Podcasts about Latin America

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Region of the Americas where Romance languages are primarily spoken

  • 5,978PODCASTS
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  • May 16, 2022LATEST
Latin America

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Best podcasts about Latin America

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Latest podcast episodes about Latin America

The Whole Word Podcast
[Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Matthew 06 - The Secret of the Lord's Prayer and Our Father

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 13:01


Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Matthew 06Giving to the Needy (v 1-4)Prayer (v 5-15)Fasting (v 16-18)Treasures in Heaven (v 19-24)Do Not Worry (v 25-34)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with Morgan Lloyd Independent Insurance Agent with Trailstone Insurance Group

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 17:48


I was lucky to grow up on a small farm in Southeastern Ohio. It was a kind of idyllic childhood surrounded by fields and forests. When I graduated high school, I was looking for adventure, so I booked a one-way ticket to Anchorage, Alaska with vague ideas of making a fortune on the frontier. I discovered that the few thousand bucks I had saved from growing and selling melons wasn't going to go far in the real world, and I started roughing it and hitch-hiking. A few months later I had made it as far as Mexico City when my money ran out and I headed home. The seed that the trip had planted grew into years of adventures throughout the world, including working as a mountain guide in Peru and teaching English throughout East Asia and Latin America. In my mid-twenties, I met my wife Lancy and we moved back to Ohio. While looking for jobs I stumbled across an advertisement saying, “Tower Climbers Wanted.” I applied, and a few months later I got a call and a job offer. On the first day, we climbed 400 feet in the air to change some bolts on an old tower, and I was hooked. I spent the next 5 years traveling around the United States while building, repairing, and decommissioning cell towers and cell equipment. Eventually, the constant wear and tear on my body took its toll and I had to find something else to do for a living. Through a roundabout journey, this led me to the insurance industry! I am now an independent agent with Trailstone Insurance Group focusing on helping people master the defensive portion of their financial strategy. I love what I do and try to treat every client like a friend.Learn More: https://trailstoneinsurancegroup.com/morgan-lloyd/Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-morgan-lloyd-independent-insurance-agent-with-trailstone-insurance-group

Know Your Enemy
TEASER: A New Pink Tide? (w/ Thea Riofrancos & David Adler)

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 1:28


Hope for the American left is at a fairly low ebb, at the moment, but our counterparts in Latin America are on the march and succeeding at beating back repressive right wing governments across the region. What can we learn from them? And given extremely volatile global conditions — and the continued role of the US in defending the interests of capital in the region — what can these new left-wing governments hope to accomplish?Sam is joined by political scientist Thea Riofrancos and David Adler, the General Coordinator of the Progressive International, to discuss left populism in Chile, Colombia, Brazil, and elsewhere. Subscribe to Know Your Enemy on Patreon to listen to this bonus episode, and all of our bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/knowyourenemy

The Cloudcast
Logging Governance and Sensitive Data

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:59


Pranay Kamat (Prod Mgmt @datadoghq) talks about the challenges is protecting sensitive data, internal vs. external attacks, evolution of DLP, the role of Governance in DevSecOps. SHOW: 617CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:Revelo: Sidestep the competitive US talent market by hiring remote engineers in Latin America. Source, hire, and pay Latin American engineers in US time zones with one service. Revelo manages all the paperwork including benefits, payroll, and compliance. Hire a full-time engineer with a 14-day trial. Revelo.com/cloudcastMonitor CI Pipelines and Tests with Datadog CI VisibilityDatadog CI Visibility supports shift-left testing Identify and resolve front-end issues on your web applications before your customers notice. Start a free trial today.strongDM - Secure infrastructure access for the modern stack. Manage access to any server, database, or Kubernetes instance in minutes. Fully auditable, replayable, secure, and drag-and-drop easy. Try it free for 14 days - www.strongdm.com/signupSHOW GIVEAWAY CONTEST - "AWS Cookbook"AWS Cookbook: Recipes for Success on AWSGitHub Chapters (free)30 O'Reilly Free TrialSHOW NOTES:Datadog Sensitive Data ScannerBest practices for reducing sensitive data blindspots and riskBuilding a Modern Compliance Strategy [video]Topic 1 - Welcome to the show. Let's talk about your background and the areas where you focus at Datadog. Topic 2 - We continuing to see headlines about critical data being stolen, which is a trend that doesn't seem to be slowing down. Give us a picture of where we are with the problems that are still causing this, and what new things companies can do to prevent it.Topic 3 - Where are some of the differences between traditional Data Loss Prevent (DLP) strategies and strategies that proactively look at logs to identify data access and breaches? Topic 4 - We often think about attacks coming from the outside, but oftentimes attacks happen from inside the house (directly or indirectly). How important is it to be able to control access to logs and what is visible within logs to prevent internal attacks and vulnerabilities?  Topic 5 - What are some of the more dynamic, modern ways to identify sensitive traffic and tag it properly so systems can act on it? Topic 6 - It's often said that security is everyone's issue. In modern teams (DevOps, DevSecOps, etc.), where are you seeing as the owner of this Governance and Sensitive data?

BlackFacts.com: Learn/Teach/Create Black History
May 15 - BlackFacts.com Black History Minute

BlackFacts.com: Learn/Teach/Create Black History

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 1:43


BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 15.Camilla Williams became the first black woman to act in a leading role in a major American opera company.She trained at Virginia State College, now Virginia State University, and received her bachelor's degree in music education. Beginning in 1944, Williams performed on the coast-to-coast RCA radio network.A noted concert artist, Williams toured throughout the United States, Latin America, fourteen African countries, as well as numerous countries in Asia.A lifetime member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), she performed in her hometown of Danville, Virginia in 1963, to raise funds to free jailed civil rights demonstrators.She also sang the national anthem before 200,000 people at the 1963 civil rights march on Washington, immediately before Martin Luther King gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.Williams retired from opera in 1970 and began teaching voice at Bronx College, Brooklyn College, and Queens College, all in New York City.Learn black history, teach black history at blackfacts.com

PBS NewsHour - Politics
Why a growing number of Latin American countries are legalizing abortion

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:03


As Americans contemplate living in a country where Roe versus Wade is overturned, a very different story is playing out in many parts of Latin America. In recent years, countries throughout the region have relaxed abortion restrictions. Alicia Yamin, senior fellow for the Global Health and Rights Project at Harvard Law School, joins Ali Rogin to discuss what's changed and why. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Why a growing number of Latin American countries are legalizing abortion

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:03


As Americans contemplate living in a country where Roe versus Wade is overturned, a very different story is playing out in many parts of Latin America. In recent years, countries throughout the region have relaxed abortion restrictions. Alicia Yamin, senior fellow for the Global Health and Rights Project at Harvard Law School, joins Ali Rogin to discuss what's changed and why. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why a growing number of Latin American countries are legalizing abortion

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:03


As Americans contemplate living in a country where Roe versus Wade is overturned, a very different story is playing out in many parts of Latin America. In recent years, countries throughout the region have relaxed abortion restrictions. Alicia Yamin, senior fellow for the Global Health and Rights Project at Harvard Law School, joins Ali Rogin to discuss what's changed and why. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Yaron Brook Show
Yaron Brook Keynote: The Motor of the World

Yaron Brook Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 76:27


In this virtual keynote, Yaron discusses the innovations and opportunities that make our times a success. The rebellion of Atlas, the famous novel by Ayn Rand, is the story of a man who says that he will stop the engine of the world, and he does. As we do so, the world begins to deteriorate, factories close, lights go out, trains stop, and all those goods and services that make our lives abundant, rich and entertaining become scarce. In the midst of a great crisis, with a mixture of despair and hopelessness, people begin to wonder Who is John Galt? At this AynRandCon'21, we will answer the question.This conference analyzes who is the engine of the world and why in Latin America we punish those who produce so much. We saw how the producers themselves unintentionally promote their own punishment. We explain why entrepreneurs need philosophy and embrace a new morality. We discuss how to stop this direct path to Rise of Atlas and how best to get the world's engine running again. We project the future that we could have if we can remove the chains that hold it back. Finally, we show a possible way to achieve the future we dream of. To see the entire conference go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJi_DFR77SI&t=1552s.This Keynote was part of the ARCon-LA hosted by Ayn Rand Center Latin America on December 4, 2021.Like what you hear? Like, share, and subscribe to stay updated on new videos and help promote the Yaron Brook Show: https://bit.ly/3ztPxTxBecome a sponsor to get exclusive access and help create more videos like this: https://bit.ly/2TCEqHcOr make a one-time donation: https://bit.ly/2RZOyJJContinue the discussion by following Yaron on Twitter (https://bit.ly/3iMGl6z) and Facebook (https://bit.ly/3vvWDDC )Want to learn more about Ayn Rand and Objectivism? Visit the Ayn Rand Institute: https://bit.ly/35qoEC3

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Climate Activism Is Seeing That The Holistic Health Of The Planet Has To Be Brought Back - Vandana Shiva, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:21


Climate Activism Is Seeing That The Holistic Health Of The Planet Has To Be Brought Back -  Vandana Shiva, PhDVandana Shiva, Ph.D. •           https://www.navdanya.org/site/•           Book - Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply Besides being a physicist, ecologist, activist, editor, and author of numerous books, Vandana Shiva is a tireless defender of the environment. She is the founder of Navdanya, a movement for biodiversity conservation and farmers' rights. She is also the founder and director of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Natural Resource Policy. Shiva fights for changes in the practice and paradigms of agriculture and food: “I don't want to live in a world where five giant companies control our health and our food.” Intellectual property rights, biodiversity, biotechnology, bioethics, and genetic engineering are among the fields where Shiva has contributed intellectually and through activist campaigns. During the 1970s, she participated in the nonviolent Chipko movement, whose main participants were women. She has assisted grassroots organizations of the Green movement in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Ireland, Switzerland, and Austria with campaigns against genetic engineering. Shiva has also served as an adviser to governments in India and abroad as well as non-governmental organizations, including the International Forum on Globalization, the Women's Environment and Development Organization, the Third World Network, and the Asia Pacific People's Environment Network. #VandanaShiva #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #RealFoodForHealth #Glyphosate #Pesticides #Monsanto  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Expat Files: Living in Latin America
The Expat Files - 05.13.22

The Expat Files: Living in Latin America

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:00


#1- Latin American Cops on the tourist trail have learned some new tricks: What this means for Gringos, expats and tourists…    #2- The “Google Translate” crutch: At first you thought it was a godsend right? Well sorry folks, it ain't.    #3- The truth about those scruffy little “hole in the wall” mechanic shops: They are very cheap but can you trust them to do a good job?    #4- How has inflation affected labor costs in Latin America?    #5- Some Macho hombre (man) rules for gringo men to consider while in Latin America:  #6- Latinos and their unspoken but deep-seated internal prejudices:  #7- Do you want to get into the exploding Crypto-currency world but don't feel quite confident enough to dive in? Our own Captain Mango has developed a unique one-on-one Crypto consulting and training service (he's been deep into crypto since 2013). To get started, email him at: bewarecaptainmango@gmail.com #8- Be sure to pick up my newly updated, "LATIN AMERICAN HEALTHCARE REPORT": The new edition for 2022 (and beyond) is available now, including the latest "Stem Cell Clinic" info and data and my top picks for the best treatment centers for expats and gringos. Just go to www.ExpatPlanB.com and click on the "Latin American Healthcare Report”.

