarding the United States Navy has, for far too long, been focused on the popular question of how many ships does the service need? To Provide and Maintain a Navy, a succinct but encompassing treatise on sea power by Dr. Henry J "Jerry" Hendrix, goes beyond the numbers to reveal the crucial importance of Mare Liberum (Free Sea) to the development of the Western thought and the rules-based order that currently govern the global commons that is the high seas. Proceeding from this philosophical basis, Hendrix explores how a "free sea" gave way to free trade and the central role sea-borne commercial trade has played in the overall rise in global living standards. This is followed by analysis of how the relative naval balance of power has played out in naval battles and wars over the centuries and how the dominance of the United States Navy following World War II has resulted in seven decades of unprecedented peace on the world's oceans. He further considers how, in the years that followed the demise of the Soviet Union, both China and Russia began laying the groundwork to challenge the United States's maritime leadership and upend five centuries of naval precedents in order to establish a new approach to sovereignty over the world's seas. It is only at this point that Dr. Hendrix approaches the question of the number of ships required for the United States Navy, the industrial base required to build them, and the importance of once again aligning the nation's strategic outlook to that of a "sea power" in order effectively and efficiently to address the rising threat. To Provide and Maintain a Navy is brief enough to be read in a weekend but deep enough to inform the reader as to the numerous complexities surrounding what promises to be the most important strategic conversation facing the United States as it enters a new age of great power competition with not one, but two, nations who seek nothing less than to close and control the world's seas.

The Opperman Report
House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and Russian Mafia

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 124:56


“The story Unger weaves with those earlier accounts and his original reporting is fresh, illuminating and more alarming than the intelligence channel described in the Steele dossier.”—The Washington Post House of Trump, House of Putin offers the first comprehensive investigation into the decades-long relationship among Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, and the Russian Mafia that ultimately helped win Trump the White House. It is a chilling story that begins in the 1970s, when Trump made his first splash in the booming, money-drenched world of New York real estate, and ends with Trump's inauguration as president of the United States. That moment was the culmination of Vladimir Putin's long mission to undermine Western democracy, a mission that he and his hand-selected group of oligarchs and Mafia kingpins had ensnared Trump in, starting more than twenty years ago with the massive bailout of a string of sensational Trump hotel and casino failures in Atlantic City. This book confirms the most incredible American paranoias about Russian malevolence. To most, it will be a hair-raising revelation that the Cold War did not end in 1991—that it merely evolved, with Trump's apartments offering the perfect vehicle for billions of dollars to leave the collapsing Soviet Union. In House of Trump, House of Putin, Craig Unger methodically traces the deep-rooted alliance between the highest echelons of American political operatives and the biggest players in the frightening underworld of the Russian Mafia. He traces Donald Trump's sordid ascent from foundering real estate tycoon to leader of the free world. He traces Russia's phoenix like rise from the ashes of the post–Cold War Soviet Union as well as its ceaseless covert efforts to retaliate against the West and reclaim its status as a global superpower. Without Trump, Russia would have lacked a key component in its attempts to return to imperial greatness. Without Russia, Trump would not be president. This essential book is crucial to understanding the real powers at play in the shadows of today's world. The appearance of key figures in this book—Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen, and Felix Sater to name a few—ring with haunting significance in the wake of Robert Mueller's report and as others continue to close in on the truth.

The Opperman Report'
House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and Russian Mafia

