Podcasts about Meaning

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    Best podcasts about Meaning

    Show all podcasts related to meaning

    Latest podcast episodes about Meaning

    Guilty As Charged: An LA Chargers Podcast
    Drafting The Best Teams From The Tom Telesco Era

    Guilty As Charged: An LA Chargers Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 96:56


    In today's episode, the GAC crew draft the best of the best when it comes to the Tom Telesco era. Meaning 2013 and beyond without the considerations of who players were before/after they got on the Chargers or after 2013. Let us know who drafted your favorite team! Follow us on Twitter! Podcast: @GACPodcast17 Steven: @StevenIHaglund Alex: @alexinsdorf99 Tyler: @tylerjschoon Arjun: @arjunmenon100 Maddie: @maddieschmidt15 Kyle: @TheKyleDe Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    High Performance Mindset | Learn from World-Class Leaders, Consultants, Athletes & Coaches about Mindset

    High performers know who they are. They grow in their awareness of themselves and one way to do that is to identify your core values in a conscious way. Meaning, you decide what values, or core beliefs, you want guiding you in this phase of life. Then, you can use these values to guide your behavior and actions.  Power Phrase this Week: “I know myself and use my values to guide my actions each day.”  Quote of the Week: Elvis Presley said, “Values are like fingerprints. Nobody's are the same, but you leave them all over everything you do.” 

    Catch22Minutes
    Hidden Victims and the Meaning of ‘Victim'

    Catch22Minutes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 22:00


    ‘Hidden victims' are people who do not access victim services, even though these services are free and independent of the police. Hidden victims are not included in official crime statistics. From those dealing with homelessness or domestic or sexual violence to those who are very young or elderly, their under-reporting means funding does not get sufficiently allocated to these groups of particularly vulnerable groups. At the same time, the term ‘victim' too often feels disempowering to those affected by crime. How do we better reach those in need of support? And what can we do to empower all victims in today's justice system? To discuss this, Catch22Minutes host Josie Cochrane is joined by Emma Jones, Catch22's Director of Victim Services, and Millie Gant, Juniper Lodge Manager - a sexual assault referral centre based in Leicestershire. catch-22.org.uk #Catch22Minutes

    RTS Washington Faculty Podcast

    Episode 120: Scott, Peter, and Gray talk about crafting, telling, and interpreting stories. Topics include hermeneutics, simulacrum, narratology, dischronologization, inspiration, authorial intent, Obi-Wan Kenobi, MindHunter, the counsel of God as the precondition for the meaningfulness of every fact, epistemological humility, subjectivity, objectivity, error theory, House, irrationality, ectypal and archetypal knowledge, and more. Ask a question: rts.edu/washington/podcast About RTS Washington: rts.edu/washington Upcoming classes: https://rts.edu/campuses/washington-dc/students/upcoming-classes/

    Becoming Buddha Cross River Meditation Center Podcast
    Wise Restraint Structured Study Class 14 Cula-Vedalla Sutta – A Nun Teachers Her Ex The Meaning of Wise Restraint

    Becoming Buddha Cross River Meditation Center Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 55:49


    This is a recording from Cross River Meditation Center in Frenchtown, New Jersey. Our Dhamma classes are streamed live on Tuesday at 7:15 pm, Thursday at 2:15 pm, and Saturday at 8:30 am Eastern Us Time.  Please support  future recordings and the continued restoration, preservation, and presentation of the Buddha's Dhamma, please consider a donation: Support John and B ecoming-Buddha.com  There are guided Jhana meditations, more than 300 restored Suttas and 800 Dhamma class recordings at Becoming-Buddha.com Each Dhamma class will have a Jhana meditation session followed by my Dhamma talk and Sangha discussion. We conclude with mindfulness of Metta.   My talks and classes can be joined live:   Through your web browse: https://zoom.us/j/9083919079  Through your Android device here: Zoom Android App  Through your IOS device here: Zoom IOS Ap   New audio and video recordings are posted typically within twenty-four hours post-class:   Podcast/Audio Archive   Video Archive   If you are subscribed to my Podcast on Podbean or iTunes, you will receive notifications when new videos are posted.   To schedule private individual or group Dhamma instruction via video conference please  Email John

    YUTORAH: R' Efrem Goldberg -- Recent Shiurim
    Ten Minutes of Meaning (Part 167): Our Brands are Intertwined

    YUTORAH: R' Efrem Goldberg -- Recent Shiurim

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 11:08


    Latest shiurim from Boca Raton Synagogue
    Ten Minutes of Meaning (Part 167): Our Brands are Intertwined

    Latest shiurim from Boca Raton Synagogue

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 11:08


    Papa Bear Hikes
    Sleeping Bag Care

    Papa Bear Hikes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 9:37


    Like and SUBSCRIBE TO: Martin Outside - YouTube*If you found this episode of Papa Bear Hikes entertaining, informative, and/or interesting please leave a review on Apple iTunesPapa Bear Hikes on Apple PodcastsAmazon.com: Switching Gears: Rediscovering the Meaning of Life, Love, and Happiness While Backpacking Vermont's Long Trail eBook : Armitage, Martin: Kindle StorePlease consider supporting my work, so I can continue bringing you excellent content:https://www.patreon.com/papabearhikesMartin Armitage - Fundraising For American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (afsp.org)

    Aubrey Marcus Podcast
    The Balance of Happiness and Meaning W/ Chris Williamson #368

    Aubrey Marcus Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 155:10


    How do we find our purpose? How can we clarify our desires? What is the right way to balance our cognition with our intuition? These questions, along with many others are answered in this incredible conversation with Chris Williamson. As the host of Modern Wisdom, Chris has such a breadth of knowledge our conversations are always wide ranging and wildly interesting, whether it's at a dinner party or on a podcast. This show is loaded with mind expanding takeaways to help you lead the legendary life you are desiring. Check out the Modern Wisdom podcast | https://apple.co/3HX5bLQ Aubrey Marcus on the Modern Wisdom podcast | https://apple.co/3ucw6xu Jordan Peterson on the Modern Wisdom Podcast | https://apple.co/3uzwdn9 Connect with Chris Williamson Website | https://chriswillx.com/ Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/chriswillx/ YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/c/ModernWisdomPodcast This episode is sponsored by: ONNIT Get 10% off all Onnit Products: https://bit.ly/3LMVArK CURED grab the Sleep Bundle for an extra 20% off of CURED's already discounted price by visiting https://www.curednutrition.com/amp/ Helix Sleep save up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders AND two free pillows by visiting HelixSleep.com/AMP To partner with the Aubrey Marcus Podcast Connect with Aubrey Website | https://www.aubreymarcus.com/ Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/aubreymarcus/ Twitter | https://twitter.com/aubreymarcus Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/AubreyMarcus/ YouTube | https://bit.ly/2DLctpk Check out Own The Day Own Your Life by Aubrey Marcus| https://bit.ly/2t6x4hu Subscribe to the Aubrey Marcus Newsletter: https://www.aubreymarcus.com/pages/email Join the Aubrey Marcus Podcast Premium Membership on Supercast and get all the new AMP episodes ad free, a monthly AMA episode only for the Supercast community, as well as exclusive content only found on the Aubrey Marcus Premium Subscription like guided meditations, breathworks and unreleased podcast episodes | https://aubreymarcuspodcast.supercast.com/ Subscribe to the Aubrey Marcus Podcast: iTunes | https://apple.co/2lMZRCn Spotify | https://spoti.fi/2EaELZO Stitcher | https://bit.ly/2G8ccJt IHeartRadio | https://ihr.fm/3CiV4x3 Google Podcasts | https://bit.ly/3nzCJEh Android | https://bit.ly/2OQeBQg

    The Gardenangelists
    From Our Imperfect Gardens To Yours

    The Gardenangelists

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 39:27


    Carol and Dee talk about Pentas, imperfect vegetable gardens, and more on this week's episode.Visit our Substack newsletter for more show notes.  Subscribe to get the newsletter delivered each week to your inbox.Links:Awards from the National Federation of Press Women!Second Place for our podcast episode: We Almost Became a Math Podcast! Kidding!First Place for Carol for a personal blog post:  My New Gardening Admiring Service.Pentas - an annual flower for your garden. Carol write a blog post about them.On the bookshelf:  Grow Your Own Mini Fruit Garden: Planting and Tending Small Fruit Trees and Berries in Gardens and Containers by Christy Wilhelmi (Amazon Link)Piper and Ivy gardening T-shirtsFrosted Elfins found in OklahomaRoar Like a Dandelion, by Ruth KraussThe Marginalian: The Dandelion and the Meaning of Life: G. K. ChestertonDocumentary: The Pollinators on Amazon Affiliate link to Botanical Interest Seeds. (If you buy something from them after using this link, we earn a small commission at no cost to you. This helps us continue to bring this podcast to you ad-free!)  Book links are also affiliate links.Email us at TheGardenangelists@gmail.com  For more info on Carol and her books, visit her website.  Visit her blog May Dreams Gardens.For more info on Dee and her book, visit her website.  Visit her blog Red Dirt Ramblings.Don't forget to sign up for our newsletters, via our websites!

    Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen
    Episode 108 Movement is Medicine with Kristina Hoyer (Part 2)

    Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 36:35


    Continuing the conversation with Kristina Hoyer, John discusses the relationship aspect of her life. The first part of the interview (Episode 107) focused on her journey into the US Navy and her life as a human performance coach. Listen to this episode to learn more: [00:00] - When mindset and wellness go hand in hand [04:36] - Kristina's go-to supplements [08:22] - Kristina's approach to strengthening relationships and how they impact her business [10:53] - The importance of community [13:43] - Harmonizing your personal and professional lives [16:10] - Kristina's non-negotiable habits [18:58] - John's go-to habits [21:35] - How John feels when he is meditating and when he is not [31:00] - Books Kristina is reading [33:00] - Meaning of the word “Meek” [38:23] - Podcast Kristina listens to on a regular basis NOTABLE QUOTES: "You are the epicenter; you're the driver for your personal brand or businesses for the most part. If you are not doing well, your business is not. And one of the main pillars of human health is community."  "You don't know the level of support you can have until you give someone the opportunity to support you. And the feeling that connected, supported, cared for, and loved bolsters every part of your life." "If you are a personal brand, business, or a CEO, the more supported you are the more full you are; the more connected you are, the more heart-centered and heart-driven you can be."  "Most awesome thing about humanity is that we have the capability to become wildly invested in something." "You have to know what it is that you need to do for you. And once you figure those things out, those are the things you need to do." "We have to build in white space … because there has to be room for life to happen." BOOKS MENTIONED: Mary Magdalene Revealed: The First Apostle, Her Feminist Gospel & the Christianity We Haven't Tried Yet by Meggan Watterson (https://tinyurl.com/MaryMagdaleneRevealedBook) Power vs. Force: The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior by David R. Hawkins (https://tinyurl.com/PowerVsForceBook) PODCAST MENTIONED: The Huberman Lab Podcast (https://tinyurl.com/HubermanLabPdcst) USEFUL RESOURCES: https://www.kristinahoyercollective.com  https://www.instagram.com/kristinahoyercollective/  https://www.facebook.com/Kristina-Hoyer-Collective-112781317226104  https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristinahoyer/  CONNECT WITH JOHN Website - https://thejohnhulen.com  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/johnhulen  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/johnhulen  Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/johnhulen  LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnhulen  YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLX_NchE8lisC4NL2GciIWA  EPISODE CREDITS Intro music provided by Tony Palacios - https://www.instagram.com/tonytonedog/  Outro music provided by Jeff Scheetz - https://jeffscheetz.com/ 