MANTORSHIFT - The Art of Being a Man...
#40 Of Mafia and Men with Aldo Civico

MANTORSHIFT - The Art of Being a Man...

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:17


We romanticize criminality and the Mafia a lot.  Endless movies stand as proof of our fascination. But only a few us know what we are really talking about. I reached out to an expert who does know a lot about both the Mafia and the Cartel. Aldo Civico is ranked as one of the Top30 Leadership global experts by Global Gurus (#13). For the past 30 years he has been helping leaders in politics and business, as well as communities and organizations to find and connect with their purpose. During his tenure as director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution at Columbia University, Aldo has been facilitating peace talks and Peacebuilding efforts in different parts of the world, especially in Colombia. He is a columnist for Spanish speaking newspapers in the United States and throughout Latin America.

Latino USA
Genias in Music: Violeta Parra

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 46:47


Violeta Parra changed music in her native Chile and beyond. She is known as the “Mother of La Nueva Canción,” a political folk music movement that swept Latin America in the late 1960s. Most people might have heard a version of her masterpiece “Gracias a la vida,” which has been covered countless times across the world. But behind that anthem of gratitude there is a deeply existential and complex musician who presented love as an ethical principle in her songs, even when her own life was marked by loss and illness. In the latest episode of our Genias in Music series —about the lives and work of notable women musicians— we dive into the complexities of Violeta Parra, a pioneer of political folk music in Latin America.

The Whole Word Podcast
[Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Matthew 05 - The Beatitudes and the Sermon on the Mount

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:03


Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Matthew 05Introduction to the Sermon on the Mount (v 1-2)The Beatitudes (v 2b-12)Salt and Light (v 13-16)The Fulfillment of the Law (v 17-20)Murder (v 21-26) | Adultery (v 27-30)Divorce (v 31-32) | Oathes (v 33-37)Eye for Eye (v 38-42)Love for Enemies (v 43-48)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

Thoughts on the Market
Andrew Ruben: Can eCommerce Sustain its Uptrend?

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 4:20


As consumers deal with rising interest rates, persistent inflation, and a desire to get outside in the ever changing COVID environment, the question is, what does this all mean for the future of eCommerce growth?-----Transcript-----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Rubin, Morgan Stanley's Latin America Retail and eCommerce Analyst. Along with my colleagues bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about the outlook for global e-commerce in the years ahead. It's Thursday, May 12th, at 2 p.m. in New York. Amid rising interest rates and persistent inflation, we've seen quite a lot of debate about the health of the consumer and the effect on eCommerce. If you couple those factors with consumers' desire to return to in-person experiences as COVID recedes, you can see why we've fielded a lot of questions about what this all means for eCommerce growth. To answer this question, Morgan Stanley's Internet, eCommerce and Retail teams around the world drew on both regional and company level data to fashion what we call, the Morgan Stanley Global eCommerce Model. And what we found was that the forward looking picture may be more robust than some might think. While stay at home trends from COVID certainly drove outsized eCommerce growth from 2019 to 2021, we found the trend should stay stronger for longer, with eCommerce set to grow from $3.3 trillion currently to $5.4 trillion in 2026, a compound annual growth rate of 10%. And there are a few reasons for that. First, the shift toward online retail had already been in place well before the COVID acceleration. To put some numbers behind that, eCommerce volumes represented 21% of overall retail sales globally in 2021. That's excluding autos, restaurants and services. So, while the rise of eCommerce during the first year of COVID in 2020 is easily explained, the fact that growth persisted in 2021, even on a historically difficult comparison, is evidence, in our view, of real behavioral shift to shopping online. Another factor that supports our multi year growth thesis is a trend of broad based eCommerce gains, even for the highest penetration countries and categories. As you might expect, China and the U.S. represent a sizable 64% of global eCommerce volumes, and these countries are the top drivers of our consolidated market estimates. But we see higher growth rates for lower penetrated regions, such as Latin America, Southeast Asia and Africa, as well as categories like grocery and personal care. Interestingly, however, in our findings, no country or vertical represented a single outsized growth driver. Looking at South Korea, which is the global leader in e-commerce, we expect an increase from 37% of retail sales in 2021 to 45% in 2026. For the electronics category worldwide, which leads all other major categories with 38% penetration, we forecast penetration reaching 43% in 2026. And while there are some headwinds due to logistics in certain countries and verticals, we believe these barriers will continue to come down. Another encouraging sign is that globally, we have yet to see a ceiling for eCommerce penetration. We identify three fundamental factors that underpin our growth forecasts and combine for what we see as a powerful set of multi-year secular drivers. First, logistics. We see a big push towards shorter delivery times and lower cost or free delivery. The convenience of delivery to the door is a top differentiating factor of eCommerce versus in-store shopping. And faster speeds can unlock new eCommerce categories and purchase occasions. Second, connectivity. Internet usage is shifting to mobile, and smartphones and apps are increasingly the gateway to consumers, particularly in emerging markets. And these consumers, on average, skew younger and over-index for time spent on the mobile internet. And third is Marketplace. We see a continued shift from first party owned inventory to third party marketplace platforms, connecting buyers and sellers. For investors, it's important to note that global eCommerce does not appear to be a winner-take-all market. And this implies opportunity for multiple company level beneficiaries. In particular, investors should look at companies with forecast share gains, exposure to higher growth categories, and discounted trading multiples versus history. Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed the show, please share Thoughts on the Market with a friend or colleague, or leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. It helps more people find the show.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
A real estate investor's guide to investing in agricultural land

