Podcasts about Soviet Union

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Communist state in Europe and Asia that lasted from 1922 to 1991

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    Best podcasts about Soviet Union

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    Latest podcast episodes about Soviet Union

    JFK The Enduring Secret
    Episode 108 Lee Harvey Oswald Part 9 More Minsk

    JFK The Enduring Secret

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 34:58


    Episode 108   is the ninth episode in season two of JFK The Enduring Secret. We begin our wander this season with an in depth review of Lee Harvey Oswald, the principal character in the JFK assassination Episode 108 picks back up where we left off in Minsk and goes deeper.  Minsk  is where he was sent by the Russian authorities after his suicide attempt in Moscow. Join us for the whole series of episodes about the fantastic goings on that encompass this part of the JFK story.  Our episodes have now begun  to explore  an array of matters that  dive into a deeper  darkness  related to what  went on that day in Dallas and in the  period before and after the assassination.  Matters   that possibly point  to a  wider  and more sinister  plot to kill the president and  that clearly call into question the theory that there was a  lone assassin.   Complex cases without  an eyewitness that can actually identify the shooter make the forensic and circumstantial evidence that much more important.  Ironically, problems abound with much of the evidence in this case. Evidence that is complex, incomplete and sometimes conflicting. Even as early as 1964, rumors and serious concerns over  the lone gunman theory and the evidence that might contravene it,  were becoming a major concern for the government and the commission. Conspiracy theories were contrary to the government's stated narrative from the very beginning. Stay tuned as there are many more episodes to come!This series comprehensively explores the major facts,  themes, and  events leading up to the assassination in Dealey Plaza and the equally gripping stories surrounding the subsequent investigation. We  review  key elements of the Warren Commission Report , and the role of the CIA and FBI. We explore the  possible involvement of the Mafia in the murder and the review of that topic by the government's House Select Committee on Assassinations in the 1970's. We explore the Jim Garrison investigation and the work of other key figures such as Mark Lane and others. Learn more about Lee Harvey Oswald the suspected killer and Jack Ruby the distraught Dallas night club owner with underworld ties and the man that killed Oswald as a national TV audience was watching.  Stay with us as we take you through the facts and theories in bite sized discussions that are designed to educate, and inform as well as entertain the audience. This  real life story is more fascinating than fiction. No matter whether you are a serious researcher or a casual student, you will enjoy the fact filled narrative and story as  we relive one of the most shocking moments in American History. An event that changed the nation and changed the world forever.

    Jimmy Akin Podcast
    The Cuban Missile Crisis! (Nuclear War; Kennedy, Khrushchev, 1962) - Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World

    Jimmy Akin Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 81:40


    Sixty years ago, the world was locked in a 13-day crisis between the USA and Soviet Union. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli discuss the Cuban Missile Crisis and the little-known details about how the world came within a whisker of a global nuclear war.

    Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World
    The Cuban Missile Crisis! (Nuclear War; Kennedy, Khrushchev, 1962)

    Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 81:40


    Sixty years ago, the world was locked in a 13-day crisis between the USA and Soviet Union. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli discuss the Cuban Missile Crisis and the little-known details about how the world came within a whisker of a global nuclear war. The post The Cuban Missile Crisis! (Nuclear War; Kennedy, Khrushchev, 1962) appeared first on StarQuest Media.

    The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast
    How America is Winning and Losing | 06.29.2022 #ProAmericaReport

    The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 39:42


    What You Need to Know is How America is Winning and Losing. One way we are losing in America is how the Narrative Machine is reporting the Jan. 6th select committee hearings — They are being effective in their propaganda reporting. One way America is winning is by debunking false testimonies during the Jan. 6th hearings. Also, they have not succeeded in broadening its viewership! Stefano Gennarini, Vice President for Legal Studies at the Center for Family and Human Rights, discusses European Union Backs UN Resolution to Make Abortion a Human Right. Stefano talks about how foreign countries may fund groups within the United States to offer assistance to those wanting an abortion. Check out C-fam.org.  Dr. Ted Malloch—author, historian, businessman, professor, and frequent contributor for American Greatness, talks about his article Joey B's ‘Top Gun' Advisor. Dr. Malloch also talks about the J6 show trials and compares them to the show trials in Stalin's Soviet Union. Check out his website — TedMalloch.com.  Wrap up: Let's talk about the SCOTUS decisions over the past week. There has been a profound shift in their decision and it shows itself with not only Dobbs v. Jackson, but also their votes on the second amendment, immigration, etc. It's turning things back to the way they were and should be.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Chatham House - Undercurrents
    War in Ukraine: Ukrainian identity

    Chatham House - Undercurrents

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 27:52


    How has the war impacted Ukranians' sense of identity? How has Ukrainian language, culture, and politics changed after fall of the Soviet Union. Are Putin's views on Ukrainian identity shared by others in Russia? Host: Ned Sedgwick  Guests: Orysia Lutsevych (Head and Research Fellow, Ukraine Forum, Russia and Eurasia Programme); Professor Georgiy Kassianov (Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland, author of “From 'the Ukraine' to Ukraine. In the search of the future, 1991-2021"). This episode was produced by David Dargahi of Earshot Strategies on behalf of Chatham House.

    UnderCurrents
    War in Ukraine: Ukrainian identity

    UnderCurrents

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 27:52


    How has the war impacted Ukranians' sense of identity? How has Ukrainian language, culture, and politics changed after fall of the Soviet Union. Are Putin's views on Ukrainian identity shared by others in Russia? Host: Ned Sedgwick  Guests: Orysia Lutsevych (Head and Research Fellow, Ukraine Forum, Russia and Eurasia Programme); Professor Georgiy Kassianov (Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland, author of “From 'the Ukraine' to Ukraine. In the search of the future, 1991-2021"). This episode was produced by David Dargahi of Earshot Strategies on behalf of Chatham House.

    Trent Loos Podcast
    Rural Route Radio June 29, 2022 JC Cole with information he acquired in Latvia in 2006 about Russia vs Ukraine, really is anything not planned out?

    Trent Loos Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 48:05


    JC Cole spent 18 years in Latvia as the Soviet Union was being disassembled and sadly he is seeing too many familiar events take place in the USA today.

    Radio Diaries
    The Almost Astronaut

    Radio Diaries

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 21:49


    In the 1960s, the U.S. was in a tense space race with the Soviet Union - and was losing. The Soviets had sent the first satellite and the first man into space. So, President Kennedy pledged to do something no country had done: send a man to the moon. This mission excited many white Americans, but many Black Americans thought the space program wasted money that could've helped Black communities. So, the U.S. embarked on a plan that could beat the Soviets and appease Black Americans: tapping Air Force Captain Ed Dwight as the first Black astronaut candidate.

