Podcasts about Austrian

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Best podcasts about Austrian

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Latest podcast episodes about Austrian

Lions of Liberty
536. Jeff Deist on the 20th Century Disaster, Libertarianism and Left/Right Divide

Lions of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:32


In this week's flagship Lions of Liberty podcast, Marc welcomes back Jeff Deist, the President of the Mises Institute. Marc and Jeff catch up and discuss how the uptick in interest for the ideas of free markets and Austrian economics during the COVID era. They then discuss Jeff's recent assertion that the 20th Century was an "illiberal disaster", and why it's no coincidence that the century of Democracy coincided with the century of war. Jeff and Marc then discuss the relationship of libertarianism to the current political spectrum. Is libertarianism "neither right nor left", as many libertarians assert? Create more LIBERTY in your own life by joining myself, Pete Quinones, Brian McWilliams, John Odermatt and more entrepreneurs over at the Nomad Network! Invest in your future with iTrustCapital and use code LIONS for 1 month FREE  Get access to all of our bonus audio content, livestreams, behind-the-scenes segments and more for as little as $5 per month by joining the Lions of Liberty Pride on Patreon OR support us on Locals! Patrons also get 20% off all merchandise at the Lions of Liberty Store, including our hot-off-the-press Hands Up Don't Nuke! T-Shirt! Get 25% off your selection of the AMAZING CBD products over at PalomaVerdeCBD.com and use discount code "ROAR" at checkout! Check out the other Lions-hosted podcasts: Second Print Comics podcast with Marc Clair and Remso Martinez The BOHRing podcast with Brian, Odie, Howie and Rico

Business Matters
WeWork shares jump more than 13 per cent in public markets debut

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 52:20


Shares of the office-leasing company WeWork closed up more than 13.49 per cent on Thursday, after the company went public through a special purpose acquisition. We hear from Peter Eavis of The New York Times, who has been following the ups and downs of the company. A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute. The company behind a new cryptocurrency called Worldcoin wants to give away its tokens for free. But in exchange, users have to agree to have their eyes' iris scanned. This is, the website says, to "prove that they are indeed human... and that they have not received their free share of Worldcoin already". But there are already privacy concerns, as we hear from Sam Biddle of The Intercept. Shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The Austrian city of Vienna is known for its collection of art galleries and museums. But some of the exhibits, it seems, are a little too racy for some social media networks. So the tourism board is posting images on the website OnlyFans, the only social network that permits depictions of nudity. We hear from Norbert Kettner of the Vienna Tourist Board. Plus, it's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets partying til dawn. All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, a contributing editor at US National Public Radio, in Los Angeles. And writer Rachel Cartland, in Hong Kong. (Picture: A WeWork office building. Credit: Getty Images.)

World Business Report
WeWork shares jump more than 13 per cent in public markets debut

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:00


Shares of WeWork closed up more than 13.49 per cent on Thursday after the company went public through a special purpose acquisition, more than two years after its failed IPO. We hear from Peter Eavis of The New York Times, who has been following the ups and downs of the company. Plus, the Austrian city of Vienna is known for its collection of art galleries and museums. But some of the exhibits, it seems, are a little too racy for some social media networks. So the tourism board is posting images on the website OnlyFans, the only social network that permits depictions of nudity. We hear from Norbert Kettner of the Vienna Tourist Board. Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors, in Chicago, tells us about the day's trading on Wall Street.

Composers Datebook
A quirky piece by Marga Richter

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Let's face it. Brevity and wit are not always qualities one associates with new music. But today we offer a sample: this comic overture is less than 5 minutes long, and opens, as you just heard, with a Fellini-esque duet for piccolo and contrabassoon. The overture is entitled “Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark,” and is a rather burlesque celebration of modern theoretical physics. Its alliterative title evokes those subatomic particles known as “quarks” that, we're told, make up our universe. And, since this music changes time signature so often, perhaps Heisenberg's “uncertainty principle” is thrown in for good measure. The music is by Marga Richter, who was born on this date in 1926 in Reedsburg, Wisconsin. Richter received her early music training in Minneapolis, and then moved to New York's Juilliard School. By the time of her death in 2020, she had composed over 75 works including an opera and two ballets, as well as two piano concertos and a variety of solo, chamber and symphonic works. "Composing,” said Richter,” is my response to a constant desire to transform my perceptions and emotions into music … Music is the way I speak to the silence of the universe." Music Played in Today's Program Marga Richter (b. 1926) — Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark (Czech Radio Orchestra; Gerard Schwarz) MMC 2006 On This Day Births 1879 - French composer, pianist, and writer Joseph Canteloube, in Annonay (near Tournon); 1885 - Austrian composer and musicologist Egon Wellesz, in Vienna; 1921 - English composer (Sir) Malcolm Arnold, in Northampton; 1926 - American composer Marga Richter, in Reedsburg, Wisconsin; 1949 - Israeli composer Shulamit Ran, in Tel Aviv; Deaths 1662 - English composer Henry Lawes, age 66, in London; Premieres 1784 - Gretry: opera, "Richard Coeur de Lion" (Richard the Lionhearted), in Paris; 1858 - Offenbach: comic opera, "Orphée aux enfers" (Orpheus in the Underworld), in Paris; 1900 - Rimsky-Korsakov: opera "The Tale of Tsar Saltan," at the Solodovnikov Theatre in Moscow, with Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov conducting (Gregorian date: Nov. 3); 1921 - Third (and final) version of Sibelius: Symphony No. 5, in Helsinki under the composer's direction; Sibelius conducted the first performances of two earlier versions of this symphony in Helsinki on Dec. 8, 1915 and Dec. 14, 1916; 1926 - Nielsen: Flute Concerto (first version), in Paris, conducted by Emil Telmányi (the composer's son-in-law), with Holger Gilbert-Jespersen the soloist; Nielsen revised this score and premiered the final version in Oslo on November 9, 1926, again with Gilbert-Jespersen as the soloist; 1933 - Gershwin: musical "Let 'Em Eat Cake," at the Imperial Theater in New York City; 1941 - Copland: Piano Sonata, in Buenos Aires, by the composer; 1956 - Menotti: madrigal-fable "The Unicorn, the Gordon and the Manticore," at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.; 1984 - Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: Double Quartet for strings, at a concert of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, by the Emerson Quartet and friends. 2004 - Danielpour: "Songs of Solitude" (to texts of W.B. Yeats), at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall in Philadelphia, by baritone Thomas Hampson and the Philadelphia Orchestra, with Daniel Robertson conducting; Others 1739 - Handel completes in London his Concerto Grosso in D, Op. 6, no. 5 and possibly his Concerto Grosso in F, Op. 6, no. 9 as well (see Julian date: Oct. 10). Links and Resources On Marga Richter An interview with Richter

Coin Stories
Vijay Boyapati: The Bullish Case for Bitcoin

Coin Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 65:54


Vijay Boyapati was born and raised in Australia and moved to the United States to do a PhD in Computer Science. He never started the PhD, but took a job offer instead and ended up at a small startup called Google. After leaving the much bigger Google, in 2007, Vijay spent a year campaigning in the 2008 Presidential election, helping to raise millions of dollars for Ron Paul. After becoming disillusioned by the political process, Vijay decided to continue to seek change through technology. Discovering Bitcoin in 2011, Vijay quickly went down the Bitcoin rabbit hole. With a background in Austrian economics he spent years thinking about the economic framework within which Bitcoin's value proposition could be understood. His thinking on the economics of Bitcoin culminated in an article called the Bullish Case for Bitcoin which is one of the most read articles on Bitcoin after Satoshi Nakamoto's Whitepaper and it has been translated into 20 different languages. The article is often cited as the most useful resource to give to newcomers who are attempting to understand Bitcoin. -- This episode was brought to you by Bitcoin Magazine and the Bitcoin Conference. Buy your Bitcoin 2022 pass here and use code COINSTORIES for 10% off all tickets:  https://www.tixr.com/groups/bitcoinconference/events/bitcoin-2022-26217 

Fifth Wrist Radio
The European Gang Talks Watches #4

Fifth Wrist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 173:53


A couple of European guys from the global Fifthwrist family get together to talk about watches. In this session we talk about watches from the regions we all come from. So, Benoît (@petitsecondes) has a lot to tell us about the famous watch region around Besançon, Claus (@tapir_ffm) will prove to you, that Frankfurt has more to offer than banks and the airport, Phil (@pippy) has some manufacturers nearly in walking distance and Wolfgang (@w_a_t_c_h_s_t_y_l_e) will introduce you to more than one Austrian brand. Show notes: 00:00 Intro 01:19 Wrist and drink checks 15:10 Watches from the Besançon area 42:12 Watches from the Frankfurt area 1:14:00 The Rant: new watches are boring, Instagram is boring, booooring 1:35:40 Watches from the London area 1:59:00 Watches from Austria 2:30:36 Watch Focus: Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Ti230 2:41:55 Instagram recommendations 2:49:33 Outro (2:50:42 Outtakes) Watch companies mentioned (in order of appearance): Sinn https://www.ablogtowatch.com/sinn-910-srs-flyback-chronograph-watch/ https://wornandwound.com/introducing-the-sinn-717-chronograph/ Guinand https://wornandwound.com/the-return-of-guinand/ http://fliegerfriday.com/flieger-friday-modern-fliegers-and-the-history-of-guinand/ https://www.guinand-uhren.de/kalender-31/kalender-31.html Botta https://masterhorologer.com/2020/10/12/botta-uno-24-automatic/ https://longislandwatch.com/botta-clavius-24-three-hand-12-hour-swiss-automatic-watch-with-a-44mm-case-849000be/ Kieser Design https://en.kieserdesign.de Shoutouts: @fifthwrist_travel.watch @brownsvillewatchguy @jenniwatch Instagram recommendations: Phil: @eva.leube.watchmaking Benoît: @lipfredwatch Wolfgang: @ the_space_giant Claus: @nbobinchak Theme music: diy by @tapir_ffm based on the aria «Ebben? Ne andrò lontana» of the opera «La Wally» by Alfredo Catalani Fifth Wrist and Fifth Wrist Radio are both community run projects. Designed to serve the watch enthusiast community. We reject all forms of outside watch brand intervention and take no money, watches or goods from watch companies. The future direction of the website and podcasts are driven by the people who take part in this project.

