Podcasts about Palestine

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  • 4,291PODCASTS
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  • Jun 21, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Palestine

Show all podcasts related to palestine

Latest podcast episodes about Palestine

GALACTIC PROGENY
PH10 83. X2M-91 TEVATRON

GALACTIC PROGENY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 137:40


His head is like the most pure gold. SOS 5:11a tn Heb “his head is gold of pure gold.” In the genitive construct phrase כֶּתֶם פָּז (ketem paz, literally, “gold of pure gold”) the genitive noun פָּז (paz, “pure gold”) functions as an adjectival genitive modifying כֶּתֶם(“gold”), that is, “pure gold.” The repetition of two different words for “gold” suggests that the phrase should be nuanced “the purest gold.” This phrase is a predicate nominate in a metaphorical statement: “his head is (like) the purest gold.” In the OT gold is frequently used in comparisons to emphasize the idea of beauty, value, or rarity (Job 28:12-19; Pss 19:11; 119:127; Prov 8:19; Isa 13:12; Lam 4:2). Palestine had no known sources of gold, but had to import it, making it a rare and precious commodity (Ruth V. Wright and R. L. Chadbourne, The Gems and Minerals of the Bible, 65). But he shall acknowledge the first-born, the son of the hated, by giving him a double portion of all that he hath; for he is the beginning of his strength; the right of the first-born is his. Deuteronomy 21:17 “I will appoint him to be my firstborn son, the most exalted of the earth's kings.” ‭‭Psalms‬ ‭89:27‬ “So the last will be first, and the first last.”” ‭‭Matthew‬ ‭20:16‬ ‭NET‬‬ “He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation,” Colossians‬ ‭1:15‬ ‭NET‬‬ The Son is “firstborn” as he is both the first in time and preeminent of the group. First-born, Lk. 2:7; Heb. 11:28; in NT prior in generation, Col. 1:15; a firstborn head of a spiritual family, Rom. 8:29; Heb. 1:6; firstborn, as possessed of the peculiar privilege of spiritual generation, Heb. 12:23 πρωτότοκος (prōtotokos), ον (on): adj.; ≡ DBLHebr 1147; Str 4416; TDNT 6.871—1. LN 10.43 birthright, pertaining to the inheritance rights of the firstborn (Lk 2:7; Ro 8:29; Col 1:15, 18; Heb 1:6; 11:28; 12:23; Rev 1:5+; Mt 1:25 v.r.; Rev 2:8 v.r. NA26); 2. LN 13.79 existing before (Col 1:15); 3. LN 87.47 superior (Col 1:15), for another interp, see above, note: there may be overlap in the verses and entries בְּכֹר beḵōr first-born, oldest offspring רֹאשׁ - head; hair; person, individual; height, peak, upper end; beginning; topmost, outermost, best; leader, chief; value, total amount, sum: 1 Ch 5:12; בִּכּוּרִים—first-fruits: Eze 44:30 British novelist, aeronautical engineer and pilot Nevil Shute expressed this perfectly in his 1953 autobiography Slide Rule: “The good test pilot is not the daring young bachelor of fiction, with half a dozen girlfriends and a big sports car….The good test pilot is the happily married man with a wife and young children dependent on him, helpless people that he loves and who will be grievously injured if he loses his life. In the hands of such a man your experimental aeroplane will be as safe as it is possible to be.” He That Cometh: The Messiah Concept in the Old Testament and Later Judaism (trans. G. W. Anderson; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005); Joseph A. Fitzmyer, The One Who Is to Com (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2007). Christ Is King: Paul's Royal Christology (Minneapolis: Fortress, forthcom-ing 2016). Decrease time over target: PayPal.me/mzhop or Venmo @clastronaut

Oh Hey Truth
Episode 177 | New Testament Culture

Oh Hey Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 34:22


How did the history and military conquests leading up to the New Testament affect the culture? How did the Jewish nation deal with pagan ruler after pagan ruler? How did the Roman Empire impact Jesus' life? If you have ever asked any of these questions, this episode is for you! We dive into the culture of first century Palestine and how Jewish lives were impacted by the Hellenistic culture around them. Knowing this context helps us better understand the Gospels and Christ's life and message. Join Autumn and Annabel on this historical roller coaster! Join us on Instagram @ohheytruth Donate to our ministry on Patreon!

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2864 - Juneteenth & The Limits Of Celebrating The End Of Slavery w/ Robin D.G. Kelley

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 71:41


Sam and Emma host Robin D.G. Kelley, professor of American History at UCLA, to discuss Juneteenth, observed today. First, however, Sam and Emma dive into Gustavo Petro's victory in Colombia's presidential election over a mayoral tycoon, Melanchon's coalition topping Macron's (and both being beaten out by LePen's), Iowa's Supreme Court overturning the state constitution's protection of abortion rights, and the outright refusal of liberals to hold any ranking Republican accountable for the stochastic terrorism that led to 1/6. Then, they're joined by Professor Kelley as he first tackles the classic story behind the holiday, celebrating the arrival of Union forces in Galveston Texas to deliver the good news of emancipation, supposedly marking the official end of slavery in the US, and contrasts this with the way Black folks in Texas celebrated this moment, referring to it as a “jubilee” and a recognition of their divine sovereignty over their own life and land, as they look forwards to right to vote and the promise of reconstruction. Continuing off this, Kelley, Sam, and Emma discuss the actual history of the emancipation proclamation as leaving out some 450k enslaved people, the actual freedom of these people coming through their own agency and fight as they flocked to help union forces, and the role Texas played as a haven for slave owners escaping this “tyranny.” After touching on the continuation of this fight, with the right's bulwark against history and the liberals' own erasure in favor of uplifting a fallacy of unity, Professor Kelley dives into celebrating Juneteenth in a way that genuinely raises these issues and views this date as the start of a new war for reconstruction, working towards the reparations and decolonization that were seen in the promise of reconstruction, and expanding it to fights for indigenous people from Palestine to the US. Then they expand the discussion to the relationship between racism and capitalism (or just racial capitalism), how the birth of this economic system occurred in a European society that centered on racial and gendered differences for social delineations, and thus had access to a mode of thinking that legitimized the exploitation of “lesser” people. Next, they look to the development of capitalism in the United States, and how it built up white patrimony to deceive the majority of white Americans, and patriotism and nationalism for the rest, indoctrinating them into a world where racial and ethnic hierarchy are standards, before they wrap up the interview by emphasizing that class struggle is not colorblind, anti-racism is not anti-class, and that to truly fight these powers and live up to the promise of Juneteenth's jubilee, we have to simultaneously take on these overlapping systems. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma cover Trump speaking out against the accusations of him calling Mike Pence a wimP**** when really, he just meant Pence lacked courage, Brendan from PA calls in to discuss the upcoming Pennsylvania races and why the GOP is going unopposed in 3 of the 17 house races, and discuss the Democrats' desire to not politicize the 1/6 coup attempt. Adam Schiff discusses Clarence Thomas' conflicts of interest before Sonya Sotomayor comes to Thomas' rescue, because how could you ever force a man to resign when he knows his colleagues' names. Krystal Ball embarrasses Bill Maher by having a reasonable recollection of the last two years, Denis Prager calls out the left for refusing to debate him, and ignores the calls for debate, and a Missouri Senate Candidate, accused of all sorts of violence against women and children, launches his RINO Hunting campaign. Plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: Cozy Earth: One out of three Americans report being sleep deprived, and their sheets could be the problem. Luckily Cozy Earth provides the SOFTEST, MOST LUXURIOUS and BEST-TEMPERATURE REGULATING sheets. Cozy Earth has been featured on Oprah's Most Favorite Things List Four Years in a Row! Made from super soft viscose from bamboo, Cozy Earth Sheets breathe so you sleep at the perfect temperature all year round.  And for a limited time, SAVE 35% on Cozy Earth Bedding. Go to https://cozyearth.com/and enter my special promo code MAJORITY at checkout to SAVE 35% now. LiquidIV: Cooler weather makes it easier to miss signs of dehydration like overheating or perspiration, which means it's even more important to keep your body properly hydrated. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your favorite Liquid I.V. flavors nationwide at Walmart or you can get 25% off when you go to https://www.liquid-iv.com/ and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at https://www.liquid-iv.com/. ZipRecruiter: Some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves - so we know we've got the one that's best for us - like cuts of steak or mattresses. What if you could do the same for hiring - choose your ideal candidate before they even apply? That's where ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' comes in - it gives YOU, as the hiring manager, the power to pick your favorites from top candidates. According to ZipRecruiter Internal Data, jobs where employers use ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' get on average two and a half times more candidates — which helps make for a faster hiring process. See for yourself! Just go to this exclusive web address, https://www.ziprecruiter.com/majority to try ZipRecruiter for free! Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Radio Islam
Palestine Report - 20 June 2022