    Quotomania
    Quotomania 271: Marina Tsevetaeva

    Quotomania

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 1:30


    Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva (also Marina Cvetaeva and Marina Tsvetayeva) was born in Moscow. During her lifetime she wrote poems, verse plays, and prose pieces; she is considered one of the most renowned poets of 20th-century Russia. Tsvetaeva's life coincided with turbulent years in Russian history. She married Sergei Efron in 1912; they had two daughters and later one son. Efron joined the White Army, and Tsvetaeva was separated from him during the Civil War. She had a brief love affair with Osip Mandelstam, and a longer relationship with Sofia Parnok. During the Moscow famine, Tsvetaeva was forced to place her daughters in a state orphanage, where the younger, Irina, died of hunger in 1919. In 1922 she emigrated with her family to Berlin, then to Prague, settling in Paris in 1925. In Paris, the family lived in poverty. Sergei Efron worked for the Soviet secret police, and Tsvetaeva was shunned by the Russian expatriate community of Paris. Through the years of privation and exile, poetry and contact with poets sustained Tsvetaeva. She corresponded with Rainer Maria Rilke and Boris Pasternak, and she dedicated work to Anna Akhmatova.In 1939 Tsvetaeva returned to the Soviet Union. Efron was executed, and her surviving daughter was sent to a labor camp. When the German army invaded the USSR, Tsvetaeva was evacuated to Yelabuga with her son. She hanged herself on August 31, 1941.Critics and translators of Tsvetaeva's work often comment on the passion in her poems, their swift shifts and unusual syntax, and the influence of folk songs. She is also known for her portrayal of a woman's experiences during the “terrible years” (as the period in Russian history was described by Aleksandr Blok). Collections of Tsvetaeva's poetry translated into English include Selected Poems of Marina Tsvetaeva, translated by Elaine Feinstein (1971, 1994). She is the subject of several biographies as well as the collected memoirs No Love Without Poetry (2009), by her daughter Ariadna Efron (1912–1975).From https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/marina-tsvetaeva. For more information about Marina Tsvetaeva:“No One Has Taken Anything Away”: https://ruverses.com/marina-tsvetaeva/nothing-s-been-taken-away/9732/Bride of Ice: New Selected Poems: https://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847770608“Tsvetaeva: The Tragic Life”: https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2003/02/13/tsvetaeva-the-tragic-life/

    The BreakCast
    The Anniversary Brothers Movie Podcast: Air Force One 25th Anniversary

    The BreakCast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 80:34


    Aaron and Josh Sarnecky have returned for their movie retrospective on Air Force One. Joining them is the Commander-in-Chief of The Pop Break, Bill Bodkin. Air Force One is an action film directed by Wolfgang Petersen. It open in theaters 25 years ago, on July 25, 1997. In the movie, President James Marshall (Harrison Ford) fights for control of Air Force One after terrorists take the other passengers hostage. Leading the terrorists is Egor Korshunov (Garry Oldman), who seeks to rebuild the Soviet Union. Assisting President Marshall on the ground is Vice President Kathyrn Bennett (Glenn Close). Air Force One was generally well-received and the fifth highest grossing film of 1997. It earned Oscar nominations for Best Sound and Best Film Editing. Aaron, Josh, and Bill talk about the film's plot, characters, and action. They also discuss its place in Harrison Ford's filmography and how it compares to other ‘90s movies. For another action movie podcast, you can listen to the brothers and Bill talk about Terminator 2: Judgment Day. Air Force One is available on Prime Video and Apple TV

    The Korea Now Podcast
    The Korea Now Podcast #123 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘Moscow's Fear of Japan and the Division of Korea'

    The Korea Now Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 66:33


    This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Kathryn Weathersby. They speak about ‘borderlands' as places of fear and confrontation, how this phenomenon impacted Russian involvement in the great power struggle over Korea prior to its seizure by Japan in 1905, the patterns that informed Moscow's actions toward the peninsula, and which ultimately led the Soviet Union and the United States to divide Korea. Kathryn Weathersby is an Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University Washington, DC; Adjunct faculty at Korea University in Seoul, Korea; and Co-founder of the Korean War archive at Korea University. *** The Korea Now Podcast #17 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘Dividing Korea - Politics, War and Fear' The Korea Now Podcast #17 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘Dividing Korea - Politics, War and Fear' *** The Korea Now Podcast #67 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘The 1988 Seoul Olympics - Terrorism, Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War' The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #67 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘The 1988 Seoul Olympics - Terrorism, Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War' (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry

    River to River
    Personal and political perspectives on the war in Ukraine

    River to River

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    A University of Iowa professor born and raised in the Soviet Union and a political scientist share their insights on the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

    The CJN Daily
    Roman Baber is the Jewish political maverick hoping to lead the Conservative party—and all of Canada

    The CJN Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 19:02


    In January 2021, Roman Baber—then a rookie Progressive Conservative MPP—was booted from caucus by Doug Ford after opposing his government's COVID-19 vaccine mandates and provincial lockdowns. Fast-forward just over a year, and Baber, who continued to sit as an independent in Ontario's legislature after that ejection, announced he would seek the leadership of the federal Conservative party. He's something of a maverick candidate. He staunchly opposes vaccine mandates, supports the trucker convoy and is one of the few Conservative politicians speaking out against Canada's strict supply management of dairy products. If elected party leader—and ultimately prime minister—he would scrap the carbon tax; fire the chief public health officer, Theresa Tam; and be the first Jewish prime minister in the country's history. In this wide-reaching interview, Baber discusses his concerns over Canada's economy, his immigrant journey moving from the former Soviet Union to Israel before settling in Canada, and whether he's afraid of suffering the same kind of antisemitism that brought down Green leader Annamie Paul. What we talked about: Visit Roman Baber's website Read The CJN's coverage of Baber's Conservative leadership announcement Read the press release about Michael Levitt meeting the Pope Credits The CJN Daily is written and hosted by Ellin Bessner (@ebessner on Twitter). Victoria Redden is the producer. Michael Fraiman is the executive producer. Our theme music is by Dov Beck-Levine. Our title sponsor is Metropia. We're a member of The CJN Podcast Network. To learn how to support the show by subscribing to this podcast, please watch this video.

    Seriously…
    Ukraine's Nuclear Gamble

    Seriously…

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 28:35


    It was a night of intense negotiation which would change the world order as Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons. Clive Myrie examines what was at stake in Budapest in 1994, how the deal was finally reached and how it went on to shape the world we face today. Three decades ago, the newly independent country of Ukraine was briefly the third-biggest nuclear power on the planet. Thousands of nuclear arms had been left on Ukrainian soil after the collapse of the Soviet Union. But in the years that followed, Ukraine made the decision to denuclearise. As Ukraine fights for its continued independence and the world hopes to stave off a catastrophic acceleration of nuclear weapons activity, Clive finds out how that agreement was negotiated and interpreted – and what it says about the situation we find ourselves in today. He talks to negotiators and others with an interest in those important diplomatic discussions 28 years ago. Producer: Ashley Byrne A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4

    Blunt Force Truth
    We Need to Do Something Now America - an Interview with Michael Johns

    Blunt Force Truth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 51:14


    Today's show rundown: Our military is now woke! They can't fight unless they have a safe space. When the left gets in power they love to learn down the US military. Imagine the parody video we could shoot of two guys in a foxhole, but having to stop and get their pronouns right. Buzz Lightyear movie flop - millions lost so far, go woke, go broke has never been more true. Meanwhile Top Gun Maverick is still killing it at the box office. We meet our returning guest Michael Johns - where is the Tea Party now. The juncture now is that we have so many fires going on in this country - a threat to our survival and way of government that may not be reversible if we do not prevail. The Left will tell us that WE are the problem, and that WE are the threat to Democracy itself. Projection and the Left is a book that could write itself. https://www.facebook.com/MichaelJohnsTeaParty MICHAEL JOHNS is a co-founder and national leader of the national Tea Party movement, which was launched in 2009 and grew into the largest and most influential grassroots political movement in U.S. history. The Tea Party took control of the U.S. House in 2010, permanently blocking Obama's legislative agenda, and later took control of the U.S. Senate in 2014 and paving the ground for Trump to run a successful populist insurgent campaign against the Republican Party establishment and then the Clinton political machine. Michael has served as a White House speechwriter to President George H.W. Bush, a senior aid to a Republican U.S. Senator and Governor and a Heritage Foundation policy analyst, where he led the foundation's Reagan Doctrine initiatives that many historians have since credited with being the decisive factor in America prevailing in the Cold War. In the 1990s, as a director of the U.S. government-funded International Republican Institute, he was responsible for developing global programs to strengthen democracy, free and fair elections, and election monitoring in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union. On June 16, 2015, the first day of Donald Trump's candidacy, Michael was among the first prominent national conservatives to endorse Trump for president. Michael has written for The Wall Street Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, National Review and other national media and appears as a conservative public policy and political commentator for many global television-band radio news outlets.