FT News Briefing
The crash landing of Austria's chancellor

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 10:19


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/a263a468-2f91-490c-896c-a232866afb4eChina has told McDonald's to expand a digital renminbi payments system at restaurants across the country before the Beijing Winter Olympics; and about a quarter of all US infrastructure is at risk of serious flooding, which could hit prices in the $4tn municipal bond market. Plus, the FT's Sam Jones discusses the scandal that led to the spectacular downfall of former Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz and what could be next for the country. VOTE: The FT News Briefing has been nominated for the Lovie Awards news & politics podcast category! https://vote.lovieawards.com/PublicVoting#/2021/podcasts/general-series/news-politicsBeijing presses McDonald's to expand e-currency system before Olympicshttps://www.ft.com/content/1f4274f4-b914-4534-89c0-62b9b7763f2bFlooding could leave billions of US municipal debt under waterhttps://www.ft.com/content/da0ac736-7c38-4f93-baaf-e315a51faf22Rise and fall: the scandal that toppled Austria's Sebastian Kurzhttps://www.ft.com/content/fc574b47-195c-4e7f-a442-12b6c8f0c97dWeWork to make belated arrival on stock market after Spac mergerhttps://www.ft.com/content/258121b8-299e-4993-91d9-cb2a18d387f4The FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Gavin Kallmann and Michael Bruning. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

HistoryPod
20th October 1740: Maria Theresa inherits the Austrian throne, prompting the War of the Austrian Succession

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


Maria Theresa inherited the Austrian throne, prompting the War of the Austrian ...

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Top 6 Organic Essential Oils and their Do's & Don'ts

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:23


Join us for a dive into the power of essential oils in our daily lives. The interest in essential oils is rapidly on the rise according to Google Trends. The trend line is fascinating. Why? What makes essential oils so sought after? They work! Organixx carries a line of organic and pure essential oils. Today we will share the top 3 uses of the top single essential oils in our line.   Lavender Lavender oil is believed to have antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. We've all heard by now that lavender promotes deeper sleep, but did you know…   There's promising research for breast health too. 2014 Iranian research published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer found that lavender oil kills breast cancer cells but leaves healthy cells unharmed. It's important to note that this study was on cells in a petri dish, not on humans. The researchers concluded that: “L. angustifolia has cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines, and apoptosis is proposed as the possible mechanism of action.”1 Stops the itch and burn of insect bites. Even fire ants! Put a drop of lavender oil on a bee sting, mosquito, or other bug bite to stop pain, itching, and reduce swelling. Reapply as necessary. Lavender oil works really well for this, especially if applied immediately. Use it as a flavor booster. Add a drop of high-quality lavender oil suitable for consumption to brownie batter, chocolate icing, cookie dough, dessert recipes, raw chocolate, or even salad dressings. It's absolutely delicious.   Is Lavender Oil Safe? Using diluted lavender oil topically or in aromatherapy is generally considered safe for most adults but may not be recommended for children. Applying pure lavender oil to your skin (especially open wounds) may also cause irritation, so we recommend infusing it with a carrier oil, such as olive oil or coconut oil. Dissolving it in water also works.   Be careful not to rub lavender oil in your eyes and mucous membranes. If this happens, wash it out immediately. Lavender oil may also cause allergic reactions in people with unusually sensitive skin, so do a spot test before using it. Simply apply a drop of lavender oil to your arm and see if any reaction occurs.   The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) also warns against using lavender oil when taking medications like barbiturates, benzodiazepines and chloral hydrate, as it may increase their sedative effects and cause extreme drowsiness and sleepiness.     Tea Tree (Melaleuca) This versatile oil possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifungal properties.   Due to its potent anti-inflammatory benefits, tea tree oil helps to relieve inflammatory skin conditions, especially eczema and psoriasis. Dilute as necessary and apply to affected area two to three times daily. Tea tree oil has long been used as a natural bug repellent by native Australian aboriginal people. Chinese research in 2016 found tea tree to be effective against the cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais.3 The cereal weevil is considered to be an extremely destructive pest to stored cereals all over the world. Tea tree also helps to relieve the pain, itching, and inflammation of insect bites. If it's an extra-hot day and your deodorant has failed, apply again, but this time with a drop or two of tea tree oil to help kill bacteria. Tea tree oil's potent antibacterial properties are well proven with dozens of research studies.   Is Tea Tree Oil Safe? The answer is yes, as long as it is applied topically in appropriate doses and NOT swallowed. This oil may irritate your skin, especially if used for the first time. We recommend starting with low concentrations until you figure out your tolerance. Determine if you have an allergy to tea tree oil before using it by doing a skin test — apply a small amount to your inner arm to see if any reaction such as a rash or hives occurs.   The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) recommends avoiding oxidized oil, which has been exposed to air, because it may help trigger allergies more than fresh tea tree oil.  Avoid using undiluted tea tree oil as well and use tea tree oil-infused products instead to reduce your risk of skin irritation.   Lemon The health benefits of lemon oil can be attributed to its stimulating, calming, astringent, detoxifying, antiseptic, disinfectant and antifungal properties. *Important to note: Lemon essential oil can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Lemon oil has a balancing effect on the oil glands of the scalp. Massage a drop or two of lemon oil into your scalp before you go to bed at night. Wash it out in the morning. Done over a period of weeks, you will notice much less oily hair. It will make your pillow smell nice and fresh too! Diffuse lemon oil to help kill airborne bacteria. Research carried out by Dr. Jean Valnet (co-author of the book The Practice of Aromatherapy: A Classic Compendium of Plant Medicines and Their Healing Properties) shows that diffused lemon oil can rapidly kill off the bacteria that causes meningococcal infections, typhoid fever, staph infections, pneumonia, diphtheria, and tuberculosis. Several essential oils are haemostatic, i.e. they help to stop bleeding by speeding up the coagulation of the blood. The most useful of these is oil of Lemon, though Geranium and Rose have similar, though less powerful, effects.   Is Lemon Oil Safe? It is advisable not to use lemon oil without diluting it first, as it can irritate skin. It must be used with a carrier oil for direct application to the skin. Effective carrier oils include coconut oil, olive oil and jojoba oil.   There are findings showing that lemon oil may promote photosensitivity, which increases your sensitivity to the sun and may lead to sunburn and uneven darkening of the skin. We also recommend you avoid applying lemon oil and other citrus oils to your skin when outdoors, as blistering may occur.   People with sensitivities should use essential oils with caution. Reactions can vary from person to person. Some may experience skin reactions, while some may have respiratory problems. Consult your physician first before use. Pregnant women and children should also see a doctor before applying lemon oil.   Peppermint According to a review conducted by the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, peppermint has significant antimicrobial and antiviral activities. It also works as a strong antioxidant, displays anti-tumor actions in lab studies, shows anti-allergenic potential and pain-killing effects, helps to relax the gastrointestinal tract and may be chemopreventive.4   Note: Chemoprevention is the use of a medication, vitamin or supplement to stop cancer from happening. This is most often used for people who have a high risk of developing cancer. The high menthol content of peppermint makes it great for cooling off during hot flashes. At the first sign of a hot flash developing, place a drop at the back of the neck, at the base of the skull, or on the collarbones. Breathe it in. This has an instant cooling and calming effect. Peppermint oil not only relaxes skeletal muscles, it also helps to relax the muscles of the respiratory system. Inhaling the scent of peppermint helps to relieve congestion due to allergies and counteract the effects of pollen. Especially powerful when combined with lavender and lemon to ease seasonal allergies! Peppermint oil is superb for helping to relieve indigestion and heartburn. Put just one drop of peppermint oil into a glass of water and drink. It works much more quickly than peppermint tea due to the concentrated nature of peppermint oil. If it's too strong for you, just dilute it and rub it across the tummy.   Is Peppermint Oil Safe? Peppermint oil is safe in low amounts in most adults, but it can trigger side effects in people with sensitivities. It is important for the following individuals to either avoid using this essential oil or to use it carefully only with the help of a healthcare professional. Pregnant and nursing women — Peppermint oil or other similar products may have emmenagogue and abortifacient effects, so it would be wise not to use peppermint oil without your physician's approval. Infants and children 7 years old and younger — Peppermint oil must not be used undiluted because there isn't enough information regarding its safety for them. Diabetics — Using peppermint oil may raise your risk of low blood sugar levels or hypoglycemia. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia patients — Peppermint can relax the sphincter between the stomach and esophagus, and cause acid to move up to the esophagus. People with gallbladder problems — Peppermint oil may cause gallbladder inflammation; those diagnosed with gallstones should consult a physician before using peppermint oil. People taking antacids — These drugs can cause peppermint oil capsules to break down easily, increasing the risk of heartburn.   Eucalyptus The healing benefits of Eucalyptus Oil can be attributed to its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, and antiseptic qualities, among other valuable properties.   Eucalyptus oil is known to be a vasodilator, meaning it dilates, or opens, blood vessels. In 1994, Austrian researchers discovered that eucalyptol, a phytochemical in eucalyptus oil (also known as 1,8-cineol) improved global blood flow to the brain, after only 20 minutes of inhalation.9 A newer study released in 2016 by Korean researchers found that eucalyptol is also able to pass through the blood-brain barrier. This research also found eucalyptol's high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to be helpful in the management of chronic conditions such as respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and degenerative nerve and brain diseases. Some studies have shown that several different species of eucalyptus may help to reduce blood sugar levels in mice. Also because eucalyptus is such an excellent vasodilator, the entire body benefits from this increase in blood circulation. To help combat poor blood circulation, dilute eucalyptus oil and massage it into the legs, hands, and feet as needed. Eucalyptus oil's anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anti-phlegm properties work very quickly to open congested airways. Make a steam inhalation by boiling two cups of water, pour it into a large bowl, then let it cool for five minutes. Add a drop or two of eucalyptus oil. Then create a tent from a small towel draped over your head. Place your face over the bowl and carefully breathe in the vapor until you get some relief. This should only take a couple of minutes. This is great for bronchitis, head colds, chest colds, and asthma.   Is Eucalyptus Oil Safe? Essential oils like eucalyptus oil are generally safe to use, but with specific precautions. Before using it, consult a holistic doctor to see if your condition would allow you to do so, and undergo an allergen patch test to check for possible allergic reactions and lower your risk for developing side effects. In general, adults should not take eucalyptus oil orally except under a doctor's supervision, and this oil mustn't be given to children, especially those under 2 years old.   While eucalyptus oil is generally safe when applied to adult skin, refrain from applying the oil, salve or chest rub on the face or nose of baby because of its potential side effects. Lastly, pregnant and breastfeeding women should also avoid using the oil as evidence is lacking regarding its safety for these groups of women.     Frankincense – The KING of essential oils! Frankincense essential oil is distilled from the resin of the Boswellia tree that grows in many regions within northern Africa and the Middle East. Oman, Somalia, and Ethiopia are the most prominent suppliers today.   Research shows that the natural plant chemical constituents in frankincense oil stimulate the immune system.2   But it supports so much more… Frankincense is a powerful health support for respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and bronchitis. It even helps when suffering from laryngitis. Diffuse it into the room where you intend to spend some time. For best results, use an ultrasonic cool mist diffuser. Never heat essential oils because heating them diminishes their therapeutic effects. Whether your skin is dry and mature or oily and blotched with blemishes, frankincense oil has wonderful balancing qualities. It helps to reduce lines and wrinkles by tightening and toning skin, accelerates the healing of blemishes, skin ulcers and wounds, and stimulates cell regeneration. For anti-aging benefits, put several drops into your favorite night time moisturizer. For acne and blemishes, apply it neat directly on the problem area, unless you have very sensitive skin, then dilute. Use frankincense oil to help calm and center the mind, to promote spiritual awareness, and to cultivate a sense of inner peace while meditating. Frankincense contains compounds known as sesquiterpenes which work directly on the limbic system of the brain, the center of memory and emotions. Frankincense is calming, grounding, and centering to the nervous system. Diffuse it into your room, or just inhale directly from the bottle at the start of your meditation.   Is Frankincense Oil Safe? Yes, frankincense oil is generally safe. Just make sure to undergo an allergen patch test before applying frankincense oil topically to see if you have any sensitivity to this oil.   For some groups of people, frankincense oil isn't recommended, since it may trigger adverse reactions. If you're pregnant or nursing, avoid using frankincense oil because it may trigger contractions, prompt menstruation and lead to a miscarriage. As for children, there is very limited information regarding the potential use of this oil for this age group, so if you're a parent or guardian, do not let them use this oil.   How to Dilute Essential Oils Although essential oils can be used neat (undiluted) in many cases, it is best (and more economical) to dilute essential oils before applying them to the body. Add a drop or two of your chosen oil to one-half to one teaspoonful of an organic carrier oil such as coconut, almond, hemp, or jojoba.   If using with children or pets, use even less essential oil because their smaller bodies cannot tolerate an adult dose. It's best to consult a qualified aromatherapist before using essential oils with pets or children.    A Final Word About Quality Always choose high quality, organic essential oil that has been properly distilled so that its phytochemical content is not compromised. Look for bottles labeled 100% pure oil and beware of cheap oils that may be diluted with potentially toxic chemical ingredients.   In addition to the powerful essential oils we touched on today, Organixx carries 6 more beautiful single oils just as powerful and effective to help you maintain optimal health; Orange, Grapefruit, Oregano, Geranium Rose, Rosemary, and Clove. Resources: Organixx Essential Oils - 100% Pure, Organic, Non-GMO 1 Comparative studies of cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of different extracts and the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia on malignant and normal cells. 2 Immunomodulatory activity of biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata. 3 Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation. 4 A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy – Safety Information 12 Top Essential Oils & 60+ Uses Non-Toxic DIY Essential Oil Mosquito Repellent Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems What Are Essential Oils? 21 Facts About Essential Oils You May Not Know