    [Learning Japanese] ManoNihongo
    #328 Multiple Meaning Verb 67 [まわる(3)]

    [Learning Japanese] ManoNihongo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 4:01


    いくつかの意味がある動詞を紹介します。今回は「まわる(回る)3」です。Script of this episode: https://manonihongo.com/328-multiple-meaning-verb-67/

    ICNYU Podcasts
    Quranic Reflections: Virtues, Benefits & Meaning of Surah Quraysh with Imam Khalid Latif

    ICNYU Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 76:29


    Greatest Day Podcast
    #315: Why Your Associations Matter

    Greatest Day Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 12:32


    We've all heard that the people you most associate with will determine your level of success, income, and happiness. Proximity has power for sure. Meaning, whoever you are closest to has access and influence to the way you see the world, yourself and your potential. Make sure you keep that select few of people ones that are doing things and going places in life that align with the person you are trying to become. The 'Greatest Day' mindset is a lifestyle; a way of living every moment of every day with a positive attitude. It is choosing to be happy and live life with energy no matter your circumstances. Today truly is the only day you have to live, shape, and create who you want to become so choose to MAKE TODAY THE GREATEST DAY OF YOUR LIFE! More about Craig: Instagram: @greatestdaymindset Email: greatestdaymindset@gmail.com Website: http://greatestdaymindset.com/ FOCUS: A Guided Journal to Create Lasting Change in Your Life. https://www.greatestdaymindset.com/product-page/focus If you like the show please take a screen shot and share it with your friends and tag @greatestdaymindset. If you would like notifications of new episodes and stay up to date with the show SUBSCRIBE and provide a rating and some feedback, as it helps the show get more recognition and found more easily. Thanks for the ongoing support!

    Delgado Podcast
    Creation Rediscovered: Finding New Meaning in an Ancient Story w/ Dr. Jeffery M. Leonard

    Delgado Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 51:44


    In this week's podcast, we learn from Dr. Jeffery M. Leonard about his book “Creation Rediscovered: Finding New Meaning in an Ancient Story,” which was written to help Christians understand the creation stories in our Hebrew Bible, while also appreciating what science tells us about our world. His book is available at Hendrickson Publishers: https://www.hendricksonrose.com/p/creation-rediscovered/9781683072348 Jeffery M. Leonard is Associate Professor of Religion at Samford University in Birmingham, AL, where he specializes in Hebrew, Hebrew Bible, and the ancient Near East. He received his MDiv from Alliance Theological Seminary in Nyack, and his PhD from Brandeis University in Waltham, MA. YouTube video: https://youtu.be/ykiqGOEPdGo

    Thought Of The Day
    Words that lost their meaning

    Thought Of The Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:19


    Thought of the Day

    The Model FA
    Guiding Clients through Market Downturns with Rusty Vanneman and Dr. Daniel Crosby

    The Model FA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:47


    Rusty Vanneman is the Chief Investment Strategist of Orion Advisor Solutions. An industry veteran with over 30 years of experience, Rusty has managed multiple mutual funds and hedge funds throughout his career. Before joining Orion, Rusty served as the President and Chief Investment Officer of CLS Investments. He was also a senior analyst at Fidelity Management and Research and previously worked for Thomson Reuters and General Electric. Rusty received his Bachelor of Science degree in Management from Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts. In addition to his work at Orion, Rusty hosts The Weighing Machine podcast and is the author of the book, Higher Calling.   Dr. Daniel Crosby is the Chief Behavioral Officer of Orion Advisor Solutions. A psychologist and behavioral finance expert, Daniel specializes in helping organizations understand the intersection of minds and markets. Before joining Orion, Daniel served as the Chief Behavioral Officer of Brinker Capital. He was educated at Brigham Young University, where he completed his Bachelor's degree and Ph.D. in Psychology. He is also the author of the New York Times bestseller, Personal Benchmark, as well as The Laws of Wealth, which the Axiom Business Book Awards named the best investment book in 2017. His latest work, The Behavioral Investor, takes an in-depth look at how sociology, psychology, and neurology impact investment decision-making.   Rusty and Daniel join us today to discuss how financial advisors can connect with their clients and guide them through difficult economic conditions. They explain how they encourage their clients to continue on their investing path. They describe why it's important for advisors to highlight their services' features rather than their technical aspects. They also enumerate the five elements of wellness and underscore why the success of a financial advisor's business and career relies on self-care and wellbeing.   “We have to convey to our clients that we're partners in the journey, and our ability to get there is only as good as their ability to take the ride.” - Dr. Daniel Crosby   This week on The Model FA Podcast:   How financial advisors can communicate their value proposition to their clients The value of communicating technical aspects as features How financial advisors can encourage their clients amid challenging economic times The five elements of wellness and the role of self-care in a financial advisor's life The first thing financial advisors need to do when the markets take a downturn Why everyone should explore existentialism and stoicism   Resources Mentioned:   Book: A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William Irvine Book: Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl Book: Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill   Our Favorite Quotes:   “To have a thriving business and happy clients—whether the market is crushing it or crashing down—you need to be the best version of yourself mentally, physically, emotionally.” - David DeCelle “Whatever the normal person needs to do from a self-care perspective, the financial advisor needs to do even more because of all the bullets they take.” - David DeCelle “A confident advisor will create a confident investor.” - Rusty Vanneman   Connect with Orion:   Orion Portfolio Solutions Orion Practice Management Orion Advisor Tech on LinkedIn Orion Advisor Tech on Twitter   Connect with Rusty Vanneman:   Book: Higher Calling: A Guide to Helping Investors Achieve Their Goals Podcast: The Weighing Machine Rusty Vanneman on LinkedIn Rusty Vanneman on Twitter   Connect with Dr. Daniel Crosby:   Book: The Behavioral Investor Book: Personal Benchmark: Integrating Behavioral Finance and Investment Management Podcast: Standard Deviations Daniel Crosby on LinkedIn Daniel Crosby on Twitter   About the Model FA Podcast   The Model FA podcast is a show for fiduciary financial advisors. In each episode, our host David DeCelle sits down with industry experts, strategic thinkers, and advisors to explore what it takes  to build a successful practice — and have an abundant life in the process. We believe in continuous learning, tactical advice, and strategies that work — no “gotchas” or BS. Join us to hear stories from successful financial advisors, get actionable ideas from experts, and re-discover your drive to build the practice of your dreams.    Did you like this conversation? Then leave us a rating and a review in whatever podcast player you use. We would love your feedback, and your ratings help us reach more advisors with ideas for growing their practices, attracting great clients, and achieving a better quality of life. While you are there, feel free to share your ideas about future podcast guests or topics you'd love to see covered.    Our Team: President of Model FA, David DeCelle   If you like this podcast, you will love our community! Join the Model FA Community on Facebook to connect with like-minded advisors and share the day-to-day challenges and wins of running a growing financial services firm.

    Inside Outside
    Designing Resilient Remote Teams: IO2020 Replay with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / Hubspot