    A Correction Podcast
    Elle Hardy on How Pentecostalism Became the Fastest Growing Religion on Earth

    A Correction Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


    Elle Hardy is an Australian-born journalist usually based between the UK and US. She has reported extensively on stories from the United States and the former Soviet Union, among other places. Credits include The Times, GQ, The Guardian, The Outline, Monocle, Foreign Policy, Vice, ABC, and Lonely Planet. She has written a book called Beyond Belief: How Pentecostal Christianity is Taking Over the World for Hurst Publishers (2021). DONATE TODAYA note from Lev:I am a high school teacher of history and economics at a public high school in NYC, and began the podcast to help demystify economics for teachers.  The podcast is now within the top 2.5% of podcasts worldwide in terms of listeners (per Listen Notes) and individual episodes are frequently listed by The Syllabus (the-syllabus.com) as among the 10 best political economy podcasts of a particular week.  The podcast is reaching thousands of listeners each month.  The podcast seeks to provide a substantive alternative to mainstream economics media; to communicate information and ideas that contribute to equitable and peaceful solutions to political and economic issues; and to improve the teaching of high school and university political economy. I am looking to be able to raise money in order to improve the technical quality of the podcast and website and to further expand the audience through professionally designed social media outreach. I am also hoping to hire an editor. Best, Lev

    Aviatrix Book Review
    Aviatrix Book Club June 2022 - Kate Quinn

    Aviatrix Book Review

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 45:58


    In this interview with best-selling author Kate Quinn, we talk about her historical fiction thriller, The Huntress, which is the June 2022 Aviatrix Book Club discussion book alongside the young adult non-fiction A Thousand Sisters: The Heroic Women of the Soviet Union in World War II by another best-selling author, Elizabeth Wein. The Huntress is told from three perspectives, one of whom is Nina, a Russian Night Witch who flies combat missions during WWII. Kate also shares her writing journey and advice for aspiring writers. Many thanks to Kate for bringing her passions for history and writing to the story of the Russian women who flew combat during WWII!

    Hollywood and Beyond
    Sera Barbieri and Potato Dreams of America

    Hollywood and Beyond

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 31:44


    Actress Sera Barbieri joins host Steven Brittingham to discuss her leading role in Director/Writer Wes Hurley's ambitious autobiographical film Potato Dreams of America. Learn more about this true story of a young gay boy growing up in the Soviet Union with a fondness for eighties bootlegged movies. Sera did an outstanding job portraying his mother in the first portion of the film and shares the making of the film, thoughts on her character and how she prepared to portray a real person.    Welcome Greeting by Anna Easteden Email/Podcast Promos by Carrie Mitchum Created/Produced/Edited/Hosted by actor & writer Steven Brittingham   Visit the new website: hollywoodbeyond.net Email Steven hollywoodandbeyondshow@gmail.com   Please leave a Rating or a Review. Your support is appreciated!   Your home for "Meaningful Interviews". See you on the next episode soon!

    Russophiles Unite! Movie Podcast
    Trailer: Teddy Goes to the USSR podcast

    Russophiles Unite! Movie Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 2:31


    We highly recommend you check out this history podcast series centering on Teddy Roe, an American who visited the Soviet Union in 1968. Visit the Teddy Goes to the USSR website, or find the show wherever you get your podcasts.

    The History of Computing
    St Jude, Felsenstein, and Community Memory

    The History of Computing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 11:38


    Lee Felsenstein went to the University of California, Berkeley in the 1960s. He worked at the tape manufacturer Ampex, where Oracle was born out of before going back to Berkeley to finish his degree. He was one of the original members of the Homebrew Computer Club, and as with so many inspired by the Altair S-100 bus, designed the Sol-20, arguably the first microcomputer that came with a built-in keyboard that could be hooked up to a television in 1976. The Apple II was introduced the following year. Adam Osborne was another of the Homebrew Computer Club regulars who wrote An Introduction to Microcomputers and sold his publishing company to McGraw-Hill in 1979. Flush with cash, he enlisted Felsenstein to help create another computer, which became the Osborne 1. The first commercial portable computer, although given that it weighed almost 25 pounds, is more appropriate to call a luggable computer. Before Felsensten built computers, though, he worked with a few others on a community computing project they called Community Memory.  Judith Milhon was an activist in the 1960s Civil Rights movement who helped organize marches and rallies and went to jail for civil disobedience. She moved to Ohio, where she met Efrem Lipkin, and as with many in what we might think of as the counterculture now, they moved to San Francisco in 1968. St Jude, as she became called learned to program in 1967 and ended up at the Berkeley Computer Company after the work on the Berkeley timesharing projects was commercialized. There, she met Pam Hardt at Project One.  Project One was a technological community built around an alternative high school founded by Ralph Scott. They brought together a number of non-profits to train people in various skills and as one might expect in the San Francisco area counterculture they had a mix of artists, craftspeople, filmmakers, and people with deep roots in technology. So much so that it became a bit of a technological commune. They had a warehouse and did day care, engineering, film processing, documentaries, and many participated in anti-Vietnam war protests. They had all this space and Hardt called around to find the computer. She got an SDS-940 mainframe donated by TransAmerica in 1971. Xerox had gotten out of the computing business and TransAmerica's needs were better suited for other computers at the time. They had this idea to create a bulletin board system for the community and created a project at Project One they called Resource One. Plenty thought computers were evil at the time, given their rapid advancements during the Cold War era, and yet many also thought there was incredible promise to democratize everything.  Peter Deutsch then donated time and an operating system he'd written a few years before. She then published a request for help in the People's Computer Computer magazine and got a lot of people who just made their own things. An early precursor to maybe micro-services, where various people tinkered with data and programs. They were able to do so because of the people who could turn that SDS into a timesharing system.  St Jude's partner Lipkin took on the software part of the project. Chris Macie wrote a program that digitized information on social services offered in the area that was maintained by Mary Janowitz, Sherry Reson, and Mya Shone. That was eventually taken over by the United Way until the 1990s.  Felsenstein helped with the hardware. They used teletype terminals to connect a video terminal and keyboard built into a wooden cabinet so real humans could access the system. The project then evolved into what was referred to as Community Memory. Community Memory Community Memory became the first public computerized bulletin board system established in 1973 in Berkeley, California. The first Community Memory terminal was located at Leopard's Record in Berkeley. This was the first opportunity for people who were not studying the scientific subject to be able to use computers. It became very popular but soon was shut down by the founders because they face hurdles to replicate the equipment and languages being used. They were unable to expand the project.  This allowed them to expand the timesharing system into the community and became a free online community-based resource used to share knowledge, organize, and grow. The initial stage of Community Memory from 1973 to 1975, was an experiment to see how people would react to using computers to share information.  Operating from 1973 to 1992, it went from minicomputers to microcomputers as those became more prevelant. Before Resource One and Community Memory, computers weren't necessarily used for people. They were used for business, scientific research, and military purposes. After Community Memory,  Felsenstein and others in the area and around the world helped make computers personal. Commun tty Memory was one aspect of that process but there were others that unfolded in the UK, France, Germany and even the Soviet Union - although those were typically impacted by embargoes and a lack of the central government's buy-in for computing in general.  After the initial work was done, many of the core instigators went in their own directions. For example, Felsenstein went on to create the SOL and pursue his other projects in personal computing. Many had families or moved out of the area after the Vietnam War ended in 1975. The economy still wasn't great, but the technical skills made them more employable.  Some of the developers and a new era of contributors regrouped and created a new non-profit in 1977. They started from scratch and developed their own software, database, and communication packages. It was very noisy so they encased it in a card box. It had a transparent plastic top so they could see what was being printed out. This program ran from 1984 to 1989.  After more research, a new terminal was released in 1989 in Berkeley. By then it had evolved into a pre-web social network.  The modified keyboard had brief instructions mounted on it, which showed the steps to send a message, how to attach keywords to messages, and how to search those keywords to find messages from others.  Ultimately, the design underwent three generations, ending in a network of text-based browsers running on basic IBM PCs accessing a Unix server. It was never connected to the Internet, and closed in 1992. By then, it was large, unpowered, and uneconomical to run in an era where servers and graphical interfaces were available. A booming economy also ironically meant a shortage of funding. The job market exploded for programmers in the decade that led up to the dot com bubble and with inconsistent marketing and outreach, Community Memory shut down in 1992. Many of the people involved with Resource One and Community memory went on to have careers in computing. St Jude helped found the cypherpunks and created Mondo 2000 magazine, a magazine dedicated to that space where computers meet culture. She also worked with Efrem Lipkin on CoDesign, and he was a CTO for many of the dot coms in the late 1990s. Chris Neustrup became a programmer for Agilent. The whole operation had been funded by various grants and donations and while there haven't been any studies on the economic impact due to how hard it is to attribute inspiration rather than direct influence, the payoff was nonetheless considerable.