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 10:51


Palestine Report - 20 June 2022 by Radio Islam

The Palestine Pod
Winning the PR battle with Jenan Matari

The Palestine Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 45:50


This week Lara and Michael sat down with the CEO of Zaytoun Publicity, 2x Award-winning Palestinian storyteller, and TEDx speaker, Jenan Matari. We talk about how she found her voice as a Palestinian woman and developed the courage to speak out for Palestinian liberation. She states that just because Palestinians live in the diaspora doesn't mean they don't have a part in the collective liberation of Palestine. We cover how she was forced to leave the corporate world, and how that helped her realize she could be more in control of her own destiny if she started her own publicity company. Jenan takes us through her family history dating back to the early 1300s when her great-great-grandfather a Sufi sheik opened up a center in Al Quds/Jerusalem that was frequented by Muslims from all over the world. Jenan tells us the inspiration for starting Zaytoun Publicity was to center BIPOC entrepreneurs, actors, directors, and other creatives that don't get the media coverage or publicity they deserve. This serves to keep Black, brown, and indigenous business owners at a disadvantage to their white counterparts. Zaytoun Publicity seeks to bridge that gap. Michael cracks jokes the whole episode like it's an involuntary tic. 

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - MARCIA MCMAHON - Channels Princess Diana, John Lennon, and Jesus

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 57:55


Marcia is a gifted intuitive channel for Diana and Mother Teresa, as well as having served professionally as an art teacher for almost 25 years. Marcia is listed in Who's Who in America (2003, 2004) and also Who's Who in the World (2004) for her professional accomplishments including her lovely watercolors of Princess Diana. Marcia's work with Diana is having an impact on the peace process for Israel and Palestine, amongst those diplomats who knew Diana in life! Her work as a confirmed channel for Princess Diana is corroborated from many famous psychics, and she is developing an international presence on behalf of Princess Diana's intervention in world affairs.Now listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv or www.xzoneuniverse.com *** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

Bourbon 'n BrownTown
Ep. 80 - Remapping, Electoralism, & Challenging the Border Myth ft. Stephanie Skora

Bourbon 'n BrownTown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 100:41


BrownTown chops it up about electoral politics, the remap process post-2020 Census, borders and anti-Zionism, and much more with repeat guest (Ep. 60) Stephanie Skora, movement worker and creator of the popular "Girl, I Guess" Progressive Voter Guide. The gang again takes on the nuances of engaging in electoralism while holding radical politics and the importance international solidarity between colonized peoples. Originally recorded May 16, 2022, before the new Chicago ward map was approved. Spring 2022 marks two years since the most recent Census where the new representational map of our political reality has changed to, so we're told, better reflect our lived populations. It has also been one year after renewed worldwide attention on the Israeli occupation, specifically in the Palestenian neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah. How do we place the remap process within the broader system of American electoralism, for better or worse? More broadly, how do we conceptualize not only the invisible lines of representational democracy based on population in America but also the more militarily enforced borders that manufacture our economic and political reality to justify the state's existence, globally? This is their take. GUESTStephanie Skora is a hard femme Lesbian, trans woman, and anti-Zionist working class Ashkenazi Jew whose activist work centers around Palestinian solidarity organizing, queering Jewish spaces, and fighting for justice and liberation for all trans people. She is the COO of Brave Space Alliance, the South Side LGBTQ Center, the Board President of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, a longtime member of Jewish Voice for Peace, and the author and editor of the "Girl, I Guess" Progressive Voter Guide. Check out Stephanie's site and follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Mentioned in episode and more information:SoapBox's Census 2020 projectNicole Lee and the 11th Ward, Chicago (Block Club Chi)The Ferguson-Palestine connection (1, 2, 3)Hoda Katebi on holding your institutions accountable Opinions on this episode only reflect David, Caullen, and Stephanie as individuals, not their organizations or places of work.CREDITS: Intro music from I Was a Teenage Anarchist by Against Me! and outro music Payback by Immortal Technique ft. Diabolic and Ras Kass. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. --Bourbon 'n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast
Saudi Arabia banking oil windfall to keep focus on fiscal discipline, diversification, says Stephen Kalin

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 24:13


Stephen Kalin, Wall Street Journal Middle East Correspondent based in Riyadh and Dubai, breaks down the issues around US President Joe Biden's upcoming visit to Saudi Arabia and the region, including Iran, Yemen, Israel normalization, and global energy security….and how Saudi Arabia is managing the windfall from higher oil prices.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books in History
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in Christian Studies
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books in British Studies
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in Israel Studies
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Israel Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Sarah Irving et al., "'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:05


'The House of the Priest': A Palestinian Life (1885-1954) (Brill, 2022) presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury's memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement. In this episode we discussed the life and memoirs of Niqula Khoury with Sarah Irving and Charbel Nassif, two of three editors of the book (Karene Sanchez is the third) which is also available as open access at here. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

Reportage International
Cisjordanie occupée: guerre des drapeaux entre Israéliens et Palestiniens

Reportage International

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 2:30


Bleu et blanc d'un côté, rouge, noir, blanc et vert de l'autre. La guerre des drapeaux est déclarée entre Israéliens et Palestiniens. L'État hébreu vient de voter une loi pour bannir l'emblème palestinien de ses institutions, comme ses universités. Le texte doit encore être approuvé par le Parlement, avant d'être définitivement adopté. Et en parallèle, c'est une véritable bataille qui se déroule sur le terrain, et notamment dans les territoires palestiniens occupés.  De notre correspondant à Jérusalem, Dans le village arabe de Howarah, il faut désormais ouvrir l'œil pour apercevoir un drapeau palestinien. L'un est accroché au minaret de la mosquée. Deux ou trois autres flottent discrètement au-dessus de certaines maisons. Anes, lui, a planté le sien sur le toit de son taxi. « Ici, on est dans un village palestinien. Ce n'est pas comme si on avait brandi notre drapeau au centre de Tel-Aviv ou à Jérusalem, où c'est contesté. Nous sommes en Cisjordanie, c'est la Palestine. Légalement, nous avons le droit d'accrocher des drapeaux palestiniens, lance-t-il. C'est dans les Accords d'Oslo. Même Israël reconnaît le drapeau palestinien. Il est reconnu partout le monde. Mais les colons ne l'acceptent pas. Alors ils viennent décrocher nos drapeaux. Qui accepterait que son drapeau soit décroché et piétiné ? C'est inacceptable. Ils viennent ici, ils nous provoquent, et si on réagit, on se fait réprimer. » Un incident relayé sur les réseaux sociaux Une vidéo, partagée sur les réseaux sociaux par un député arabe israélien, montre un groupe de colons juifs au centre de Howarah. L'un d'eux grimpe sur un réverbère et décroche le drapeau palestinien sous le regard des habitants du village. Tollé général. L'armée israélienne intervient rapidement pour y mettre fin. Un militaire pointe son arme sur la foule et somme les Palestiniens de se taire. Il finit par lancer une grenade assourdissante. Motez, un jeune commerçant du quartier, a assisté à la scène. « Ici, à côté de Howarah, se trouve la pire colonie de toute la Cisjordanie. C'est la colonie de Yzhar. Ces gens-là sont haineux. Ce sont des extrémistes. Ils disent : mort aux Arabes. Ils souhaiteraient nous éradiquer », déplore le jeune homme. Une cohabitation difficile avec la colonie de Yzhar La colonie de Yzhar surplombe le village de Howarah. Il faut à peine dix minutes de voiture pour l'atteindre. Caméra, barrière de sécurité. C'est là que vit avec sa famille Shalom Khalfon, un juif d'origine française. Pour lui, le drapeau palestinien est l'emblème du terrorisme. « Quand ils mettent le drapeau palestinien, ça veut dire : c'est à nous. Ceux qui brandissent les drapeaux sont des voyous qui sèment la terreur. Nous, cet endroit, on a envie qu'il soit à nous. Qu'il soit sécurisé. Quand ma femme et mes enfants passent ici, j'ai envie que cet endroit soit sûr à 100 %. » Pour garantir la sécurité des colons, des militaires israéliens sont déployés dans le centre de Howarah. Selon Billal Awda, un villageois, son neveu âgé d'une dizaine d'années a été arrêté par l'armée pour avoir brandi un drapeau palestinien.