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:08


Josh Ziegelbaum currently serves as Director of Investor Relations at Legacy Group and is based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He is responsible for managing investor communications, onboarding, individual and commercial clients, as well as overall support of company initiatives. The dynamic work experience Josh has gained throughout his career gives him a unique perspective on both sales and operations. Prior to joining Legacy Group, Josh worked as Vice President of Business Development for Lifeafar Capital, a boutique private equity and asset management firm where he led his team's capital-raising efforts. Before that, he was a Private Banker for Wells Fargo with a focus on complex credit needs and investments in public securities. During his time at Wells Fargo, Josh climbed through the ranks and received multiple internal recognitions and awards for his efforts. He most recently managed a book of business for high-net worth individuals and business owners in Miami Beach. Today, Josh shares about investing in ag land outside of the US and specifically in Colombia with a coffee company. Episode Links: https://legacy-group.co/ --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everyone? Welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. Today with me I have Josh Ziegelbaum, the director of Investor Relations at the legacy group and Josh is going to be talking to us today about investments in ag land outside of the US and specifically in Colombia with a coffee company. So let's get into it.   Before we jump in today's episode, I just want to speak really briefly about Roofstock Academy which is Rootstocks one stop shop for Investor Education, independent of where you are in your investing journey, whether you're just getting started or already have a sizable portfolio, we have something for you. Over 50 hours of on demand lecture access to private slack forums, one on one coaching as well as mastermind groups, depending on which program you end up enrolling in. We definitely want encourage you to come check us out. I look forward to seeing you there. Happy investing.   Josh, what's going on, man. Welcome to the Remote Real Estate Investor. Thanks for hanging out with me.   Josh: Hey, Michael, I'm happy to be here.   Michael: Awesome, so before we hit record here, we were chatting a little bit about your background. But for those people who weren't privy to that conversation, give us a quick and dirty who you are, where do you come from and what is it that you do in real estate today?   Josh: Sure, happy to dive into that. So my name is Josh Ziegelbaum. I'm the director of Investor Relations for legacy group. We're an alternative asset manager focused on real assets in Latin America, our niche in the real estate space will be agriculture. Our portfolio company Green Coffee Company is the second largest coffee producer in Colombia. Today, we have the business on track to be the largest this year. So that's the niche in which we're in. It's certainly different than the typical space that most guys invest in. But we love the alternative investment space. I've been working in this industry for the last few years, but in financial services for more than the last decade. Prior to doing this, I was a private banker with Wells Fargo, in New Jersey, and then in Miami Beach and I currently sit in Fort Lauderdale and support our teams capital raising efforts and investor relations across our portfolio companies.   Michael: Right on, so taking a step back, I mean, you mentioned is an alternative asset company or company focused on alternative asset, what's an alternative asset for someone that might not be familiar?   Josh: Sure, it's anything that falls out of your scope of traditional investments. So traditional assets would be stocks, bonds, cash and equivalents. So typical investor portfolio, you may have heard the 60-40 approach that 60% bonds, or sorry, 60% stocks, 40% bonds, depends on the age, of course and those are what's traditional. So a financial advisor in the traditional space will say, all right, based on your age, and risk tolerance, you should have X amount stock in your portfolio, X amount of bonds and this much cash alternatives would be things like gold, real estate, cryptocurrencies, private equity, anything that falls out of the scope of traditional asset classes, and they're a great, I'm not saying anything bad about traditional investments, but alternatives are a great way to diversify portfolios and most of our investors, you know, they have stocks and bonds and cash in their portfolio, and we're looking to complement that.   Michael: So Josh, why is it important, in your opinion, taking, you know, putting on your kind of financial hat for a minute, just from a personal standpoint, why is it important to have alternative assets? I mean, Why can't someone just go into the stock and bond and cash world? What attracted you?   Josh: Yeah, I mean, coming from that industry of traditional investments, portfolio management, kind of selling ETFs, mutual funds, individual securities, that everything's somewhat cut and dry and there's similar offerings across the board at all banks, right and, I mean, you could, you know, no matter what you do in your portfolio, if you have all stocks, months, like April, everything's going down, right. So I mean, stocks perform well, in the long term, but it's important to have parts of your portfolio that are entirely uncorrelated, and that could weather a recession and that can weather inflation, right. So if you look at the inflation rate today, I mean, we're clocking over 8% a year right now. So even the historical return of a stock portfolio, it's, it's basically at or below inflation, you can go in yeah, you want to add assets to your portfolio that are uncorrelated and that can also you know, beat that. So I was attracted to the industry by the high returns, the interesting offerings, you know, early stage investing is sexy. It's something cool and suddenly you can't get in a bank. So, you know, I was I was attracted by the projects and social and environmental impact of the projects and really, you know, bringing something unique and interesting to a client base that they otherwise wouldn't have access to.   Michael: Right on, and let's talk about you mentioned, uncorrelated for someone that might not be familiar with what correlation is, or how to be thinking about that, in terms of portfolio theory, making give us a quick rundown of how people should be thinking about that and really what correlation means.   Josh: Correlation essentially means that assets move in tandem with one another. So there's certain assets called risk assets, stocks that usually move in tandem. So when there's, you've heard, everyone's probably heard of the S&P 500, or the Dow Jones Industrial Average. So this tracks the movements of a basket of securities. However, if you actually look granularly, at each one of the securities that makes up the Dow Jones or the S&P and you look at it during a trading day, they somewhat move together. So I mean, while we're recording this markets recovering post lunch, and looking, if you look at the stocks that make up an index, almost all of them are recovering at the same time. So that's correlation, so you want to have assets that move in opposite directions, and that aren't all tied to one another. Another term for this in the industry would be beta. So a beta of one means that if the S&P goes up 1%, the underlying security in reference also goes up 1%. So a younger growth investor looks for high beta names. But at the same time, when the market goes down, all the high beta names go down at the same time. So look at taking a step back, and kind of looking at a typical portfolio of stocks and bonds, people are now starting to add other assets there. So maybe that's real estate that they own personally, real estate that they own in a syndicated manner, whether that be apartment buildings, or something similar to that. cryptocurrency is one, I mean, we're hearing from a lot of professionals, two to 5% of your portfolio should be in crypto assets. So that's one that wasn't really taught when I when I was studying finance, but that's emerged, right. So we're seeing this emergence of alternative investments, and it's becoming more widely accepted that they should be a part of an investor's portfolio in order to mitigate risk. hedge against inflation and increased upside potential.   Michael: Okay, right on. So and that's kind of where the legacy group comes in. That's an offering that you all have for investors and specifically, you said, in Latin America, ag land is that the main focus in Colombia, of course.   Josh: That is right now. So we're an asset manager, we're focusing on early stage investment opportunities in operating businesses. So the Green Coffee Company, our flagship portfolio company, is an operating business in the agricultural space. So we founded the company about five years ago, we've gone through several funding rounds brought in over $25 million of equity capital primarily from the US and we're deploying that and buying up real assets farmland in Sagar Colombia, it's two to three hours outside of managing and we're consolidating infrastructure and building a world class operation. It's collateralized like it like a real estate play, but our investors get the upside of an operating business, our goal is to continue to acquire farmland and grow and establish ourselves to be in a position to exit through a sale or an IPO. For our investor base.   Michael: What a cool kind of approach.   Josh: Yeah, it's a bit of a hybrid. So it's like different than, you know, a traditional agricultural investment where, well, it's kind of hard to describe a traditional because it's hard to access. But if you bought a plot of land, you have access to the, you know, the cash flow that's produced on that particular plot of land. In our model, we, our investors own a slice of a large, very large plot of land, you know, over 5000 acres right now is what we control and but they have higher upside than just the cash flow. So we're building out mechanisms in which we can use coffee byproduct to create possibly a liquor or southern other alternative. We're building out processing facilities, roasting channels are on the horizon. So investors not only own the land of the underlying business, but they have the left side of the operations and we think that markets will reward this type of business in the years to come for the reasons I mentioned, and also because of the impact, you know, we're doing a lot of things to lift up the community in which we operate. something really special, and I can attest to the fact that it's something really unique that I haven't seen in any other offering.   Michael: Interesting, so there's some wisdom out there that says don't invest in anything you don't understand, or you can't explain and so if someone doesn't have a clue about the club, be in coffee market or ag land in general, how should they get educated before making an investment like this?   Josh: Yeah, so I would encourage you to follow us on social subscribe to our newsletter, it takes time to get comfortable with the asset manager that you're working with and we put out regular content that educates you on the coffee industry shows us videos and footage from the farms. In terms of our management team. You know, we have world class operators on the ground in Colombia. We've hired a 25 year veteran of the Colombian agriculture industry, Boris Molnar, to head up the Green Coffee Company has it CEO, we have our chief agronomist, as the former agronomist for Starbucks in Colombia, we have a really strong team and within our investment materials, there's more details on the management team and more of an explanation of the process and, and in the model. So in order to get comfortable, I would subscribe to us request our offering docs hop on a call with me happy to address questions individually, but definitely it takes a bit of time, of course.   Michael: Okay, cool and you were talking about the return profile, potentially out beating are outpacing inflation and having a really attractive return compared to your traditional investments. What are you seeing in terms of returns to your investors over the last couple of years with Green Coffee Company?   Josh: Sure, we're about to launch our Series C funding round, we're expecting to launch that and in July, and our expectation is to do that, at $1,000 a share up from 700 a share in our series B round and we're currently forecasting 8x net returns for our investors or in terms of an IRR or internal rate of return 53% annualized through a 2026 exit. The value that we've delivered to date is up rounds for all of our earlier investors. The seed round was at $500 a share and most recently, our B was at 700. So we've delivered significant value for our investors through capital appreciation. But from here, there's even more upside, like I said at the current are what we're expecting to be the next funding round. We're forecasting 8x net returns way higher than the inflation rate in the US and forecasting right now.   Michael: That's awesome and so should investors expect a cash flow dividend or payment on any kind of regular frequency or not until the exit of the company are they IPO?   Josh: Yeah, that's a great question, Michael. So we are modeling in dividends and cashflow on an annual basis. In our investor presentation it's forecasted to begin in 2023 for the 2022 operating year, and to continuously pay dividends each year of throughout operations until we exit. It's mostly a growth investment. So the bulk of the return is going to be realized when we sell the business or we IPO. But there's definitely a cashflow component that that we're modeling in here.   Michael: Interesting, so in a syndication play, a lot of syndicators will give investors the opportunity at the exit to 1031 their money, keep their money with the operator, we're gonna go invest it into a new property, you're not going to pay any capital gains tax. How does it work with this because it's really a business more so than a real estate asset in the US specifically, because it's international, so how does that all work?   Josh: That's a great question, Michael. So we've structured the investment to be in the US. So our investors are receiving common equity in Green Coffee Company holdings and it's a US based investment for all intents and purposes, the assets are primarily in Colombia, but the structure of the business is here in the States. Now, once we exit, whether that if it's through an IPO, we would classify that as a liquidity event, investors would be able to sell their shares without a lockup period. But you're not forced to sell in the event of an IPO. Similar, like if someone comparatively if we're exiting a commercial real estate deal, you have to take your money out and like if they're selling or the refinancing, they're gonna give you your money out. But if we go public, there's optionality there, you could sell a portion you could sell all you could sell none, it's actually the investor could not realize any capital gains if they wanted to. Now, there's no ability to 1031 stocks, right. So even though there's underlying real estate, and it's a US based investment, there's no ability to do a 1031 exchange with this type of product. However, investors can invest in a tax deferred manner. We have people who invest in retirement accounts, traditional IRAs or Roth IRAs, so that they could essentially accomplish what you're saying, but within a retirement account, that's a way in which people could do it. I didn't mention this, but it's a it's open for accredited investors only. So it's a 506 C offering minimum investments 100,000 so most of our investors are high net worth or ultra are high net worth and it's a means in which to complement their current portfolio, but um, no ability on the 1031. But there's there are other tax advantages through an IRA that can be achieved.   Michael: Okay, interesting. Have you ever looked into qualified opportunity zones?   Josh: We have, so I have experience in that through another portfolio company of ours, we were developing opportunity's own projects in in Puerto Rico, which is a US territory. Now, the business as it relates to coffee, the coffee business, it's in the US, but the assets, the farmland, it's all in Colombia. So there's no the opportunity's own legislation is specific to the US and its territories. So that we unfortunately, we don't have ability to use utilize the opportunity's own legislation for this project.   Michael: But I'm wondering about actually going the other way with it. So if it's considered a stock and someone sells shares of their stock and has a capital gain, if they invest those gains into a fund, I think that there might be opportunity there as well.   Josh: That's right on the back end, if an investor I mean, assuming that the opportunity zone legislation remains intact, at the exit, right. When an investor gets a distribution, they could, like you said, theoretically identify and opportunities on investment to roll their capital gain into to relieve to alleviate some of the tax burden.   Michael: Yeah, but definitely talk to a tax professional before doing any of this stuff, because we're not tax advisers. It's really interesting. So I'm curious, Josh, I think a lot of investors, especially in the states understand some of the risks and the downside associated with real estate investing, specifically with regard to single family homes. That's why they have insurance, that sort of thing. What kind of risks and downsides are you seeing as potentials that people should be aware of in the coffee industry down in Colombia?   Josh: Yeah, I think the main one is weather. So you know, in agriculture, whether it's Columbia us, I mean, weather is something that needs to be mitigated. It's just the main risk when it comes to agriculture. Last year, the harvest in Colombia, it was lighter than expected across the board. There was also some adverse weather patterns in Brazil and other parts of the world. This pushed up coffee commodity prices dramatically, however, it lowered production of the farmland, so a bit of a double edged sword, we were able to benefit from the increase in prices. But there is some uncertainty as it relates to weather and we have to mitigate it. We use methods in which to monitor soil weather patterns and we have some world class technology on the farms in order to monitor and mitigate on the weather side and be proactive. But I would say that's a risk that investors need to be aware of, in the end.   Michael: It was great to know and you mentioned social and environmental impacts. Can you talk to that a little bit?   Josh: Sure, on the social side, it's my favorite one. So we're the largest start there. We're the largest employer in Sagar. It's a town in which we operate. We have great relationship with the mayor and the local officials there. We recently inaugurated a processing facility at the end of last year, we had the America mount the chief of police, the head of the Council of American enterprises doing business in the country and what we're doing in the community is something really special, we're providing fair and equal employment with above average wages, paid time off, fringe and benefits in an industry that does not have benefits, and that pays its employees with cash. So we're taking an industry that's done in this informal manner, and we're formalizing it and we're more really lifting up the community and you could see it when you're there. There's so much passion behind the work that's done by the employees. It's something it's really special to me, and we're employing several 100 people and growing and, yeah, we have an entire presentation on social and environmental impact. On the environmental side of some things that we're doing, we're planting the coffee with through a system called an Ella pod. It allows us to plant biodegradable pods for the new trees instead of coffee, but instead of plastic bags, so we're removing tons and tons of waste from the environment with our planting methods. On fertilizers, we're spraying the trees at the base. So we're reducing the amount of fertilizer that's used and we're also preventing harm to the surrounding area. We do reforestation and a lot of different things and we're working on a solar project. Now that's in the works. So a lot of things on the environmental side as well, I would say.   Michael: Very, very cool. So Josh, this has been super fun, man. Where can people learn more about you and learn more about Green Coffee Company get in touch with folks at Legacy group? How, you know, how should they go about doing that?   Josh: Yeah, definitely go to our website. That's legacy/group.co. Maybe we could put a link to that in the show notes, then our email address investor.relations@legacy/group.co and you can find us on social media through LinkedIn, Instagram, but definitely check out our website, subscribe to our newsletter. I think that's the best way to get in touch with us and always happy to connect for a call or through email as well.   Michael: Perfect, Josh, thank you so much. I really appreciate it and can't wait to stay in touch. see where this goes.   Josh: Thanks, Michael. Appreciate your time as well.   Michael: Hey, you got it, take care. So that was episode everyone a big thank you to Josh for coming on super interesting business model with that hybrid approach of kind of stock company private equity as well as the real estate side of things. So definitely go give their company website at checkout. As always, if you liked the episode, please feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever you get your podcasts these are really, really, really helpful for us, and we look forward to seeing our next one. Happy investing…