    Interplace
    Freedom Fries and the Big Mac Attack

    Interplace

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 24:22


    Hello Interactors,This episode kicks off the summer season on the environment and our interactions with it and through it. I’m starting with food. Food is a big topic that impacts us all, albeit in uneven ways. It got me wondering about the global food system and how it’s controlled. Who are the winners and who are the losers? And why is there competition for nourishment in first place?As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…АТАКА БОЛЬШОГО МАКА (ATAKA BOL'SHOGO MAKA)Верните Биг Мак! Срочно верните Биг Мак. Мы требуем этого прямо сейчас. Прямо сейчас. Прямо здесь. Биг Мак!(Vernite Big Mak! Srochno vernite Big Mak. Moy trebuyem etogo pryamo seychas. Pryamo seychas. Pryamo zdes'. Big Mak!)“Bring back the Big Mac! Bring back the Big Mac. We demand it right now. Right now. Right here. Big Mac!” Holding a handwritten sign that read “Bring back the Big Mac” a protestor in Moscow took advantage of a press conference a couple weeks ago at the reopening of McDonalds under a new name. Albeit a bit tongue in cheek, he was demanding the return of one popular product not on the menu. The Big Mac name and special sauce are both copyright protected. But the new owner of the new McDonald’s, Alexander Govor – who was a Siberian McDonald’s franchise owner before buying the entire Russian chain – promised he’d find a suitable replacement for the Big Mac. As for a new name, I vote for Большая говядина (Bol'shaya Govyadina), Big Beef. Or given the new owners last name how about just Bol’shaya Gov – Big Gov.Govor claims he paid below market price for the world’s most recognized fast-food chain and he’s already slashed prices. McDonald’s priced the double cheeseburger at 160 rubles ($2.95) but it’s now 129 rubles ($2.38). The fish burger was 190 rubles ($3.50) and is now 169 rubles ($3.11). The composition of the burgers stays the same as does the equipment, but they did add pancakes, omelets, and scrambled eggs to the morning menu. However, the golden arches are gone, and the name has changed to Vkusno & tochka's (Delicious and that’s it or Delicious, full stop).After 32 years, that’s it for McDonald’s in Russia but it’s promised to remain delicious. Back in 1990 the American based company had to import all the ingredients to fulfill the promise of a true McDonald’s. It made for an expensive introduction of the American icon. French fries were a problem. The Russian potatoes were too small, so McDonalds had to import seeds to grow larger russet potatoes locally. Apples for the McDonald’s ‘apple pie’ had to come from Bulgaria. After three decades McDonald’s managed to source just about everything locally and ultimately employed 62,000 Russians throughout their operations. But those McDonald’s branded red, yellow, and blue uniforms have been replaced with just red ones. Judging from the lines and enthusiasm at the grand opening, I suspect the new MickeyD’s will continue to be popular…and delicious, full stop.McDonald’s was popular in Russia from the day it opened in 1990. The Berlin wall had come down, perestroika was nearing its peak, glasnost embraced a blend of socialism and traditional liberal economics that allowed more U.S. companies to enter the former Soviet Union. It was the age of exceedingly fast globalization. A year after McDonald’s showed up Microsoft offered a Russian version of DOS. Just as I was starting at Microsoft in 1992, localized versions of software were flying on floppy disks around the world. By 1996 localized versions of Windows and Office 95 were on a computer on every desk a new McDonald’s was being built every three days. 1996 was the first year McDonald’s made more revenue from outside the United States than within.And McDonald’s wasn’t just pushing their McMunchies on unsuspecting countries. Many were clamoring for their own MickyD’s. James Cantalupo, president of McDonald's International at time, said, “'I feel these countries want McDonald's as a symbol of something -- an economic maturity and that they are open to foreign investments. I don't think there is a country out there we haven't gotten inquiries from. I have a parade of ambassadors and trade representatives in here regularly to tell us about their country and why McDonald's would be good for the country.'”There were some who believed the proliferation of McDonald’s symbolized the spread of freedom and democracy. Thomas Friedman of the New York Times offered in 1996 a “Golden Arches Theory of Conflict Prevention -- which stipulates that when a country reaches a certain level of economic development, when it has a middle class big enough to support a McDonald's, it becomes a McDonald's country, and people in McDonald's countries don't like to fight wars; they like to wait in line for burgers.” There goes that theory. Though, Russians are still waiting in line for a burger…just not from McDonald’s.I’m reminded of the “freedom fries” scandal from 2003. That’s when the Republican senator from Ohio, Bob Ney, changed the name of ‘French Fries’ to ‘Freedom Fries’ in three Congressional cafeterias. It was in response to French opposition to the American invasion of Iraq. The name was changed back in 2006 after Ney was forced to retire. He was implicated in a scandal involving a group of lobbyists that swindled $85,000,000 from Native American tribes. Ney was bribed by one of the guilty lobbyists. On the satirical Saturday Night Live news show Weekend Update, Tina Fey quipped, “‘In a related story, in France, American cheese is now referred to as 'idiot cheese.'"SEEDS OF GREEDOf course, McDonald’s wasn’t the only multinational food company spreading fast food around the world. I, for one, was grateful to come across a Burger King on the Champs-Élysées in Paris back in 1984. It was my first trip to Europe and my 18-year-old palette wasn’t quite tuned to fine French cuisine. Truth be told, my 56-year-old palette isn’t either. I find French food to be highly overrated. I remember my 18-year-old self thinking that “Le Whopper” and Pepsi with ice, amidst pumping French disco, was both surreal and comforting.Pizza Hut, Domino’s, and Taco Bell are found in all corners of the world today. Except Mexico. Despite many gallant attempts, Taco Bell can’t seem to crack the Mexican market. I suspect Mexicans find their interpretation of the taco insulting…and gross. But it’s not just fast food. Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, General Mills, Kellog’s, Kraft, and Mars are all American companies that make a plethora of processed and packaged products marketed as food. There are other multinational companies outside of the U.S. doing the same. Mexico’s Grupo Bimbo is where Thomas English muffins, Orowheat, and Sara Lee treats come from. They also own Colonial bread: a white bread that originated in colonized America by a Scandinavian immigrant and is now run out of colonized Mexico by the grandson of a Spanish immigrant who could pass as just another white billionaire CEO.And who hasn’t heard of Switzerland’s Nestlé products? They are so big there’s a wiki page just to list their products. Chips Ahoy cookie anyone? What about the Anglo-Dutch company Unilever?  They bring us Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, Dove Bars, and Hellman’s mayonnaise. Have you ever had Nutella? That comes from the Italian company Ferrero. That single company consumes one quarter of the world’s supply of hazelnuts. Increasingly those nuts are coming from my neighboring state, Oregon. I love Oregon hazelnuts, so save some for me Ferrero.This select group of companies produce, market, and sell most of the food around the world that is baked, canned, chilled, frozen, dried, and processed. Adding to the fat and sugar found in fast-food chains, they make dairy products, ice cream, meal replacements, bars, snacks, noodles, pasta, sauces, oils, fats, TV dinners, dressings, condiments, spreads, and an array of beverages. This gives them massive market leverage over the source ingredients produced by farmers around the world.The very seeds needed to grow these crops are also controlled by a select group of multinational companies. The food policy advocacy group Food and Power reported: “In 2020, the top four corporations, Bayer (formerly Monsanto), Corteva (formerly DuPont), Syngenta (part of ChemChina), and Limagrain together controlled 50% of the global seed market, with Bayer and Corteva alone claiming roughly 40%. And when it comes to genetic traits, this control is even more pronounced: Bayer controls 98% of trait markers for herbicide-resistant soybeans, and 79% of trait markers for herbicide-resistant corn.”  