Interviews
Samuele Murtinu: How Low Time Preference Elevates the Investment Returns of Family Corporate Venture Capital

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Family businesses play a major role in the US economy. According to the Conway Center, family businesses comprise 90% of the business ventures in the US, generate 62% of the employment in the nation, and deliver 64% of US GDP. And, they're good at venture capital. Samuele Murtinu, Professor of Law, Economics, and Governance at Utrecht University, visits the Economics For Business podcast to share the findings and insights (see Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF) from his very recent analysis of venture capital databases. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Corporate venture capital is a special animal. There are many types of venture capital. Professor Murtinu focused first on the distinction between traditional or independent venture capital (IVC) and corporate venture capital (CVC). Independent venture capital funds are structured with a general partner in the operational, decision-making role, and investors in the role of limited partner. Corporate venture capital funds are fully owned and managed by their parent corporation. The CEO or CFO of the corporation typically appoints a corporate venture capital manager, who selects targets, conducts due diligence and so on from a subordinate position in the corporate hierarchy. The important difference between IVC and CVC lies in objectives and goals. IVC goals are purely financial — the highest capital gain in the shortest possible time. CVC funds often have strategic goals in addition to, or substituting for, financial goals. These strategic goals might include augmenting internal R&D capabilities and performance, and accessing new technologies and new innovations, or entering new markets. Another form of CVC licenses patented technologies to startups in cases where the corporate firm does not have the capacity to exploit the IP, but can oversee the implementation at the startup with a view to further future investment or acquisition. This is the method of Microsoft's IP Ventures arm, for example. Typically, IVC investments are easy to measure against financial performance benchmarks or targets. CVC's strategic investments are harder to measure. Goals such as technology integration are too non-specific to measure, and normal VC guardrails like specified duration of investments are not typically in place and so can't be used as benchmarks. On the other hand, CVC investments often expand beyond the financial into strategic support via corporate assets such as brand, sales and distribution channels and systems. Corporate venture capital out-performs traditional venture capital in overall economic performance. Professor Murtinu's performance metric in his data analysis was total factor productivity — performance over and above what's attributable to the additions to capital and labor inputs. IVC's performance for its investments was measured in the +40% range, and CVC's was measured at roughly +50%. IVC performs better in the short term, while CVC performs better in the longer term. This difference reflects the lower time preference of CVC. It extends to IPO's: corporate venture capital funds stay longer in the equity capital of their portfolio companies in comparison to independent venture capital. Family CVC is another animal again — and even higher performing than non-family CVC. Professor Murtinu separated out family-owned firms (based on a percentage of equity held) with corporate venture capital funds for analysis. Some of his findings include: They prefer to maintain longer and more stable involvement in the companies in which they invest.They prefer to maintain control over time (as opposed to exiting for financial gain).They look to gains beyond purely financial returns, including technology acquisition / integration into the parent company and/or learning new processes.They are more likely to syndicate with other investors, for purposes of portfolio risk mitigation.They target venture investments that are “close to home” both in geographic terms and in terms of industries closely related to their core business. The resultant outcomes are superior: a higher likelihood of successful exits (IPO or sale to another entity), and a greater long term value effect on the sold company after the IPO or exit. Further, there is evidence from the data of a higher innovation effect for Family CVC holdings, as measured by the post-exit value of the patent portfolio held by the ventures. Family CVC is resilient in economic downturns. During the last economic downturn, family CVC invested at double the amount of corporate venture capital, reflecting family businesses' preference for long-term investing and for control. The lower time preference of family businesses and family CVC is crucial for the achievement of superior financial performance, especially in the longer term. Family CVC's lower time preference and longer investment time horizons result in beneficial effects. Ownership in the venture companies is more stable, and the value effect after IPO (when family CVC stability continues because these funds stay in the post-IPO company longer) is significant. Professor Murtinu relates this phenomenon to Austrian economics. The longer time horizon permits a closer relationship between investor and entrepreneur — it develops over time — and their subjective judgment about the future state become more aligned. Frictions and information asymmetries are reduced, and a shared view of the future emerges. This stability can scale up to the industry level and national level when there are more family CVC funds at work. Instead of pursuing unicorns and gazelles, an environment more conducive to duration and resilience is created. Additional Resources "Types of Venture Capital" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF "Families In Corporate Venture Capital" by Samuele Murtinu, Mario Daniele Amore, and Valerio Pelucco (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_Paper