    Inside Outside

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:37


    In honor of our upcoming IO2022 innovation Accelerated Summit, which is happening September 19th and 20th in Lincoln Nebraska. Thought it'd be nice to pull some of the best interviews and sessions from our IO2020 virtual event. So, over the next few weeks, check out some of our amazing speakers and grab a ticket for the upcoming event. We'd love to see you there. Tickets and more information can be found at io2022.com. And now back to the show. Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / HubspotBrian Ardinger: We are excited to have Steph Smith here with the Hustle and Trends to talk about one of these amazing new trends that we're seeing. It's the whole move to remote work. Steph is the Head of Trends and Product Manager at the Hustle, which is a great newsletter, if you don't subscribe to that. Trends is their exclusive group. And I I've got to say it's, it's one of the best groups out there to talk about new things that are happening out there, new business leaders, things along those lines. She's got a new book out called Standing Out in 2020. Doing Content Right. And I know she's been doing a series of sessions on that. It's an eBook. You can check it out at stephsmith.io. She's been blogging for a ton of time. And she's also been in this world of remote work. Been a digital nomad for a while. So, with that, I'm going to just turn over to Steph. And we'll talk the trend of remote working. Steph Smith: Sweet. Thanks so much. That was a great intro, Brian. Today, I'm going to be talking about something that I care a lot about. I saw some other people in the chat mention that they've been working remotely for a long time. Two, I'm going to be talking about thinking past the office and designing what I call resilient, remote teams. And I do this in a little bit of a different way than I think most presentations on this topic are, which give you a lot of super, super concrete, like you must do this. I like to think of this more so as how do we think about what has changed? What does that mean? And what can we learn from this? So, I use three books and I'll get into that in a second to actually convey some of these points. But just quickly, I don't want to talk about myself very much. Brian gave me a great intro. All you need to know is that I have been working remotely for the last four or five years now. And I did that originally at a company called Top Tell, which was one of those kind of remote first companies built from the ground up to be remote. Now I work at a company called The Hustle and I've done some remote training for different companies. And in general, have been nomadding around for the last couple years as I work remotely. So that's enough about me. Let's talk about where we are in this world. As I mentioned before COVID there was a series of companies I'd say only a couple dozen of scale that were built up to be remote. From the ground up, they said, you know what, we're never going to have any offices. Or if we do, we're going to be remote first. Companies like Zapier Basecamp, Web Flow. All these companies were built from the ground up to facilitate positive remote working environment. Now, as we all know, you saw this kind of trend, the slow trickle of people that were searching for remote work overtime. This is Google trends from 2004 to present. Then as we all know, 2020. crazy year. We see this big spike and we're all remote, whether we want to be or not. And this includes huge companies like Google, Cora, Coinbase. Shopify that at least are either going to be remote for several, several years or in some cases like Shopify have just claimed that they are now remote first from here forward. The question then becomes with all of these companies with now millions, if not billions of people that are kind of thrown into this new environment, what happens. What happens to these organizations that weren't built from the ground up? Like Zapier, Base Camp, or Buffer. Some of the questions that I have here, allude to what I'll be talking about in this presentation. So how does remote work or the shift influence how people interact with one another? How does it influence the social fabric or culture of the company? How does this change how potentially leaders should or can operate at these organizations?And in general, this all brings me back to the title of this presentation. How do we build resilient teams? And resiliency in this case means teams that thrive in the environment that they're put in, right. It doesn't feel like they're kind of pushing against walls. It doesn't feel like there's friction to achieve certain things.It feels like they're put in an environment where they're put in a place to succeed by nature, by the nature of the environment that they're in. So, as I said, this presentation is really based on three books that I've read and, and I think are excellent. It's Give and Take, Algorithms to Live By and The Four Tendencies.And I like using books like this to really frame these conversations because these books are actually not based on remote work at all. They're based on human psychology. They're based on how people interact in given situations or environments. And then I just layer on a question. Is this still true with remote work or how does this change as people go from an in-person environment to remote. And so, we'll talk specifically about how giving and taking behavior may change with remote work. We'll talk about how we can design systems. So, using something From Algorithms to Live By, Game Theory. How do we incentivize people to actually act in their best interest? Because they don't always do that on their own. And how do we in general make remote work sustainable. And then I'll talk about the potential archetype of remote worker using this four tendencies framework. To preface the three books and the three things that we'll talk about, I want to jump back to summarize where we are.So, we as a society had a majority of people working in offices. And now we have a majority of people working remotely. And I like to kind of facetiously say that when you work in an office, you work in a box. And that box is predefined for you. And even though it's a little facetious in terms of the analogy, a lot of that is true in the sense that you have a lot of things, whether it's, you know, where you're physically working, how you're working exactly, when you're working. A lot of that is super predefined for you. And for some people that's actually better. Some people that's worse. I'm not trying to ascertain whether one is better or worse, but the idea is that before you had a lot of things mapped out for you, right? And now when you're working remotely, the way, the analogy that I like to give is that box is kind of like stripped clean.So, you get rid of the walls, you get rid of exactly when, how you work. And now a lot of people are left to figure out how to build their own box. And what I see a lot of people doing, whether it's individuals or companies is they basically do this Control C Control V where they basically say, you know, we had all these things, these processes, these systems, these frameworks that worked in our office. So, let's just take all those and let's paste them into our new environment. And that can work. But what I think we have a unique opportunity to do is in fact, rethink the box. So, build our new box from the ground up. So instead of just copying everything and saying, oh, this worked there. It should work here. Let's just rethink what are the things that we should operate by in this new environment? How do we rebuild our box? And something more important than that is instead of giving our employees a new box saying, hey, this is your box. Please take it. And again, abide by these rules or operations or logistics. Let's actually just give them the tools to build their own box. And this kind of summarizes part of what I'm, I'm getting to at least to preface three examples is, is a quote from Amir. Who's a CEO of Doist one of those kind of remote first and companies. And he says, basically, remote. Isn't just a different way to work. It's a different way to live. We have to acknowledge that we're kind of blurring these lines and people, you know, experience isolation, anxiety, depression. And in general, we need to figure out ways in systems to resolve this new, almost more complex issue where you have people, people's work and their lives just meshing into this continuous system.All right. So, what are the cornerstones of remote work? I mentioned this because this bleeds into some of the examples. So remote work overall, at least prior to COVID, when people weren't forced into it, really prioritized three things over three other things. Meaning output trumped input, which meant that didn't matter exactly how many hours you were working or exactly what you did to get to the impact that you're driving for a company.What mattered was the impact, the output. Similarly, remote work tended to favor autonomy over administration. Again, this idea that didn't matter exactly how you got from Point A to Point B. You had the autonomy to figure that out. And similarly, flexibility over rigidity. So, let's keep these cornerstones in mind throughout the presentation. And consider that even those cornerstones sound kind of resoundingly positive, all of us at face value are like, yes, I love being graded on my output. I love being graded or given the autonomy to figure out how I deliver that output. And I love being given flexibility. But let's just keep those in mind and consider that they're not always strictly positive. All right, so let's dive into the first example in the book, Give and Take. Obviously, these books are very in depth and I only covered one small sliver of them in this presentation. But the key takeaway from Give and Take is that Adam Grant, he's a professor at Wharton, amazing writer as well. He talks about three different types of individuals. So, Givers, Takers, and Matchers. All you need to know about them for the purpose of this presentation is that givers basically believe in this world as a positive sum game. Meaning they believe in mutually beneficial situations. They're willing to give without expecting anything in return. Takers are kind of the opposite of that. They think zero sum game. I'm sure you can imagine or conceptualize people in your life that you've encountered that really are trying to get ahead at the expense of other people.Now matchers fall somewhere in the middle. They basically believe, or kind of function off of this idea of reciprocity and fairness. All right. So with that in mind, the question or sorry, before I even get to the question, something I want to mention is that the whole premise of Adam Grant's book is a little surprising in that most people would expect that given Takers and Matchers and Takers in particular, their approach to life in terms of kind of utilizing other people to get ahead or prioritizing their own growth over other people, you would expect those people to be the most successful.Now, interestingly enough, he found that Givers were both at the very top of the spectrum of success, and the very bottom. You can notice two different types of Givers here. One is selfless. One is, is otherish. All you need to know here is that Otherish Givers are Givers but have found a way to prioritize their own needs.So really interesting that Givers not only elevate other people, but they are actually the most successful on their own. So, this is kind of a summary or a quote from Adams, which basically says they succeed in a way that creates a ripple effect, enhancing the success of others around them. You'll see that the difference lies in how Giver success creates value instead of just claiming it.So, in general, I think the obvious takeaway here is that we want more Givers at our organizations. Now the question becomes, and this will be a repetitive question throughout, is this the same with remote work. Or how does this change with remote work? Some of the sections here are based on actual data sources.This one, not so much. This is me more hypothesizing. And what I've come to in terms of my many years leading teams, interacting with teams, being individual contributors on teams is that because if we remember the cornerstones of remote work, we prioritize output. We prioritize impact. That which in remote, all that matters is that impact, right?Are you delivering value? Are you worth your salary? Are you hitting your KPIs. In person when you're in an office? All that stuff matters. But it's also weighed against certain unspoken things, unspoken rules, like the amount of time you're spending in the office. Whether you're on time for things, whether you stay late to help another employee in general, everyone knows who the team players are in an office.That's not always true when you work remotely. I think if you've worked remotely over the last couple months, especially if you were in an office before, you can probably resonate with this idea. In remote, there's a couple thing, other things that I want to know. This idea of staying on longer to, you know, as a Giver, let's say you're helping other people.That's super difficult to quantify because when you're working remotely again, our work life and our lifeline blend together. So, it's actually hard, if I were to ask anyone on this call, how many hours did you spend this week working remotely? I think a lot of people would struggle to actually quantify that.So then layering on, am I working extra? Am I not working enough? It's really hard to kind of parse that out. Additionally, if you support someone. Let's say I have a friend and her name is Sally at work. And she says, Hey Steph, can you help me with this project? And it actually takes like, you know, five hours out of my day.I end up helping her. All of that work for better or for worse is hidden online. Sally knows about it. But everyone else at work, didn't see me stay late to help Sally. They didn't see the output of that work. They didn't see the Giving behavior. And so, in addition to this, KPIs in general, when you work remotely by nature of trying to ascertain that output of people, tends to be more individual. You even hear people use terms like manager of one when they're working remotely.And in