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 94:00


“The story Unger weaves with those earlier accounts and his original reporting is fresh, illuminating and more alarming than the intelligence channel described in the Steele dossier.”—The Washington PostHouse of Trump, House of Putin offers the first comprehensive investigation into the decades-long relationship among Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, and the Russian Mafia that ultimately helped win Trump the White House.It is a chilling story that begins in the 1970s, when Trump made his first splash in the booming, money-drenched world of New York real estate, and ends with Trump's inauguration as president of the United States. That moment was the culmination of Vladimir Putin's long mission to undermine Western democracy, a mission that he and his hand-selected group of oligarchs and Mafia kingpins had ensnared Trump in, starting more than twenty years ago with the massive bailout of a string of sensational Trump hotel and casino failures in Atlantic City. This book confirms the most incredible American paranoias about Russian malevolence.To most, it will be a hair-raising revelation that the Cold War did not end in 1991—that it merely evolved, with Trump's apartments offering the perfect vehicle for billions of dollars to leave the collapsing Soviet Union. In House of Trump, House of Putin, Craig Unger methodically traces the deep-rooted alliance between the highest echelons of American political operatives and the biggest players in the frightening underworld of the Russian Mafia. He traces Donald Trump's sordid ascent from foundering real estate tycoon to leader of the free world. He traces Russia's phoenix like rise from the ashes of the post–Cold War Soviet Union as well as its ceaseless covert efforts to retaliate against the West and reclaim its status as a global superpower.Without Trump, Russia would have lacked a key component in its attempts to return to imperial greatness. Without Russia, Trump would not be president. This essential book is crucial to understanding the real powers at play in the shadows of today's world. The appearance of key figures in this book—Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen, and Felix Sater to name a few—ring with haunting significance in the wake of Robert Mueller's report and as others continue to close in on the truth.

Nightlife
This Week in History: The Cuban Missile Crisis

Nightlife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 34:11


For 13 days in October 1962 the world watched as the USA and Soviet Union stared each other down over the question of nuclear missiles on Cuba.

The Closet Conservative Podcast
Where is Christ among Challenges

The Closet Conservative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 13:37


On March 10, 1943, under the orders of Adolf Eichmann, one of Hitler's architects of the Final Solution to the Jewish Question, railcars began rolling into the country of Belarus. The purpose? To transport all of the Jews of Bulgaria to the Death Camps of Treblinka located in German Occupied Poland. Bulgarian police began to round up Jews - going door-to-door as early as 3 in the morning. They were taken at gunpoint. Jewish collection centers were located in schools and other community centers. There was one problem, though - The Bulgarian People. You see, when the train cars began to arrive, the Bulgarian people united to save the Jews of their country. Although they did not know the Bulgarian Jews' final destination was to the death camps and gas chambers, some rumors had circulated the cities and towns. The Bulgarian Church led the opposition to the deportation of the Bulgarian Jews. If the Church allowed the Jews to be deported, they would have violated their obligations, the Rev. Boris Halapia stated. The word, WE MUST HELP. The whole Orthodox Church of Bulgaria came together - and sent a letter to the King, begging mercy for the Jews of the country. The Church also told the Chief of Police that they would not accept the mandate to deport the Jews from the country and would do anything possible to hinder the deportation efforts. Church followers began to arrive at the centers, and they told the frightened Jews that they would not let anything happen to them. Crowds protested across the country; the Church printed thousands of forged Baptismal certificates for Jews, risking their own lives. The falsification of faith - saved lives! It would take several months before Jews would return from hiding to their homes - much to the dismay of the Nazis. Hitler was furious. In a meeting with King Boris, he demanded the deportation of the Jews - Hitler went into a rage, King Boris recalled. Screaming; and going into a tirade, King Boris described - but Boris didn't surrender, not one inch. Boris told Hitler that Bulgaria needed the Jews for labor projects. Hitler did not believe the King, but he didn't want to lose an ally. He finally bought what Boris was selling and agreed, but only if all the Jewish men were relocated from the cities to labor camps. Some 20,000 Jews were indeed moved from the cities to the countryside - but not one of them outside the borders of Bulgaria. The deportation of the Jews of Bulgaria never took place. As a result, Bulgaria was the only country in Eastern Europe whose Jewish population remained the same throughout the Holocaust. It was known as The Miracle of the Jewish People Among the Jews of Bulgaria. This miracle was never made public immediately following World War II because the Soviet Government suppressed it - sound familiar? And Why? Because Communist Soviet Regime didn't want the credit of the rescue of these Jews given to a monarchy and The Church - both of which are enemies of The Soviet Union and communism. It would take the fall of The Iron Curtain in 1989 for this to finally become known. Folks, why do I tell this story? Is it because I am indeed a history nerd? Perhaps. But more to the point, I want to share that people can do many things when they come together for a common purpose. We are those people. As conservatives and challengers to our country's communistic push and pull, we are charged to protect what so many before us died to preserve. Granted, we are not coming together to save a race or population from mass murder and extinction. Instead, we are here to preserve the American way of life - that has been being attacked from within our borders. We now live in a society where we allow hundreds and thousands of tyrants in Washington DC to tell us how they think, believe, and parent. We sit back and buy into a system that government, not God, knows best. Music courtesy of Greg Shields Music. http://www.reverbnation.com/GregShields  