Carlos J. Maya-Ambía, a professor of Political Economy and Agriculture at the University of Guadalajara in Mexico, uses an hourglass as a metaphor to explain the control these companies have over the food making process. Imagine the top of the hourglass are the world’s farmers producing edible plants and animals and the bottom are the world’s human inhabitants – consumers. Both are wide and round. The middle of the hourglass is relatively narrow. These are the few multinational companies mentioned above who control most of the flow from the top of the hourglass (the farms) to the bottom (our tables).Because these seeds are engineered for largescale monoculture farm productions that these corporations require. They tend to rely on agrochemicals to achieve desired yields. It’s a short-term positive yield strategy optimized for quarterly earnings reports, but with severe long-term negative consequences. And guess who controls an estimated 75 percent of the global pesticide market? Those same top tier seed companies.These chemicals are largely petrochemicals, so the fossil fuel industry also profits from global food production and consumption. These processes, genetically modified seeds, and chemicals no doubt have helped bring countless people out of poverty and starvation. Especially where increasingly harsh conditions make it hard to grow crops. But at what cost? These industrial scale schemes not only leach nutrients from the soil and pollute water supplies, but exposure to these chemicals can also cause neurological disorders, birth defects, infertility, stillbirths, miscarriages, and multiple forms of cancer.Worse yet are the inequities. Many of these chemicals and genetically modified foods are banned in developed countries. Before Monsanto was purchased by Bayer, massive protests across Europe led to the company pulling out of parts of the EU. Those countries with the most organized farmer and consumer protests had the biggest effect. It’s testimony to the power of democracy and organized protest. But Monsanto, and companies like them, just move on to more willing governments or vulnerable people and places. They seek lands far away from the peering eyes of consumers with a conscience. Many of whom who sit there munching snacks, and tapping on their phones to make that next online fast-food delivery. Guilty as charged. Sad as it may be, when the exploitive interdependent global food system is out of sight, it’s also out of mind.As Maya-Ambia puts it, “the scenario becomes clearer if we consider agriculture as a global system and as a long global value chain, composed of several links where agents interact and connect with the whole economy, nationally and globally. Accordingly, the global economy is formed by a complex web of value chains, whose links are located in different places around the world. Therefore, it is correct to speak of…the global value chain of agriculture that does not begin at the production process, but rather with the appropriation of nature and the transformation of natural objects into economic inputs, including the current land-grabbing in several places by transnational corporations. Driven by profit, these corporations have appropriated land, resulting in disastrous ecological effects.”He continues, “These practices of appropriation and consumption have created a ‘new international division of labor’: the Global South has become the place of appropriation of nature and in some ways a type of dumping ground.”FAIR TRADE LAY BAREMany of the same places these powerful corporations exploit are also the first to be hit with food insecurity. The United Nations Food and Agricultural Association (FAO) reported last year that “the number of undernourished people in the world continued to rise in 2020. Between 720 and 811 million people in the world faced hunger in 2020.” This includes 480 million people in Asia, 46 million in Africa, and 14 million in Latin America. Food insecurity has been climbing steadily over the last six years. One in three of the world’s 2.37 billion people do not have adequate access to food. This isn’t a supply issue. The world has enough food to feed everyone. This is about fair access.Many of the same people responsible for producing food exported to more developed countries are the one’s who reap the smallest rewards from the value chain. The smallest share of value goes to those farmers in developing countries. And the smaller the farm, the worse the effect. This fact is revealed by observing stagnating long-run trends of producer prices compared to rising consumer prices. These prices are controlled through governance schemes that squeeze the middle of the hourglass. Firms can exert extreme market power, leverage advanced financial and technological mechanisms, influence local, regional, and state leadership, and assert a particular cultural influence. My Parisian “Le Whopper” influenced the culture of the Champs-Élysées. American fast-food culture in Russia lives on in the new ‘Delicious’ McDonald’s. Full stop.Inequities are also found in the devastating effects of industrialized agriculture at the hands of these powerful firms. Large swaths of sensitive and diverse habitat in developing countries are violently destroyed – like in the Amazon. They’re making space for more croplands and pastures to grow more food and animals, to make more food products, that are sold to increasingly affluent populations who are rising out of poverty in search of the famed Western consumer lifestyle. This only further destroys the land and water making living conditions in these already poor areas even more stressed. As criminal as it is to live poor in a developed country like the United States, it’s not nearly as worse as living poor in unfairly exploited countries. Especially when it comes to acute food insecurity.On the other hand, living in developed countries – or desiring to adopt a similar lifestyle – comes with a higher risk of death by obesity…in large part due to fast and junk food. In 2021 the World Health Organization reported that worldwide obesity has tripled since 1975. More people in the world are likely to die of obesity than malnutrition. And because the globalization of high calorie junk and fast-food production exists to drive prices as low as possible, it makes it more accessible to poor people in both developing and developed countries. This puts poorer people at higher risk of both malnutrition and obesity.Naturally occurring factors, like the pandemic and a changing climate also unfairly impact those most vulnerable. As does war. How naïve to believe countries with a McDonald’s would never take arms against one another; that French fries, freedom fries, would somehow united the world. Russia and Ukraine have proven otherwise. Conflicts in the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America have resulted in millions of people fleeing for safety and starving in the process. Many of whom were farmers. Much of the food needed to feed these refugees historically came from Ukraine and Russia but that is all at risk now.But American farmers might be able to help. In a rare bipartisan partnership on Capital Hill, just this week President Biden signed into law the Ocean Shipping Reform Act of 2022 (OSRA). U.S. agricultural shippers complained to the federal government that the world’s top ocean carriers unfairly denied them container space. Shippers on the West coast found it more profitable to return empty boxes to Asia so they could be re-loaded for the next round of more profitable exports back to the U.S. Of course, this is all fed by increasing consumer demand by overconsuming Americans. But these interruptions made it difficult for farmers and shippers to predict when their time sensitive goods should be delivered to ports before they spoiled.But with the passing of this law, ocean shippers are required to report to the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) how many exports they’re loading and from where. The bill also includes rules that determines what makes a denial to export agricultural goods unreasonable. Maersk, Mediterranean Shipping Co., and Transfar Shipping have already offered container space for U.S. agricultural shippers and others are soon to follow. Hopefully, food grown in America can stand a better chance of making it to those in most need in Asia, Africa, Latin America and beyond.The world seems to be swimming in so many crises that the word has somehow lost urgency. But between war, climate change, and economic inequalities the global food system needs transformation. Here are six ways the FAO believes the global food system could be made more healthy, sustainable, and inclusive:Integrating humanitarian, development and peacebuilding policies in conflict-affected areas.Scaling up climate resilience across food systems.Strengthening resilience of the most vulnerable to economic adversity.Intervening along the food supply chains to lower the cost of nutritious foods.Tackling poverty and structural inequalities, ensuring interventions are pro-poor and inclusive.Strengthening food environments and changing consumer behaviour to promote dietary patterns with positive impacts on human health and the environment.These steps read a lot like the steps McDonald’s took 32 years ago after entering the Russian market. The introduction of fast-food chains was believed to be a peacebuilding exercise in a conflict-affected area. Freedom fries brought hope and russet potatoes to Russia. McDonald’s scaled up a resilient food system by investing in local farming. They optimized food supply chains within the region. Impoverished Russian’s adjusting to a post communist reality were given jobs growing McDonald’s produce, delivering goods, and working in restaurants. They strengthened the local food environment and changed consumer behavior. And while McDonald’s may not be the healthiest food, not the healthiest habit, it may have been better than what was offered before and it certainly made people happy.“Delicious and That’s It” just might make it even better. It could be their menu alterations make it a healthier version of McDonald’s. They’ve already made it cheaper. But judging from the Hugo Boss shirt one customer was wearing at the grand opening in Moscow, I have a hunch the new MickeyD’s just might be an elite treat. Still, they may be on to something. Perhaps this is a model that could be used in other places. Maybe more globetrotting fast-food restaurants and junk food producers should be selling out to the locals. Pizza Hut in Japan already offers squid as a pizza topping, but maybe a Japanese owned franchise would result in even more localized interpretations of a food that originated in Italy. After all, flatbreads exist in a variety of forms all over the world. Imagine مناقيش بيتزا (Manakish pizza), pisa bing 披薩餅 (Bing pizza), or a Catalonia coca? They could all be made with local ingredients, sourced from smaller sustainable farms, sold in locally owned franchises, employing local residents with wages high enough to live on. Who knows where the next Big Mac could be invented? Maybe Russia. Bol’shaya Gov anyone? This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