general, the idea that I'm trying to get across here is that by nature, when you're working remotely, because there are so much emphasis on output and impact, which has many positives, basically takes away the recognition that you typically get in an in-person environment of these Givers, and what happens is these Givers end up burning out, they become more of those selfless givers that you saw at the tail end. Instead of the Otherish givers that were the most successful individual. And something I want to call out here is that regardless of intentions, morals, or values, and what I'm saying here is it doesn't matter if someone's a good person or bad person. That's not what I'm trying to ascertain. Bad incentive structures result in bad behavior, no matter how good of a person you think you are. So, what's the takeaway here? Again, I'm trying to go through this quickly, so I won't go through everything. But the idea here is that you still won't have a water cooler. In the office, which almost acted like, you know, animals in the wild. There's like a certain hierarchy and there's a kingdom and, and it kind of regulates things, right. You just subtly, but it does. You don't have that anymore with remote, or at least it's not created without intentionality. And so, there are a couple quick things that you can do. The first thing is just ask your team very simply who helped you this week? Who did you work with? Where did you put in extra hours? Where did someone else put in extra hours for you? You must ask this because it will not be surfaced as naturally as in the office. The second thing is build KPIs to incentivize teamwork. This is a little harder to do because again, when you work remotely, you're trying to ascertain output. But think about how you can do this to incentivize teamwork. So, you're not kind of encouraging people to act more as Takers versus Givers. And then finally create an environment where you're not just recognizing good behavior or giving behavior, but you're actually rewarding it.So, some companies like GitLab have actually started things like micro bonuses, where in addition to the bonus structures or the compensation structures that you get from your boss, other people around you can actually reward you based on your giving behavior. Because that's really important. You're not just recognizing it in like kind of shout outs or things like that, but you're actually rewarding this behavior. So, you're incentivizing people to continue doing it. The final thing I want to call out is that you can do as much as you can once you have people at an organization to incentivize giving behavior. But you can also kind of integrate this into your hiring process. Which means bringing in people who are more naturally Givers.So, Adam Grant mentions in his book. This is directly from Give and Take where he, during the hiring process asks this question, can you give me the names of four people whose careers you have fundamentally improved? And the idea here is that people who are Givers tend to mention either people at the same level as them or below them in terms of the people that they've helped.And it's a natural response. Of course, this is again, not quite scientific versus Takers, tend to mention people that are above them. That they've helped, because again, there's this nature of people who are Takers, trying to get ahead and using things like status to get ahead. So, something to keep in mind as well as you're hiring.So, the second example that I want to go through is from Algorithms to Live By. Again, excellent book. This is a book where basically they take principles from software development or software engineering and use it to help us think through problems that are outside of that scope. So, things like Cashing Theory or Kneeling or making intractable problems tractable.The one that I want to talk about today is Game Theory. So, in Game Theory, I'm not going to go into depth, but it's this idea that within a game, there are certain rules. And within those rules, they incentivize people to act a certain way. And once a game is predefined, you tend to get to this equilibrium where all the players individually are acting their own best interest.But sometimes the kind of aggregate of those actions actually may result in outcomes that are worse for everyone. Again, depending on the rules that were set for that game. And this equilibrium that I'm specifically talking about is called the Nash Equilibrium. And it's this idea again, there's this kind of long definition and talks about a stable state.The idea here is the Nash Equilibrium is within an environment within a game. It's the outcome or the optimal state, where there's no incentive for any individual to deviate. Now, this may not sound super actionable. So let me give you a precise example of what I'm talking about. So, with remote work, a lot of remote first companies tend to go with unlimited vacation.And I think this is something that probably more companies will end up moving towards as well. But something you keep in mind here is the Nash Equilibrium of unlimited vacation approaches, zero days. And the reason for this it's a little counterintuitive because you think unlimited vacation sounds amazing. Sounds like a great perk. Well, what happens with unlimited vacation is that people look to be perceived as more loyal, more committed, more dedicated than their peers. And therefore, they look to take just slightly less vacation than their peers. And what happens is a cascading effect, which approaches zero.This is actual data from Buffer's Data Remote Report from 2019, where you can see in blue, the amount of vacation offered, and then in orange, the amount of vacation that was actually taken. So, you can see around 30, 35% of people had unlimited vacation. And if you look at how that's actually distributed, most of the people who had unlimited vacation took anywhere from no vacation to two weeks' vacation. Versus the people who had, you know, six weeks, five weeks, four weeks were likely to actually take that amount of vacation.So, what is my point here? Well, in Game Theory is this idea where basically you have a game and then those rules are set for the game. And then you just see what behaviors actually emerge from those given set of rules. Well, I think with remote work, we have to be a lot more intentional about not just kind of throwing rules out there, again, kind of redefining our box and, and not just taking a box that already exists. And you can do that through Mechanism Design, which is kind of flipping that script and saying, what are the behaviors that we actually want and what rules do we need to establish to actually generate those behaviors? So kind of again, reversing the question and figuring out what behaviors you want to incentivize. And then figuring out what rules need to be in place to actually achieve that.As I mentioned, the box has changed, the game has changed. So, here's a couple examples of things that people struggle with from the same report, when they're working remotely. It's things like unplugging, loneliness, distractions, culture, and communication. If you were to ask the same question to people who are working in an, in an office, these would not be the case, which shows us the game has changed. The problems have changed. The things that we're solving for have changed and therefore you must come up with rules or incentives so that people act in their own best interest. So again, you're thinking backwards. You're asking the question, what are the KPIs that you need to actively design to encourage people to, for example, have a work life balance outside of just the freedom to define their own. And this is really important because it sounds counterintuitive to say a I'm actually going to define more rules. Because flexibility sounds like a great perk or sounds like a great thing to have. But actually, you can help your employees in certain situations to actually help them again, this idea of building their own box.Something I want to call out here is again, is Wall Street, which is again, the most like capitalist type environment there is, has mandatory off hours. So that brokers don't push themselves to their Nash Equilibrium, which would be the sleepless equilibrium, where they're constantly trading. So, you have to think backwards and figure out how to design an environment that people succeed in.Quick couple examples before we move on to the third example. The third book are things like a minimum vacation policy, mandatory days that they must take off, allowing people to take back their calendars and actually block off significant parts so that they're not encountering what people call Calendar Tetris. I like this example from Keith, I don't know Keith personally, and this was pre COVID.But basically, he decided to close his office on Friday. Simple things like this, where he basically said it's a mandatory weekend. You are not allowed to work, even though it seems strange in a digital environment. And I'm giving you 50 bucks to go eat at your favorite restaurant. So, think about how you are intentionally designing systems for your employees.Finally, third example that I'll breeze through is the Four Tendencies. And I'll caveat this example with this quote directly from Gretchen Rubin, the author that says the happiest, healthiest, most productive people aren't those from a particular tendency, but rather the people who have figured out how to harness the strengths of their tendency, counteract the weaknesses, and build lives that work for them.So, what is the Four Tendencies? It's this idea that there as it sounds like four tendencies. Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, and Rebel. Now these two highlighted in green are not highlighted, because they're the best. As Gretchen said in that quote, it's just that they're they are the most common. Now the Four Tendencies is basically a two-by-two framework, which identifies how people respond to expectations or accountability.So, do they readily meet outer expectations? Do they readily meet inner expectations? Do they resist both of them or do they kind of fluctuate towards or air towards one or the other? So, I personally am a Questioner. I resist outer expectations and I meet inner expectations. To give a quick example, if I wanted to get fit, having a gym buddy as an outer expectation expecting me to show up that actually wouldn't help me. And that actually is something that I've tried to do throughout my life. Hasn't worked. Meanwhile, something like actually understanding the science behind why I should be fit or kind of convincing myself that my identity, or I want to be the type of person who, you know, respects their health. That works for me. So as a Questioner, I meet inner expectations. I resist outer expectations.Now I did a poll on Twitter a while ago, got around 400 votes from people who had been working remotely again, pre COVID. And it was interesting to see that the most popular tendencies among this again, non-scientific poll were Questioners and Rebels, and I thought, huh, that's interesting.If you remember questioners and obligers for the most common in the overall population with remote workers, or at least those who sought out remote work. Where questioners and rebels with the, the familiarity or the common thread here is that they both resist outer expectations. I thought that was really interesting.And I think that relates to this idea that there's a level of self-selection or misalignment with outer expectations of society, of people trying to at least identify their own work norms, identify their own vision or how they can actually build something, build their own box. And this isn't again, mean that they're more successful or less successful.It's just perhaps that they actively sought out this type of environment. Now, what's the takeaway here. This is a brief section compared to the other two, but it's the idea that people actually respond differently to inner and outer accountability. We used to have everyone in an office and that didn't necessarily work with everyone.Now we have everyone remote that doesn't necessarily work for everyone. So, I think the idea here is that leaders need to actually learn past, just the high level this person is good at these skills. This person is good at these skills. This is my top player. This is my, you know, less valuable player. And more so think about how to tailor their leadership stylers to figure out how to motivate their employees. Whether they're in a remote environment or not. But especially if you're in a remote environment, how do you incentivize, if we just quickly go back, how do you incentivize Upholders and Obligers when Questioners and Rebels tend to naturally seek out this environment?And on the flip side, if you're in an office, how do you naturally incentivize Questioners and Rebels so that they're motivated when Upholders and Obligers may more naturally fit into those traditional environments. So just something to consider. Right. This is the final slide I have, and I know we're running out of times, but the idea here is just, again, there are certain things or certain ways that humans tend to interact in, in an person environment.And they don't necessarily act the same ways in a remote environment. And in particular, they may not even act in ways that benefit themselves all the time. So, we must as leaders, if you're leading a team, if you're leading a company, It's good to consider some of these things and figure out A: How do I encourage Giving through discovering, hiring, promoting, and acknowledging and rewarding as I said before Givers. How do I select incentives or develop the right systems so that we're using Mechanism Design and not just throwing people into a game and hoping that they choose the best outcomes that are best for them or best for everyone?And then finally, how do we actually learn about our people past the face value in terms of their skills and figure out how to harness their unique strengths, whether they're in an in-person environment or a remote environment. If you want to find me, or if you have questions, happy to answer them now, but you're also welcome to email me or DM me on Twitter and that is it.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  Also don't miss IO2022 - Innovation Accelerated in Sept, 2022.