Mises Media
Samuele Murtinu: How Low Time Preference Elevates the Investment Returns of Family Corporate Venture Capital

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Family businesses play a major role in the US economy. According to the Conway Center, family businesses comprise 90% of the business ventures in the US, generate 62% of the employment in the nation, and deliver 64% of US GDP. And, they're good at venture capital. Samuele Murtinu, Professor of Law, Economics, and Governance at Utrecht University, visits the Economics For Business podcast to share the findings and insights (see Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF) from his very recent analysis of venture capital databases. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Corporate venture capital is a special animal. There are many types of venture capital. Professor Murtinu focused first on the distinction between traditional or independent venture capital (IVC) and corporate venture capital (CVC). Independent venture capital funds are structured with a general partner in the operational, decision-making role, and investors in the role of limited partner. Corporate venture capital funds are fully owned and managed by their parent corporation. The CEO or CFO of the corporation typically appoints a corporate venture capital manager, who selects targets, conducts due diligence and so on from a subordinate position in the corporate hierarchy. The important difference between IVC and CVC lies in objectives and goals. IVC goals are purely financial — the highest capital gain in the shortest possible time. CVC funds often have strategic goals in addition to, or substituting for, financial goals. These strategic goals might include augmenting internal R&D capabilities and performance, and accessing new technologies and new innovations, or entering new markets. Another form of CVC licenses patented technologies to startups in cases where the corporate firm does not have the capacity to exploit the IP, but can oversee the implementation at the startup with a view to further future investment or acquisition. This is the method of Microsoft's IP Ventures arm, for example. Typically, IVC investments are easy to measure against financial performance benchmarks or targets. CVC's strategic investments are harder to measure. Goals such as technology integration are too non-specific to measure, and normal VC guardrails like specified duration of investments are not typically in place and so can't be used as benchmarks. On the other hand, CVC investments often expand beyond the financial into strategic support via corporate assets such as brand, sales and distribution channels and systems. Corporate venture capital out-performs traditional venture capital in overall economic performance. Professor Murtinu's performance metric in his data analysis was total factor productivity — performance over and above what's attributable to the additions to capital and labor inputs. IVC's performance for its investments was measured in the +40% range, and CVC's was measured at roughly +50%. IVC performs better in the short term, while CVC performs better in the longer term. This difference reflects the lower time preference of CVC. It extends to IPO's: corporate venture capital funds stay longer in the equity capital of their portfolio companies in comparison to independent venture capital. Family CVC is another animal again — and even higher performing than non-family CVC. Professor Murtinu separated out family-owned firms (based on a percentage of equity held) with corporate venture capital funds for analysis. Some of his findings include: They prefer to maintain longer and more stable involvement in the companies in which they invest.They prefer to maintain control over time (as opposed to exiting for financial gain).They look to gains beyond purely financial returns, including technology acquisition / integration into the parent company and/or learning new processes.They are more likely to syndicate with other investors, for purposes of portfolio risk mitigation.They target venture investments that are “close to home” both in geographic terms and in terms of industries closely related to their core business. The resultant outcomes are superior: a higher likelihood of successful exits (IPO or sale to another entity), and a greater long term value effect on the sold company after the IPO or exit. Further, there is evidence from the data of a higher innovation effect for Family CVC holdings, as measured by the post-exit value of the patent portfolio held by the ventures. Family CVC is resilient in economic downturns. During the last economic downturn, family CVC invested at double the amount of corporate venture capital, reflecting family businesses' preference for long-term investing and for control. The lower time preference of family businesses and family CVC is crucial for the achievement of superior financial performance, especially in the longer term. Family CVC's lower time preference and longer investment time horizons result in beneficial effects. Ownership in the venture companies is more stable, and the value effect after IPO (when family CVC stability continues because these funds stay in the post-IPO company longer) is significant. Professor Murtinu relates this phenomenon to Austrian economics. The longer time horizon permits a closer relationship between investor and entrepreneur — it develops over time — and their subjective judgment about the future state become more aligned. Frictions and information asymmetries are reduced, and a shared view of the future emerges. This stability can scale up to the industry level and national level when there are more family CVC funds at work. Instead of pursuing unicorns and gazelles, an environment more conducive to duration and resilience is created. Additional Resources "Types of Venture Capital" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_PDF "Families In Corporate Venture Capital" by Samuele Murtinu, Mario Daniele Amore, and Valerio Pelucco (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_140_Paper

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 274 - Nurse Threatened with Losing Her Job Over the COVID Vaccine Fights Back and Keeps It

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 73:57


Subscribe to the podcast We speak to a nurse whose employer was going to fire her for not getting the COVID vaccine. She fought back and kept her job. Learn about Bitcoin at a trickle BitcoinTrickle.com Sponsor Liberty Mugs Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Join our Sphinx Tribe Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @RolloMcFloogle @Slappy_Jones_2 Check us out on Patreon Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified
#203 Unit 3 - Leopold I and Austrian Absolutism

Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 19:38


In this episode we look at the form and shape that absolutism will take in the Holy Roman Empire (Austria) after the Thirty Years War and the Peace of Westphalia with Leopold I. Lyndeurozone.com Would you please consider giving the show a rating on Apple Podcasts and leaving a comment on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really makes a difference helping to get the word out about the podcast. We could use your help! Our goal is to keep the Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified Podcast a free resource for the students that use it, but our costs are substantial. If you use this podcast regularly would you please consider supporting us on Patreon for as little as a dollar a month?  We also have subscription tiers at our Patreon that allow you to access the Lyndeurozone study files, slides, and tutorials to help you prepare for your exams.  Check out what we have to offer our subscribers. If you don't want to make a monthly contribution you can also make a one time donation in any amount at Lyndeurozone.com, just look for the “Donate” button. Episodes will be released on the following schedule: Unit 1 and Unit 2 - August/September Unit 3: October Unit 4: November Unit 5: December Unit 6: January Unit 7: February Unit 8 : March Unit 9: April   Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook: @Lyndeurozone

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine
APRIL IN SPAIN by John Banville, read by John Lee

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:04


Narrator John Lee delivers a well-constructed, ably paced, and stylish performance of John Banville's elegantly written mystery. Host Jo Reed and AudioFile's Alan Minskoff discuss Lee's Irish intonations that help bring the characters to life. Lee's portrayal of the garrulous pathologist, Quirke, sets the tone. Quirke and his Austrian wife are vacationing in San Sebastian, Spain, when he sees a woman named April—long thought to be murdered years ago. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile's website. Published by Harlequin Audio. Listeners can enjoy Homer's THE ILIAD, translated by Ian Johnston, and narrated by Anton Lesser, on AudioFile's Audiobook Break podcast. Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.com Support for AudioFile's Behind the Mic Podcast comes from Blackstone Publishing, publisher of bestselling and award-winning books and audiobooks by fantastic writers and narrators. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I Always Wanted To
Play A Theremin

I Always Wanted To

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 33:04


Dorit Chrysler has been dubbed a superior wizard of the theremin. An Austrian-born, New York-based composer, producer, and singer Chrysler is the co-founder of the New York Theremin Society and founder of the first school for theremin.  As much as the theremin is a tool in Chrysler's electronic instrument arsenal she's also one of the most visible thereminists spreading the gospel of this mysterious sounding instrument which is basically played by massaging thin air. Her music has been described by Ann Magnuson in Paper Magazin, “Imagine if Marianne Faithfull and Nikola Tesla had a love child with Jane Birkin as the nanny and Bjork as the wayward Girl Scout Leader!”  Arte TV calls Dorit “Theremin Goddess” Wall Street Journal  “A futuristic Lotte Lenya“   DoritChrysler.comhttps://www.facebook.com/doritchryslerofficial/ https://www.instagram.com/doritchrysler/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=WKmMRtuLfCc&list=UU2FnHcTW8yYhKX8WGQcKEsA&index=1 Resources Dorit mentions: New York Theremin Society - https://www.nythereminsociety.org/ Dorit at CERN Hadron Collider for 100th anniversary https://www.moogmusic.com/media/electric-storm-100-years-theremin The Theremin 100 - https://www.nythereminsociety.org/theremin-100-4 THEREMIN GOES BROADWAY I am happy to have contributed theremin for “FallingInLoveWithMr.Dellamort” a “mysterious new audio musical” by Jack Feldstein and Paul Doust with a tony-nominated cast -  released on Broadway Records and making a splash on Playbill https://www.playbill.com/article/falling-in-love-with-mr-dellamort-recording-with-james-monroe-iglehart-courtney-reed-telly-leung-released-july-23?fbclid=IwAR32wprk1L2NDb66_Lr0oz4BcDnhAVpE2Nqlx5-mQkg10AVCx2Hr1wZ0dkA In the podcast I used snippets from The Dark Shadows theme by Bob Cobert, Good Vibrations by the Beach Boys, and Clara Rockmore performing The Swan. ********************* Please fill out a 5-question survey at lizsumner.com/survey. Let me know when you're done and I'll send you a coupon code for my online course, 8 Steps to Launch Your Dream Life. (launchyourdreamlife.com) ********************* Remarks I've been fascinated by the theremin since 1966 when I used to watch Dark Shadows every day after school. Then of course the iconic sound of the instrument in Good Vibrations took the theremin out of the scary movie realm and into popular music. In 1993 we saw Theremin: An Electronic Odyssey in the theater and I learned more about the instrument's origin as the first electronic instrument invented in 1920. That's also where I learned of the amazing Clara Rockmore, Theremin's first virtuoso performer.  The idea of shaping sound in thin air with your hands intrigues me so much. I've never been patient enough to learn an instrument but I'm drawn to weirdness of a theremin.  My guest, Dorit Chrysler, is a virtuoso herself and a teacher. She's been playing for 20 years, and warns us that the theremin is difficult to learn. A lot of people start then give up. In our conversation Dorit describes her teaching approach and how to avoid some of the pitfalls that frustrate people so that they lose interest. I kicked myself a few years when I missed an opportunity to take a class with her locally.. I learned about it too late. I sincerely hope I'll get another chance. Here's the interview. Full transcript available at ialwayswantedto.net