The Opperman Report
The Valediction: Three Nights of Desmond

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 74:20


Afghanistan was an American crusade to win the cold war against the “Evil Soviet Empire” and remake the world in its own image. Our telling goes right to the heart of understanding what really happened to America with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Instead of fulfilling the Western Dream, the US trapped itself in its own nightmare of endless war. Now Americans long for a spiritual regeneration towards peace. No one seems able to make the process move in the right direction. Over four decades we assimilated an understanding of how to envision moving from war as an honorable sacrifice to peace that serves all. Our two-part novelized memoir delivers a revelatory look at how we came to that awareness through worldly and otherworldly encounters with many fascinating people along the way. -The Valediction: Three Nights of Desmond Part 1 combines Three Days of the Condor and JFK as journalist Paul Fitzgerald unravels the deep state mystery behind the unsolved 1979 assassination of U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan Adolph Dubs. Dubs' death changed the world as much as JFK's but few even know his name. In a serendipitous encounter at the Kabul Hotel during his investigation, Paul meets a mysterious ally who not only helps him solve the Dubs' murder, he challenges Paul's assumptions about why he was drawn to Afghanistan in the first place and what to do about it.

Hockey Central @ Noon
McDavid Does It Again

Hockey Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 66:11


Jeff talks about another incredible goal from Connor McDavid and an Oilers shootout win over the Jets with Louie DeBrusk (0:51). Next, Steve Valiquette discusses the incredible play of Igor Shesterkin and which goalies people aren't talking about that should take notice of (17:29). To finish, Ron MacLean chats about hockey in the Soviet Union, the problem getting young people into officiating and more (46:45).The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

Sex Stories
143 | I Love Him Invading My Body: Marina's Sex Stories

Sex Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 68:31


Marina is having the best sex she's ever had, and she's had some very hot sex with partners who had very yummy butts in the two decades she lived in Israel. Her current partner is in tune with her mentally, physically, spiritually—and exploring sex with a power dynamic is hot. They have a Daddy Dom/baby girl dynamic, a Dom/sub flavor, and even a Sadist/masochist flavor. We cover so much: lack of Sex Ed growing up in the Soviet Union, finding her grandpa's softcore porn, a first partner who became a husband who also didn't know what to do (but who didn't mind if her eyes wandered), and her first orgasm after discovering a tiny bullet vibrator when she was 21. Marina has always enjoyed sucking cock; she gives details on the sensory experiences she enjoys (delicious asses; getting touched, being kissed on the neck, ankles and feet, how she loves to look at people. She shares about her phase of meeting and using guys after her divorce, recalls a beautiful sexy memory that includes tequila and an impromptu evil-spirits-of-the-bedroom exorcism, and explains how writing tasks from Daddy have also helped her explore desire, and lead to things she wouldn't have previously imagined. We talk vulnerability, piss play, needles in clits, what it's like to have a fuckbench, caramel sauce punishment, sensory deprivation, getting fisted, ball-gagged and stretched, her desire to explore more impact play, and the sisterhood of fucking a woman. 42, bi cis F, submissive alpha; secular Jewish upbringing, born in Russia, lived in Israel for 20 years, now in the US.   JOIN THE MISSION / http://mission69.org   ///   SHARE STORIES / http://sexstoriespodcast.com 

The Shaun Thompson Show
November 18, 2021

The Shaun Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 97:24


One of Biden's nominees was born in the Soviet Union and was guilty of theft! Then, Kevin Bessler, reporter on statewide issues in Illinois, joins Shaun to discuss Pritzker's attempt to lower the crime rate. Plus, Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson talks about the media, vaccine mandates, and if he'll run for re-election.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
WHISTLEBLOWER: Physician Assistant Exposes VAERS Cover-Up - Communism in America is Demonic Influence - Kari Lake LIVE - Fake ”Conservative Media” Enforces Vaxx Mandate for LIVE Event!