    Screaming in the Cloud
    TikTok and Short Form Content for Developers with Linda Vivah

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:01


    Full Description / Show Notes Corey and Linda talk about Tiktok and the online developer community (1:18) Linda talks about what prompted her to want to work at AWS (5:29) Linda discusses navigating the change from just being part of the developer community to being an employee of AWS (10:37) Linda talks about moving AWS more in the direction of short form content, and Corey and Linda talk about the Tiktok algorithm (15:56) Linda talks about the potential struggle of going from short form to long form content (25:21) About LindaLinda Vivah is a Site Reliability Engineer for a major media organization in NYC, a tech content creator, an AWS community builder member, a part-time wedding singer, and the founder of a STEM jewelry shop called Coding Crystals. At the time of this recording she was about to join AWS in her current position as a Developer Advocate.Linda had an untraditional journey into tech. She was a Philosophy major in college and began her career in journalism. In 2015, she quit her tv job to attend The Flatiron School, a full stack web development immersive program in NYC. She worked as a full-stack developer building web applications for 5 years before shifting into SRE to work on the cloud end internally.Throughout the years, she's created tech content on platforms like TikTok & Instagram and believes that sometimes the best way to learn is to teach.Links Referenced:lindavivah.com: https://lindavivah.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We talk a lot about how people go about getting into this ridiculous industry of ours, and I've talked a little bit about how I go about finding interesting and varied guests to show up and help me indulge my ongoing love affair on this show with the sound of my own voice. Today, we're going to be able to address both of those because today I'm speaking to Linda Haviv, who, as of this recording, has accepted a job as a Developer Advocate at AWS, but has not started. Linda, welcome to the show.Linda: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while and there's been a lot of interesting things I learned along the way. You were one of the first people I encountered when I joined the TikToks, as all the kids do these days, and was trying to figure out is there a community of folks who use AWS. Which really boils down to, “So, where are these people that are sad all the time?” Well, it turns out, they're on TikTok, so there we go. We found my people.And that was great. And we started talking, and it turns out that we were both in the AWS community builder program. And we've developed a bit of a rapport. We talk about different things. And then, I guess, weird stuff started happening, in the context of you were—you're doing very well at building an audience for yourself on TikTok.I tried it, and it was—my sense of humor sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. I've had challenges in finding any reasonable way to monetize it because a 30-second video doesn't really give nuance for a full ad read, for example. And you've been looking at it from the perspective of a content creator looking to build the audience slash platform is step one, and then, eh, step two, you'll sort of figure out aspects of monetization later. Which, honestly, is a way easier way to do it in hindsight, but, yeah, the things that we learn. Now, that you're going to AWS, first, you planning to still be on the TikToks and whatnot?Linda: Absolutely. So, I really look at TikTok as a funnel. I don't think it's the main place, you're going to get that deep-dive content but I think it's a great way, especially for things that excite you or get you into understanding it, especially beginner-type audience, I think there's a lot of untapped market of people looking to into tech, or technologists that aren't in the cloud. I mean, even when I worked—I worked as a web developer and then kind of learned more about the cloud, and I started out as a front-end developer and shifted into, like, SRE and infrastructure, so even for people within tech, you can have a huge tech community which there is on TikTok, with a younger community—but not all of them really understand the cloud necessarily, depending on their job function. So, I think it's a great way to kind of expose people to that.For me, my exposure came from community. I met somebody at a meetup who was working in cloud, and it wasn't even on the job that I really started getting into cloud because many times in corporations, you might be working on a specific team and you're not really encountering other ends, and it seems kind of like a mystery. Although it shouldn't seem like magic, many times when you're doing certain job functions—especially the DevOps—could end up feeling like magic. So, [laugh] for the good and the bad. So sometimes, if you're not working on that end, you really sometimes take it for granted.And so, for me, I actually—meetups were the way I got exposed to that end. And then I brought it back into my work and shifted internally and did certifications and started, even, lunch-and-learns where I work to get more people in their learning journey together within the company, and you know, help us as we're migrating to the cloud, as we're building on the cloud. Which, of course, we have many more roles down the road. I did it for a few years and saw the shift. But I worked at a media company for many years and now shifting to AWS, and so I've seen that happen on different ends.Not—oh, I wasn't the one doing the migration because I was on the other end of that time, but now for the last two years, I was working on [laugh] the infrastructure end, and so it's really fascinating. And many people actually—until now I feel like—that will work on maybe the web and mobile and don't always know as much about the cloud. I think it's a great way to funnel things in a quick manner. I think also society is getting used to short videos, and our attention span is very low, and I think for—Corey: No argument here.Linda: —[crosstalk 00:04:39] spending so mu—yeah, and we're spending so much time on these platforms, we might as well, you know, learn something. And I think it depends what content. Some things work well, some things doesn't. As with anything content creation, you kind of have to do trial and error, but I do find the audience to be a bit different on TikTok versus Twitter versus Instagram versus YouTube. Which is interesting how it's going to play out on YouTube, too, which is a whole ‘nother topic conversation.Corey: Well, it's odd to me watching your path. It's almost the exact opposite of mine where I started off on the back-end, grumpy sysadmin world and, “Oh, why would I ever need to learn JavaScript?” “Well, genius, because as the world progresses, guess what? That's right. The entire world becomes JavaScript. Welcome.”And it took me a long time to come around to that. You started with the front-end world and then basically approached from the exact opposite end. Let's be clear, back in my day, mine was the common path. These days, yours is very much the common path.Linda: Yeah.Corey: I also want to highlight that all of those transitions and careers that you spoke about, you were at the same company for nine years, which in tech is closer to 30. So, I have to ask, what was it that inspired you, after nine years, to decide, “I'm going to go work somewhere else. But not just anywhere; I'm going to AWS.” Because normally people don't almost institutionalized lifers past a certain point.Linda: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Oh, you'll be there till you retire or die.” Whereas seeing significant career change after that long in one place, even if you've moved around internally and experienced a lot of different roles, is not common at all what sparked that?Linda: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's such a good question. I always think about that, too, especially as I was reflecting because I'm, you know, in the midst of this transition, and I've gotten a lot of reflecting over the last two weeks [laugh], or more. But I think the main thing for me is, I always, wherever I was—and this kind of something that—I'm very proactive when it comes to trying to transition. I think, even when I was—right, I held many roles in the same company; I used to work in TV production and actually left for three months to go to a coding boot camp and then came back on the other end, but I understood the product in a different way.So, for that time period, it was really interesting to work on the other end. But, you know, as I kind of—every time I wanted to progress further, I always made a move that was actually new and put me in an uncomfortable place, even within the same company. And I'm at the point now that I'm in my career, I felt like this next step really needs to be, you know, at AWS. It's not, like, the natural progression for me. I worked alongside—on the client end—with AWS and have seen so many projects come through and how much our own workloads have changed.And it's just been an incredible journey, also dealing with accounts team. On that end, I've worked alongside them, so for me, it was kind of a natural progression. I was very passionate about cloud computing at AWS and I kind of wanted to take it to that next place, and I felt like—also, dealing with the community as part of my job is a dream part to me because I was always doing that on the side on social media. So, it wasn't part of my day-to-day job. I was working as an SRE and an infrastructure engineer, so I didn't get to do that as part of my day-to-day.I was making videos at 2 a.m. and, you know, kind of trying to, like, do—you know, interact with the community like that. And I think—I come from a performing background, the people background, I was singing since I was four years old. I always go to—I was a wedding singer, so I go into a room and I love making people happy or giving value. And I think, like, education has a huge part of that. And in a way, like making that content and—Corey: You got to get people's attention—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —you can't teach them a damn thing.Linda: Right. Exactly. So, it's kind of a mix of everything. It's like that performance, the love of learning. You know, between you and I, like, I wanted to be a lawyer before I thought I was going to—before I went to tech.I thought I was going to be a lawyer purely because I loved the concept of going to law school. I never took time to think about the law part, like, being the lawyer part. I always thought, “Oh, school.” I'm a student at heart. I always call myself a professional student. I really think that's part of what you need to be in this world, in this tech industry, and I think for me, that's what keeps my fire going.I love to experiment, to learn, to build. And there's something very fulfilling about building products. If you take a step back, like, you're kind of—you know, for me that part, every time I look back at that, that always is what kind of keeps me going. When I was doing front-end, it felt a lot more like I was doing smaller things than when I was doing infrastructure, so I felt like that was another reason why I shifted. I love doing the front-end, but I felt like I was spending two days on an Internet Explorer bug and it just drove me—[laugh] it just made it feel unfulfilling versus spending two days on, you know, trying to understand why, you know, something doesn't run the infrastructure or, like, there's—you know, it's failing blindly, you know? Stuff like that. Like, I don't know, for me that felt more fulfilling because the problem was more macro. But I think I needed both. I have a love for both, but I definitely prefer being back-end. So. [laugh]. Well, I'm saying that now but—[laugh].Corey: This might be a weakness on my part where I'm basically projecting onto others, and this is—I might be completely wrong on this, but I tend to take a bit of a bifurcated view of community. I mean, community is part of the reason that I know the things I know and how I got to this place that I am, so use that as a cautionary tale if you want. But when I talk to someone like you at this moment, where you're in the community, I'm in the community, and I'm talking to you about a problem I'm having and we're working on ways to potentially solve that or how to think about that. I view us as basically commiserating on these things, whereas as soon as you start on day one—and yes, it's always day one—at AWS and this becomes your day job and you work there, on some level, for me, there's a bit shift that happens and a switch gets flipped in my head where, oh, you actually work at this company. That means you're the problem.And I'm not saying that in a way of being antagonistic. Please, if you're watching or listening to this, do not antagonize the developer advocates. They have a very hard job understanding all this so they can explain that to the rest of us. But how do you wind up planning to navigate, or I guess your views on, I guess, handling the shift between, “One of the customers like the rest of us,” to, as I say, “Part of the problem,” for lack of a better term.Linda: Or, like, work because you kind of get the—you know. I love this question and it's something I've been pondering a lot on because I think the messaging will need to be a little different [coming from me 00:10:44] in the sense of, there needs to be—just in anything, you have to kind of create trust. And to create trust, you have to be vulnerable and authentic. And I think I, for example, utilize a lot of things outside of just the AWS cloud topic to do that now, even, when I—you know, kind of building it without saying where I work or anything like that, going into this role and it being my job, it's going to be different kind of challenge as far as the messaging, but I think it still holds true that part, that just developing trust and authenticity, I might have to do more of that, you know? I might have to really share more of that part, share other things to really—because it's more like people come, it doesn't matter how much somet—how many times you explain it, many times, they will see your title and they will judge you for it, and they don't know what happened before. Every TikTok, for example, you have to act like it's a new person watching. There is no series, you know? Like, yes, there's a series but, like, sometimes you can make that but it's not really the way TikTok functions or a short-form video functions. So, you kind of have to think this is my first time—Corey: It works really terribly when you're trying to break it out that way on TikTok.Linda: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Right. Here's part 17 of my 80-TikTok-video saga. And it's, “Could you just turn this into a blog post or put this on YouTube or something? I don't have four hours to spend learning how all this stuff works in your world.”Linda: Yeah. And you know, I think repeating certain things, too, is really important. So, they say you have to repeat something eight times for people to see it or [laugh] something like that. I learned that in media [crosstalk 00:12:13]—Corey: In a row, or—yeah. [laugh].Linda: I mean, the truth is that when you, kind of like, do a TikTok maybe, like, there's something you could also say or clarify because I think there's going to be—and I'm going to have to—there's going to be a lot of trial and error for me; I don't know if I have answers—but my plan is going into it very much testing that kind of introduction, or, like, clarifying what that role is. Because the truth is, the role is advocating on behalf of the community and really helping that community, so making sure that—you don't have to say it as far as a definition maybe, but, like, making sure that comes across when you create a video. And I think that's going to be really important for me, and more important than the prior even creating content going forward. So, I think that's one thing that I definitely feel like is key.As well as creating more raw interaction. So, it depends on the platform, too. Instagram, for example, is much more community—how do I put this? Instagram is much more easy to navigate as far as reaching the same community because you have something, like, called Instagram Stories, right? So, on Instagram Stories, you're bringing those stories, mostly the same people that follow you. You're able to build that trust through those stories.On TikTok, they just released Stories. I haven't really tried them much and I don't play with it a lot, but I think that's something I will utilize because those are the people that are already follow you, meaning they have seen a piece of content. So, I think addressing it differently and knowing who's watching what and trying to kind of put yourself in their shoes when you're trying to, you know, teach something, it's important for you to have that trust with them. And I think—key to everything—being raw and authentic. I think people see through that. I would hope they do.And I think, uh, [laugh] that's what I'm going to be trying to do. I'm just going to be really myself and real, and try to help people and I hope that comes through because that's—I'm passionate about getting more people into the cloud and getting them educated. And I feel like it's something that could also allow you to build anything, just from anywhere on your computer, brings people together, the world is getting smaller, really. And just being able to meet people through that and there's just a way to also change your life. And people really could change their life.I changed my life, I think, going into tech and I'm in the United States and I, you know—I'm in New York, you know, but I feel like so many people in the States and outside of the States, you know, all over the world, you know, have access to this, and it's powerful to be able to build something and contribute and be a part of the future of technology, which AWS is.Corey: I feel like, in three years or whatever it is that you leave AWS in the far future, we're going to basically pull this video up and MST3k came together. It's like, “Remember how naive you were talking about these things?” And I'm mostly kidding, but let's be serious. You are presumably going to be focusing on the idea of short-form content. That is—Linda: Yeah.Corey: What your bread-and-butter of audience-building has been around, and that is something that is new for AWS.Linda: Yeah.Corey: And I'm always curious as to how companies and their cultures continue to evolve. I can only imagine there's a lot of support structure in place for that. I personally remember giving a talk at an AWS event and I had my slides reviewed by their legal team, as they always do, and I had a slide that they were looking at very closely where I was listing out the top five AWS services that are bullshit. And they don't really have a framework for that, so instead, they did their typical thing of, “Okay, we need to make sure that each of those services starts with the appropriate AWS or Amazon naming convention and are they capitalized properly?” Because they have a framework for working on those things.I'm really curious as to how the AWS culture and way of bringing messaging to where people are is going to be forced to evolve now that they, like it or not, are going to be having significantly increased presence on TikTok and other short-form platforms.Linda: I mean, it's really going to be interesting to see how this plays out. There's so much content that's put out, but sometimes it's just not reaching the right audience, so making sure that funnel exists to the right people is important and reaching those audiences. So, I think even YouTube Shorts, for example. Many people in tech use YouTube to search a question.They do not care about the intro, sometimes. It depends what kind of following, it depends if [in gaming 00:16:30], but if you're coming and you're building something, it's like a Stack Overflow sometimes. You want to know the answer to your question. Now, YouTube Shorts is a great solution to that because many times people want the shortest possible answer. Now, of course, if it's a tutorial on how to build something, and it warrants ten minutes, that's great.Even ten minutes is considered, now, Shorts because TikTok now has ten-minute videos, but I think TikTok is now searchable in the way YouTube is, and I think let's say YouTube Shorts is short-form, but very different type of short-form than TikTok is. TikTok, hooks matter. YouTube answers to your questions, especially in chat. I wouldn't say everything in YouTube is like that; depends on the niche. But I think even within short-form, there's going to be a different strategy regarding that.So, kind of like having that mix. I guess, depending on platform and audience, that's there. Again, trial and error, but we'll see how this plays out and how this will evolve. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. Screaming in the Cloud listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: I feel like there are two possible outcomes here. One is that AWS—Linda: Yeah.Corey: Nails this pivot into short-form content, and the other is that all your TikTok videos start becoming ten minutes long, which they now support, welcome to my TED Talk. It's awful, and then you wind up basically being video equivalent for all of your content, of recipes when you search them on the internet where first they circle the point to death 18 times with, “Back when I was a small child growing up in the hinterlands, we wound—my grandmother would always make the following stew after she killed the bison with here bare hands. Why did grandma kill a bison? We don't know.” And it just leads down this path so they can get, like, long enough content or they can have longer and longer articles to display more ads.And then finally at the end, it's like ingredient one: butter. Ingredient two, there is no ingredient two. Okay. That explains why it's delicious. Awesome. But I don't like having people prolong it. It's just, give me the answer I'm looking for.Linda: Yeah.Corey: Get to the point. Tell me the story. And—Linda: And this is—Corey: —I'm really hoping that is not the direction your content goes in. Which I don't think it would, but that is the horrifying thing and if for some chance I'm right, I will look like Nostradamus when we do that MST3k episode.Linda: No, no. I mean, I really am—I always personally—even when I was creating content these last few years and testing different things, I'm really a fan of the shortest way possible because I don't have the patience to watch long videos. And maybe it's because I'm a New Yorker that can't sit down from the life of me—apart from when I code of course—but, you know, I don't like wasting time, I'm always on the go, I'm with my coffee, I'm like—that's the kind of style I prefer to bring in videos in the sense of, like, people have no time. [laugh]. You know?The amount of content we're consuming is just, uh, bonkers. So, I don't think our mind is really a built for consuming [laugh] this much content every time you open your phone, or every time you look, you know, online. It's definitely something that is challenging in a whole different way. But I think where my content—if it's ten minutes, it better be because I can't shorten it. That's my thing. So, you can hold me accountable to that because—Corey: Yeah, I want ten minutes of—Linda: I'm not a—Corey: Content, not three minutes of content in a ten-minute bag.Linda: Exactly. Exactly. So, if it's a ten-minute video, it would have been in one hour that I cut down, like, meaning a tutorial, a very much technical types of content. I think things that are that long, especially in tech, would be something like, on that end—unless, of course, you know, I'm not talking about, like, longer videos on YouTube which are panels or that kind of thing. I'm talking more like if I'm doing something on TikTok specifically.TikTok also cares about your watch time, so if people aren't interested in it, it's not going to do well, it doesn't matter how many followers you have. Which is what I do like about the way TikTok functions as opposed to, let's say, Instagram. Instagram is more like it gives it to your following—and this is the current state, I don't know if it always evolves—but the current state is, Instagram Reels kind of functions in a way where it goes first to the people that follow you, but, like, in a way that's more amplified than TikTok. TikTox tests people that follows you, but if it's not a good video, it won't do well. And honestly, they're many good videos videos that don't go viral. I'm not talking about that.Sometimes it's also the topic and the niche and the sound and the title. I mean, there's so many people who take a topic and do it in three different ways and one of them goes viral. I mean, there's so many factors that play into it and it's hard to really, like, always, you know, kind of reverse engineer but I do think that with TikTok, things won't do well, more likely if it's not a good piece of content as opposed to—or, like, too long, right? Not—I shouldn't say not good a good piece of content—it's too long.Corey: The TikTok algorithm is inscrutable to me. TikTok is firmly convinced, based upon what it shows me, that I am apparently a lesbian. Which okay, fine. Awesome. Whatever. I'm also—it keeps showing me ads for ADHD stuff, and it was like, “Wow, like, how did it know that?” Followed by, “Oh, right. I'm on TikTok. Nevermind.”And I will say at one point, it recommended someone to me who, looking at the profile picture, she's my nanny. And it's, I have a strong policy of not, you know, stalking my household employees on social media. We are not Facebook friends, we are not—in a bunch of different areas. Like, how on earth would they have figured this out? I'm filling the corkboard with conspiracy and twine followed by, “Wait a minute. We probably both connect from the same WiFi network, which looks like the same IP address and it probably doesn't require a giant data science team to put two and two together on those things.” So, it was great. I was all set to do the tinfoil hat conspiracy, but no, no, that's just very basic correlation 101.Linda: And also, this is why I don't enable contacts on TikTok. You know, how it says, “Oh, connect your contacts?”Corey: Oh, I never do that. Like, “Can we look at your contacts?”Linda: Never.Corey: “No.” “Can we look at all of your photos?” “Absolutely not.” “Can we track you across apps?” “Why would anyone say yes to this? You're going to do it anyway, but I'll say no.” Yeah.Linda: Got to give the least privilege. [laugh]. Definitely not—Corey: Oh absolutely.Linda: Yeah. I think they also help [crosstalk 00:22:40]—Corey: But when I'm looking at—the monetization problem is always a challenge on things like this, too, because when I'm—my guilty TikTok scrolling pleasures hit, it's basically late at night, I just want to see—I want something to want to wind down and decompress. And I'm not about ready to watch, “Hey, would you like to migrate your enterprise database to this other thing?” It's, I… no. There's a reason that the ads that seem to be everywhere and doing well are aimed at the mass market, they're generally impulse buys, like, “Hey, do you want to set that thing over there on fire, but you're not close enough to get the job done? But this flame thrower today. Done.”And great, like, that is something everyone can enjoy, but these nuanced database products and anything else is B2B SaaS style stuff, it feels like it's a very tough sell and no one has quite cracked that nut, yet.Linda: Yeah, and I think the key there—this is, I'm guessing based on, like, what I want to try out a lot—is the hook and the way you're presenting it has to be very product-focused in the sense that it needs to be very relatable. Even if you don't know anything about tech, you need to be—like, for example, in the architecture page on AWS, there's a video about the Emirates going to Mars mission. Space is a very interesting topic, right? I think, a hook, like, “Do want to see how, like, how this is bu—” like, it's all, like, freely available to see exactly [laugh] how this was built. Like, it might—in the right wording, of course—it might be interesting to someone who's looking for fun-fact-style content.Now, is it really addressing the people that are building everyday? Not really always, depends who's on there and the mass market there. But I feel like going on the product and the things that are mass-market, and then working backwards to the tech part of it, even if they learn something and then want to learn more, that's really where I see TikTok. I don't think every platform would be, maybe, like this, but that's where I see getting people: kind of inviting them in to learn more, but making it cool and fun. It's very important, but it feels cool and fun. [laugh]. So.Because you're right, you're scrolling at 2 a.m. who wants to start seeing that. Like, it's all about how you teach. The content is there, the content has—you know, that's my thing. It's like, the content is there. You don't need to—it's yes, there's the part where things are always evolving and you need to keep track of that; that's whole ‘nother type thing which you do very well, right?And then there's a part where, like, the content that already exists, which part is evergreen? Meaning, which part is, like, something that could be re—also is not timely as far as update, for example, well-architected framework. Yes, it evolves all the time, you always have new pillars, but the guide, the story, that is an evergreen in some sense because that guide doesn't, you know, that whole concept isn't going anywhere. So, you know, why should someone care about that?Corey: Right. How to turn on two-factor authentication for your AWS account.Linda: Right.Corey: That's evergreen. That's the sort of thing that—and this is the problem, I think, AWS has had for a long time where they're talking about new features, new enhancements, new releases. But you look what people are actually doing and so much of it is just the same stuff again and again because yeah, that is how most of the cloud works. It turns out that three-quarters of company's production infrastructures tends to run on EC2 more frequently than it tends to run on IoT Greengrass. Imagine that.So, there's this idea of continuing to focus on these things. Now, one of my predictions is that you're going to have a lot of fun with this and on some level, it's going to really work for you. In others, it's going to be hilariously—well, its shortcomings might be predictable. I can just picture now you're at re:Invent; you have a breakout talk and terrific. And you've successfully gotten your talk down to one minute and then you're sitting there with—Linda: [laugh].Corey: —the remainder of maybe 59. Like, oh, right. Yeah. Turns out not everything is short-form. Are you predicting any—Linda: Yep.Corey: Problems going from short-form to long-form in those instances?Linda: I think it needs to go hand-in-hand, to be honest. I think when you're creating any short-form content, you have—you know, maybe something short is actually sometimes in some ways, right, harder because you really have to make sure, especially in a technical standpoint, leaving things out is sometimes—leaves, like, a blind spot. And so, making sure you're kind of—whatever you're educating, you kind of, to be clear, “Here's where you learn more. Here's how I'm going to answer this next question for you: go here.” Now, in a longer-form content, you would cover all that.So, there's always that longevity. I think even when I write a script, and there's many scripts I'm still [laugh] I've had many ideas until now I've been doing this still at 2 a.m. so of course, there's many that didn't, you know, get released, but those are the things that are more time consuming to create because you're taking something that's an hour-long, and trying to make sure you're pulling out the things that are most—that are hook-style, that invite people in, that are accurate, okay, that really give you—explain to you clearly where are the blind spots that I'm not explaining on this video are. So, “XYZ here is, like, the high level, but by the way, there's, like, this and this.” And in a long-form, you kind of have to know the long-form version of it to make the short-form, in some ways, depending on what—you're doing because you're funneling them to somewhere. That's my thing. Because I don't think there should be [crosstalk 00:27:36]—Corey: This is the curse of Twitter, on some level. It's, “Well, you forgot about this corner case.” “Yeah, I had 280 characters to get into.” Like, the whole point of short-form content—which I do consider Twitter to be—is a glimpse and a hook, and get people interested enough to go somewhere and learn more.For something like AWS, this makes a lot of sense. When you highlight a capability or something interesting, it's something relevant, whereas on the other side of it, where it's this, “Oh, great. Now, here's an 8000-word blog post on how I did this thing.” Yeah, I'm going to get relatively fewer amounts of traffic through that giant thing, but the people who are they're going to be frickin' invested because that's going to be a slog.Linda: Exactly.Corey: “And now my eight-hour video on how exactly I built this thing with TypeScript.” Badly—Linda: Exactly.Corey: —as it turns out because I'm a bad programmer.Linda: [laugh]. No, you're not. I love your shit-posting. It's great.Corey: Challenge accepted.Linda: [laugh]. I love what you just mentioned because I think you're hitting the nail on the head when it comes to the quality content that's niche focus, like, there needs to be a good healthy mix. I think always doing that, like, mass-market type video, it doesn't give you, also, the credibility you need. So, doing those more niche things that might not be relevant to everybody, but here and there, are part of that is really key for your own knowledge and for, like, the com—you know, as far as, like, helping someone specific. Because it's almost like—right, when you're selling a service and you're using social media, right, not everybody's going to buy your service. It doesn't matter what business you're in right? The deep-divers are going to be the people that pay up. It's just a numbers game, right? The more people you, kind of, address from there, you'll find—Corey: It's called a funnel for a reason.Linda: Right. Exactly.Corey: Free content, paid content. Almost anyone will follow me on Twitter; fewer than will sign up for a newsletter; fewer will listen to a podcast; fewer will watch a video, and almost none of them will buy a consulting engagement. But ‘almost' and ‘actually none of them,' it turns out is a very different world.Linda: Exactly. [laugh]. So FYI, I think there's—Corey: And that's fine. That's the way it works.Linda: That's the way it works. And I think there needs to be that niche content that might not be, like, the most viral thing, but viral doesn't mean quality, you know? It doesn't. There's many things that play into what viral is, but it's important to have the quality content for the people that need that content, and finding those people, you know, it's easier when you have that kind of mass engagement. Like, who knows? I'm a student. I told you; I'm a professional student. I'm still [laugh] learning every day.Corey: Working with AWS almost makes it a requirement. I wish you luck—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —in the new gig and I also want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me about how you got to this point. And we're all very eager to see where you go from here.Linda: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me. I'm a huge fan, I love your content, I'm an avid reader of your newsletter and I am looking forward to very much being in touch and on the Twitterverse and beyond. So. [laugh].Corey: If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and other assorted nonsense, where's the best place they can go to find you?Linda: So, the best place they could go is lindavivah.com. I have all my different social handles listed on there as well a little bit about me, and I hope to connect with you. So, definitely go to lindavivah.com.Corey: And that link will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:30:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Linda: Thank you, Corey. Have a wonderful rest of the day.Corey: Linda Haviv, AWS Developer Advocate, very soon now anyway. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the like and subscribe buttons, and of course, leave an angry comment that you have broken down into 40 serialized TikTok videos.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    Time4Coffee Podcast
    1002: How to Break Into Political Science & Public Policy in Higher Education With Professor Lynn Vavreck, UCLA [Espresso Shots]