Women With Vision
9.7 Taking Chance On People With Ana Pompa Alcaron

Women With Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 32:25


Ana Pompa Alarcón is the CEO of Founders Registry, a one-stop-shop for founders of startups and small businesses. She is half Mexican, half Austrian, and the mother of Leila and Ezra. Together they live in Los Angeles CA. Ana's passion is to support BIPOCS, women, and non-binary founders to get the support they need to start the company of their dreams. She believes in disrupting existing social constructs and helping minorities to build generational wealth for their families and communities to create long-lasting changes. Previously she founded the tech startup findSisterhood, a platform that created safe spaces and connected people across socioeconomics in over 2,500 cities and 38 countries.

2 Ales and Hockey Tales with Wally
Episode 84 David Imonti

2 Ales and Hockey Tales with Wally

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 125:43


-Fitting the player to the opportunity -Knowing the wives, kids, coaches & dogs of your guys -Starting & selling an agency from your dorm room -The Uk, Norwegian, Austrian, DEL2, Slovakian? honey hole -Being a great player and working hard

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle
What we can learn from a pile of poo in a salt mine

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 14:05


Nearly 3,000 years ago, someone in an Austrian mine pulled down their trousers — and gave scientists an astonishing glimpse into their rich culture.

Kinsella On Liberty
KOL360 | Discussion with Isaac Funderburk about College, Careers, IP

Kinsella On Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 360. https://youtu.be/eC4g0vVepeI Isaac Funderburk sent me this email: Hello, Mr. Kinsella! I'm an economics student in Tennessee looking to get involved in the discourse around Austrian economics and libertarianism, particularly through culture change and academic organizations. Would it be possible to talk for a few minutes sometime this weekend or next week? I'm currently working with Turning Point USA as a social media manager and event organizer for a local ambassador, and I am involved with the Libertarian Party in the area. I've been familiar with Austrian economics for years now, but I had the good fortune to get an Austrian economics professor this semester and he has influenced me to pursue connections within the Mises Institute. I came across the many Mises Institute lectures and articles, and realized this is something I could get behind. I've recently spoken to Dr. Jonathan Newman, Mr. Jeff Deist, and Dr. Patrick Newman. I'm interested in understanding contract theory on a deeper level and found your lectures on intellectual property to be insightful. Would it be possible to arrange a brief phone call this week? Thank you for your time. We talked about college and what a libertarians goals should be, activism, careers, publishing, and economic and libertarian issues such as intellectual property. Related: Advice for Prospective Libertarian Law Students Reading Suggestions for Prospective/New Law Students (Roman/Civil law focus) (March 3, 2021)

The Libertarian Angle
The Importance of Ludwig von Mises

The Libertarian Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:28


Who was Ludwig von Mises and why is he so important in the history of economic thought? Join FFF president Jacob G. Hornberger and Citadel professor Richard M. Ebeling as they discuss the rich legacy of Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises. Please subscribe to our email newsletter FFF Daily here.

Gun Sports Radio
San Diego Wildlife Federation with Gary Brennan

Gun Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 96:37


TIMECODES: 0:00 - Intro 0:55- Find out what's on the Auction block at Gun Prom 10:19 - San Diego Wildlife Federation 35:21 - RECOIL #56 NFT Auction featuring Top Shot Chris Cheng 56:29 - CCW's in Southern California 1:07:19 - How to get started hunting in San Diego 1:20:42 - STUMP MY NEPHEW: Which pistol lost the contract trials to the Austrian military to Glock in 1983? 1:26:02 - MIKE DROP: San Marcos Mayor Rebecca Jones 1:29:48 - Outro   Our Second Amendment Celebration Gala is next weekend, and BOY are there some COOL Auction Items! Find out what you can win at the #GunProm Auction!   If you're into: Hunting, Fishing, Shooting Sports, and All Outdoor Recreation Pursuits - maybe you should be a member of the San Diego Wildlife Federation! Gary Brennan, President of the San Diego Wildlife Federation joins the show. Learn more on their website.http://www.sdcwf.org/   NON-FUNGIBLE TOKENS - contrary to what you might think, they are not mushroom-resistant coins. Learn more about the RECOIL #56 NFT Auction with Chris Cheng. Are you ready to participate in the first-ever gun community-related digital collectible? Learn more about the auction at the link below.   http://NFT.recoilweb.com   Learn HOW to bid on the RECOIL auction below.   https://www.gunownersradio.com/how-to-bid-on-the-recoil-56-digital-collectible-with-chris-cheng/   Do you have your CCW yet? Mike and special guest Gary Brennan from the San Diego Wildlife Federation talk about obtaining your concealed carry weapons (CCW) permit in Southern California.   Gary from the San Diego Wildlife Federation shares how to get into hunting in California.   STUMP MY NEPHEW: Which pistol lost the contract trials to the Austrian military to then-newcomer Glock in 1983?   MIKE DROP: San Marcos Mayor Rebecca Jones -- The right to self-defense is a basic human right. Gun ownership is an integral part of that right. If you want to keep your rights defend them by joining San Diego County Gun Owners (SDCGO),  Orange County Gun Owners (OCGO) in Orange County, San Bernardino County Gun Owners (SBCGO) in San Bernardino County, or Riverside County Gun Owners (RCGO) in Riverside. Support the cause by listening to Gun Owners Radio live on Sunday afternoon or on the internet at your leisure Join the fight and help us restore and preserve our second amendment rights. Together we will win. https://www.sandiegocountygunowners.com https://orangecountygunowners.com/ https://sanbernardinocountygunowners.org/ https://riversidecountygunowners.com/ https://www.firearmspolicy.org/ https://www.gunownersca.com/ https://gunowners.org Show your support for Gun Owners Radio sponsors! http://scottvinson.com https://365glacierpayments.com https://www.primeres.com/alpine https://dillonlawgp.com https://www.uslawshield.com https://www.nationalconcealedcarryassociation.com https://conservativeeconomy.com/gunownersradio

The New Witches
77. Abduction of Natascha Kampusch + Ghosts of Ancient Ram Inn

The New Witches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 83:22


In this Spooky episode, The New Witches chat about their busiest time of year, spooky honeymoons in New England, and how the term "alien" is apparently not PC to use anymore to refer to extraterrestrials ... ?? Maria covers true crime in this episode, retelling the harrowing abduction story of Austrian 10-year-old Natascha Kampusch, and her 8.5 year captivity under the disturbed Wolfgang Priklopil. Laura walks us through a nearly millenia-old building in England called the Ancient Ram Inn. It's got us saying, "that's a lot for one building". Bonus— listen to our best impressions of Zak Bagans from Ghost Adventures!Support the show (https://patreon.com/thenewwitches)

The Daily Gardener
October 13, 2021 Bringing Plants Back Inside, Victor Hugo, Clinton Scollard, Mark Vitosh, G. K. Chesterton, The Flower Recipe Book by Alethea Harampolis and Jill Rizzo, and Sophia Thoreau