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:57


Something very dark is happening to America. More and more people are turning against the values and traditions that made this country so successful in the first place. We're becoming like the Soviet Union or Maoist China, and not simply because more and more of our leaders seem to be literal communists. We're seeing Christianity disappear from public life, replaced by nihilism, hedonism, and Satanism. Connie Thach is a Physician Assistant who joined Stew Peters to discuss. One of the primary tools we have for tracking all the side effects to this vaccine is the VAERS database kept by the CDC. As-is, that database has showed tens of thousands of adverse effects connected to the vaccine, including many deaths. The CDC insists there's nothing to see here, but is VAERS even accurate in the first place? Deborah Conrad says it isn't.. he Arizona audit has come and gone, putting up a whole Soviet parade's worth of red flags about the 2020 election there. But that audit is only going to help Republicans if they learn from it, and make sure Arizona's elections are secure going forward. Kari Lake is running for governor of Arizona. She joins us. How long has Fox News been controlled opposition? Stew Peters investigative journalist Edward Szall discusses the vaccine mandate Rupert Murdoch's network placed on a supposedly “Patriot Awards” ceremony in Hollywood, Florida, and what it means for all the hosts who showed up and submitted. Get Dr. Zelenko's Anti-Shedding Treatment, NOW AVAILABLE FOR KIDS: www.zStackProtocol.com Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on social media: http://evrl.ink/StewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/ Advertise with Red Voice Media: https://redvoicemedia.net/ads  

Free To Choose Media Podcast
Episode 151 – The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited: Phase 2, Part II (Podcast)

Free To Choose Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


In today's podcast, we present part two of a panel moderated by Richard Neustadt with four members of President John F. Kennedy's executive committee–Robert S. McNamara, George W. Ball, McGeorge Bundy, and U. Alexis Johnson–as they reconvene twenty years after the Cuban Missile Crisis to reflect on the lessons learned. Here is “The Cuban Missile Crisis Revisited: Phase 2, Part II.” Listen now.

Fearless with Jason Whitlock
Ep 94 | Soviet Singer Rejected Communism to Follow God to America

Fearless with Jason Whitlock

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 84:19


On a very special Tennessee Harmony segment, Jason interviews Christian Ray Flores, an evangelist from Austin's TRIBE church. Flores tells his epic personal history, starting with his childhood under Marxism in Russia, Chile, and Mozambique. How did he go from a master's degree in economics to becoming a major pop star in the Soviet Union? What sparked his conversion to Christianity and his ultimately founding a church in Texas? How does his outlook on America's future differ from Whitlock's? What personal chapter in his life does Flores reflect upon as he talks about abortion?   ​​Today's Sponsor: Get with Good Ranchers today and support American farmers! Visit https://GoodRanchers.com/FEARLESS to get $20 dollars OFF and FREE express shipping.   Save 20% on “Fearless” swag! Use Promo Code Fearless20 at: www.shop.blazemedia.com/fearless to make yourself an official member of the “Fearless Army.”  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American History Tellers
Traitors | The Atomic Spies | 3

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 41:32


In September 1949, the world was shocked to learn that the Soviet Union had conducted its first nuclear weapons test, just four years after the United States dropped the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. U.S. authorities thought there was only one way the Soviets could narrow the nuclear arms gap so quickly -- by stealing atomic secrets from the U.S.In 1950, the FBI arrested a young Jewish couple, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, for running a spy ring and passing nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. At their trial, the Rosenbergs became lightning rods for controversy and anti-communist hysteria. But the true extent of their guilt would remain shrouded in mystery for decades to come.Better Help- Listeners get 10% OFF their first month at betterhelp.com/tellers!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jacobin Radio
Jacobin Radio w/ Suzi Weissman: October 1917