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2838 - What Is The Future Of Sex? w/ Amia Srinivasan & Melanie D'Arrigo

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 78:47


Emma hosts Amia Srinivasan, Professor of Social and Political Theory at the University of Oxford, to discuss her recent book The Right to Sex: Feminism in the 21st Century. Then Emma is joined by Melanie D'Arrigo, candidate for Congress in New York's 3rd district, to give us an update from the campaign trail. Prof. Srinivasan and Emma dive right into the biggest news of the last two weeks, taking on their initial reactions to the Roe v. Wade leak, from the instinctive and personal horror to deranged awe for the American conservatives seeing their strategy of the last half-century finally come to fruition, before getting into the questions this decision raises and what the future of reproductive rights looks like when the party defending them is constantly inert. Next, they turn to Professor Srinivasan's book, looking at the divide between the sphere of politics and the private sphere, and how she follows in the path of emphasizing the inherently political nature of feminism and sex. First looking to the feminisms of the ‘60s and '70, Emma and Amia discuss this repoliticization of private issues, as concepts like abortion, family structure, childcare, and education became central to the feminist fight, alongside a birth of sex positivity, before the ‘80s rolled around and saw pushback amidst feelings of encouraging sex on men's terms, looking beyond just consent at the larger coercive factors. This brings Professor Srinivasan to an analysis of the neoliberal market ideology, with consent and contracts as the only moral factor, considering sexual freedom along the same lines of tradeoffs, particularly around status, and how this analysis can be used to pushback, particularly against incel misogyny. They then look to the development of feminisms' stances on porn, with the antithesis to sex positivity seeing porn as the lynchpin of patriarchy and a training ground for men's subjugation of women, despite the large inaccessibility of porn at the time, before the boom of the internet in the 21st Century saw it become almost ubiquitous in much of the Western world, and thus plagued by monopoly and corruption as a neoliberal institution. Emma and Amia pin that conversation with a discussion on the importance of a sex-worker-owned-and-led world of porn as the only one where they can have a sense of security, before they wrap up the interview with a discussion on #MeToo, and the racialization and classism involved in rape accusations and where they go in the legal world. Then, Melanie D'Arrigo discusses her campaign in NY-3, and engaging as a progressive with notoriously conservative constituents. Emma also covers Israel's murder of journalist Shereen Abu Aqleh, Finland getting closer to joining NATO, and Manchin's objection to giving women rights, when that's not what some Americans want! And in the Fun Half: Emma is joined by Matt and Brandon as they listen in awe to Randy Zuckerberg's crypto anthem sequel, before having an extensive discussion on the recent crypto collapse and the role of Luna and Terra currencies in the drop. Bryan in the Poconos gives some updates on the PA Senate race on both the left and right, Ned Price, representing Biden's administration, does anything but address Israeli war crimes, entrusting the IDF to investigate whether or not they're murderers, and the crew discusses constitutional reform and Latin America. Jordan Peterson declares the Bible as the basis for truth itself and Dennis Prager gets covid (again), plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Amia's book here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374721039/therighttosex Check out Melanie's campaign here: https://darrigo2022.com/ Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Latino Rebels Radio
The Green Wave

Latino Rebels Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:39


Following last week's Supreme Court draft opinion leak that may mark the end of abortion rights in the U.S., Latino Rebels Radio host Julio Ricardo Varela speaks with journalist Juanita Ramos Ardila to discuss why some countries in Latin America are going in the other direction and how feminist groups in Colombia, Mexico and Argentina are leading the charge.

35 West
Sharpening the Democratic Playbook

35 West

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:34


Around the world, democratic institutions have come under siege, while consolidation within and between autocratic regimes has accelerated in recent years. As it becomes increasingly evident that autocrats are following a shared ‘playbook,' it is of extreme importance that democracies build their own set of shared tactics for promoting civil and political rights, defending electoral integrity, and sustaining rule of law. In this episode, Ryan C. Berg sits down with Christopher Sabatini, Senior Research Fellow for Latin America, the US and the Americas Programme at Chatham House. Together, they outline what the international community can do to push back on rising authoritarianism, and empower democracy defenders. They focus in particular on the case of Venezuela, considering the options available for the opposition, United States, and global democratic community for dismantling Maduro's dictatorial playbook. 

Fifteen Minutes of Fascism
Episode 107: Wait, the CIA *Doesn't* Want a Coup in Latin America?

Fifteen Minutes of Fascism

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 15:13


Episode 107: Wait, the CIA *Doesn't* Want a Coup in Latin America? by Craig Johnson

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville
Season 3: Episode 6 - Pulpo Beer Company

Pint Talking with The Brewer of Seville

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 111:43


This week Bob and I talk about the upcoming Ashland Alefest which takes place on 6/18. We also discuss the Ohio breweries that brought home wins at this year World Beer Cup. Thirteen Ohio Breweries brought home 15 medals. We also discuss BrewDog owner James Watt giving up 5% of his stake in the company to employees. In the second half of the show I traveled to Willoughby, Ohio to talk to Paola Valbuena and Jon Hill from Pulpo Beer Company. Pulpo is the first Latin owned brewery in the state of Ohio. They bring a taste of Latin America to all of their beers on tap. During the interview we talked about their expansion to Crocker Park where they will open a tap room that features 24 different beers ready to serve. Don't forget to join the Pint Club by visiting my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/PintTalkingPintClub There are three tier levels and when you join the Pint Club you will get an opportunity to win a six pack of Ohio beer that is shipped by Rivalry Brews https://rivalrybrews.com/. You will also get a few coupon codes, and once every month you will be invited to a one-hour Q&A session on Facebook in which you can ask them anything you want about craft beer and the industry. In the very near future patrons will gain access to exclusive content that no one else is going to hear. Make sure you visit Pulpo Beer Company on the web at https://www.pulpobeerco.com/ to see what they are brewing up. You can also follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pulpobeerco and on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/pulpobeerco/ Don't forget to visit my website at https://www.thebrewerofseville.com/ to catch up on old episodes and visit the BOS swag store. Make sure you check out our friends at  Wrecking Crew Brew Works on the web at https://www.wreckingcrewbrewworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Wreckingcrewbrewworks and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wreckingcrewbrewworks You can also check out the Medina Brewery Passport on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MedinaCountyBreweryPassport/ Get ready for the Ashland Ale Fest on June 18th from 4pm to 8pm in Downtown Ashland Ohio. There will be somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 to 30 breweries for this event and there will only be 900 tickets available. Make sure that you don't miss out as ticket sales will end by June 8th. I will be giving away a pair of tickets the week before the show to someone that completes the following tasks. Like and Follow me on Facebook Like and Follow me on Instagram Email feedback@thebrewerofseville.com or call the hotline at 33-271-0874 and tell us why you deserve to go to the second annual Ashland Alefest Follow the link to the ticket site and get yourself primed up for a night of fun and excitement in Ashland, Ohio. Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ashland-ale-fest-tickets-330653532617?aff=ebdssbdestsearch Make sure you check out this week's sponsors Blue Cooler  - Shop for a high quality cooler at half the price. Go to: https://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&merchant_id=fdaa7e76-35bf-4f93-a2f2-0ba0fd3f2dcd&website_id=1b4fdbbe-e41e-40ba-a3b4-8cd9bcb808a9&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbluecoolers.com%2F Also don't forget to visit Shirts on Tap at https://shirtsontap.com/ and use the code rq7szr  For $10 off your first order.  

Worthless Servants
132. Fry Farewell

Worthless Servants

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 43:26


After 5 years and 132 episodes, AJ and Chelsea say goodbye to the Dominican Republic. Although their ministry in Latin America comes to a close, they will be starting a new chapter in another urban district. The Worthless Servants asked them to reflect on their time in the D.R. as well as what they have enjoyed or will miss the most. They may be leaving the podcast and the D.R., but they will need your good wishes and continued prayer support in the States! Stay tuned for an epic surprise at the end of the episode, as well.

The Whole Word Podcast
[Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Matthew 04 - What Were the Supernatural Temptations of Jesus?

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:58


Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Matthew 04Jesus Is Tested in the Wilderness (v 1-11)Jesus Begins to Preach (v 12-17)Jesus Calls His First Disciples (v 18-22)Jesus Heals the Sick (v 23-25)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

Learn Spanish with Live Lingua
1.5: Honorifics in Spanish

Learn Spanish with Live Lingua

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:18


Welcome to episode 1.5 of the Live Lingua Spanish Podcast. In this m-episode, we are going to learn about honorifics in Spanish. I'll be honest — when I started learning Spanish, I didn't actually know what an honorific was. It wasn't until I started learning another language that I actually learned that that was the word we use for titles — such as Mrs., Mr., and Dr. In this exercise, we're going to learn some of these titles. Side note — In Mexico and the rest of Latin America, they put a lot of emphasis on these titles. It's very important that you call them Señor, Señora, Señorita. If you know they have a college degree or a Masters, they even have a title for that — and you're going to learn this in this episode. It can be difficult for somebody who is not a native Spanish speaker to pick up on this in the beginning. But really put in the effort — in addition to the titles, you have to remember the gender. Enjoy the m-episode.  Let's get started.  Empezamos.

Consider This from NPR
How Abortion Laws Around The World Compare To The U.S.