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:20


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a French writer and poet, an adorable poem called Song of October that's kind of faded into obscurity, and a Forester's advice about pine needles. We'll hear an excerpt from an English writer often called the prince of paradox. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a lovely recipe book as we settle into fall - it's called The Flower Recipe Book. And then we'll wrap things up with a charming little story from the Thoreaus. This one comes our way via Sophia Thoreau, the friend, and collaborator of her brother, Henry David Thoreau.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.     Curated News Fall Garden: Outside In | Rural Intelligence | Madeline Sparks Pumpkin Turkey Chili | P. ALLEN SMITH   Important Events October 13, 1878 On this day, the Chicago Tribune ran a feature article on Victor Hugo, French poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, and dramatist.   Opposed to the Second Empire of Napoleon III, Hugo was banished from his home country of France. In October 1855, the exiled Hugo was in desperate need of asylum, and he arrived on the rainy island of Guernsey seeking refuge. (Guernsey is just twenty-six miles off France's Normandy coast.) In deep sorrow, Hugo wrote in a letter, Exile has not only detached me from France, it has almost detached me from the Earth. Eventually, Hugo came to see the island as his "rock of hospitality and freedom." Hugo was a prolific writer during the serenity of fifteen years of island life. It's where he completed his masterpiece Les Misérables. He also enjoyed spending time doing something he had never experienced before:  working on his home and garden, the first he ever owned. Today, the City of Paris has renovated Hugo's island garden, including a kitchen garden, fruit trees, a large fountain, and his bench of contemplation. In 1870, Hugo planted an oak tree in the middle of his lawn, and he named it the United States of Europe. The tree was symbolic and represented Hugo's vision of European unification. He would not have been a fan of Brexit. In 1878, the Chicago Tribune piece described the magnificent view beyond the garden visible from Hugo's 2nd-floor study. It is impossible to conceive a finer view than one gets from this aerial room of glass... At our feet, the furthermost rocks of Guernsey plunge themselves into the sea. Everywhere the great ocean. At the extreme point of the port, we view the old castle and the red-coated soldiers of Great Britain. In front, the Islands of Herm and Sark bar the horizon like a colossal dyke. On the right, the lines of Jersey are vaguely to be seen, always in a perpetual fog. And finally, in the far, far dim distance, the coast of France. But it takes clear weather to view it. This is the magical panorama before which Victor Hugo has worked for sixteen years. When I descended [the outdoor staircase], I found [his] old face under a huge straw hat in his garden, playing with his little granddaughter, and following with rapt attention the frolics of young George Hugo, who was blowing with terrible effort a tiny [boat] across the fountain-basin.   October 13, 1895 On this day, the Omaha Daily Bee (Nebraska) shared a little poem called An October Song from Clinton Scollard, which had been shared in the Ladies Home Journal. There's a flush on the cheek of the pippin and peach, And the first glint of gold on the bough of the beech;  The bloom from the stem of the buckwheat is cut, And there'll soon be a gap in the burr of the nut.  The grape has a gleam like the breast of a dove.  And the haw is as red as the lips of my love;  While the hue of her eyes the blue gentian doth wear, And the goldenrod glows like the gloss of her hair.  Like bubbles of amber the hours float away As I search in my heart for regrets for the May;  Alas, for the spring and tho glamour thereof; The autumn has won me the autumn and love.   October 13, 1995 On this day, Iowa Forester Mark Vitosh ("Vit-tosh") shared information about falling pine needles. Many folks can get alarmed by the amount of pine needle loss, and the enormous amount of shedding that takes place this time of year. Mark reminds us what is expected and what we can expect from his post via Iowa State University Extension. I have had many calls in the last few weeks concerning the abrupt discoloration of the interior needles in many different types of conifers.  The good news in most cases is that this is a normal characteristic of many different conifers in the fall and not some fatal disease. This time of year, we are used to seeing deciduous (broad-leaved) trees showing their brilliant colors.  However, when we see this on conifers, it does not appear normal and becomes alarming. Unlike their deciduous counterparts, evergreen conifers only discard a portion of their foliage each fall.  For example, pine trees tend to keep 1-3 years of needles active, and in the fall, the old needles turn yellow-brown before they are shed.  The pine species showing the most brilliant color change this year are white, Austrian, and Scotch. The color change is also noticeable on arborvitae and sometimes spruce. This color change occurs each year, but in some years, such as 1995, it is more eye-catching. As long as the color change is in the inner portion of the tree and in the fall, you should have no worries. So instead of worrying, enjoy the brilliant yellow fall color of your conifer tree(s).   Unearthed Words October knew, of course, that the action of turning a page, of ending a chapter, or of shutting a book did not end a tale. Having admitted that, he would also avow that happy endings were never difficult to find: "It is simply a matter," he explained to April, "of finding a sunny place in a garden, where the light is golden, and the grass is soft; somewhere to rest, to stop reading, and to be content." ― G. K. Chesterton, The Man Who Was October   Grow That Garden Library The Flower Recipe Book by Alethea Harampolis and Jill Rizzo   This book came out in 2013. And the subtitle is 100 magical sculptural. Seasonal arrangements, and they are beautiful. And so that's where they get the title, The Flower Recipe Book, because they're pulling these things together. And they do a marvelous job. They dedicate the book to their nature-loving mothers, And I thought that was so touching. And then, right upfront in the book, they introduce the flowers they will be working with. And I love this idea because, as in many cookbooks that share a master list of ingredients - That's what Elisia and Jill are doing with their book. So, if you've struggled in the past with flower arranging, if you feel that you can just never get the look that you've been striving for., Jill and Alethea  Are going to break this down, and they have three words that are their mantra for when they're creating their arrangements: base, focal, and bits.  So they start with this group of flowers and greenery- That's their base. They add in a hero flower- that's their focal point. And then they toss in a little bit of color and character - and that's their bits. And that's what fills out their arrangements.  Now, what I love about these two is that they genuinely love flowers. They start the introduction to their book this way, which tells you that they are truly kindred spirits. They write, A patch of unruly honeysuckle makes our hearts skip a beat.  The gnarled and thorny stems of garden roses call to us, despite the guaranteed hand scratches. We also have a great respect for the clean lines of Calla lilies and the simplicity of a single blooming succulent.  Now, doesn't that make them sound like gardeners?  Yes, it does. Well, I tell you what, this book is a gem for flower arranging. It is so, so pretty. I think they have over 400 pictures in this book, along with step-by-step instructions. So you really can't go wrong. Jill and Alethea share the essential recipes for all of their arrangements, and just like with cooking, you can follow the recipe. Or you can add in a few substitutions; if you don't have everything, it's totally fine.  You can still end up with a beautiful arrangement. Now Alethea and Jill are truly masters. In fact, the two work together, and they created their own San Francisco-based floral design studio. And their work has been featured in Sunset magazine, Food and Wine and Veranda;  And it should, because it's absolutely gorgeous. Over at the blog Design*Sponge, they left this review for the book. A pitch-perfect combination of beautiful and functional. . . . Showcasing over 100 floral creations, The Flower Recipe Book breaks down flower arrangements as if they were recipes: including ingredients, how-to steps, and ideas for altering arrangements to suit your style.  So super, super friendly, and hands-on. This book is 272 pages of simple flower recipes that will help you become the floral arranger that you've always wanted to become deep down. You can get a copy of The Flower Recipe Book by Alethea Harampolis and Jill Rizzo and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $6.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart October 13, 1868 On this day, Sophia Thoreau inscribed this hickory leaf with a poem entitled "Fair Haven" by her older brother Henry. It is preserved in the Concord Museum. The beautiful Fairhaven Hill, near Bear Garden Hill and the Boiling Spring, was one of Thoreau's favorite places on earth. He often went there to pick huckleberry. Today Fairhaven is only partially protected by the Concord Land Conservation Trust and The Walden Woods Project. The other part of Fairhaven has been sparsely developed for houses. Here are the verses from Henry David Thoreau's Fair Haven poem that Sophia wrote on the Hickory leaf over 150 years ago: When little hills like lambs did skip, And Joshua ruled in heaven, Unmindful rolled Musketuquid, Nor budged an inch Fair Haven. If there's a cliff in this wide world, 'S, a stepping stone to heaven, A pleasant, craggy, short hand cut, It sure must be Fair Haven. If e'er my bark be tempest-tossed, And every hope the wave in, And this frail hulk shall spring a leak, 'll steer for thee, Fair Haven. And when I take my last long rest, And quiet sleep my grave in, What kindlier covering for my breast, Than thy warm turf Fair Haven.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
A Tribute to Great Minds – Walter Block, Ph.D.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:19


https://youtu.be/f7q_dNJoaw4 The egalitarian revolt against biological reality, as significant as it is, is only a subset of a deeper revolt: against the ontological structure of reality itself, against the “very organization of nature”; against the universe as such. At the heart of the egalitarian left is the pathological belief that there is no structure of reality; that all the world is a tabula rasa that can be changed at any moment in any desired direction by the mere exercise of human will — in short, that reality can be instantly transformed by the mere wish or whim of human beings. Murray N. Rothbard Egalitarianism as a Revolt Against Nature, p. 17 Walter Block, Ph.D., is an Austrian school economist and anarcho-libertarian philosopher, is Harold E. Wirth Eminent Scholar Chair in Economics and Professor of Economics at Loyola University New Orleans and Senior Fellow with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. Find his work here: http://www.walterblock.com/ Odysee BitChute Minds Spotify Archive Flote

Long may she reign
Marie Antoinette

Long may she reign

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:36


As Marie Antoinette probably never said let them eat cake because it's (almost) my birthday yay! Today we are covering the exciting and tragic life of France's last Queen. Marie Antoinette was just an Austrian princess thrust into the spotlight after marrying the heir to the French throne and she get's some undeserved hate so let's talk about it. Works Cited History.com Editors. “Marie-Antoinette.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 9 Nov. 2009, www.history.com/topics/france/marie-antoinette. “Louis XVI.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 15 June 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_XVI. Maranzani, Barbara. “What Happened to Marie Antoinette's Children?” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 3 June 2021, www.biography.com/news/marie-antoinette-children-louis-charles-marie-therese. “Marie Antoinette.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 16 June 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Antoinette. “Marie Antoinette.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 10 Sept. 2019, www.biography.com/royalty/marie-antoinette. Www.facebook.com/historyofroyalwomen. “Marie Antoinette of Austria - Madame Déficit.” History of Royal Women, 14 June 2020, www.historyofroyalwomen.com/marie-antoinette/year-maria-theresa-maria-antonia-madame-deficit/.