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 57:50


On the 104th anniversary of the Russian revolution, Suzi Weissman switches seats with Robert Brenner: She is the guest and he does the interviewing. The podcast begins with Suzi on "One Hundred Years Since October: When the Russian Working Class Opened the Possibilities For Humanity." Robert and Suzi then discuss the significance of October 1917, when workers took power with profoundly democratic institutions of popular control from below in the Russian empire, creating the Soviet Union.The program ends with the song that revolutionaries around the world sing: the International. Billy Bragg wrote new lyrics for the song that was first written in 1871 at the time of the Paris Commune. On May 3, 2020, Billy Bragg joined a live stream celebration of Pete Seeger's 101st birthday. Bragg explains how he came to write his striking version of the 'Internationale' and Pete Seeger's role in the evolution of this song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBgfNy7dk4I

Colin's Last Stand: KnockBack
#196: Metal Gear Solid 3

Colin's Last Stand: KnockBack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 168:00


The third entry in the Metal Gear Solid franchise is the first game to take us backwards in time. While the original two adventures took place slightly ahead of their release window, MGS3 takes place 40 years prior to its 2004 launch, and within is a captivating Cold War-slash-alternate history tale about the Soviet Union, some American (and other foreign) agents, and a vaunted, nuclear-armed super weapon that will change the face of warfare forever. Infused with memorable characters and dialogue, revamped combat, and a deeply geopolitical tale, Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is considered by many fans of the series to be its best entry. Do the Moriarty Brothers agree? As usual, there's only one way to find out: Hit play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Expanded Perspectives
Grey Wolf: Classic Rewind

Expanded Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 74:49


On this episode of Expanded Perspectives Classic Rewind, we go all the way back to January 27, 2014, when we spoke with author, researcher,  and friend Gerrard Williams about his book Grey Wolf - The Escape of Adolf Hitler!  Gerrard Williams is an international journalist and historian with an esteemed career spanning over thirty years. His resume includes acting as Duty Editor for Reuters, the BBC and Sky News. Williams' groundbreaking reporting has taken him to the front lines of the fall of the Soviet Union, the Rwandan Genocide, the 2004 tsunami in Thailand and the US occupation of Iraq, among many other international stories. Ten years ago, while reporting in Argentina, Williams came across evidence in a local archive that changed the way he looked at historical reporting–Nazi war criminals, potentially including Adolf Hitler, used clandestine international routes to flee defeated Germany for safe haven in Argentina and other South American countries. Using these archives, eye-witness reports and other local histories, Williams published the book, Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler. Despite the rigor in his journalism and his adherence to facts and evidence, the international community has largely ignored him. Today, with the release of classified FBI and OSS documents, his work is finally getting the credit and respect it deserves. Williams has taken over a dozen trips to Argentina, and visited locations like Hotel Eden, Bariloche and the Inalco House years before the FBI files pointed them out as potential locations of intrigue. Unlike his previous efforts, which lacked the finances and technology to dig deep enough to truly uncover anything, he believes that this team won't be held back in the same way. Williams understands how sensitive to discuss and unfathomable to comprehend this subject is, but he stands by his work and welcomes a spirited debated revolving around the newly released facts. All of this and more on this episode of Expanded Perspectives Classic Rewind! Show Notes: Email: expandedperspectives@yahoo.com Hotline: 888-393-2783 Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler Want to help out the show? Expanded Perspectives Elite Music: All music for Expanded Perspectives is provided by Epidemic Sound!