    History Daily
    Saturday Matinee: The Industry

    History Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 65:34


    During the 1970s the cold war began to thaw a bit with the policy of detente. It's also when the first US-USSR co-production happened. The idea was to make a non-political children's musical that could appeal to audiences in both countries. The US side would provide the talent with stars like Elizabeth Taylor, Jane Fonda, and Ava Gardner. While the USSR would provide the set, locations, and crew. However the Americans sorely underestimated the situation in the Soviet Union and the cold winter, outdated equipment, and translations issues would cause the production to lag way behind schedule and even temporarily shut down.  Interviews include Blue Bird producer Paul Maslansky, and Blue Bird star Todd Lookinland. About The Industry: The Industry is a documentary podcast that examines forgotten movie history. Each episode host Dan Delgado looks at a movie, an event, or a movement in cinema history and attempts to answer the question, 'how did this happen?'  The Industry website is IndustryPodcast.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Joshua Citarella
    Soros Centers for Contemporary Art w/ Aaron Moulton

    Joshua Citarella

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 49:42


    After the collapse of the Soviet Union, an estimated 24 million dollars helped to fund 20 newly established art centers throughout eastern Europe. The SCCA mission was to archive “unofficial art” (works that were previously unrecognized by the authoritarian state) and to cultivate a new form of avant garde contemporary art with curious political overtones. Follow Aaron: https://www.instagram.com/aaronkmoulton/ Blue Pill Press Release: https://www.instagram.com/p/CejWkqTJmOB/ Red Pill Press Release: https://www.instagram.com/p/Cejmhdkv-_n/ Voices of Love by Arsen Savadov & Georgy Senchenko: https://vimeo.com/349395357 https://vimeo.com/349394633 https://vimeo.com/349396581

    KUCI: Film School
    Chernobyl: The Lost Tapes / Film School radio interview with Director James Jones

    KUCI: Film School

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


    Directed by Emmy®-winning filmmaker James Jones (Mosul), CHERNOBYL: THE LOST TAPES, is the powerful and at times graphic film that tells the story of the disaster and its far-reaching ripple effects entirely through extraordinary and immersive footage, shot on site in the hours, days, weeks and months following the accident. As soldiers, pilots and miners were called on to help contain the radiation at huge physical risk, the Soviet apparat continued to deny and distort the enormity of the situation. Deeply personal witness testimony contextualizes the tragedy, providing an overview of life in Chernobyl before the meltdown and harrowing details of its aftermath. Government propaganda films illustrate the Soviet Union's pride in its nuclear program and news reports show President Gorbachev's delayed and mendacious announcements to his trusting countrymen. Thirty-six years after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor exploded in Soviet Ukraine, newly uncovered archival footage and recorded interviews with those who were present paint an emotional and gripping portrait of the extent and gravity of the disaster and the lengths to which the Soviet government went to cover up the incident, including the soldiers sent in to “liquidate” the damage. CHERNOBYL: THE LOST TAPES is the full, unvarnished true story of what happened in one of the least understood tragedies of the twentieth century. Director James Jones (Mosul) joins us for a conversation on why this man-made disaster holds lessons for people today regarding disinformation and its deadly consequences, the very real dangers that shadow the hundreds of nuclear power currently operating around the world and the arrogance of unchecked power and unaccountable political leadership.   For news and screenings go to: hbo.com/chernobyl-the-lost-tapes

    TNT Radio
    Anna Khait on Joseph Arthur & his Technicolor Dreamcast - 24 June 2022

    TNT Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 55:51


    GUEST OVERVIEW: Originally born in the Soviet Union, Anna Khait became a world traveling professional poker player and was featured as a contestant on the CBS television show Survivor in 2016. She was the only person from reality television to endorse candidate Donald Trump in 2016 and received media backlash. She worked undercover for Project Veritas in 2018 and was successful in getting two communists fired from the department of state through her investigations. She is now a full time Evangelist and public speaker.

    Big Ideas - ABC RN
    The Marshall Plan and the Cold War

    Big Ideas - ABC RN

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 54:05


    Wars cost a punishing amount of money and,  after they're over,  there's the cost of reconstruction. Western Europe received a life-saving injection of money under the Marshall Plan following the second world war. Other countries since , facing the devastation of war , have asked for a similar scheme. The Marshall Plan was successful but also cemented the Cold War rivalry between America and the Soviet Union according to economist Ben Steil.