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:18


Some countries in Latin America are expanding abortion rights. Other countries, like Poland, have all but outlawed the procedure. Meanwhile, health officials in Canada have signaled Americans would be welcome to seek abortion services across the border if they cannot access care at home. All of that speaks to the reality that America's abortion debate is not happening in vacuum, and is being watched closely around the world.Mary Louise Kelly spoke about how abortion laws around the world compare to those in the U.S., with NPR correspondents Mara Liasson in Washington D.C., Philip Reeves in Brazil, and Rob Schmitz in Germany. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
#194 - Tono Mandly, Riogrande: Taking on the $100B LATAM DTC Market

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 40:14


Tono Mandly stopped by DTC Pod's Miami studio to discuss the current consumer landscape in Latin America and how Riogrande is filling a gap in the consumer market, the startup scene in LatAm, the challenges of building in Latin America, and the incredible potential for this $100 billion e-commerce market.3:47 - 10:22 Tono's background10:36 - 14:22 Ecommerce landscape in LatAm14:28 - 16:47 Challenges in LatAm Ecommerce17:03 - 21:18 What is Riogrande21:21 - 23:46 Consumer landscape in LatAm26:22 - 29:12 Operating in different countries 30:07 - 33:59 Startup scene in LatAm34:17 - 36:12 Fixing the lack of trust between consumers and businesses38:12 - 40:10 Opportunity in LatAm40:12 - 41:53 VCs in LatAM 41:55 - 43:07 Who should join YC This episode is brought to you by OpenStore:Visit https://open.store to get a free, no-obligation offer for your e-commerce business from OpenStore in 24 hours. Have any questions about the show or topics you'd like us to explore further? Shoot us a DM; we'd love to hear from you.Follow us for content, clips, giveaways, & updates!DTCPod InstagramDTCPod TwitterDTCPod TikTokTono Mandly- CEO of RiograndeRamon Berrios - CEO of Trend.ioBlaine Bolus - COO of OmniPanel

Design in Transition/Diseño en Transición
EP.25 Jorge Camacho: Transiciones, diseños y futuros, visiones latinoamericanas [ESP]

Design in Transition/Diseño en Transición

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 39:58


ESP Para el episodio final de nuestra segunda temporada quisimos retomar el tema de diseño, transiciones y futuros, ahora desde una perspectiva latinoamericana. Charlamos con Jorge Camacho, docente e investigador mexicano que enfoca su práctica en el diseño prospectivo y estratégico. Invitamos a Jorge a escuchar el primer episodio de esta segunda temporada grabado con Terry Irwin y Gideon Kossoff como punto de partida para tener una conversación sobre las posibilidades del Transition Design en América Latina. En este episodio completamente en español, Jorge nos cuenta sobre su trabajo en temas de futuros y diseño. Además, nos invita a reflexionar sobre América Latina como un terreno fertil para nuevas prácticas del diseño donde el cambio ha sido una constante. La producción de audio fue hecha por Kyle Leve. En este episodio, Sofía Bosch Gómez, Silvana Juri y Marysol Ortega Pallanez entrevistaron a Jorge Camacho. La producción de este podcast se hizo con el apoyo de la Escuela de Diseño de la Universidad Carnegie Mellon. ENG For the final episode of our second season, we wanted to circle back to the connection between design, transitions, and futures from a Latin American perspective. We spoke to Jorge Camacho, Mexican researcher, professor and designer whose practice focuses on prospective and strategic design. We invited Jorge to listen to the first episode of this second season, recorded with Terry Irwin and Gideon Kossoff, as a starting point to have a conversation about the possibilities of Transition Design in Latin America. In this episode, entirely in Spanish, Jorge talks about his work on futures and design. In addition, he opens the conversation on Latin America as a fertile ground for new design practices, a ground where change has been a constant. Audio production by Kyle Leve. In this episode, Sofía Bosch Gómez, Silvana Juri and Marysol Ortega Pallanez interviewed Jorge Camacho. The production of this podcast was carried out with the support of the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University.

World in Progress | Deutsche Welle
World in Progress: Vulnerable

World in Progress | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 29:59


Refugees fleeing from the war in Ukraine run the risk of falling into the hands of human traffickers. RT (formerly known as Russia Today) has a huge influence on Latin America. And why Iraq's farmers are barely making a living anymore.

Take as Directed
Yasmeen Abutaleb: "No One has Succeeded in Predicting What is Going to Happen."

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:46


Yasmeen Abutaleb, health policy reporter at The Washington Post, joins Steve Morrison and Andrew Schwartz for this 136th episode. The Biden administration struggles on multiple fronts, from systemic dysfunction within agencies to increased polarization of virtually every measures to mitigate Covid-19. The administration wants to invest in a long-term vaccine strategy that protects against multiple variants in advance -- but lacks the resources. Omicron taught us:  "You can't start buying stuff when the wave has started.” "The disinformation problem is so widespread"  that "… everyone in the Biden administration is going to be distrusted by half of America." The US government has not staged a powerful Covid-19 messaging campaign on social media, and a national commission on the pandemic, with real bipartisan leadership, remains out of reach.  Courts are exercising considerable sway over health security policy which require a careful political calculations. Would appealing federal Judge Mizell's April 18 injunction against the national mask mandate on transport ultimately leave the CDC in a weakened position? Americans continue to experience the pandemic in vastly different ways, depending on socio-economic profile. Many who have protections through vaccines and treatments may feel they will be exempt from infection, yet they make up a significant share of those experiencing severe illness. 

The LAFS Podcast
NFTs, ARTivismo y la conmovedora historia de Annaiss Yucra

The LAFS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 44:58


La innovación es su Norte y la conmovdedora historia de las mujeres de su familia, lo que la impulsa a hacer de su arte un proyecto con impacto positivo. En nuestra última conversación en The LAFS Podcast junto a Annaiss Yucra, la diseñadora peruana ganadora del Pitch to LAFS en la categoría Proyecto de Impacto Positivo, la misma nos cuenta los detalles acerca de su entrada al Metaverso, recuerda las manifestaciones más impactantes de su marca, y narra la conmovedora historia de las mujeres de su familia. ¡No te lo pierdas!