    Time4Coffee Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 18:47


    Lynn Vavreck is a Marvin Hoffenberg professor of American politics and public policy professor at UCLA, teaching courses on campaigns, elections and public opinion. She co-authored "Identity Crisis: The 2016 Presidential Campaign and the Battle for the Meaning of America" and has also contributed pieces to The Upshot at the New York Times. The post 1002: How to Break Into Political Science & Public Policy in Higher Education With Professor Lynn Vavreck, UCLA [Espresso Shots] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

    Behind The Mission
    BTM75 - Besa Pinchotti - The National Military Family Association

    Behind The Mission

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:28


    About Today's GuestAs Executive Director, Besa brings leadership at NMFA along with her personal experience as a military spouse to this incredible team. Besa is an award-winning journalist and marketer whose passion for our military began during her time as a reporter and television news anchor. From Jacksonville, North Carolina to Kosovo, her assignments opened her eyes to the post-9/11 military experience, and its cycles of deployment, redeployment, and constant transition. She also covered highly-contentious Congressional hearings and the impact military life has on families, including the effects of water contamination aboard military bases. During Besa's time covering Camp Lejeune, she met a guy named Dave, whom she decided to marry despite warnings to “never marry a Marine.” Now 15+ years later, they live on Capitol Hill with their 3 kids.Links Mentioned In This EpisodeNational Military Family Association Web SiteMilitary Teen Experience ReportBasic Needs Allowance LegislationPsychArmor Resource of the WeekThe PsychArmor Resource of the Week is the PsychArmor course Veteran 201: Military Families. The life of a military family can be chaotic and stressful. This course provides some insight into the unique challenges faced by military families, and you can find a link to the resource here: https://learn.psycharmor.org/courses/veteran-201-military-families This Episode Sponsored By:This episode is sponsored by PsychArmor, the premier education and learning ecosystem specializing in military culture content. PsychArmor offers an online e-learning laboratory with custom training options for organizations.Contact Us and Join Us on Social Media Email PsychArmorPsychArmor on TwitterPsychArmor on FacebookPsychArmor on YouTubePsychArmor on LinkedInPsychArmor on InstagramTheme MusicOur theme music Don't Kill the Messenger was written and performed by Navy Veteran Jerry Maniscalco, in cooperation with Operation Encore, a non profit committed to supporting singer/songwriter and musicians across the military and Veteran communities.Producer and Host Duane France is a retired Army Noncommissioned Officer, combat veteran, and clinical mental health counselor for service members, veterans, and their families.  You can find more about the work that he is doing at www.veteranmentalhealth.com  

    Face2Face Series
    Accounts Payable – Meaning, Importance, Example & Days

    Face2Face Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 4:23


    What Are Accounts Payable? Company when purchasing goods, it is not always in monetary terms, purchases are also made in credit. What this means is, that the company receives goods and services immediately from the seller and then receives an invoice from the seller which asks to pay money later to them. This is the liability for the company and comes under the head ‘CURRENT LIABILITY' as Accounts Payable. It is a liability, due to a particular supplier when the purchase of goods and services happens without paying cash immediately. Let's discuss Accounts Payable – Meaning, Importance, Example & Days To read, go to link: https://www.elearnmarkets.com/blog/accounts-payable-meaning-importance/

    For Zion’s Sake Podcast
    06-28-22 FOR ZION'S SAKE - The Meaning Of Covenant - Tue

    For Zion’s Sake Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 14:32


    FOR ZION'S SAKE - The Meaning Of Covenant Support the show: https://shellyandjunevolk.com/product/partner-with-us-psalm-127-fund/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Face2Face Series
    Working Capital Meaning – Ratio, Example, Formula & Cycle

    Face2Face Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 6:48


    In order to carry on the business, the company has to plan for future needs and also meet its day-to-day expenses, such as payrolls or paying for raw materials, tools, and supplies. To meet these expenses the company requires cash. Therefore, the funds that are required by a company to meet its short-term expenses (within 1 year) are known as ‘Working Capital'. Working Capital meaning is the cash required to meet the company's short-term expenses. Let's discuss Working Capital Meaning – Ratio, Example, Formula & Cycle. To read, go to the link : https://www.elearnmarkets.com/blog/working-capital-meaning/

    Face2Face Series
    Types of Shareholders – Meaning, Rights & Example

    Face2Face Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 5:24


    Companies, when wanting to expand or grow in a business, need to raise funds from the market by way of issue of shares or by issue of debentures (i.e loans). So people being issued shares are known as shareholders and the ones issued debentures are known as the debenture holders. These decisions are taken by the promoter of the company. Thus, shares are the company's securities that are held by the people. These people who have purchased the shares or have subscribed to the shares are known as the shareholders. These types of shareholders become part owners of the companies with the percentage of shares they hold. Let's discuss about Types of Shareholders – Meaning, Rights & Example. To read, go to link : https://www.elearnmarkets.com/blog/types-of-shareholders/

    [Learning Japanese] ManoNihongo
    #327 Multiple Meaning Verb 66 [まわる(2)]

    [Learning Japanese] ManoNihongo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:24


    いくつかの意味がある動詞を紹介します。今回は「まわる(回る)2」です。Script of this episode: https://manonihongo.com/327-multiple-meaning-verb-66/

    Outrageous
    Outrageous Episode 6.3 - The Meaning of Abbott Elementary

    Outrageous

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 40:00


    Ever called the cops on your neighbor? Chris has. The Outrageous Crew talk about last season's breath of fresh air, Abbott Elementary, and discuss if our opinions about the show can shift real world attitudes about education.    Trecia's Recommendation: Rent! Live (this show has closed) Jason's Recommendation: The Thing about Pam Chris's Recommendation: Everything, Everywhere, All At Once

    Search for Meaning with Rabbi Yoshi
    Search for Meaning with Matthew Waksman and Rabbi Yoshi Zweiback

    Search for Meaning with Rabbi Yoshi

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 51:06


    In the latest edition of his Search for Meaning podcast, Stephen Wise Temple Senior Rabbi Yoshi Zweiback hosts Matthew Waksman, a brand strategy partner at Ogilvy in Great Britain, one of the top marketing agencies in the world.Having experienced antisemitism as a young man growing up in London, Waksman wrote a stirring article about anti-Zionism and antisemitism in December of 2021: "When it comes to social justice and inclusive marketing, Jews don't count."The piece was inspired by attacks on Jewish students and Jewish symbols in central London at Hanukkah time, which was only really reported in the Jewish press, a distressing trend that speaks to a much larger and much more concerning issue: Growing antisemitism, cloaked in anti-Zionism, spreading not only across Europe, but across the United States, as well.Currently in Israel, Waksman delves into how antisemitism and anti-Zionism has complicated international efforts to aid the Ukrainian Jewish community, particularly members of that community who are seeking refuge in Israel. The rise in anti-Zionist sentiment (fueled by growing antisemitism) in Europe and the fear of a proxy war in the Middle East is particularly vexing as the human toll of Russia's invasion continues to rise.In response to those like Gigi Hadid, who have made comparisons between the Russia-Ukraine dynamic and the Israel-Palestine relationship, Waksman calls such efforts "incredibly dangerous and reductive," because of the level of complexity that accompanies such conflicts."When people are comparing one conflict to another, it's never to shine a light on a particular conflict," Waksman says. "It's in order to further an agenda or an opinion, which is not about the specific conflict to begin with. I always find it cynical and ... deeply unhelpful."Russian President Vladimir Putin initially called his invasion a "de-Nazification" effort, despite the fact that Ukraine's Jewish president Volodymyr Zelenskyy's great-grandparents were murdered in the Holocausts. Zelenskyy's response to that—"How could you possibly accuse me of being a Nazi?"—notably omitted the (likely implied) fact that he was Jewish."From what I see, at least at the start of the conflict, he was not the one who led with his Jewish identity," Waksman says. "People then commented, and he did that. He's not the one who put his Jewish identity [forward], nor should he have to. I'm just making the observation."That leads to a deeper conversation about the state of inclusivity, and how Jews, despite being the quintessential Other for millennia, still don't rank high in the hierarchy of racism. In the words of British author David Baddiel, "Jews Don't Count" in identity politics.