True Talk
True Talk for 06/16/2022

True Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


Arab-Muslim discussion and interviews with hosts Samar Jarrah and Ahmed Bedier.

Nights at Nefertiti's
60: Burnout is Everywhere

Nights at Nefertiti's

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 22:29


What's have you learned throughout your life that has truly stuck with you? This week on the podcast we're talking about all the things I have learned that I feel worth sharing. Plus this is only part one make sure to come back next week for part 2. Email me: nightsatnefertitis@gmail.com Instagram: @nightsatnefertitis www.instagram.com/nightsatnefertitis/ @naghamtab www.instagram.com/naghamtab/ For more information on Ukraine News and Donation Links: kyivindependent.com www.instagram.com/withukraine/ www.instagram.com/svidomi_eng/ www.instagram.com/ukraine.updates/ savelife.in.ua/en/donate/ linktr.ee/hey.i.am.vika For more information about what is happening in Palestine follow on Instagram: @sbeih.jpg www.instagram.com/sbeih.jpg/ www.aljazeera.com/where/palestine/ www.anera.org/blog/update-on-the…isis-in-palestine/ Research on International Affairs www.pewresearch.org/topic/international-affairs/ www.crisisgroup.org For more information regarding International Women's Day: www.internationalwomensday.com/Mission/Empowerment My recommendation for this week is:

The Middle Geeks
Episode 39: ‘Ms. Marvel' Episodes 1-2 Review

The Middle Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 61:47


Ms. Marvel is here! We discuss the first two episodes of the series, discussing how wonderful Iman Vellani is in the main role, how well the series does at portraying Kamala and her family and friends, how well it does on portraying Islam, and where it can do better in certain fronts. We also discuss the exciting news that Abubakr Ali is starring in Billy Porter's Anything's Possible for Amazon Prime, give our recommendations, and much more!   Donate to our fundraiser for Palestine and join us June 25th on the Nerds of Color Twitch Channel for our all day livestream!   Spoilers for the first two episodes of Ms. Marvel throughout.   Mae's review of the first two episodes for ScreenRant   Swara's review of the first episode for io9   Swara's review of the second episode for io9   Our music is composed by Ashley Hefnawy. You can find more of her music here.   We are a proud member of the Hard NOC podcast family.   Follow us on Twitter: @TheMiddleGeeks, @MaeAbdu, @spiderswarz   Subscribe to The Middle Geeks on Hard NOC Media   Please support us on Patreon!

InterNational
La mort de l'écrivain israélien Avraham B. Yehoshua, un pacifiste déçu

InterNational

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 3:04


durée : 00:03:04 - Géopolitique - par : Pierre Haski - La disparition du grand écrivain israélien, à 85 ans, marque l'éclipse d'une génération qui s'est battue pour la paix mais a échoué. A.B. Yehoshua ne croyait plus à la solution des deux États, Israël et la Palestine, qu'il a longtemps soutenue.

Géopolitique
La mort de l'écrivain israélien Avraham B. Yehoshua, un pacifiste déçu

Géopolitique

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 3:04


durée : 00:03:04 - Géopolitique - par : Pierre Haski - La disparition du grand écrivain israélien, à 85 ans, marque l'éclipse d'une génération qui s'est battue pour la paix mais a échoué. A.B. Yehoshua ne croyait plus à la solution des deux États, Israël et la Palestine, qu'il a longtemps soutenue.

Douglas Jacoby Podcast
CLEAN – podcast 16, Father & Son

Douglas Jacoby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 14:50


For additional notes and resources check out Douglas' website.IntroductionYesterday: mother/daughter; today: father/son.New life -- not just for the boy, but for the dadChildren have the power to hurt us -- just as spouses do. In today's passage, the pain that is breaking the parent's heart is unwitting (beyond the control of the child).Context: While Jesus and the Three were up on the Mount of Transfiguration, the other disciples failed to exorcise a demon who was destroying a family.Scriptural study: Matt 17:14-20Notice the man's posture (v.14). Like so many who beg Jesus for release from leprosy or demons, he's on his knees. He deeply desires a miracle for his son's sake.The demonic attacks are beyond the control of the boy, harming him by exposing him to death by burning or drowning.The Canaanite woman approaches Jesus first; the man in today's account went first to Jesus' disciples (v.16). Not to his three most trusted, however, who were with him on the Mount of Transfiguration.Even when we've been following Christ for a while--like the nine, who had been Jesus' disciples for nearly three years--we still have far to go.I wonder how the 9 disciples felt when the man says these words to Jesus!Lack of faith is a serious problem (v.17). It is unnatural. We should have faith, and failure to trust God is culpable.Sometimes we need to bring our problems to the Lord, when those persons we had hoped could help fail to fix the problem.The demon is rebuked (v.18); it ought not to be inhabiting a human being.Instant healing—not in multiple stages, nor partial healing.Faith is the issue (v.20).The disciples were apparently not praying enough, or with sufficient faith.Mustard seed = smallest seed known in Palestine, though not the smallest of seeds globally. Jesus is speaking in a way they can relate to, not with perfect biological precision. In fact, all the science in the Bible is of the ancient variety. (It's not a science book, even remotely.)No mountains are literally moved by faith. (Consider, for example, the other impossible deeds of 1 Cor 13:1-2.) Yet we instinctively—and correctly—spiritualize Jesus' words, because then they make sense, and are applicable to our lives.Renewal and relief come to this family, although the passage seems to be more a lesson for Jesus' disciples -- and for us -- about faithful prayer.Thought questionsHow is my prayer life? What things may I be prevented from accomplishing for lack of prayer?As with the Canaanite woman, the transition for the children from possession to freedom is tremendously faith-building for the parents -- not just for the child. In the same way, disciples of Christ need to see the miracle of the new birth on a regular basis. How long has it been since you have helped someone to make the radical transition from the slavery of the world to the freedom in Christ?

The Lit Muslim
27. Writing QA with Hend Hegazi | What Is A Successful Author?

The Lit Muslim

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 44:14


We are so excited to bring you some instagram lives with our publishing department head Hend Hegazi who answers your questions on writing and editing. To find out more about our new book Poetic Justice, click: 'Buy 'Poetic Justice | An Anthology Of Poems By Muslims' Here' here: https://linktr.ee/thestrangerspoets 5% of all proceeds go to Palestine. The rest go towards The Strangers Inc to fund future impact projects. Disclaimer: The views and opinions shared in this Podcast are those of the speakers. The Strangers Poets Inc do not endorse any personal view of the speakers on any platform. The Strangers Poets Inc adhere to the widely accepted traditional, orthodox doctrine of Ahlus Sunnah. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thelitmuslim/message

Balagan
Israel's Moment w. Prof. Jeffrey Herf

Balagan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 38:02


For many, supporting the Zionist aspirations of establishing a Jewish state prior to 1948 seems obvious. But we don't know how many players worked really hard in order to make this happen. Today we are going to deep dive into behind the scenes the support and opposition to the establishment of Israel, and that is why I am happy to have Prof. Jeffrey Herf of the University of Maryland, and author of “Israel's Moment: International Support for and Opposition to Establishing the Jewish State, 1945–1949, where he examines the political realities that underpinned support for and opposition to Zionist aspirations in Palestine in the United States, and Europe, including the Soviet bloc. Prof. Herf's book is available to purchase HERE #Israel #1948 #Diplomacy #IsraelUSRelations

Anchored by Truth from Crystal Sea Books - a 30 minute show exploring the grand Biblical saga of creation, fall, and redempti