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 273 - Rollo on the Lamb

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 70:29


Subscribe to the podcast Slappy has techincal issues and Rollo talks about the lamb. Learn about Bitcoin at a trickle BitcoinTrickle.com Sponsor Liberty Mugs Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Join our Sphinx Tribe Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @RolloMcFloogle @Slappy_Jones_2 Check us out on Patreon Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone
A Tribute to Great Minds - Walter Block, Ph.D.

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:19


Walter Block, Ph.D., is an Austrian school economist and anarcho-libertarian philosopher, is Harold E. Wirth Eminent Scholar Chair in Economics and Professor of Economics at Loyola University New Orleans and Senior Fellow with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. Find his work here: http://www.walterblock.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you find value in the content, please consider donating to my PayPal KeithKnight590@gmail.com LBRY: https://lbry.tv/@KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone:b BitChute: KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone https://www.bitchute.com/channel/keithknightdonttreadonanyone/ Minds: https://www.minds.com/KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone/ MeWe: mewe.com/i/keithknight25 Flote: https://flote.app/VoluntaryistKeith Gab: https://gab.com/Voluntarykeith Twitter: @an_capitalist The Libertarian Institute: https://libertarianinstitute.org/dont-tread-on-anyone/ One Great Work Network: https://www.onegreatworknetwork.com/keith-knight

Singletracks Mountain Bike News
Tips for Landing Tricks and Recovering from Injury, with Fabio Wibmer

Singletracks Mountain Bike News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:08


Fabio Wibmer is an Austrian trials rider and mountain biker with almost 7 million YouTube subscribers and his videos have been viewed more than 1.2 billion times. He's known for starring in videos like Wibmer's Law, Fabiolous Escape 1 and 2, and most recently, Home Office. In addition to trials riding, Fabio is also a winning downhill and freeride mountain biker. How are you feeling following your dirt bike crash in November? Do you have any tips or tricks for recovering from injury? How do you fill your time off the bike? Are dirt bikes just a hobby for you, or is it something you use to get better on the mountain bike? Like a lot of people, I imagine you started riding bikes as a kid. When did you realize that you were more talented, or maybe just more passionate, than the other kids? Who were the riders who inspired you as you were growing up? Are there any tricks you really wanted to include in a video like Home Office, but weren't able to complete? How do you know when it's time to give up on a trick and move on? Do you consider yourself a perfectionist? Where do you get your confidence? Which video project are you the most proud of? What are some of the skills that cross over between trials and freeride mountain biking? What's the secret to pulling off a really good tail whip? What are some of the best mountain bike trails you have ridden around the world? What do you have to say to younger riders who look up to you? If you weren't a trials rider and Red Bull athlete, what would you be doing instead? Photo: Hannes Berger / Red Bull Content Pool This episode first aired on January 11, 2021. --Keep up with the latest in mountain biking at Singletracks.com and on Instagram @singletracks --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/singletracks/support

AP Audio Stories
Kurz to quit as Austrian chancellor amid corruption probe

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 1:35


Today in the History of Freedom
Episode 9: Hayek and Nobel

Today in the History of Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 2:17


An Austrian picks up a little Swedish gold.  

Archive Atlanta
Fannie Springer

Archive Atlanta

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 11:55


Fannie Springer was a Austrian-born, Jewish woman who moved to Atlanta with her husband shortly after getting married in 1889. After an incident with an Atlanta patrolman in 1900, she turned to dedicating her life to volunteering in prisons and then later obtaining pardons for 44 incarcerated people. This week, I am sharing the brief history of her life and work. Want to support this podcast? Visit here Email: thevictorialemos@gmail.com Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

The Bitcoin Standard Podcast
83. Bitcoin Maximalism, Altcoins and Satoshi with Pete Rizzo

The Bitcoin Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 128:38


October 4th 2021. In this episode Saifedean talks to bitcoin journalist Pete Rizzo about bitcoin maximalism, altcoins and Satoshi. They discuss objectivity in journalism, what constitutes a “neutral” stance on altcoins for journalists, and how bitcoin differentiates itself from other cryptocurrencies through its high degree of decentralization. They also discuss the role that Satoshi and his disappearance had in shaping today's bitcoin, and whether Satoshi was motivated by studying Austrian economics. They also discuss the late Mircea Popescu's underrated role in articulating and demonstrating bitcoin's immutability, resistance to capture, and sovereignty. In the Q&A session, Pete answers questions about potential attack vectors for bitcoin and explains his views on the likelihood of hyperbitcoinization.

The History of Computing
eBay, Pez, and Immigration

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:46


We talk about a lot of immigrants in this podcast. There's the Hungarian mathemeticians and scientists that helped usher in the nuclear age and were pivotal in the early days of computing. There are the Germans who found a safe haven in the US following World War II. There are a number of Jewish immigrants who fled persecution, like Jack Tramiel - a Holocaust survivor who founded Commodore and later took the helm at Atari. An Wang immigrated from China to attend Harvard and stayed. And the list goes on and on. Georges Doriot, the father of venture capital came to the US from France in 1899, also to go to Harvard. We could even go back further and look at great thinkers like Nikolai Tesla who emigrated from the former Austrian empire. And then there's the fact that many Americans, and most of the greats in computer science, are immigrants if we go a generation or four back. Pierre Omidyar's parents were Iranian. They moved to Paris so his mom could get a doctorate in linguistics at the famous Sorbonne. While in Paris, his dad became a surgeon, and they had a son. They didn't move to the US to flee oppression but found opportunity in the new land, with his dad becoming a urologist at Johns Hopkins. He learned to program in high school and got paid to do it at a whopping 6 bucks an hour. Omidyar would go on to Tufts, where he wrote shareware to manage memory on a Mac. And then the University of California, Berkeley before going to work on the MacDraw team at Apple. He started a pen-computing company, then a little e-commerce company called eShop, which Microsoft bought. And then he ended up at General Magic in 1994. We did a dedicated episode on them - but supporting developers at a day job let him have a little side hustle building these newish web page things. In 1995, his girlfriend, who would become his wife, wanted to auction off (and buy) Pez dispensers online. So Omidyar, who'd been experimenting with e-commerce since eShop, built a little auction site. He called it auction web. But that was a little boring. They lived in the Bay Area around San Francisco and so he changed it to electronic Bay, or eBay for short. The first sale was a broken laser printer he had laying around that he originally posted for a dollar and after a week, went for $14.83. The site was hosted out of his house and when people started using the site, he needed to upgrade the plan. It was gonna' cost 8 times the original $30. So he started to charge a nominal fee to those running auctions. More people continued to sell things and he had to hire his first employee, Chris Agarpao. Within just a year they were doing millions of dollars of business. And this is when they hired Jeffrey Skoll to be the president of the company. By the end of 1997 they'd already done 2 million auctions and took $6.7 million in venture capital from Benchmark Capital. More people, more weird stuff. But no guns, drugs, booze, Nazi paraphernalia, or legal documents. And nothing that was against the law. They were growing fast and by 1998 brought in veteran executive Meg Whitman to be the CEO. She had been a VP of strategy at Disney, then the CEO of FTD, then a GM for Playskool before that. By then, eBay was making $4.7 million a year with 30 employees. Then came Beanie Babies. And excellent management. They perfected the online auction model, with new vendors coming into their space all the time, but never managing to unseat the giant. Over the years they made onboarding fast and secure. It took minutes to be able to sell and the sellers are the ones where the money is made with a transaction fee being charged per sale, in addition to a nominal percentage of the transaction. Executives flowed in from Disney, Pepsi, GM, and anywhere they were looking to expand. Under Whitman's tenure they weathered the storm of the dot com bubble bursting, grew from 30 to 15,000 employees, took the company to an IPO, bought PayPal, bought StubHub, and scaled the company up to handle over $8 billion in revenue. The IPO made Omidyar a billionaire. John Donahoe replaced Whitman in 2008 when she decided to make a run at politics, working on Romney and then McCain's campaigns. She then ran for the governor of California and lost. She came back to the corporate world taking on the CEO position at Hewlett-Packard. Under Donahoe they bought Skype, then sold it off. They bought part of Craigslist, then tried to develop a competing product. And finally sold off PayPal, which is now a public entity of its own right. Over the years since, revenues have gone up and down. Sometimes due to selling off companies like they did with PayPal and later with StubHub in 2019. They now sit at nearly $11 billion in revenues, over 13,000 employees, and are a mature business. There are still over 300,000 listings for Beanie Babies. And to the original inspiration over 50,000 listings for the word Pez. Omidyar has done well, growing his fortune to what Forbes estimated to be just over $13 billion dollars. Much of which he's pledged to give away during his lifetime, having joined the Bill Gates and Warren Buffet giving pledge. So far, he's given away well over a billion with a focus in education, governance, and citizen engagement. Oh and this will come as no surprise, helping fund consumer and mobile access to the Internet. Much of this giving is funneled through the Omidyar Network. The US just evacuated over 65,000 Afghans following the collapse of that government. Many an oppressive government runs off the educated, those who are sometimes capable of the most impactful dissent. Some of the best and most highly skilled of an entire society leaves a vacuum in regions that further causes a collapse. And yet finding a home in societies known for inclusion and opportunity, and being surrounded by inspiring stories of other immigrants who made a home and took advantage of opportunity. Or whose children could. Those melting pots in the history of science are when diversity of human and discipline combine to make society for everyone better. Even in the places they left behind. Anyone who's been to Hungary or Poland or Germany - places where people once fled - can see it in the street every time people touch a mobile device and are allowed to be whomever they want to be. Thank you to the immigrants, past and future, for joining us to create a better world. I look forward to welcoming the next wave with open arms.