Screaming in the Cloud
Reliability Starts in Cultural Change with Amy Tobey

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:37


About AmyAmy Tobey has worked in tech for more than 20 years at companies of every size, working with everything from kernel code to user interfaces. These days she spends her time building an innovative Site Reliability Engineering program at Equinix, where she is a principal engineer. When she's not working, she can be found with her nose in a book, watching anime with her son, making noise with electronics, or doing yoga poses in the sun.Links Referenced: Equinix Metal: https://metal.equinix.com Personal Twitter: https://twitter.com/MissAmyTobey Personal Blog: https://tobert.github.io/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. “Screaming in the Cloud” listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while I catch up with someone that it feels like I've known for ages, and I realize somehow I have never been able to line up getting them on this show as a guest. Today is just one of those days. And my guest is Amy Tobey who has been someone I've been talking to for ages, even in the before-times, if you can remember such a thing. Today, she's a Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix. Amy, thank you for finally giving in to my endless wheedling.Amy: Thanks for having me. You mentioned the before-times. Like, I remember it was, like, right before the pandemic we had beers in San Francisco wasn't it? There was Ian there—Corey: Yeah, I—Amy: —and a couple other people. It was a really great time. And then—Corey: I vaguely remember beer. Yeah. And then—Amy: And then the world ended.Corey: Oh, my God. Yes. It's still March of 2020, right?Amy: As far as I know. Like, I haven't checked in a couple years.Corey: So, you do an awful lot. And it's always a difficult question to ask someone, so can you encapsulate your entire existence in a paragraph? It's—Amy: [sigh].Corey: —awful, so I'd like to give a bit more structure to it. Let's start with the introduction: You are a Senior Principal Engineer. We know it's high level because of all the adjectives that get put in there, and none of those adjectives are ‘associate' or ‘beginner' or ‘junior,' or all the other diminutives that companies like to play games with to justify paying people less. And you're at Equinix, which is a company that is a bit unlike most of the, shall we say, traditional cloud providers. What do you do over there and both as a company, as a person?Amy: So, as a company Equinix, what most people know about is that we have a whole bunch of data centers all over the world. I think we have the most of any company. And what we do is we lease out space in that data center, and then we have a number of other products that people don't know as well, which one is Equinix Metal, which is what I specifically work on, where we rent you bare-metal servers. None of that fancy stuff that you get any other clouds on top of it, there's things you can get that are… partner things that you can add-on, like, you know, storage and other things like that, but we just deliver you bare-metal servers with really great networking. So, what I work on is the reliability of that whole system. All of the things that go into provisioning the servers, making them come up, making sure that they get delivered to the server, make sure the API works right, all of that stuff.Corey: So, you're on the Equinix cloud side of the world more so than you are on the building data centers by the sweat of your brow, as they say?Amy: Correct. Yeah, yeah. Software side.Corey: Excellent. I spent some time in data centers in the early part of my career before cloud ate that. That was sort of cotemporaneous with the discovery that I'm the hardware destruction bunny, and I should go to great pains to keep my aura from anything expensive and important, like, you know, the SAN. So—Amy: Right, yeah.Corey: Companies moving out of data centers, and me getting out was a great thing.Amy: But the thing about SANs though, is, like, it might not be you. They're just kind of cursed from the start, right? They just always were kind of fussy and easy to break.Corey: Oh, yeah. I used to think—and I kid you not—that I had a limited upside to my career in tech because I sometimes got sloppy and I was fairly slow at crimping ethernet cables.Amy: [laugh].Corey: That is very similar to growing up in third grade when it became apparent that I was going to have problems in my career because my handwriting was sloppy. Yeah, it turns out the future doesn't look like we predicted it would.Amy: Oh, gosh. Are we going to talk about, like, neurological development now or… [laugh] okay, that's a thing I struggle with, too right, is I started typing as soon as they would let—in fact, before they would let me. I remember in high school, I had teachers who would grade me down for typing a paper out. They want me to handwrite it and I would go, “Cool. Go ahead and take a grade off because if I handwrite it, you're going to take two grades off my handwriting, so I'm cool with this deal.”Corey: Yeah, it was pretty easy early on. I don't know when the actual shift was, but it became more and more apparent that more and more things are moving towards a world where you could type. And I was almost five when I started working on that stuff, and that really wound up changing a lot of aspects of how I started seeing things. One thing I think you're probably fairly well known for is incidents. I want to be clear when I say that you are not the root cause as—“So, why are things broken?” “It's Amy again. What's she gotten into this time?” Great.Amy: [laugh]. But it does happen, but not all the time.Corey: Exa—it's a learning experience.Amy: Right.Corey: You've also been deeply involved with SREcon and a number of—a lot of aspects of what I will term—and please don't yell at me for this—SRE culture—Amy: Yeah.Corey: Which is sometimes a challenging thing to wind up describing or putting a definition around. The one that I've always been somewhat partial to is, “SRE is DevOps, except you worked at Google for a while.” I don't know how necessarily accurate that is, but it does rile people up.Amy: Yeah, it does. Dave Stanke actually did a really great talk at SREcon San Francisco just a couple weeks ago, about the DORA report. And the new DORA report, they split SRE out into its own function and kind of is pushing against that old model, which actually comes from Liz Fong-Jones—I think it's from her, or older—about, like, class SRE implements DevOps, which is kind of this idea that, like, SREs make DevOps happen. Things have evolved, right, since then. Things have evolved since Google released those books, and we're all just figured out what works and what doesn't a little bit.And so, it's not that we're implementing DevOps so much. In fact, it's that ops stuff that kind of holds us back from the really high impact work that SREs, I think, should be doing, that aren't just, like, fixing the problems, the symptoms down at the bottom layer, right? Like what we did as sysadmins 20 years ago. You know, we'd go and a lot of people are SREs that came out of the sysadmin world and still think in that mode, where it's like, “Well, I set up the systems, and when things break, I go and I fix them.” And, “Why did the developers keep writing crappy code? Why do I have to always getting up in the middle of the night because this thing crashed?”And it turns out that the work we need to do to make things more reliable, there's a ceiling to how far away the platform can take us, right? Like, we can have the best platform in the world with redundancy, and, you know, nine-way replicated data storage and all this crazy stuff, and still if we put crappy software on top, it's going to be unreliable. So, how do we make less crappy software? And for most of my career, people would be, like, “Well, you should test it.” And so, we started doing that, and we still have crappy software, so what's going on here? We still have incidents.So, we write more tests, and we still have incidents. We had a QA group, we still have incidents. We send the developers to training, and we still have incidents. So like, what is the thing we need to do to make things more reliable? And it turns out, most of it is culture work.Corey: My perspective on this stems from being a grumpy old sysadmin. And at some point, I started calling myself a systems engineer or DevOps or production engineer, or SRE. It was all from my point of view, the same job, but you know, if you call yourself a sysadmin, you're just asking for a 40% pay cut off the top.Amy: [laugh].Corey: But I still tended to view the world through that lens. I tended to be very good at Linux systems internals, for example, understanding system calls and the rest, but increasingly, as the DevOps wave or SRE wave, or Google-isation of the internet wound up being more and more of a thing, I found myself increasingly in job interviews, where, “Great, now, can you go wind up implementing a sorting algorithm on the whiteboard?” “What on earth? No.” Like, my lingua franca is shitty Bash, and no one tends to write that without a bunch of tab completions and quick checking with manpages—die.net or whatnot—on the fly as you go down that path.And it was awful, and I felt… like my skill set was increasingly eroding. And it wasn't honestly until I started this place where I really got into writing a fair bit of code to do different things because it felt like an orthogonal skill set, but the fullness of time, it seems like it's not. And it's a reskilling. And it made me wonder, does this mean that the areas of technology that I focused on early in my career, was that all a waste? And the answer is not really. Sometimes, sure, in that I don't spend nearly as much time worrying about inodes—for example—as I once did. But every once in a while, I'll run into something and I looked like a wizard from the future, but instead, I'm a wizard from the past.Amy: Yeah, I find that a lot in my work, now. Sometimes things I did 20 years ago, come back, and it's like, oh, yeah, I remember I did all that threading work in 2002 in Perl, and I learned everything the very, very, very hard way. And then, you know, this January, did some threading work to fix some stability issues, and all of it came flooding back, right? Just that the experiences really, more than the code or the learning or the text and stuff; more just the, like, this feels like threads [BLEEP]-ery. Is a diagnostic thing that sometimes we have to say.And then people are like, “Can you prove it?” And I'm like, “Not really,” because it's literally thread [BLEEP]-ery. Like, the definition of it is that there's weird stuff happening that we can't figure out why it's happening. There's something acting in the system that isn't synchronized, that isn't connected to other things, that's happening out of order from what we expect, and if we had a clear signal, we would just fix it, but we don't. We just have, like, weird stuff happening over here and then over there and over there and over there.And, like, that tells me there's just something happening at that layer and then have to go and dig into that right, and like, just basically charge through. My colleagues are like, “Well, maybe you should look at this, and go look at the database,” the things that they're used to looking at and that their experiences inform, whereas then I bring that ancient toiling through the threading mines experiences back and go, “Oh, yeah. So, let's go find where this is happening, where people are doing dangerous things with threads, and see if we can spot something.” But that came from that experience.Corey: And there's so much that just repeats itself. And history rhymes. The challenge is that, do you have 20 years of experience, or do you have one year of experience repeated 20 times? And as the tide rises, doing the same task by hand, it really is just a matter of time before your full-time job winds up being something a piece of software does. An easy example is, “Oh, what's your job?” “I manually place containers onto specific hosts.” “Well, I've got news for you, and you're not going to like it at all.”Amy: Yeah, yeah. I think that we share a little bit. I'm allergic to repeated work. I don't know if allergic is the right word, but you know, if I sit and I do something once, fine. Like, I'll just crank it out, you know, it's this form, or it's a datafile I got to write and I'll—fine I'll type it in and do the manual labor.The second time, the difficulty goes up by ten, right? Like, just mentally, just to do it, be like, I've already done this once. Doing it again is anathema to everything that I am. And then sometimes I'll get through it, but after that, like, writing a program is so much easier because it's like exponential, almost, growth in difficulty. You know, the third time I have to do the same thing that's like just typing the same stuff—like, look over here, read this thing and type it over here—I'm out; I can't do it. You know, I got to find a way to automate. And I don't know, maybe normal people aren't driven to live this way, but it's kept me from getting stuck in those spots, too.Corey: It was weird because I spent a lot of time as a consultant going from place to place and it led to some weird changes. For example, “Oh, thank God, I don't have to think about that whole messaging queue thing.” Sure enough, next engagement, it's message queue time. Fantastic. I found that repeating myself drove me nuts, but you also have to be very sensitive not to wind up, you know, stealing IP from the people that you're working with.Amy: Right.Corey: But what I loved about the sysadmin side of the world is that the vast majority of stuff that I've taken with me, lives in my shell config. And what I mean by that is I'm not—there's nothing in there is proprietary, but when you have a weird problem with trying to figure out the best way to figure out which Ruby process is stealing all the CPU, great, turns out that you can chain seven or eight different shell commands together through a bunch of pipes. I don't want to remember that forever. So, that's the sort of thing I would wind up committing as I learned it. I don't remember what company I picked that up at, but it was one of those things that was super helpful.I have a sarcastic—it's a one-liner, except no sane editor setting is going to show it in any less than three—of a whole bunch of Perl, piped into du, piped into the rest, that tells you one of the largest consumers of files in a given part of the system. And it rates them with stars and it winds up doing some neat stuff. I would never sit down and reinvent something like that today, but the fact that it's there means that I can do all kinds of neat tricks when I need to. It's making sure that as you move through your career, on some level, you're picking up skills that are repeatable and applicable beyond one company.Amy: Skills and tooling—Corey: Yeah.Amy: —right? Like, you just described the tool. Another SREcon talk was John Allspaw and Dr. Richard Cook talking about above the line; below the line. And they started with these metaphors about tools, right, showing all the different kinds of hammers.And if you're a blacksmith, a lot of times you craft specialized hammers for very specific jobs. And that's one of the properties of a tool that they were trying to get people to think about, right, is that tools get crafted to the job. And what you just described as a bespoke tool that you had created on the fly, that kind of floated under the radar of intellectual property. [laugh].So, let's not tell the security or IP people right? Like, because there's probably billions and billions of dollars of technically, like, made-up IP value—I'm doing air quotes with my fingers—you know, that's just basically people's shell profiles. And my God, the Emacs automation that people have done. If you've ever really seen somebody who's amazing at Emacs and is 10, 20, 30, maybe 40 years of experience encoded in their emacs settings, it's a wonder to behold. Like, I look at it and I go, “Man, I wish I could do that.”It's like listening to a really great guitar player and be like, “Wow, I wish I could play like them.” You see them just flying through stuff. But all that IP in there is both that person's collection of wisdom and experience and working with that code, but also encodes that stuff like you described, right? It's just all these little systems tricks and little fiddly commands and things we don't want to remember and so we encode them into our toolset.Corey: Oh, yeah. Anything I wound up taking, I always would share it with people internally, too. I'd mention, “Yeah, I'm keeping this in my shell files.” Because I disclosed it, which solves a lot of the problem. And also, none of it was even close to proprietary or anything like that. I'm sorry, but the way that you wind up figuring out how much of a disk is being eaten up and where in a more pleasing way, is not a competitive advantage. It just isn't.Amy: It isn't to you or me, but, you know, back in the beginning of our careers, people thought it was worth money and should be proprietary. You know, like, oh, that disk-checking script as a competitive advantage for our company because there are only a few of us doing this work. Like, it was actually being able to, like, manage your—[laugh] actually manage your servers was a competitive advantage. Now, it's kind of commodity.Corey: Let's also be clear that the world has moved on. I wound up buying a DaisyDisk a while back for Mac, which I love. It is a fantastic, pretty effective, “Where's all the stuff on your disk going?” And it does a scan and you can drive and collect things and delete them when trying to clean things out. I was using it the other day, so it's top of mind at the moment.But it's way more polished than that crappy Perl three-liner. And I see both sides, truly I do. The trick also, for those wondering [unintelligible 00:15:45], like, “Where is the line?” It's super easy. Disclose it, what you're doing, in those scenarios in the event someone is no because they believe that finding the right man page section for something is somehow proprietary.Great. When you go home that evening in a completely separate environment, build it yourself from scratch to solve the problem, reimplement it and save that. And you're done. There are lots of ways to do this. Don't steal from your employer, but your employer employs you; they don't own you and the way that you think about these problems.Every person I've met who has had a career that's longer than 20 minutes has a giant doc somewhere on some system of all of the scripts that they wound up putting together, all of the one-liners, the notes on, “Next time you see this, this is the thing to check.”Amy: Yeah, the cheat sheet or the notebook with all the little commands, or again the Emacs config, sometimes for some people, or shell profiles. Yeah.Corey: Here's the awk one-liner that I put that automatically spits out from an Apache log file what—the httpd log file that just tells me what are the most frequent talkers, and what are the—Amy: You should probably let go of that one. You know, like, I think that one's lifetime is kind of past, Corey. Maybe you—Corey: I just have to get it working with Nginx, and we're good to go.Amy: Oh, yeah, there you go. [laugh].Corey: Or S3 access logs. Perish the thought. But yeah, like, what are the five most high-volume talkers, and what are those relative to each other? Huh, that one thing seems super crappy and it's coming from Russia. But that's—hmm, one starts to wonder; maybe it's time to dig back in.So, one of the things that I have found is that a lot of the people talking about SRE seem to have descended from an ivory tower somewhere. And they're talking about how some of the best-in-class companies out there, renowned for their technical cultures—at least externally—are doing these things. But there's a lot more folks who are not there. And honestly, I consider myself one of those people who is not there. I was a competent engineer, but never a terrific one.And looking at the way this was described, I often came away thinking, “Okay, it was the purpose of this conference talk just to reinforce how smart people are, and how I'm not,” and/or, “There are the 18 cultural changes you need to make to your company, and then you can do something kind of like we were just talking about on stage.” It feels like there's a combination of problems here. One is making this stuff more accessible to folks who are not themselves in those environments, and two, how to drive cultural change as an individual contributor if that's even possible. And I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you have thoughts on both aspects of that, and probably some more hit me, please.Amy: So, the ivory tower, right. Let's just be straight up, like, the ivory tower is Google. I mean, that's where it started. And we get it from the other large companies that, you know, want to do conference talks about what this stuff means and what it does. What I've kind of come around to in the last couple of years is that those talks don't really reach the vast majority of engineers, they don't really apply to a large swath of the enterprise especially, which is, like, where a lot of the—the bulk of our industry sits, right? We spend a lot of time talking about the darlings out here on the West Coast in high tech culture and startups and so on.But, like, we were talking about before we started the show, right, like, the interior of even just America, is filled with all these, like, insurance and banks and all of these companies that are cranking out tons of code and servers and stuff, and they're trying to figure out the same problems. But they're structured in companies where their tech arm is still, in most cases, considered a cost center, often is bundled under finance, for—that's a whole show of itself about that historical blunder. And so, the tech culture is tend to be very, very different from what we experience in—what do we call it anymore? Like, I don't even want to say West Coast anymore because we've gone remote, but, like, high tech culture we'll say. And so, like, thinking about how to make SRE and all this stuff more accessible comes down to, like, thinking about who those engineers are that are sitting at the computers, writing all the code that runs our banks, all the code that makes sure that—I'm trying to think of examples that are more enterprise-y right?Or shoot buying clothes online. You go to Macy's for example. They have a whole bunch of servers that run their online store and stuff. They have internal IT-ish people who keep all this stuff running and write that code and probably integrating open-source stuff much like we all do. But when you go to try to put in a reliability program that's based on the current SRE models, like SLOs; you put in SLOs and you start doing, like, this incident management program that's, like, you know, you have a form you fill out after every incident, and then you [unintelligible 00:20:25] retros.And it turns out that those things are very high-level skills, skills and capabilities in an organization. And so, when you have this kind of IT mindset or the enterprise mindset, bringing the culture together to make those things work often doesn't happen. Because, you know, they'll go with the prescriptive model and say, like, okay, we're going to implement SLOs, we're going to start measuring SLIs on all of the services, and we're going to hold you accountable for meeting those targets. If you just do that, right, you're just doing more gatekeeping and policing of your tech environment. My bet is, reliability almost never improves in those cases.And that's been my experience, too, and why I get charged up about this is, if you just go slam in these practices, people end up miserable, the practices then become tarnished because people experienced the worst version of them. And then—Corey: And