Episode 164 – Paul’s Places – Part 5: Corinth II Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. In John 14:6, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” The goal of Anchored by Truth is to encourage everyone to grow in the Christian faith by anchoring themselves to the secure truth found in the inspired, inerrant, and infallible word of God. Script: Several people from Chloe's family have already reported to me that you keep arguing with each other. They have said that some of you claim to follow me, while others claim to follow Apollos or Peter or Christ. 1 Corinthians, chapter 1, verses 11 & 12, Contemporary English Version ******** VK: Hello! I’m Victoria K. Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. We’re very glad to be with you today. We are in the midst of a series on Anchored by Truth that we are calling “Paul’s Places.” By “Paul,” of course, we’re referring to the Apostle Paul who wrote at least 13 of the books out of the 27 books that comprise the New Testament. Most people know that the Apostle Paul was the foremost apostle to the gentiles as part of his ministry he wrote a number of letters to various churches. Many of those letters have been preserved in the books of the New Testament. In fact, God used Paul to write almost half of the New Testament including first and second Corinthians. In our last episode of Anchored by Truth we started looking at these letters to the Corinthians and we’re going to conclude that look today. In the studio today we have RD Fierro, an author and the founder of Crystal Sea Books. RD, why don’t you remind us of what this series “Paul’s Places” is all about and give us a brief summary of where we are? RD: Well, I’d like to start by thanking our listeners for joining us here today. As our longtime listeners know Anchored by Truth is focused on helping people develop a solid understanding of why they may be confident that the Bible is the inspired, inerrant, and infallible word of God. Well, one of the key points to people having that confidence is to see that the books of the Bible are trustworthy from the standpoint of history. In our opinion any book claiming to be the word of an almighty and perfect God would have to meet two criteria. First, the book would have to be consistent with what we know about the history of the natural world and the history of humanity. Second, the book would have to contain evidence of a supernatural point of origin. VK: And you cite four lines of evidence that the Bible meets those two criteria: reliable history, remarkable unity, fulfilled prophecy, and redeemed destinies. RD: Right. So, we believe that any book claiming to be the word of God would have to be consistent with what we know about human history in the parts of the Bible upon which the Bible reports. VK: And, in the case of the New Testament, the history with which the Bible is primarily concerned is the history of the Roman Empire. The books of the New Testament were all written during latter portion the first century AD. At that time the Roman Empire was the dominant power in Europe, the Mideast, and North Africa. At its height the Roman Empire extended all the way from modern day India to England and included most of the Mediterranean Coast of North Africa. RD: Yes. And since Jesus lived, died, and rose in what is today modern day Israel that was the point of origin of Christianity. In essence, Christianity began in Jerusalem and spread outward through the rest of Palestine, the adjoining nations, through the eastern part of the Roman Empire, and, of course, ultimately throughout the world. But, as you noted the books of our New Testament were all written in the latter half of the first century AD. During that time the gospel had gone from Jerusalem and through such modern day nations as Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, Greece, and Italy. Those are the nations in which the New Testament territory was primarily occurring. So, one question that can be reasonably asked is whether the books of the New Testament give evidence that they were authentic letters written to people who lived in those places at that time. VK: And that’s why we’re doing this “Paul’s Places.” We’re looking at the content of the New Testament letters and seeing whether that content makes sense from the standpoint of what we know about the geography, culture, and people of that time. And last time we saw that first and second Corinthians do contain a great deal of evidence that the concerns Paul expressed would have been legitimate concerns for a city like Corinth. For instance, we saw that Corinth is located on an isthmus that joins northern and southern Greece. As such it was a very active city for trade and commerce. It was literally the meeting place where east met west in terms of the Roman Empire. It had two port cities that serviced it – one on its east and one on its west. Ships would arrive in those ports and off load their goods. Those cargoes were then taken to Corinth and sold or exchanged for something else. Then the ships were reloaded with the new merchandise and headed back to another port usually in the opposite direction. So, Corinth was not only filled with merchants and trader but also sailors, buyers, and travelers. RD: And the most prominent Roman goddess worshipped in Corinth was Venus. Venus was the Roman version of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. Aphrodite was the ancient Greek goddess associated with love, lust, beauty, pleasure, passion and procreation. There was a huge temple dedicated to Venus on the south side of the city and there were a thousand prostitutes that served as priestesses at the temple. VK: In short, sexual immorality was a prominent feature of life in Corinth. From the fifth century BC onward the expression ‘to Corinthianize’ meant to be sexually immoral.” Given all that, you would expect that when Paul was writing to the Corinthians he might have to pay special attention to the problem of avoiding sexual immorality – and he did. Paul devoted more attention to the problem of dealing with sexual immorality in 1 Corinthians than he did in any other of his epistles. Epistle is just another word for letter. Often, the books of the New Testament that Paul wrote are referred to as “Pauline epistles.” RD: Yes. So, the fact that Paul spent almost 3 chapters out of the 16 chapters of 1 Corinthians dealing with sexual immorality is strong evidence that the letters to the Corinthians are authentic communications to believers in Corinth during the 1st century AD. We know the city was well known within the Roman world as a city where temptation abounded, money was often made and lost quickly, and the believers were living in a licentious and dissolute society. In other words, the character of the letter matches perfectly with what we know of the character of the city. And that was true in other respects besides just sexual immorality. VK: What are you thinking about? RD: Corinth was not only a thoroughly immoral city but it was also a very competitive one. In a city where goods and merchandise are coming in and going out every day, where ships are on schedules they want to meet, where money is changing hands every minute of every day, and where the velocity of the economy is tied to the prosperity of the empire, obviously, the competition to be among the best is going to be fierce. VK: Last time we noted that Corinth was sort of the Roman Empire’s version of Las Vegas. And anyone who has ever been to Las Vegas can see the evidence of competition all around them. No sooner is one giant hotel or casino built than another developer comes along who wants to build something bigger and grander. One brilliant light display is quickly eclipsed by another. Every Vegas show competes with every other show. It seems like each new project must be bigger, grander, and showier than the last. RD: Right. Corinth was Vegas without the electricity. It would have been that way just based on the geography, economy, and culture. But as if all that weren’t enough, Corinth was also the site of one of the most famous of the ancient Greek sporting events. It was the site of the Isthmian Games. The Isthmian Games were similar in size and scope to the Olympic Games. VK:. The Isthmian Games were one of the so-called Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece. And the Isthmian Games were named after the Isthmus of Corinth, where they were held. The Isthmian Games were held both the year before and the year after the Olympic Games while another set of games, the Pythian Games, were held in the third year of the Olympiad cycle RD: Panhellenic Games was the collective term for four separate sports festivals that were held in ancient Greece. The four festivals were the Olympics, the Isthmian Games, the Pythian Games, and the Nemean Games. The Olympics started the cycle. The Olympics and Pythian Games were held every four years whereas the Isthmian and Nemean Games were held every two years. VK: In other words the ancient Greeks were very fond of their sports. I guess that isn’t too much different from today. And also like today the cities that hosted the games would have benefitted economically from the games as well as well as being proud of their status as a host city. I see what you’re getting at. There was a highly competitive atmosphere present in Corinth because of its status as an important commercial and trading center. But beyond that, the fact that of one of the ancient world’s premier sporting events was regularly conducted in Corinth would have added to that atmosphere of competitiveness. RD: Exactly. So, in continuing our look at how the culture and geography were reflected in the letters that Paul sent to various church congregations we can see that this competitive atmosphere was present not just outside the Corinthian church but also inside it. VK: I’m sure one of the passages in 1 Corinthians that you have in mind is what we heard in our opening scripture. This is verses 11 and 12 of the first chapter of 1 Corinthians. Those verses say, “For some members of Chloe’s household have told me about your quarrels, my dear brothers and sisters. Some of you are saying, “I am a follower of Paul.” Others are saying, “I follow Apollos,” or “I follow Peter,” or “I follow only Christ.” That’s from the New Living Translation. RD: Yes. These verses tell us that rather than being unified around the gospel the members of the Corinthian church had begun to identify with specific personalities. In other words at least some members of the church were drifting into a cult of personality. They had lost their focus on Christ and apparently on Christ’s command that the way the world would know his followers was by their love for each other. So, the church was being split by this competition among the members where the members were more focused on specific figures rather than being unified by their love and commitment to Christ. They were becoming unduly focused on personalities. VK: In other words you think that what Paul was observing was that those people who were claiming loyalty to Peter or Apollos were doing so in the spirit of “one-upsmanship.” RD: Yes. That was what his rebuke that followed his observation pointed out. He said in verses 13 through 15, “Has Christ been divided into factions? Was I, Paul, crucified for you? Were any of you baptized in the name of Paul? Of course not! I thank God that I did not baptize any of you except Crispus and Gaius, for now no one can say they were baptized in my name.” Evidently the Corinthians had started bragging about who had baptized them as though the person who baptized them made a difference. Paul said I’m glad I only baptized a couple of