    No Other Foundation
    The Meaning of 1453

    No Other Foundation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:57


    08:57 https://www.ancientfaith.com/podcasts/nootherfoundation/the_meaning_of_1453 feeds@ancientfaith.com (Fr. Lawrence Farley and Ancient Faith Radio)

    Mortgage Mom Radio - Podcast
    What is a Notice of Default? What happens next?

    Mortgage Mom Radio - Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:23


    6/27/2022 Many homeowners have recently received a Notice of Default, why now? For more than two years, the federal government and has put a moratorium on foreclosures. Meaning, if someone was behind prior to the pandemic, they could not be foreclosed on. Many became behind due to the pandemic and as stated, there was nothing that the bank, county (think property taxes), or HOA's (yes, that's right, your HOA can foreclose on you), good do to collect or move forward with sale to rectify the balanced owed. In today's episode we talked about the following: What is a notice of default? How much time do you have before being issue a notice of trustee sale? What is a notice of trustee sale? Are you in jeopardy of losing your home? Do you have any options to save your property outside of paying the lender the full balance due? Sometimes selling your home is your only way to take care of your balance due, but if there is a way to save your home and get you back on track without the sale of your home, Mortgage Mom Radio is here to help you make that happen! We have multiple homebuyer workshops scheduled for the rest of the year. RSVP now for our closest date! See below. Homebuyer Workshop https://www.eventbrite.com/e/367079603977 Book your free phone consultation today, BOOK NOW We are LIVE on YOUTUBE every Monday and Wednesday @ 1PM PST. Interact with us LIVE while we record! Ask us your questions right in the comments. Debbie Marcoux is licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovations under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act, NMLS ID 237926, also licensed in AZ-0941504, FL-LO76508, GA-69178, ID-167867, IL-031.0058339, NC, NV-57237, OR, TN-184373, TX, WA-MLO-237926

    Redeemer Memphis
    Zechariah 2:1-13 (ESV)

    Redeemer Memphis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 34:36


    Sermon: Dreaming of Meaning, Series: Dreaming of the Kingdom, by Rev. Ben Winkler, Zechariah 2:1-13 (ESV)

    D**O-DIDDY VISION
    Mental Snacks Ep 123 S2 " The most important part of your hustle"

    D**O-DIDDY VISION

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 3:22


    Welcome back to mental snacks with Claiborne Jackson Today is Monday Motivational Monday. As we jump back in the work week hustle Remember that your mental health is the most important part of your hustle. If you don't take care of your mental health then my friend you are definitely hustling backward Here are a few tips that I personally use to start the week off right 1 schedule at least an hour out of the day to dedicate time for yourself. In that hour walk, run, meditate or just relax 2 write out your goals. It can be just for that day or even the week. Just write them down 3 practice the 5 Second rule. Meaning as soon as you have the urge to work on your goal, you have about a 5 second window before your brain talks you out of it .. immediately start counting down from 5 4 3 2 1 and as soon as you hit one make yourself physically move. You have to take action at that point . Counting down distracts your brain and keeps it from coming up with reasons that you should do something other than your goal. 4 pace yourself 5 reconceptualize how you see Monday.. tell yourself that you love Monday's. If you say it enough to you will start to believen it.. I need to do the same about Tuesday's lol. Have a great week ,like, comment share and thank you for your ongoing support --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/claiborne-jackson0/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/claiborne-jackson0/support

    Boardroom Governance with Evan Epstein
    Ana Dutra: "Think of Your Board Journey As Any Career."

    Boardroom Governance with Evan Epstein

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 52:20


    0:00 Intro.1:45 Start of interview.2:40 Ana's "origin story". She was born and raised in Rio do Janeiro, Brazil. She got degrees in law and economics, and started her career in sales at IBM in Brazil in the mid-1980s. In 1992 she moved to the U.S. to get an MBA at Northwestern University. That led to a career of over 30 years in technology, M&A and global business transformations. A couple of years ago she retired from her last job as CEO, and she embarked in her board "portfolio career": public, private and non-profit boards, in addition to teaching and doing some advisory work for CEOs.4:55 Her advice for aspiring directors: "Think of your board journey as any career." She started serving on non-profit boards and worked her way up to private and public companies. Her first public company board was CME Group. She's served on 7 public company boards, plus many private and non-profit boards.7:46 Distinctions on serving on public/private/non-profit boards ("even within those buckets there are significant differences.") Her other current public company boards: First Internet Bancorp (NASDAQ: INBK), Carparts.com (NASDAQ: PRTS); Amyris (NASDAQ: AMRS), and Pembina Pipeline (NYSE: PBA). When she thinks about board opportunities, she thinks about three things:Is she aligned with the mission/vision of the company and what it stands for.Does she have the skills, experience, credentials and competencies to add value to the board.Does she like the people (other board members).12:56 Her experience serving on the board of Eletrobras, a major Brazilian state-owned power generation company. "There is always a give and take --what you offer and what you learn-- and that to me is what makes board service so interesting."16:27 Her thoughts on the evolution of ESG and DEI. Her article "Cutting Through the ESG Noise: A Practical Framework for Corporate Boards" with Cigdem Oktem, Regional Leader, EY Center for Board Matters.22:15 Her thoughts on boardroom diversity, SB-826 and AB-979 getting struck down in California Courts. "I wish we didn't have to rely on quotas, but the truth is that when left in the hands of nom/gov chairs, board chairs and companies and executives, [progress] was just not happening.""All I can hope for is that some halo effect [since SB-826] has demonstrated that having diversity and inclusion on boards is a good business practice."24:41 On the progress of Latinos on boards. She serves on the board of the Latino Corporate Directors Association (LCDA), co-Chairs its Latino Corporate Directors Educational Foundation (LCDEF) that delivers on the BoardReady Institute (BRI).28:20 On the politicization of boards. "Over the last three years there has been extreme politicization globally, not only in the U.S." "I am a big proponent of full disclosure on where you stand as an institution and/or corporation."32:18 Her thoughts on Coinbase's position (a "mission driven company") and Salesforce (strong proponent of stakeholder capitalism). "Both companies took a stand, and that is what's important."34:52 Her take on governance practices in the tech industry. On the role of experience and self-awareness in leadership.37:17 Discussion of founder-led tech companies, governance consequences, and reverse bias discrimination. "Revenue is vanity, profit is sanity but cash is reality." "Sometimes there is too much of a good thing." "What is lacking is appreciation and respect for experience."44:52 The 3 books that have greatly influenced her life:Man's Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl (1946)The Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho (1988)Exodus, by Leon Uris  (1958)46:06- Who were your mentors, and what did you learn from them? "I have had so many, I apply a 360 mentorship model" "I crave feedback and mentorship all the time."47:05 - Are there any quotes you think of often or live your life by? "When contemplating an opportunity, if you don't foresee the possibility of death, bankruptcy or prison, then go for it!""Always think about how to pay it forward" (good karma)Particularly for women who suffer from imposter syndrome: "Remember that you're seeing people from the outside where they seem so confident but you don't know what they are feeling on the inside, so do your thing, walk in confident, don't worry too much about outside influence."49:16- An unusual habit or an absurd thing that she loves: "Melting chocolate and top it with yogurt or nuts to pretend that it's healthy." Reality TV, she's watched every season of the Survivor!50:30 - The living person she most admires: her middle sister, a pediatrician in Brazil, "probably the most knowledgeable, powerful and yet so humble and generous."Ana Dutra is an experienced CEO, business advisor and corporate director of publicly traded, family-owned and private corporations. As CEO of Korn Ferry Consulting, Ana led the global the Board  Effectiveness practice. Ana currently serves as corporate director at the CME Group (NASDAQ: CME), First Internet Bancorp (NASDAQ: INBK), Carparts.com (NASDAQ: PRTS); Amyris (NASDAQ: AMRS), and Pembina Pipeline (NYSE: PBA). She also serves on the Board of the Latino Corporate Directors Association and co-Chairs its Educational Foundation Board. __ You can follow Evan on social media at:Twitter: @evanepsteinLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/epsteinevan/ Substack: https://evanepstein.substack.com/__Music/Soundtrack (found via Free Music Archive): Seeing The Future by Dexter Britain is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License 

    Flow Research Collective Radio
    Change Your Perception of Time and Meaning with Oliver Burkeman

    Flow Research Collective Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 61:42


    TODAY´S EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FLOW RESEARCH COLLECTIVE Are you an entrepreneur, a leader, or a knowledge worker, who wants to harness the power of flow so you can get more done in less time with greater ease and accomplish your boldest professional goals faster? If you´ve answered this question with “hell yes” then our peak-performance training Zero to Dangerous may be a good fit for you. If this sounds of interest to you all you need to do is click here right now, pop in your application and one of our team members will be in touch with you very soon.   ABOUT THE GUEST: Oliver Burkeman is the author of the New York Times and Sunday Times bestseller Four Thousand Weeks, about embracing limitation and finally getting round to what counts, along with The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking and Help! How to Become Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done. For many years he wrote a popular column for the Guardian, 'This Column Will Change Your Life'. In his email newsletter The Imperfectionist, he writes about productivity, mortality, the power of limits and building a meaningful life in an age of distraction. He lives in the North York Moors.    ABOUT THE EPISODE:  In this episode, you will learn about: Intro (0:00) Core Message of 4000 Weeks (1:09) How Perception of Time Has Changed (5:22) The Idea of Deep Time (12:22) Role of Capitalism in Time  (13:54) Cosmic Insignificance Therapy (22:55) Misconceptions About A Meaningful Life (31:49) Reason for 4000 Weeks' Success (37:49) Practices To Better Relationship with Time (42:57) What Oliver's Day Looks Like (47:19) How Being A Father Affects Time & Meaning (54:51)   RESOURCES Website: https://www.oliverburkeman.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/oliverburkeman ‍ STEVEN KOTLER is a New York Times bestselling author, award-winning journalist, and Founder and Executive Director of the Flow Research Collective. He is one of the world's leading experts on human performance. His books include The Art of Impossible, Stealing Fire, and The Rise of Superman. His work has been translated into over 40 languages and appeared in over 100 publications, including the New York Times Magazine, Wall Street Journal, TIME, Wired, Atlantic Monthly, The Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

    Morning Mindset Daily Christian Devotional
    R: Meaning & Purpose in life (2 Corinthians 1:3-4)

    Morning Mindset Daily Christian Devotional

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 6:58


    Today's Scripture: 2 Corinthians 1:3-4 - Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, 4 who comforts us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. EXPRESS YOUR INTEREST IN HUSBAND CAMP - https://CareyGreen.com/HusbandCamp