    Stuff To Blow Your Mind
    Red Leviathan, with Ryan Tucker Jones

    Stuff To Blow Your Mind

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 40:20


    In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert chats with Ryan Tucker Jones, author of the new book “Red Leviathan: The Secret History of Soviet Whaling.” Jones discusses the horrific impact of 20th century whaling, the Soviet Union's place in whaling history and the efforts of scientists and activists to stop the practice – including scientists within the Soviet Union. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Composers Datebook
    Reinhold Gliere

    Composers Datebook

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 2:00


    Synopsis Today we remember the Russian composer Reinhold Glière, who died in Moscow on today's date in 1956. These days Glière is probably best known for the popular “Russian Sailor's Dance” from his ballet “The Red Poppy.” Glière was born in Kiev in 1875, and studied at the Moscow Conservatory, where he later became professor of composition. That was after the Russian Revolution, and Glière could count among his students Sergei Prokofiev and Nikolai Miaskovsky. With the success of works like “The Red Poppy,” Glière is often cited as the founder of Soviet ballet. Glière also wrote several symphonies, all intensely Russian in color and character. The most famous of these is his Third, subtitled “Ilya Murometz” after a legendary Russian folk hero. Glière was also intrigued by the folk music of the far eastern republics of the then USSR, incorporating folk themes from the Soviet Union's Trans-Caucus and Central Asian peoples into some of his orchestral scores. He was a very prolific composer, but apart from a handful of very popular works, most of Glière's operas, ballets and orchestral works remain largely unfamiliar to most music lovers in the West. Music Played in Today's Program Reinhold Glière (1875 – 1956) –Russian Sailors' Dance, from The Red Poppy (Philadelphia Orchestra; Eugene Ormandy, cond.) BMG 63313 Reinhold Glière (1875 – 1956) –Symphony No. 3 (Ilya Murometz) (London Symphony; Leon Botstein, cond.) Telarc 80609

    One Decision
    The Former US Defense Secretary on Putin's War and How China Takes Taiwan

    One Decision

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 55:27


    Former Defense Secretary and Director of the CIA, Dr. Robert Gates, sits down exclusively with One Decision and shares his prediction on how Beijing is likely to apply the lessons Russia learned in Ukraine. Gates began his years as an expert on the Soviet Union, and led the Agency after the fall of the USSR. With host Sir Richard Dearlove, former Chief of MI6 and host Julia Macfarlane, Gates weighs in on the current conflict, with a warning for the west. While Macfarlane pushes both Gates and Dearlove on whether Iraq can be considered a success, and the consequences of our failure to secure the peace in Afghanistan. 

    Here & Now
    Art as memory and why it must be saved; Alcohol-related deaths soar

    Here & Now

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 41:47


    Galina and Yelena Lembersky fled the Soviet Union in the 1980s with hundreds of Galina's father's paintings. The paintings are now in Massachusetts, and so is the acting director of the Odesa Fine Arts Museum, Olesksandra Kovalchuk, who recently fled the war in Ukraine. Kovalchuk has been working from the U.S. to save the art left behind. The women reflect on the meaning of art as memory and the importance of saving it. And, alcohol use increased during the pandemic. One study suggests more Americans under 65 died from alcohol-related causes than COVID in 2020. Natalie Krebs of Side Effects Public Media and Iowa Public Radio reports.

    Democracy in Question?
    Current State of Affairs in Putin's Russia

    Democracy in Question?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:09


    Guests featured in this episode:Masha Gessen,  a distinguished journalist & staff writer for the New Yorker.  Born in Moscow in the Soviet Union, Masha moved to the United States in 1981, only to return to Russia as a journalist a decade later. A strong critic of Putin's regime from the very outset, Masha decided to leave Russia and return to the US due to the politically motivated crackdown on gay parents by Russian authorities.They have authored 11 books, most recently, Surviving Autocracy (2020), an insightful account of the Trump Presidency that also draws on their experience of living in Russia. Two of their other books discussed within the podcast are; The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia, and The Man without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin (2012).  GLOSSARYWho was Boris Yeltsin? (00:19:15 or p.5 in the transcript)Boris Yeltsin, Russian politician who became president of Russia in 1991, he was the first popularly elected leader in the country's history, guiding Russia through a stormy decade of political and economic retrenching. During his first presidency Yeltsin publicly supported the right of Soviet republics to greater autonomy within the Soviet Union, took steps to give the Russian republic more autonomy, and declared himself in favour of a market-oriented economy and a multiparty political system.At the same time, Russia's parliament, the Congress of People's Deputies, had grown increasingly hostile toward his free-market reforms. Yeltsin and the Congress were also deeply divided over the question of the balance of powers in Russia's proposed new constitution, which was needed to replace the obsolete 1978 Soviet-era Russian Constitution. On September 21, 1993, Yeltsin unconstitutionally dissolved  the Congress and called for new parliamentary elections. In response, hard-line legislators attempted a coup in early October but were suppressed by army troops loyal to Yeltsin. Parliamentary elections and a referendum on a draft constitution were held in December. Yeltsin's draft constitution, which increased the powers of the presidency, was narrowly approved, but the anti-reform character of Russia's newly elected parliament, the Federal Assembly, compelled Yeltsin to govern primarily by executive decree in the coming years.In another spectacular comeback, however, he won reelection over a communist challenger in the second round of elections held in July 1996. He spent the months after his electoral victory recovering from a heart attack he had suffered that June during the rigours of the campaign. The state of Yeltsin's health was a recurring issue.In the late 1990s political maneuvering dominated much of the country's government as Yeltsin dismissed four premiers and in 1998 fired his entire cabinet, though many were later reappointed. The following year the State Duma initiated an impeachment drive against Yeltsin, charging that he had encouraged the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, among other  allegations The Duma, however, was unable to secure the necessary votes to proceed. Ever unpredictable, Yeltsin announced his resignation on December 31, 1999, in favour of what he characterized as a new, energetic leadership. He named Prime Minister  Vladimir Putin acting president, and in turn Putin granted Yeltsin immunity from future prosecution. Source: Who was Vladimir Zhirinovsky? (00:29:53 or p.7 in the transcript) Vladimir Zhirinovsky, Russian politician and leader of the far-right Liberal Democratic Party of Russia (LDPR) from 1991 to 2022. Known for his fiery Russian nationalism and broad anti-Semitic asides, he later acknowledged his Jewish roots.Much of Zhirinovsky's personal history is vague, unknown, or disputed. He left his hometown at age 18 to attend Moscow State University, where he studied Turkish and other languages. After graduating about 1969, he went to work as a translator in Turkey, but he was expelled under murky circumstances eight months later. After returning to Moscow in 1972, he worked in various state committee and union posts. He completed an evening law program at Moscow State University, earning his degree in 1977 and then working in a state-run law firm (from which he was later asked to resign). In 1983 Zhirinovsky landed a position as head of the law department at the Mir publishing company, a post that served as a springboard for his political career.Zhirinovsky cofounded the LDPR in 1989. The following year the party was launched in Moscow, and Zhirinovsky was asked to become its chairman, but by October his views had provoked his expulsion. In the spring of 1991 Zhirinovsky created his own party, giving it his previous and party's name, and in June he first ran for the Russian presidency; he ran several times for presidency during his long political carrier. A figure as colorful as Zhirinovsky was bound to be the object of rumour and speculation. It was widely reported that his career could have been possible only under the auspices of the KGB. Source: Democracy in Question? is brought to you by:• Central European University: CEU• The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD• The Podcast Company: Novel Follow us on social media!• Central European University: @CEU• Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentreSubscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to, you can support us by leaving a review and sharing our podcast in your networks!  