them, not because he didn’t want the Corinthian church to grow, but because he was, in effect, saying “don’t draw me into your contentions. I’m not interested in being part of your competition.” VK: Rather like people often do today some of the Corinthians were competing by identifying who performed their baptism as if that person were a sports star or celebrity. And Paul would have none of it. Paul knew that people being the way they are this inevitably leads to a spirit of competition as each group claims that its star is the greatest. Kind of like arguing over which quarterback or tennis player is the greatest. RD: Right. So, this baptismal competition was one example that the competitive culture that pervaded Corinth had entered the church in an unhealthy way. VK: Are there other examples in 1 Corinthians that showed that this competitive culture was present among the Corinthian believers? RD: Unfortunately, yes. Let’s take a look at 1 Corinthians, chapter 14, verses 26 through 39. In that section Paul is giving the Corinthians instructions about how to conduct their worship services. Apparently, there was a substantial amount of disorder during their communal worship because the believers were competing with one another over who got to give a message or present a revelation. Apparently, some of the Corinthians had come to think so highly of themselves that some saw themselves almost at the level of being an apostle and receiving new revelations. VK: In fact in verses 36 and 37 Paul actually asked them, “… do you think God’s word originated with you Corinthians? Are you the only ones to whom it was given? If you claim to be a prophet or think you are spiritual, you should recognize that what I am saying is a command from the Lord himself.” That’s also from the New Living Translation. The Amplified Bible puts it this way. “Did the word of the Lord originate from you [Corinthians], or has it come to you only [so that you know best what God requires].” RD: Exactly. So, chapter 14 of 1 Corinthians makes it clear that this spirit of competition was manifesting itself in disorder in their worship. And chapter 11 makes it clear they were competing in the food they brought to their services. Apparently, a part of their communal worship was to have a meal – which is fine when it’s done appropriately – but in the case of the Corinthians, it wasn’t. Let’s take a quick look at verses 20 through 22 of chapter 11. VK: The New Living Translation of those verses says, “When you meet together, you are not really interested in the Lord’s Supper. For some of you hurry to eat your own meal without sharing with others. As a result, some go hungry while others get drunk. … do you really want to disgrace God’s church and shame the poor? What am I supposed to say? Do you want me to praise you? Well, I certainly will not praise you for this!” RD: And just one more example of how this spirit of competition had infected the church is that the Corinthians were apparently competing in what is often termed “gifts of the spirit.” That is apparent from chapter 12 of 1 Corinthians. VK: Paul summed up his assessment of how the Corinthians had been behaving with respect to spiritual gifts in verses 29 and 30 of chapter 12. The New Living Translation of those verses says, “Are we all apostles? Are we all prophets? Are we all teachers? Do we all have the power to do miracles? Do we all have the gift of healing? Do we all have the ability to speak in unknown languages? Do we all have the ability to interpret unknown languages? Of course not!” RD: Yes. The general culture of Corinth contained a strong strain of competitiveness because of the nature of the economy and the regular conduct of the Isthmian games in the city. So, from all these examples we can see that this spirit of competition had entered the Corinthian church. As a result the Apostle Paul had to deal with the divisions this spirit was producing when he wrote his letters to the church there. This again provides strong evidence that the letters we know as 1 and 2 Corinthians were authentic communications from Paul, who was the most prominent apostle sent to the gentiles, to a group of believers in Corinth during the 1st century AD. The letters reflect the kinds of concerns that would have been prominent in a city like Corinth during that period in history. VK: But oddly enough – providentially really – as only God can do God used the occasion of the divisions that were cropping up within the Corinthian church to produce some of the most important teaching in scripture. In response to the competition among the Corinthians to have better “spiritual gifts” than their fellow church members Paul wrote chapter 13 of 1 Corinthians which is well-known as the classic chapter on Christian love in the Bible. And in response to the spirit of competition over the food being consumed at the church meals Paul wrote one the clearest statement in the Bible about one of the most important sacraments, the Lord’s Supper. RD: Exactly. VK: And as we saw in our last episode of Anchored by Truth we saw that Paul used the temptation to sexual immorality present within the city to give very clear directions to the church about how to deal with such temptation. Said differently, God used the problems that were confronting the Corinthian church to provide clear guidance that would help believers for the next 2,000 years. God turned evil into good as only God can. RD: Absolutely. God took the problems present within the church – that were largely there because of the nature of the surrounding culture – and instead of letting the evil and temptation dominate He brought eternal benefits. This is a dramatic illustration of the nature of God’s grace. He doesn’t let the evil of man overcome His intentions to produce good for His people. And the fact that the Corinthian believers did respond to Paul’s admonitions is evident from the content of 2 Corinthians. In 2 Corinthians Paul took great pains to begin providing comfort to the Corinthians rather than rebuke. VK: And one of the points you wanted to make today was that even though our Bible contains two of the letters Paul wrote to the Corinthian church it’s plain from 1 Corinthians, chapter 5, verse 9 that Paul wrote as least one more letter to them. The Contemporary English Version of that verse says, “In my other letter I told you not to have anything to do with immoral people.” Since this verse is contained in 1 Corinthians it’s apparent Paul had sent them an earlier version that has not been preserved. RD: Right. And many scholars actually believe that Paul had sent the Corinthian church another letter between the letters we call first and second Corinthians. Many scholars refer to the letter as the “severe letter.” It is thought that this letter resulted from a quick trip Paul made to Corinth from Ephesus when Paul was poorly treated by the church or at least some people within the church. Many scholars think the spirit of repentance that Paul recognized in 2 Corinthians came from this “severe letter.” If Paul did send this “severe letter,” this letter has also not been preserved. VK: And that also helps demonstrate the authenticity of the letters that we do have doesn’t it? It shows that the people who were involved in this back and forth were real people. When real people send real communication to one another sometimes some of it gets lost. God ensured the preservation of those letters that He determined were to be part of His inspired Word. But the material in 1 and 2 Corinthians shows that just because an Apostle or prophet wrote or said something that did not automatically mean it was intended to be part of the Bible. RD: Yes. One of the big points we’re making in this Paul’s Places series is that unlike the assertions of some Bible critics the Bible is not filled with “myths and fairy tales.” The Bible contains a record of real people doing real things in real places during the real history of the world. During that real history Christian leaders were dealing with real problems – and very often those problems were created or exacerbated by the places in which those struggling Christians were living. That is how God deals with us. We live in a real world and have real problems but God’s transcendent power is still available to help us. VK: And we should add one final note before we close for today. Competition does not have to create division. Properly understood and used competition can help people, teams, and companies improve their performance and the lives of others. RD: Right. Throughout history Christians have been very successful in sports and business – in other words they have been good competitors as well as good Christians. But a good competitor is one who strives to do his or her best while encouraging others to also do their best. We used to recognize this. And we used the term “good sportsmanship” to refer to a competitor who did their absolute best but always played fair, was willing to congratulate another on their victory, and was humble when they came out on top. Sadly, in today’s sports, business, and political worlds these kinds of people are increasingly rare. Today you hear things like “win at all costs” or “2nd place is 1st loser.” Good natured ribbing has given way to obscene “trash talk” and gracious winners are almost unknown. This is extraordinarily sad because it deprives our kids of knowing that it is possible to be a strong competitor while also being kind and generous in victory or loss. VK: We used to know all this. But as competition for attention has grown within our own culture it seems as though we have lost some of what used to be time-honored wisdom. Well, one of the best ways for us to reclaim this time-honored wisdom is for parents to begin to immerse themselves in the word of God so they can begin to teach their kids how to develop Godly characters. This sounds like a great time for a prayer. Since Father’s Day is almost here, today let’s listen to a prayer for fathers. Godly fathers are certainly one of the best gifts any child can receive – and no matter their age we should take time to reach out and let our fathers know we love them. And for those who were not blessed with a Godly father it’s always a good idea to pray for them to come to Jesus. Our prayers for our family members can move hearts and change eternal destinies. ---- PRAYER FOR FATHERS VK: Before we close we’d like to remind our audience that a lot of our radio episodes are linked together in series of topics so if they missed any episodes in this series or if they just want to hear one again, all of these episodes are available on your favorite podcast app. To find them just search on “Anchored by Truth by Crystal Sea Books.” If you’d like to hear more, try out crystalseabooks.com where “We’re not perfect but our Boss is!” (Opening Bible Quote from the Contemporary English Version) 1 Corinthians, chapter 1, verses 11 & 12, Contemporary English Version 1 Corinthians 1 Barnes' Notes (biblehub.com) Since the games' inception, Corinth had always been in control of them. When Corinth was destroyed by the Romans in 146 BC, the Isthmian games continued, but were now administered by Sicyon. Corinth was rebuilt by Caesar in 44 BC, and recovered ownership of the Games shortly thereafter, but they were then held in Corinth. They did not return to the Isthmus until AD 42 or 43. The Isthmian Games thereafter flourished until the mid-4th century at least. A possible late literary reference dates to 362. The circumstances of their demise are unknown. Imperial pressure against pagan rituals was heightened at the end of the 4th century, but some polytheistic cult practices certainly continued at Corinth into the 6th century.