with the remote explosion as well, it turns out that changing jobs basically means their company sends you a different Mac, and the next Monday, you wind up signing into a different Slack team.Amy: Yeah, so the culture really matters, right? You can't cover it over with foosball tables and great lunch. You actually have to deliver tools that developers want to use and you have to deliver a software engineering culture that brings out the best in developers instead of demanding the best from developers. I think that's a fundamental business shift that's kind of happening. If I'm putting on my wizard hat and looking into the future and dreaming about what might change in the world, right, is that there's kind of a change in how we do leadership and how we do business that's shifting more towards that model where we look at what people are capable of and we trust in our people, and we get more out of them, the knowledge work model.If we want more knowledge work, we need people to be happy and to feel engaged in their community. And suddenly we start to see these kind of generational, bigger-pie kind of things start to happen. But how do we get there? It's not SLOs. It maybe it's a little bit starting with incidents. That's where I've had the most success, and you asked me about that. So, getting practical, incident management is probably—Corey: Right. Well, as I see it, the problem with SLOs across the board is it feels like it's a very insular community so far, and communicating it to engineers seems to be the focus of where the community has been, but from my understanding of it, you absolutely need buy-in at significantly high executive levels, to at the very least by you air cover while you're doing these things and making these changes, but also to help drive that cultural shift. None of this is something I have the slightest clue how to do, let's be very clear. If I knew how to change a company's culture, I'd have a different job.Amy: Yeah. [laugh]. The biggest omission in the Google SRE books was [Ers 00:22:58]. There was a guy at Google named Ers who owns availability for Google, and when anything is, like, in dispute and bubbles up the management team, it goes to Ers, and he says, “Thou shalt…” right? Makes the call. And that's why it works, right?Like, it's not just that one person, but that system of management where the whole leadership team—there's a large, very well-funded team with a lot of power in the organization that can drive availability, and they can say, this is how you're going to do metrics for your service, and this is the system that you're in. And it's kind of, yeah, sure it works for them because they have all the organizational support in place. What I was saying to my team just the other day—because we're in the middle of our SLO rollout—is that really, I think an SLO program isn't [clear throat] about the engineers at all until late in the game. At the beginning of the game, it's really about getting the leadership team on board to say, “Hey, we want to put in SLIs and SLOs to start to understand the functioning of our software system.” But if they don't have that curiosity in the first place, that desire to understand how well their teams are doing, how healthy their teams are, don't do it. It's not going to work. It's just going to make everyone miserable.Corey: It feels like it's one of those difficult to sell problems as well, in that it requires some tooling changes, absolutely. It requires cultural change and buy-in and whatnot, but in order for that to happen, there has to be a painful problem that a company recognizes and is willing to pay to make go away. The problem with stuff like this is that once you pay, there's a lot of extra work that goes on top of it as well, that does not have a perception—rightly or wrongly—of contributing to feature velocity, of hitting the next milestone. It's, “Really? So, we're going to be spending how much money to make engineers happier? They should get paid an awful lot and they're still complaining and never seem happy. Why do I care if they're happy other than the pure mercenary perspective of otherwise they'll quit?” I'm not saying that it's not worth pursuing; it's not a worthy goal. I am saying that it becomes a very difficult thing to wind up selling as a product.Amy: Well, as a product for sure, right? Because—[sigh] gosh, I have friends in the space who work on these tools. And I want to be careful.Corey: Of course. Nothing but love for all of those people, let's be very clear.Amy: But a lot of them, you know, they're pulling metrics from existing monitoring systems, they are doing some interesting math on them, but what you get at the end is a nice service catalog and dashboard, which are things we've been trying to land as products in this industry for as long as I can remember, and—Corey: “We've got it this time, though. This time we'll crack the nut.” Yeah. Get off the island, Gilligan.Amy: And then the other, like, risky thing, right, is the other part that makes me uncomfortable about SLOs, and why I will often tell folks that I talk to out in the industry that are asking me about this, like, one-on-one, “Should I do it here?” And it's like, you can bring the tool in, and if you have a management team that's just looking to have metrics to drive productivity, instead of you know, trying to drive better knowledge work, what you get is just a fancier version of more Taylorism, right, which is basically scientific management, this idea that we can, like, drive workers to maximum efficiency by measuring random things about them and driving those numbers. It turns out, that doesn't really work very well, even in industrial scale, it just happened to work because, you know, we have a bloody enough society that we pushed people into it. But the reality is, if you implement SLOs badly, you get more really bad Taylorism that's bad for you developers. And my suspicion is that you will get worse availability out of it than you would if you just didn't do it at all.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: That is part of the problem is, in some cases, to drive some of these improvements, you have to go backwards to move forwards. And it's one of those, “Great, so we spent all this effort and money in the rest of now things are worse?” No, not necessarily, but suddenly are aware of things that were slipping through the cracks previously.Amy: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: Like, the most realistic thing about first The Phoenix Project and then The Unicorn Project, both by Gene Kim, has been the fact that companies have these problems and actively cared enough to change it. In my experience, that feels a little on the rare side.Amy: Yeah, and I think that's actually the key, right? It's for the culture change, and for, like, if you really looking to be, like, do I want to work at this company? Am I investing my myself in here? Is look at the leadership team and be, like, do these people actually give a crap? Are they looking just to punt another number down the road?That's the real question, right? Like, the technology and stuff, at the point where I'm at in my career, I just don't care that much anymore. [laugh]. Just… fine, use Kubernetes, use Postgres, [unintelligible 00:27:30], I don't care. I just don't. Like, Oracle, I might have to ask, you know, go to finance and be like, “Hey, can we spend 20 million for a database?” But like, nobody really asks for that anymore, so. [laugh].Corey: As one does. I will say that I mostly agree with you, but a technology that I found myself getting excited about, given the time of the recording on this is… fun, I spent a bit of time yesterday—from when we're recording this—teaching myself just enough Go to wind up being together a binary that I needed to do something actively ridiculous for my camera here. And I found myself coming away deeply impressed by a lot of things about it, how prescriptive it was for one, how self-contained for another. And after spending far too many years of my life writing shitty Perl, and shitty Bash, and worse Python, et cetera, et cetera, the prescriptiveness was great. The fact that it wound up giving me something I could just run, I could cross-compile for anything I need to run it on, and it just worked. It's been a while since I found a technology that got me this interested in exploring further.Amy: Go is great for that. You mentioned one of my two favorite features of Go. One is usually when a program compiles—at least the way I code in Go—it usually works. I've been working with Go since about 0.9, like, just a little bit before it was released as 1.0, and that's what I've noticed over the years of working with it is that most of the time, if you have a pretty good data structure design and you get the code to compile, usually it's going to work, unless you're doing weird stuff.The other thing I really love about Go and that maybe you'll discover over time is the malleability of it. And the reason why I think about that more than probably most folks is that I work on other people's code most of the time. And maybe this is something that you probably run into with your business, too, right, where you're working on other people's infrastructure. And the way that we encode business rules and things in the languages, in our programming language or our config syntax and stuff has a huge impact on folks like us and how quickly we can come into a situation, assess, figure out what's going on, figure out where things are laid out, and start making changes with confidence.Corey: Forget other people for a minute they're looking at what I built out three or four years ago here, myself, like, I look at past me, it's like, “What was that rat bastard thinking? This is awful.” And it's—forget other people's code; hell is your own code, on some level, too, once it's slipped out of the mental stack and you have to re-explore it and, “Oh, well thank God I defensively wound up not including any comments whatsoever explaining what the living hell this thing was.” It's terrible. But you're right, the other people's shell scripts are finicky and odd.I started poking around for help when I got stuck on something, by looking at GitHub, and a few bit of searching here and there. Even these large, complex, well-used projects started making sense to me in a way that I very rarely find. It's, “What the hell is that thing?” is my most common refrain when I'm looking at other people's code, and Go for whatever reason avoids that, I think because it is so prescriptive about formatting, about how things should be done, about the vision that it has. Maybe I'm romanticizing it and I'll hate it and a week from now, and I want to go back and remove this recording, but.Amy: The size of the language helps a lot.Corey: Yeah.Amy: But probably my favorite. It's more of a convention, which actually funny the way I'm going to talk about this because the two languages I work on the most right now are Ruby and Go. And I don't feel like two languages could really be more different.Syntax-wise, they share some things, but really, like, the mental models are so very, very different. Ruby is all the way in on object-oriented programming, and, like, the actual real kind of object-oriented with messaging and stuff, and, like, the whole language kind of springs from that. And it kind of requires you to understand all of these concepts very deeply to be effective in large programs. So, what I find is, when I approach Ruby codebase, I have to load all this crap into my head and remember, “Okay, so yeah, there's this convention, when you do this kind of thing in Ruby”—or especially Ruby on Rails is even worse because they go deep into convention over configuration. But what that's code for is, this code is accessible to people who have a lot of free cognitive capacity to load all this convention into their heads and keep it in their heads so that the code looks pretty, right?And so, that's the trade-off as you said, okay, my developers have to be these people with all these spare brain cycles to understand, like, why I would put the code here in this place versus this place? And all these, like, things that are in the code, like, very compact, dense concepts. And then you go to something like Go, which is, like, “Nah, we're not going to do Lambdas. Nah”—[laugh]—“We're not doing all this fancy stuff.” So, everything is there on the page.This drives some people crazy, right, is that there's all this boilerplate, boilerplate, boilerplate. But the reality is, I can read most Go files from top to the bottom and understand what the hell it's doing, whereas I can go sometimes look at, like, a Ruby thing, or sometimes Python and e—Perl is just [unintelligible 00:32:19] all the time, right, it's there's so much indirection. And it just be, like, “What the [BLEEP] is going on? This is so dense. I'm going to have to sit down and write it out in longhand so I can understand what the developer was even doing here.” And—Corey: Well, that's why I got the Mac Studio; for when I'm not doing A/V stuff with it, that means that I'll have one core that I can use for, you know, front-end processing and the rest, and the other 19 cores can be put to work failing to build Nokogiri in Ruby yet again.Amy: [laugh].Corey: I remember the travails of working with Ruby, and the problem—I have similar problems with Python, specifically in that—I don't know if I'm special like this—it feels like it's a SRE DevOps style of working, but I am grabbing random crap off a GitHub constantly and running it, like, small scripts other people have built. And let's be clear, I run them on my test AWS account that has nothing important because I'm not a fool that I read most of it before I run it, but I also—it wants a different version of Python every single time. It wants a whole bunch of other things, too. And okay, so I use ASDF as my version manager for these things, which for whatever reason, does not work for the way that I think about this ergonomically. Okay, great.And I wind up with detritus scattered throughout my system. It's, “Hey, can you make this reproducible on my machine?” “Almost certainly not, but thank you for asking.” It's like ‘Step 17: Master the Wolf' level of instructions.Amy: And I think Docker generally… papers over the worst of it, right, is when we built all this stuff in the aughts, you know, [CPAN 00:33:45]—Corey: Dev containers and VS Code are very nice.Amy: Yeah, yeah. You know, like, we had CPAN back in the day, I was doing chroots, I think in, like, '04 or '05, you know, to solve this problem, right, which is basically I just—screw it; I will compile an entire distro into a directory with a Perl and all of its dependencies so that I can isolate it from the other things I want to run on this machine and not screw up and not have these interactions. And I think that's kind of what you're talking about is, like, the old model, when we deployed servers, there was one of us sitting there and then we'd log into the server and be like, I'm going to install the Perl. You know, I'll compile it into, like, [/app/perl 558 00:34:21] whatever, and then I'll CPAN all this stuff in, and I'll give it over to the developer, tell them to set their shebang to that and everything just works. And now we're in a mode where it's like, okay, you got to set up a thousand of those. “Okay, well, I'll make a tarball.” [laugh]. But it's still like we had to just—Corey: DevOps, but [unintelligible 00:34:37] dev closer to ops. You're interrelating all the time. Yeah, then Docker comes along, and add dev is, like, “Well, here's the container. Good luck, asshole.” And it feels like it's been cast into your yard to worry about.Amy: Yeah, well, I mean, that's just kind of business, or just—Corey: Yeah. Yeah.Amy: I'm not sure if it's business or capitalism or something like that, but just the idea that, you know, if I can hand off the shitty work to some other poor schlub, why wouldn't I? I mean, that's most folks, right? Like, just be like, “Well”—Corey: Which is fair.Amy: —“I got it working. Like, my part is done, I did what I was supposed to do.” And now there's a lot of folks out there, that's how they work, right? “I hit done. I'm done. I shipped it. Sure. It's an old [unintelligible 00:35:16] Ubuntu. Sure, there's a bunch of shell scripts that rip through things. Sure”—you know, like, I've worked on repos where there's hundreds of things that need to be addressed.Corey: And passing to someone else is fine. I'm thrilled to do it. Where I run into problems with it is where people assume that well, my part was the hard part and anything you schlubs do is easy. I don't—Amy: Well, that's the underclass. Yeah. That's—Corey: Forget engineering for a second; I throw things to the people over in the finance group here at The Duckbill Group because those people are wizards at solving for this thing. And it's—Amy: Well, that's how we want to do things.Corey: Yeah, specialization works.Amy: But we have this—it's probably more cultural. I don't want to pick, like, capitalism to beat on because this is really, like, human cultural thing, and it's not even really particularly Western. Is the idea that, like, “If I have an underclass, why would I give a shit what their experience is?” And this is why I say, like, ops teams, like, get out of here because most ops teams, the extant ops teams are still called ops, and a lot of them have been renamed SRE—but they still do the same job—are an underclass. And I don't mean that those people are below us. People are treated as an underclass, and they shouldn't be. Absolutely not.Corey: Yes.Amy: Because the idea is that, like, well, I'm a fancy person who writes code at my ivory tower, and then it all flows down, and those people, just faceless people, do the deployment stuff that's beneath me. That attitude is the most toxic thing, I think, in tech orgs to address. Like, if you're trying to be like, “Well, our liability is bad, we have security problems, people won't fix their code.” And go look around and you will find people that are treated as an underclass that are given codes thrown over the wall at them and then they just have to toil through and make it work. I've worked on that a number of times in my career.And I think just like saying, underclass, right, or caste system, is what I found is the most effective way to get people actually thinking about what the hell is going on here. Because most people are just, like, “Well, that's just the way things are. It's just how we've always done it. The developers write to code, then give it to the sysadmins. The sysadmins deploy the code. Isn't that how it always works?”Corey: You'd really like to hope, wouldn't you?Amy: [laugh]. Not me. [laugh].Corey: Again, the way I see it is, in theory—in theory—sysadmins, ops, or that should not exist. People should theoretically be able to write code as developers that just works, the end. And write it correct the first time and never have to change it again. Yeah. There's a reason that I always like to call staging environments in places I work ‘theory' because it works in theory, but not in production, and that is fundamentally the—like, that entire job role is the difference between theory and practice.Amy: Yeah, yeah. Well, I think that's the problem with it. We're already so disconnected from the physical world, right? Like, you and I right now are talking over multiple strands of glass and digital transcodings and things right now, right? Like, we are detached from the physical reality.You mentioned earlier working in data centers, right? The thing I miss about it is, like, the physicality of it. Like, actually, like, I held a server in my arms and put it in the rack and slid it into the rails. I plugged into power myself; I pushed the power button myself. There's a server there. I physically touched it.Developers who don't work in production, we talked about empathy and stuff, but really, I think the big problem is when they work out in their idea space and just writing code, they write the unit tests, if we're very lucky, they'll write a functional test, and then they hand that wad off to some poor ops group. They're detached from the reality of operations. It's not even about accountability; it's about experience. The ability to see all of the weird crap we deal with, right? You know, like, “Well, we pushed the code to that server, but there were three bit flips, so we had to do it again. And then the other server, the disk failed. And on the other server…” You know? [laugh].It's just, there's all this weird crap that happens, these systems are so complex that they're always doing something weird. And if you're a developer that just spends all day in your IDE, you don't get to see that. And I can't really be mad at those folks, as individuals, for not understanding our world. I figure out how to help them, and the best thing we've come up with so far is, like, well, we start giving this—some responsibility in a production environment so that they can learn that. People do that, again, is another one that can be done wrong, where it turns into kind of a forced empathy.I actually really hate that mode, where it's like, “We're forcing all the developers online whether they like it or not. On-call whether they like it or not because they have to learn this.” And it's like, you know, maybe slow your roll a little buddy because the stuff is actually hard to learn. Again, minimizing how hard ops work is. “Oh, we'll just put the developers on it. They'll figure it out, right? They're software engineers. They're probably smarter than you sysadmins.” Is the unstated thing when we do that, right? When we throw them in the pit and be like, “Yeah, they'll get it.” [laugh].Corey: And that was my problem [unintelligible 00:39:49] the interview stuff. It was in the write code on a whiteboard. It's, “Look, I understood how the system fundamentally worked under the hood.” Being able to power my way through to get to an outcome even in language I don't know, was sort of part and parcel of the job. But this idea of doing it in artificially constrained environment, in a language I'm not super familiar with, off the top of my head, it took me years to get to a point of being able to do it with a Bash script because who ever starts with an empty editor and starts getting to work in a lot of these scenarios? Especially in an ops role where we're not building something from scratch.Amy: That's the interesting thing, right? In the majority of tech work today—maybe 20 years ago, we did it more because we were literally building the internet we have today. But today, most of the engineers out there working—most of us working stiffs—are working on stuff that already exists. We're making small incremental changes, which is great that's what we're doing. And we're dealing with old code.Corey: We're gluing APIs together, and that's fine. Ugh. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to talk to me about how you see all these things. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where's the best place to find you?Amy: I'm on Twitter every once in a while as @MissAmyTobey, M-I-S-S-A-M-Y-T-O-B-E-Y. I have a blog I don't write on enough. And there's a couple things on the Equinix Metal blog that I've written, so if you're looking for that. Otherwise, mainly Twitter.Corey: And those links will of course be in the [show notes 00:41:08]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Amy: I had fun. Thank you.Corey: As did I. Amy Tobey, Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, or on the YouTubes, smash the like and subscribe buttons, as the kids say. Whereas if you've hated this episode, same thing, five-star review all the platforms, smash the buttons, but also include an angry comment telling me that you're about to wind up subpoenaing a copy of my shell script because you're convinced that your intellectual property and secrets are buried within.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Explaining Brazil
Lula launches lunge for legacy