    American Conservative University
    The Victor Davis Hanson Show- The Sovietization of American Life

    American Conservative University

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 46:22


    The Victor Davis Hanson Show- The Sovietization of American Life Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Sami Winc start this episode with some thoughts on all the ways that American life is beginning to resemble aspects of the Soviet Union or Mao's China. The Victor Davis Hanson Show Visit Victor Davis Hanson website at-   https://victorhanson.com/ The Sovietization of American Life  Jun 11 2022   Google Podcasts- https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9yc3MuYXJ0MTkuY29tL3RoZS12aWN0b3ItZGF2aXMtaGFuc29uLXNob3c/episode/Z2lkOi8vYXJ0MTktZXBpc29kZS1sb2NhdG9yL1YwLzNNTTNCeGlsd2gxYXRQd2dvbTR6ZnlibnlOWUluOUp6RFhCODJEb2FYUEU?hl=en&ved=2ahUKEwji8tyS_Kz4AhVVlI4IHfhCC6oQieUEegQIBxAF&ep=6

    Straight Chilling: Horror Movie Review
    #376 – Threads (1984)

    Straight Chilling: Horror Movie Review

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 118:09


    The movie outlines the rising tensions between the Soviet Union, Iran and the United States resulting in nuclear war. The effects of nuclear fallout on the working class city of Sheffield, England are devastating and only get worse as they are documented over the course of the following decade. On this week's episode… Join the crew as we discuss nuclear fallout, nuclear winter and the end of civilization as we know it in, Threads (1984).   Show Notes: Housekeeping (3:15) Back of the Box/Recommendations (11:21) Spoiler Warning/Full Review (17:16) Rotten Tomatoes (72:19) Trivia (77:04) Cooter of the Week (82:12) What We've Been Watching (85:36) Hotline Scream (99:11)   Connect with us: Support us on Patreon Website Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Shop

    Fate of Fact
    June 22nd: Hitler Invades The USSR

    Fate of Fact

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 5:32


    On June 22nd, 1941, Adolf Hitler invades the Soviet Union. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    History of the Second World War
    100: Nomonhan Pt. 2 - Opening Phases

    History of the Second World War

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:37


    The summer of 1939, near the Mongolian village of Nomonhan, would see the largest clash between the Soviet Union and Japan of the interwar years, and it would have important ramifications for relations between the two nations as the world was rapidly descending into war. Sources: Anti-Russian and Anti-Soviet Subversion: The Caucasian-Japanese Nexus, 1904-1945 by Hiroaki Kuromiya and Georges Mamoulia Japanese Geopolitics and the Mongol Lands, 1915-1945 by Li Narangoa Khalkin-Gol: The Forgotten War by Amnon Sella The Lake Khasan Affair of 1938: Overview and Lessons by Alvin D. Coox (1973) Soviet-Japanese Confrontation in Outer Mongolia: The Battle of Nomonhan-Khalkin Gol by Larry W. Moses (1967 Nomonhan: Japan Against Russia, 1939 by Alvin D. Coox Nomonhan, 1939: The Red Army's Victory That Shaped World War II by Stuart D. Goldman Contact sales@advertisecast.com to advertise on History of the Second World War.  History of the Second World War is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
    Ukrainian Nationalism in Historical Context

    New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 66:28


    In the midst of the ongoing war between the Russian Federation and Ukraine, it is vital that the lay-educated public understand the historical origins of the conflict. It is with this in mind, that this episode of ‘Arguing History', takes a look at the subject of ‘Ukrainian Nationalism and the Russian / Soviet state'. To guide us in this intricate and not well know matter, are three superb historians: John-Paul Himka, Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Alberta; David R. Stone, is a Professor in Russian Studies in the United States, Naval War College; Alexander Watson is Professor of History at Goldsmiths, University of London. John-Paul Himka is an American-Canadian historian and retired professor of history of the University of Alberta in Edmonton. Himka received his BA in Byzantine-Slavonic Studies and Ph.D. in History from the University of Michigan in 1971 and 1977 respectively. The title of his Ph.D. dissertation was Polish and Ukrainian Socialism: Austria, 1867–1890. He received numerous awards for both excellence in teaching and in research. His work on Ukrainian history has been subject to widespread debate and discussion in Ukraine. David R. Stone, the William E. Odom Professor of Russian Studies at the Naval War College, joined the Strategy and Policy Department in 2015. He received a B.A. from Wabash College and a Ph.D. in history from Yale. He previously taught at Kansas State University. His book “Hammer and Rifle: The Militarization of the Soviet Union” (2000) won the Shulman Prize of ASEEES and the Best First Book Prize of the Historical Society. He has also published “A Military History of Russia” (2006) and “The Russian Army in the Great War: The Eastern Front, 1914-1917” (2015). He edited “The Soviet Union at War, 1941-1945” (2010). He is the author of several dozen articles on Russian military history and foreign policy. Alexander Watson is Professor of History at Goldsmiths, University of London. His latest book is The Fortress. The Great Siege of Przemysl (London: Allen Lane, 2019). This is the story of the First World War's longest siege, and of the opening of the brutal tragedy which befell East-Central Europe during the twentieth century. It follows a ragtag Habsburg garrison of old soldiers as they desperately defend Central Europe from Russian invasion, and recounts the vicious fighting, starvation and anti-Semitic ethnic cleansing which began in the region already in 1914. The book won a Society for Military History 2021 Distinguished Book Award and was a BBC History Magazine and Financial Times ‘Book of the Year'. The Times newspaper praised it as ‘a masterpiece'. ‘Vividly written and well researched …it deserves to become a classic of military history.' His two prior books were also award winners. Charles Coutinho, PH. D., Associate Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

    New Books Network
    Ukrainian Nationalism in Historical Context

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 66:28


    In the midst of the ongoing war between the Russian Federation and Ukraine, it is vital that the lay-educated public understand the historical origins of the conflict. It is with this in mind, that this episode of ‘Arguing History', takes a look at the subject of ‘Ukrainian Nationalism and the Russian / Soviet state'. To guide us in this intricate and not well know matter, are three superb historians: John-Paul Himka, Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Alberta; David R. Stone, is a Professor in Russian Studies in the United States, Naval War College; Alexander Watson is Professor of History at Goldsmiths, University of London. John-Paul Himka is an American-Canadian historian and retired professor of history of the University of Alberta in Edmonton. Himka received his BA in Byzantine-Slavonic Studies and Ph.D. in History from the University of Michigan in 1971 and 1977 respectively. The title of his Ph.D. dissertation was Polish and Ukrainian Socialism: Austria, 1867–1890. He received numerous awards for both excellence in teaching and in research. His work on Ukrainian history has been subject to widespread debate and discussion in Ukraine. David R. Stone, the William E. Odom Professor of Russian Studies at the Naval War College, joined the Strategy and Policy Department in 2015. He received a B.A. from Wabash College and a Ph.D. in history from Yale. He previously taught at Kansas State University. His book “Hammer and Rifle: The Militarization of the Soviet Union” (2000) won the Shulman Prize of ASEEES and the Best First Book Prize of the Historical Society. He has also published “A Military History of Russia” (2006) and “The Russian Army in the Great War: The Eastern Front, 1914-1917” (2015). He edited “The Soviet Union at War, 1941-1945” (2010). He is the author of several dozen articles on Russian military history and foreign policy. Alexander Watson is Professor of History at Goldsmiths, University of London. His latest book is The Fortress. The Great Siege of Przemysl (London: Allen Lane, 2019). This is the story of the First World War's longest siege, and of the opening of the brutal tragedy which befell East-Central Europe during the twentieth century. It follows a ragtag Habsburg garrison of old soldiers as they desperately defend Central Europe from Russian invasion, and recounts the vicious fighting, starvation and anti-Semitic ethnic cleansing which began in the region already in 1914. The book won a Society for Military History 2021 Distinguished Book Award and was a BBC History Magazine and Financial Times ‘Book of the Year'. The Times newspaper praised it as ‘a masterpiece'. ‘Vividly written and well researched …it deserves to become a classic of military history.' His two prior books were also award winners. Charles Coutinho, PH. D., Associate Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network