Radio Islam
Palestine Report - 13 June 2022

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 10:14


Palestine Report - 13 June 2022 by Radio Islam

McNeil & Parkins Show
Cody Decker takes a call from 'Kevin in Palestine'

McNeil & Parkins Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 4:38


Cody Decker isn't local. We can't blame him for not knowing some Chicago suburbs, but this call from Kevin in Palestine was really something else.

What Radicalized You?
“I, Like my Sister, Live and Breathe Palestine," with Maysa and Anais

What Radicalized You?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 54:18


Episode 65 featuring Maysa and Anais On Palestine, censorship, the murder of Shireen Abu-Akleh, hope as a discipline, Black-Palestinian solidarity, the impact of their fathers politics, and revolutionary love Please be sure to MATERIALLY support Palestinians living in Palestine here: https://www.instagram.com/gaza.mutual.aid.collective/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y%3D https://www.instagram.com/for.amal.xx/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y%3D https://www.instagram.com/amal_for_palestine/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y%3D

The Take
Is normalization the new normal?

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 20:39


In the Gulf, normalization with Israel is paying off: there's a major free trade deal, Israeli tourism to the United Arab Emirates is booming, and the prospect is brewing of normalization with Saudi Arabia, the largest Arab economy. The occupation is still center stage to Palestinians, and for decades, Israel's relationship with the Arab world has been at most a cold peace. What does it mean for that to change? In this episode:  Gregg Carlstrom (@glcarlstrom), Middle East correspondent, The Economist Episode credits: This episode was produced by Alexandra Locke with Ney Alvarez, Negin Owliaei, Ruby Zaman, Amy Walters, and Malika Bilal. Our sound designer is Alex Roldan. Our engagement producers are Aya Elmileik and Adam Abou-Gad. Connect with us: @AJEPodcasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in European Studies
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Economic and Business History
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in American Studies
Paul Lerner et al., "Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:55


Jewish Consumer Cultures in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Europe and North America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2022) investigates the place and meaning of consumption in Jewish lives and the roles Jews played in different consumer cultures in modern Europe and North America. Drawing on innovative, original research into this new and challenging field, the volume brings Jewish studies and the history and theory of consumer culture into dialogue with each other. Its chapters explore Jewish businesspeople's development of niche commercial practices in several transnational contexts; the imagining, marketing, and realization of a Jewish national homeland in Palestine through consumer goods and strategies; associations between Jews, luxury, and gender in multiple contexts; and the political dimensions of consumer choice. Together the essays in this volume show how the study of consumption enriches our understanding of modern Jewish history and how a focus on consumer goods and practices illuminates the study of Jewish religious observance, ethnic identities, gender formations, and immigrant trajectories across the globe. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Living Words
Blessed is the One Who Stays Awake