Hard Factor
11/12/21: Dictators End the Week Extremely Strong

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 79:18


Wow dictators really threw their weight around to end the week. China's Xi Jinping decided to make a resolution on top of his decree a little while back that he could be President for life. Now he is considered as powerful as the founding father of the People's Republic of China Mao Zedong. That story here (00:23:45) (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:05:12) - Fun Fact: The designer of the Pringles can is buried in one (00:06:35)- Holidays: National Pneumonia Day, National French Onion Dip Day (00:07:55) - This Day in History: in 1927 Joseph Stalin took over as undisputed leader of the Soviet Union (00:09:05) - Famous Deaths on November 12th: 1035 Cnut the Great, 2003 Jonathan Brandis, 2018 Stan Lee (00:10:39) - Trending Mentions: NFL trades: Cam Newton back to the Panthers, Odell Beckham Jr is on the Rams. The Hard Factor NFL weekly parlay is awesome. (00:13:13) - #3 - The death toll has raised to nine from the Astroworld concert. Also a nine year old is in a medically induced coma and Travis Scott has been sued more than 50 times (00:17:39) - #2 - Congress wants to eliminate drunk drivers by 2026 (00:23:45) - #1 - Grand Emperor Xi Jinping has made a resolution making him as powerful as Mao Zedong the founding father of the People's Republic of China TikTok International Moment (00:31:45) - Eastern EU - Belarus/Poland/Ukraine borders. The EU is thinking about building a wall, and is worried about Vladimir Putin and Alexander Lukashenko instigating conflicts at the border (00:36:34) - Yemen - Biden administration is calling for the immediate release of the Yemeni staff of the U.S. Embassy in Sana'a who are being detained by Iran-backed Houthi separatists who control the city (00:38:18) - Taiwan - A police officer got his thumb bit off by a very drunk driver who fought him (00:44:40) - Listener submitted voice mail and reviews These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: http://AdamAndEve.com - Use Promo Code: HARDFACTOR for 50% off 1 Item http://JoinFightCamp.com/FACTOR - To get an additional pair of gloves for free all November with your new Fight Camp system http://Talkspace.com - Promo Code: HARDFACTOR for $100 off http://Birddogs.com - Promo Code: Factor - Free Whistle Ball w/ Order Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 903 | HARD TO WATCH: Rittenhouse BREAKS DOWN During Testimony

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 45:04


Kyle Rittenhouse takes the stand during his own trial and breaks down in tears. With the evidence that is already out, is this even a case? And Bidenflation continues, with prices increasing to a 30-year high. Thanks, Biden! And Biden's Treasury nominee (who was educated in the Soviet Union) wants to save the climate by BANKRUPTING the oil and coal industries. Public schools in Seattle announced to parents that due to a staff shortage, classes must be canceled. So what's behind this teacher shortage? Today's Sponsors: The FBI calls home title theft one of the fastest-growing white-collar crimes. Register your home at https://www.hometitlelock.com/ with promo code RADIO for 30 FREE days of protection. If you're trying to stay fit and healthy, Built Bar is the answer. Go to https://built.com/ and use promo code NEWS15 to save 15% off your next order. To get started on protecting your savings with gold in a TAX-SHELTERED account, request a free info kit from Birch Gold by texting the word "WHY" to 9-8-9-8-9-8. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pat Gray Unleashed
Is This the End of Coal? | 11/10/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 94:57


Aaron Rodgers and the Packers get hit with a light fine, relatively speaking. Jeffy is starting to look a lot like Benjamin Franklin lately. A new Disney IMAX enhanced promo comes out. An element in our teeth has been found light years away. The largest potato in the world might have been uncovered! An 83-year-old man has just become the oldest man to have hiked the Appalachian Trail. Is Texas experiencing a drought? John Kerry has some more things to say about ending coal production in America. A Biden administration nominee is arguing that America has a larger gender pay gap than the Soviet Union. Let's take a look at why that is a total lie. The foreign minister for Tuvalu virtue-signals for climate change by standing in a pond. Inflation only continues to get worse in the United States. Are other countries raising money to "support an American"? India has annual cow poop fights? Joe Biden unveils a new multinational plan to control methane that he says will help fight climate change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Lawfare Podcast
America, China and the Tragedy of Great-Power Politics

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 45:48


Jack Goldsmith sat down with John Mearsheimer, the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor in the Political Science department at the University of Chicago, to discuss his recent article in Foreign Affairs, called “The Inevitable Rivalry: America, China, and the Tragedy of Great-Power Politics.” In that essay, Mearsheimer argues that America's engagement with China following the Cold War, and its fostering of the rise of China's economic and thus military power, was the worst strategic blunder any country has made in recent history. They discussed why he thinks this, why he believes we currently are in a cold war with China that is more dangerous than the one with the Soviet Union, and what concretely the U.S. government should do now to check China's power. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.