Explaining Brazil

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 47:18


Former President Lula officially began the race for an unprecedented third presidential term. The challenges he will face are far greater this time around. Support the show

The Whole Word Podcast
[Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Matthew 03 - John, the Kingdom of Heaven and the Prophets

The Whole Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 12:46


Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Matthew 03John the Baptist Prepares the Way (v 1-12)The Baptism of Jesus (v 13-17)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

Latin American Spanish
News In Slow Spanish Latino #466 - Easy Spanish Radio

Latin American Spanish

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 7:47


Comenzaremos la primera parte del programa hablando del inicio de la campaña electoral del ex-presidente brasilero Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva; y de las alertas ambientales en la Ciudad de México por los altos niveles de contaminación. Hablaremos también de un estudio que explica por qué muchos protectores solares son dañinos para los corales; y para finalizar, de la subasta de la camiseta más famosa de Diego Maradona en Sotheby's.    En nuestra sección Trending in Latin America hablaremos de Cuetzalan del Progreso, uno de los pueblos mágicos mexicanos. Cerraremos la emisión descubriendo el ramón, el árbol que tuvo un rol muy importante en la nutrición del pueblo maya. - Lula comienza su campaña por la presidencia de Brasil - Alerta ambiental en la Ciudad de México por altas concentraciones de ozono - Los peligros del protector solar para los corales - Camiseta de Maradona rompe récord en subasta - Cuetzalan del Progreso, abanderado de los Pueblos Mágicos mexicanos - Revalorizando el “árbol que nutrió al imperio Maya”