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022


Blessed is the One Who Stays Awake Revelation 16 By William Klock There's an old story of a clergyman, who out of concern for a parishioner who had been absent for some time, went to visit her at home.  He saw her car in the driveway.  The drapes were drawn, but he could see the lights were one.  He could hear the faint sound of the TV.  She was clearly home.  He knocked on the door and waited.  No answer.  Then he heard the TV go silent.  He knocked again.  Still no answer.  He waited.  Out of the corner of his eye he saw a faint movement of the living room drapes, as if someone had peeked around the edge.  Still no answer.  He rang the doorbell and waited again.  Still nothing.  He sighed, pulled one of his cards from his pocket, and slipped it into the front door's weather stripping.  Then he had an idea.  If anyone needed to read her Bible, it was she.  So he took the card back, pulled out his pen, and wrote on the back “Revelation 3:20”—“Behold, I stand at the door and knock”—and slipped the card back into the weatherstripping.  “She'll have to look that one up,” he thought, “and maybe she'll keep reading while her Bible's open.”  He rang the bell one more time, waited again, and left. On Sunday morning he was pleased to see that the woman was in church, but she left too quickly for him to greet her.  Then, as he was getting ready to leave the church, one of the wardens approached, holding a little card.  “It was in the offering plate,” the warden said as he handed it to him.  The priest took the card and saw it was one of his own.  He turned it over and saw the Bible reference he'd written: “Revelation 3:20”.  Underneath it the woman had written another: “Genesis 3:10”.  He laughed.  That's Adam's answer to the Lord, “I was afraid, because I was naked, and I hid myself.” Revelation 16 continues with the Lord's judgement on Greco-Roman world.  We looked at Chapter 15 two weeks ago and saw the announcement of seven plagues, carried by seven angles in bowls like those used for drink offerings in the temple.  In Chapter 16 we'll now see those plagues poured out—the wrath of God revealed.  And in the middle of the plagues John stops—in verse 15—to give a warning to God's people: “Behold, I am coming like a thief!  Blessed is the one who stays awake, keeping his garments on, that he may not go about naked and be seen exposed!”   It's a warning from Jesus for his Church to stay alert and on guard—not to be distracted, but to be diligently about the work he's given.  He gave similar warnings to the churches at Sardis and Laodicea.  The reference is to an officer in the temple in John's day, who was tasked with making sure that the men on watch stayed awake.  He would make the rounds of the temple and if he caught anyone asleep, he would beat him.  If he found the same man asleep a second time, he would strip the man naked and burn his clothes.[1]  One commentator writes, “The danger is of being caught not momentarily but habitually off guard—not, to put it crudely, with trousers down, but without trousers at all.”[2] Consider Jesus' warning to the Christians in Sardis: Wake up, and strengthen what remains and is about to die, for I have not found your works complete in the sight of my God. (Revelation 3:2) Brothers and Sisters, it is easy to become complacent.  Either we become complacent and neglect our calling to proclaim and to live out the good news about Jesus and to declare the mighty works of God.  Or we become complacent in that we become worldly.  We live in the world and it's easy to be unconsciously influenced by it when we keep our guard down and neglect to feed ourselves on God's word and to share in the means of grace found in the Church.  It's also easy to become complacent through wilful compromise with the world.  We face opposition and instead of standing firm, we compromise in the hopes that the world will oppose us less—maybe that they'll even like us.  We see an awful lot of this today.  Churches looking to attract “seekers” structure ministry and worship around what is attractive to unbelievers—which can be great when done thoughtfully and carefully, but disastrous when, as so often happens, we end up looking more like the world than the church.  Or we cozy up to the world's system, especially to politics—Left or Right—it can go either way.  When we allow ourselves to be overtaken by the world's ways of thinking, whether that be commercialism and materialism or expressive individualism, the sexual revolution, and post-modern gender theory.  Or—I think most appropriate in light of our text today—we water down our message.  Large parts of the Western Church today are hesitant to talk about sin and about the consequences of sin, about the wrath of God and of judgement.  H. Richard Niebuhr famous described the gospel of much of modern Christendom as: “A God without wrath brought men without sin into a kingdom without judgement through the ministrations of a Christ without a cross.”[3]  Such a faith is worthless—for those who believe—and for the world to which it is proclaimed.  The Church that preaches such a message is no church at all and when God's judgement does come, such churches will be swept away with everything else not of the kingdom—caught naked and asleep at her post.  It's important that the Church be clear about the difference between the things of God and the things of the world, the difference between godliness and sin, and knowing the kingdom of God, and be able to persevere in the midst of tribulation—that, to use John's metaphor, we stay awake and keep our pants on. As John announces the judgement that was soon to come on the pagan world of Caesar, using the language of cataclysmic plagues, the Church was expected to recognise the judgement of God in the same way that Israel had seen, recognised, and praised the judgment of God on Pharaoh, the supposed god-king, and on his pantheon of false gods.  John saw those who had conquered the beast, like Israel of old watching Pharaoh's army drown, singing the praises of their victorious God.  Brothers and Sisters, God's people are called to singing of his victory for the sake of the world and, in doing so, we glorify him.  Now look at Chapter 16.  John writes: Then I heard a loud voice from the temple telling the seven angels, “Go and pour out on the earth the seven bowls of the wrath of God.”   Remember that in the last scene, John saw the heavenly tabernacle filled with smoke—so full that no one could enter.  And out came seven angels bearing bowls.  The image is of the priests of the old covenant bearing their drink offerings at the conclusion of the daily service.  Since no one could enter the heavenly tabernacle because of the smoke, this must be the voice of God directing the angels.  John then goes on: So the first angel went and poured out his bowl on the earth, and harmful and painful sores came upon the people who bore the mark of the beast and worshiped its image.   The second angel poured out his bowl into the sea, and it became like the blood of a corpse, and every living thing died that was in the sea.   The third angel poured out his bowl into the rivers and the springs of water, and they became blood.  (Revelation 16:2-4) Just like the plagues poured out on rebellious Jerusalem, the plagues poured out on the pagan nations are meant to remind us of the plagues the Lord brought on Egypt.  First, painful sores reminiscent of the boils that afflicted the Egyptians.  Second, the sea turning to blood and then, third, the fresh waters turning to blood as well. In contrast to the plagues poured out on rebellious Jerusalem, these plagues are universal in scope.  The earlier plagues were limited—a third of the water, a third of the people.  I think the idea in this distinction is that when God disciplined his rebellious children, there was an opportunity for the pagan nations to see, to take heart, and to repent of their wickedness themselves.  Now that opportunity has passed.  The wine of God's wrath has been tread out in the winepress and the wicked peoples who drank the blood of the saints are now—metaphorically—left with nothing but putrid blood to drink. That raises another question?  Are these plagues meant to be understood literally?  I think it's fairly clear, given the context, that they are not.  The imagery draws on the Lord's past judgement on the nations that afflicted his people, first Egypt and then, we'll see, Babylon.  The point is that the Lord is now going to judge Rome.  Remember the point of Revelation: tribulation, perseverance, and kingdom.  Jesus' main purpose in giving John this vision is to encourage the saints to persevere in the midst of tribulation.  The great New Testament scholar, George Caird, puts it this way: “The theme of the whole series [i.e., the plagues] is neither the collapse of the physical universe nor the punishment of individual men for their personal contribution to the world's iniquity, both of which come later when the record books are opened…but the ending of persecution through the removal of the persecutor.”[4]  The angels underscore this when they sing out between the third and fourth plagues.  Look at verses 5 to 7: And I heard the angel in charge of the waters say, “Just are you, O Holy One, who is and who was,          for you brought these judgments. For they have shed the blood of saints and prophets,          and you have given them blood to drink. It is what they deserve!”   And I heard the altar saying, “Yes, Lord God the Almighty,          true and just are your judgments!”   The Lord's judgement vindicates his saints and brings justice on their persecutors.  The songs of the angels and of the altar—I assume these are the martyrs we saw earlier under the altar—the song is a needed reminder of the goodness of the Lord's judgement.  We modern Christians have often become uncomfortable with judgement—Niebuhr's God without wrath and kingdom without judgement.  One morning this week I left my prayer book at home.  I had left a Canadian prayer book on my desk—the 1962 edition—after looking up something in the lectionary last week, so I picked it up for Morning Prayer.  And I was jarred by the changes they made in the Psalter.  Wherever they could, they eliminated or watered down the passages that speak of or call for the Lord's judgement.  Whole psalms were removed.  Because modern Christians have—to our shame—become exceedingly uncomfortable with the topic of the wrath and judgement of God.  And yet, the angels sing here, it is God's justice which reveals his holiness.  Do we consider that when we sing “Holy, holy, holy Lord God almighty”?  And do we consider that it is the Lord's justice that is our consolation as we face a world that opposes us because it opposes him?  Brothers and Sisters, we need to remember that the Lord is revealed to be true and just because he judges wickedness and, in that, he deserves our praises.  There is no reason to preach the gracious mercy of the cross, if there is nothing from which we need deliverance. Now the fourth plague—verses 8 and 9: The fourth angel poured out his bowl on the sun, and it was allowed to scorch people with fire.  They were scorched by the fierce heat, and they cursed the name of God who had power over these plagues.  They did not repent and give him glory.   The fourth of the trumpets that announcement judgement on Jerusalem heralded a plague of darkness.  Now the fourth bowl brings the opposite.  It metaphorically highlights the Lord's vindication of his saints.  The martyrs we saw under the altar back in Chapter 7 were consoled with the words: They shall hunger no more, neither thirst anymore;          the sun shall not strike them,          nor any scorching heat.  (Revelation 7:16) In contrast, the wicked are exposed to the full justice of the Lord.  And yet, even as they experience his wrath, like Pharaoh, their hearts are hardened.  They know the source of their affliction, but rather than repent, rather than turn from their evil and give him glory, they curse him. With the fifth bowl, the judgement narrows from the wider pagan world of the Greeks and Romans to its throne—to the heart and embodiment of its wickedness. The fifth angel poured out his bowl on the throne of the beast, and its kingdom was plunged into darkness.  People gnawed their tongues in anguish and cursed the God of heaven for their pain and sores.  They did not repent of their deeds. (Revelation 16:10-11) The Lord's judgement now falls on the beast, on Caesar, on Nero himself.  Darkness—political chaos—descends on the empire.  In a.d. 69 the Senate declared Nero a public enemy.  He fled and committed suicide.  A year of chaos—referred to as the Year of the Four Emperors—ensued.  Galba became emperor.  He was murdered by Otho.  Meanwhile, Vitellius popular for his military victories in Germany, vied for the throne and won the support of the imperial guard.  Otho committed suicide.  But Vitellius had his own rival in the general, Vespasian, who was besieging Jerusalem.  In the end, Vespasian's supporters in the military outnumbered those of Vitellius, who abdicated and was promptly lynched by a mob in Rome.  It was a year of chaos and civil war.  But again, even as the beast was toppled from his throne, there was no repentance.  Nero, who had initiated the empire's persecution of the saints, was cast down, but in quick succession four others seized his throne and made the same blasphemous claims to divinity that he had. And the sixth bowl.  Verses 12-16: The sixth angel poured out his bowl on the great river Euphrates, and its water was dried up, to prepare the way for the kings from the east.  And I saw, coming out of the mouth of the dragon and out of the mouth of the beast and out of the mouth of the false prophet, three unclean spirits like frogs.  For they are demonic spirits, performing signs, who go abroad to the kings of the whole world, to assemble them for battle on the great day of God the Almighty.  (“Behold, I am coming like a thief! Blessed is the one who stays awake, keeping his garments on, that he may not go about naked and be seen exposed!”)  And they assembled them at the place that in Hebrew is called Armageddon.   John has referred to Rome symbolically as Babylon—historically the great enemy of the people of God.  And now the symbolism of the judgements recalls the fall of Babylon, while at the same time conjuring up the great fear of Rome at that time.  Ancient Babylon fell to the Medes when the invaders diverted the Euphrates River so that they could enter the city.  Now it's Rome's turn to fall.  Rome's great enemy to the east was the Parthian empire—on the other side of the Euphrates.  In the midst of Rome's political chaos, war was coming.  John writes of the kings of the nations assembling to battle at a place called in Hebrew, Harmageddon—the Mount of Megiddo.  It's a little interesting in that there's no Mount Megiddo.  Megiddo is a valley between the mountains—the route from the coastal plain of Palestine to the interior, to Syria and Damascus.  For that reason it had a been a place of many battles.  Deborah and Barak had won their victory there in Judges.  It was the place where King Josiah met his Waterloo, so to speak.  And that's precisely how John uses “Megiddo” here.  That there's no actual Mount Megiddo suggests strongly that John isn't using this location literally.  When we say someone has met their Waterloo, we don't literally mean that they've gone to Waterloo to lose a battle.  Waterloo is a metaphor for defeat and John uses Megiddo in a similar way here.  Rome will meet her enemies and she will fall.  The beast's own wickedness will catch up with him both at home and abroad and he will be toppled from his throne. But in the middle of all this there's that warning.  “Stay awake,” warns Jesus.  Hearkening back to the plague of frogs in Egypt, the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet spew forth demonic spirits imaged as frogs.  These unclean spirits perform signs that deceive the kings of the nations and summon them to the battle.  Jesus warns his people not to be conned by the false prophets and their lying signs.  Pharoah's magicians had once mimicked the Lord's miracles and the prophets of the dragon and the beast will do the same.  God's people must be alert, he warns, that they not fall prey to the enemy's propaganda. And in verses 17-20 the seventh and final bowl is poured out. The seventh angel poured out his bowl into the air, and a loud voice came out of the temple, from the throne, saying, “It is done!” And there were flashes of lightning, rumblings, peals of thunder, and a great earthquake such as there had never been since man was on the earth, so great was that earthquake.  The great city was split into three parts, and the cities of the nations fell, and God remembered Babylon the great, to make her drain the cup of the wine of the fury of his wrath.  And every island fled away, and no mountains were to be found.  And great hailstones, about one hundred pounds each, fell from heaven on people; and they cursed God for the plague of the hail, because the plague was so severe.   The final judgement is poured out into the air, the space between heaven and earth, and the only language John can employ to describe the result is the language of de-creation used by the Old Testament prophets.  Zechariah had once described the fall of Jerusalem using this metaphorical language—the city being split in two by an earthquake.  Now Rome is metaphorically split in three in the chaos of lightning, thunder, and earthquakes.  I think it's very possible this is a reference to the civil war that was about the rattle Rome to its core, but it was a civil war that would topple the beast who had persecuted the saints.  And yet, still, the wicked continue to curse God.  The men who took Nero's place on the throne did not continue the persecution of the saints, but they continued with their blasphemous claims to divinity.  Nevertheless, John says, “God remembered Babylon the great”.  This is our lead-in to Chapters 17 and 18.  The great city will be revealed as the world's whore.  But in that revelation, the faithfulness and the beauty of the Lord's bride will also be revealed. John saw the end of pagan Rome.  Or it might be better to say that he saw the beginning of the end of pagan Rome.  As Caird also rightly points out, Israel's prophets had always used this kind of apocalyptic language “to give theological depth and urgency to this historical crisis which he and his people were facing at the moment.  John, too, had his vision of the End, but because he had learnt his theology at the foot of the Cross, he knew that an end could also be a beginning.”[5] The Lord's judgement would cast down the beast, break his empire, and in time the good news about Jesus, proclaimed by saints and witnesses by the blood of the martyrs would transform the world.  And, Brothers and Sisters, it will continue to do so.  Throughout history the power of the gospel has brought transformation, but it's never as simple as we might like: Okay, the gospel has conquered here, now the Church can go over there or over there to conquer and forget about here.  The Church triumphs there, and then wanes here, only to triumph again here, later.  We in the West are experiencing what it's like to live in a post-Christian world—the waning of the gospel here—to fall out of favour, to experience opposition.  If John were here today he would warn and exhort us as he did the Christians of his own day: “Blessed is the one who stays awake, keeping his garments on, that he may not go about naked and be seen exposed!”  Don't give up.  Don't succumb to the spirit of the age.  Don't be swayed by the lies of the unclean spirits.  The gospel will triump here again and it will do so through the witness of faithful Christians.  So live in deep community with your church family.  Drink deeply at the well of grace provided by the sacraments.  Steep yourself in the word of God.  Don't be afraid to be different—to be holy—and to proclaim the sinfulness of sin, the gracious mercy of God revealed at the cross, and the lordship of Jesus over all things.  Be shaped by faith-filled hope for Christ has died, Christ is risen, and Christ will come again. Let's pray: Almighty God, we thank you for the exhortation you have given us through John.  You judge the wicked and deliver your people.  Your gospel is powerful and transforms the world.  Strengthen our faith and fill us with hope in these truths, so that we can live courageously for Jesus in the face of hatred and opposition.  Renew us by your Spirit and make us faithful witnesses of the transforming power of your word.  Judge the wicked, we pray, vindicate your people, and set your fallen creation to rights.  Through Jesus we pray, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, new and for ever.  Amen. [1] Philip Carrington, The Meaning of Revelation (London: SPCK, 1931), 265. [2] J. P. M. Sweet, Revelation (Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1979), 249. [3] The Kingdom of God in America (New York: Harper and Row, 1959), 193. [4] The Revelation of St. John the Divine (London: A & C Black, 1966), 201. [5] 210

Stories from Palestine
'Khazaeen' Palestinian archive

Stories from Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 48:52


 In the neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah, where Israeli settlers are in the process of taking over many Palestinian houses, there is an archive where Palestinians can store their photos, diaries, posters and other tangible documents. It is the first Palestinian run archive that is trying to collect memories, history AND documents that are produced TODAY, to store them for future generations.The initiative is called 'Khazaeen', the Arabic word for 'cabinets'. Each Palestinian that brings documents to Khazaeen, gets its own box, its own cabinet, to store the documents.  Through interviews, stories are collected and published on the blog of Khazaeen's website and on social media. The items are digitized and the owner can decide to take them home or to leave them in the cabinet. In the process of collecting and bringing documents to Khazaeen, many Palestinians have learned about the life and circumstances of their own ancestors. Often this has helped them to understand their own family history and the generational trauma that has been passed on, especially through the experiences of the Nakba in 1948 and the Naksa in 1967."It is very important to write our own history and to collect our own archive, rather than having our history stored in the colonial archives of the State of Israel", says Eman Alyan. "It is also important to collect brochures, pamphlets, posters, photos and art work of today, so we can save it for the future. "If you want to visit the website of Khazaeen you can use this link: https://khazaaen.org/enIf you enjoy listening to Stories from Palestine then you should also check out the podcast Jerusalem Unplugged. You can find it on most podcast players and on social media.

Improve the News
June 11 2022 top stories: NASA UFO study and death sentence for Brits in Ukraine

Improve the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 26:47


Facts & spin for June 11 2022 top stories: NASA will study UFOs, two British fighters are sentenced to death in Ukraine, The Belgian King expresses regret for Congo atrocities, Turkey warns Greece to demilitarize Aegean islands, the US will to reopen a diplomatic line for Palestine, a Mich. GOP candidate is arrested over January 6, the Department of Justice probes Louisiana for alleged racism and brutality, the FBI probes a general for Qatar lobbying, there's an explosion at a US natural gas plant, and the UK considers ending smoking by 2030.  

Palestine Remembered
Palestine Remembered - Dr Layth Hanbali

Palestine Remembered

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022


Articles by Dr. Layth Hanbali Israeli violence is central to Palestine's mental health crisis https://www.huckmag.com/perspectives/israeli-violence-is-central-to-palestines-mental-health-crisis/ Reimagining Liberation through the Popular Committees https://al-shabaka.org/briefs/reimagining-liberation-through-the-palestinian-popular-committees/ Dr. Layth Hanbali is a freelance consultant focusing on health policy. He has also worked as a researcher, public health practitioner, and doctor, volunteered as a civil society organiser, and taught on several Global Health programmes. He earned a Master's degree in Health Policy, Planning and Financing from the London School of Economics and Political Science and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and a medical degree and a bachelor's degree in Global Health from University College London.

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast
US Energy policy requires a Saudi hotline, says Hadley Gamble

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 25:07


Hadley Gamble, Anchor for CNBC's Capital Connection from Abu Dhabi, discusses US President Joe Biden's upcoming trip to the Middle East; why Saudi-Israel normalization may be a ‘matter of time'; the fate of the Iran nuclear deal; why Turkey is holding out on Sweden and Finland's NATO bids; the global food crisis and the consequences of the Ukraine war; and some good news trends in regional markets.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

It Could Happen Here
The Killing of Shireen Abu Aqleh

It Could Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 34:13


Shereen continues the conversation about Palestine by discussing the murder of Palestinian-American journalist Shireen Abu Aqleh and the violence perpetrated by Israeli police during her funeral. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fire These Times
112/ From Yarmouk to the World: On Syria, Palestine and Lebanon w/ Nidal Betare

The Fire These Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 87:29


Nidal Betare joins Joey Ayoub to talk about growing up in Yarmouk, being Palestinian-Syrian and the links between Syria, Palestine and Lebanon. Patreon: Patreon.com/firethesetimes Website: TheFireThisTi.Me Substack: thefirethesetimes.substack.com Twitter: twitter.com/fireTheseTimes Instagram: instagram.com/firethesetimes Recommended Books: Samir Kassir's books: ديمقراطية سوريا واستقلال لبنان: البحث عن ربيع دمشق، دار النهار، 2004 and عسكر على مين؟: لبنان الجمهورية المفقودة، دار النهار، 2004 Serhy Yekelchyk: Ukraine: What Everyone Needs to Know

True Talk
True Talk for 06/09/2022

True Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022


Arab-Muslim discussion and interviews with hosts Samar Jarrah and Ahmed Bedier.

This Is Palestine
Anti-BDS Laws and the Politics Around Them

This Is Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 25:20


The Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) movement is a Palestinian-led movement for freedom, justice and equality inspired by the South African anti-apartheid movement. Since its formal launch in 2005, the BDS movement has had a major impact on ending international support for Israeli apartheid, with companies now divesting from or not investing in Israel including companies like Ben and Jerry's. Owing to the strength of the BDS movement in the US and in Palestine, Israel has sought to break it. To date, 33 US States have passed anti-BDS laws - laws that aim to stop individuals and companies from securing contracts if they support the BDS movement. It is in this light that the Just Vision film, titled Boycott, is made. Boycott follows the attempts to challenge these anti-BDS laws in a number of US States including Texas, Arkansas and Arizona. Today we speak with the films director Julia Bacha and Bahia Amawi.