I Know Movies and You Don't w/ Kyle Bruehl
Season 4: The Horror, The Horror - Funny Games (Episode 35)

I Know Movies and You Don't w/ Kyle Bruehl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 89:00


In the thirty-fifth episode of Season 4 (The Horror, The Horror) Kyle is joined by actor Danny Hernandez and fellow podcaster Ben Thelen (of the Dead Reckoner podcast) to discuss the meta-textual anti-horror criticism about violence, the audience, and the desensitizing aspects of media in Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke's Funny Games.

Movies to Watch Before the End of the World
Movie 74: Goodnight Mommy - ”I Am Your Mom”

Movies to Watch Before the End of the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 53:30


Nadeem picks the Austrian horror "Goodnight Mommy" for the first movie review of spooky season. Mita asks the important questions. 

Mises Media
Mark McGrath: The Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method: VUCA, OODA, IOT

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Austrian economics is distinctive in its recognition and, indeed, embrace of continuous change: customer preferences change, competitors' actions change, markets change, technology changes, prices change, business methods change. New knowledge is continuously created and accumulated. And Austrian economics equally recognizes that entrepreneurial businesses must change in response: capital combinations change, supplier and customer relationships change, organization structure changes, business portfolios and value propositions change. Continuous change is required — which is something business has not traditionally been designed for. How do businesses manage continuous change? In the current digital age, the rate of change in the external business environment is accelerating, largely as a consequence of rapid technological evolution and the ways in which customer behavior and preferences change in response. We plan to cover the issue of continuous change from multiple angles in the coming weeks and months. This week, Mark McGrath joins us to review a tool for value creation amidst continuous, roiling change. It has been around for a while and so is proven in multiple arenas and situations. It goes by the name of OODA. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights The OODA loop is a deeply sourced tool that draws on eastern philosophy, western science, and aligns with Austrian economics. When a firm as a network of individuals, knowledge, ideas, tools, processes and resources works with clients and customers and their systems, all should be better off as a result of their co-ordinated action. The better the capacity to learn and make adjustments together, the better the capability to recognize and seize opportunities, and to act at co-ordinated speed. Those who can handle the rate of change fastest will be the most successful. The originator of the OODA loop model, John Boyd, synthesized thinking from multiple sources about this problem. In business, we can call it the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method. The loop is triggered by uncertainty, or what is referred to in the model as VUCA: Volatility — circumstances change abruptly and unpredictably; Uncertainty — knowledge is incomplete and the future is indeterminate; Complexity — we are individuals in a dynamic interconnected whole with emergent outcomes; Ambiguity — multiple interpretations from multiple observers, and multiple conclusions. VUCA enters the OODA loop as unfolding interaction with the ever-changing external environment or market, as information and data coming into the company, and as unfolding circumstances, whether these are the company's own sales trends and customer relationships or the activities of competitors. VUCA is the state of the universe. It's the normal condition that entrepreneurs should assume as the basis for action. It also creates an exciting state of opportunity in which dynamically adaptive entrepreneurial businesses can thrive. OODA is a feedback loop. OODA stands for observing, orienting, deciding, acting — a continuous process. [[{"fid":"126373","view_mode":"image_no_caption","fields":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"The OODA Loop","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"The OODA Loop","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""}},"attributes":{"alt":"The OODA Loop","class":"media-element file-image-no-caption media-wysiwyg-align-center","data-delta":"1"}}]] Orientation is critical to successful operation of the model. For a firm or for an individual entrepreneur, orientation is a mélange of inputs: mindset, personality, our way of thinking and interpreting, previous experiences and how we've processed them, our ability to process new information, our ability to handle change, our ability to analyze and break things down while simultaneously piecing things together and synthesizing them into an insight or construct that never existed before. Orientation houses all our biases, and all our cognitive models. It's how we perceive and how we experience the world. It determines how we process all the information we observe. Decisions are hypotheses. From our orientation-determined analysis and synthesis of incoming data, we envision a future state: what could happen if we did something? In Misesian terms, we imagine what it would be like in the future if we were able to address our own uneasiness — if we were to change our current state and trade it for another one. Any action that follows must be preceded by a decision, a hypothesis of what we think might happen. Action is an experiment to test the hypothesis. In applying the OODA loop, entrepreneurs demonstrate a bias for learning and a bias for action. We learn by testing what happens when we act and making new observations of the outcomes of the action. These outcomes will give us new signals to employ in re-orienting to ensure that our decisions and actions are well-aligned with reality. The OODA loop model is consistent with the Explore and Expand approach to business strategy. At Economics For Business, we have frequently urged entrepreneurial firms to abandon business school strategic thinking and replace it with an Explore-And-Expand approach, running many fast, low-cost exploratory experiments and quickly expanding investment in those that work, discarding others. In OODA loop, experiments are decisions and actions, and re-orientation results in expanding application of the successful ones. In OODA, we continuously build and re-build our perception of the VUCA world and attempt to match our perception with reality through exploration and expansion. We aim to ensure our orientation is attuned to the way the world is and not to the way we want it to be or imagine it to be. The more we learn, the more we build and re-build, the faster we can advance. Speed of learning is important, so long as it is based on well-processed information. Guidance and control. In the OODA loop graphic, there are two areas designated “implicit guidance and control”: our actions and our observations. Our orientation implicitly guides and controls both. Our orientation as entrepreneurs or as economists will always affect how we perceive things. Where some might see an obstacle, others see an opportunity. That's orientation at work. On the action side, orientation implicitly guides and controls our actions. There are some things we can do automatically, employing heuristics or procedures that we don't stop to think about. This also is orientation at work — and at speed. Continuous testing. The OODA loop, processing VUCA information into decisions and action via continuous reorientation, is a test. An entrepreneur is always being tested. As time moves unstoppably forward, new challenges continuously emerge. It's the ceaseless flux of human affairs, as Mises put it in Human Action. If we maintain an open and flexible or agile approach or orientation to this continuous testing, we'll avoid failure. Focusing on a well-understood purpose will eliminate wasted time and wasted action. The Adaptive Entrepreneurial Model has three major elements: VUCA, the way the world is; OODA, as described above; and IOT. IOT stands for In Order To: the purpose or mission. As we deal with VUCA, and continuously change our orientation as we learn from our decisions and experiments, quickly finding out what works and what doesn't, we must never lose sight of our purpose and our intent. What are we trying to accomplish? Everyone in our firm, or on our team, must share the same purpose and be able to articulate it in the same way. When that's the case, creative and co-ordinating action can move forward without instruction: we don't have to tell people what to do when they're in the middle of VUCA so long as they have the same shared purpose in mind. Everyone focuses on what needs to happen and why. There's never action for action's sake; it's always with a shared purpose. If team members do not share the same understanding of purpose, then they're creating more VUCA. If they do share understanding, the orchestration of their individual efforts produces harmony. People, ideas, things — in that order. All action is human action, all decisions are human decisions, all teams are human teams. When orientations are aligned, harmonious co-ordinated action is possible. There's a high priority on relationships — with teammates, colleagues, customers, vendors, partners. In a business utilizing the OODA model, people always come first because they are the ones who act. Ideas follow, judged through the lens of helping people to decide and act. Things — technology, property, money — are at the third priority level to ensure they support people and enable their ideas. "A sound understanding in application of these comments will yield geometric results." Improved results are the repayment for the effort expended to study the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method. Additional Resources "The Adaptive Entrepreneurial Model — Core Thesis" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_138_PDF John Boyd's "OODA Loop Graphic" (PPT): Mises.org/E4B_138_PPT "The Epistemology of the OODA Loop" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_138_PDF2 "Destruction And Creation" by John R. Boyd (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_138_Boyd The Theory Of Dynamic Efficiency by Jesús Huerta De Soto: Mises.org/E4B_138_deSoto The Ultimate Foundation Of Economic Science by Ludwig von Mises: Mises.org/E4B_138_Mises

Interviews
Mark McGrath: The Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method: VUCA, OODA, IOT

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Austrian economics is distinctive in its recognition and, indeed, embrace of continuous change: customer preferences change, competitors' actions change, markets change, technology changes, prices change, business methods change. New knowledge is continuously created and accumulated. And Austrian economics equally recognizes that entrepreneurial businesses must change in response: capital combinations change, supplier and customer relationships change, organization structure changes, business portfolios and value propositions change. Continuous change is required — which is something business has not traditionally been designed for. How do businesses manage continuous change? In the current digital age, the rate of change in the external business environment is accelerating, largely as a consequence of rapid technological evolution and the ways in which customer behavior and preferences change in response. We plan to cover the issue of continuous change from multiple angles in the coming weeks and months. This week, Mark McGrath joins us to review a tool for value creation amidst continuous, roiling change. It has been around for a while and so is proven in multiple arenas and situations. It goes by the name of OODA. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights The OODA loop is a deeply sourced tool that draws on eastern philosophy, western science, and aligns with Austrian economics. When a firm as a network of individuals, knowledge, ideas, tools, processes and resources works with clients and customers and their systems, all should be better off as a result of their co-ordinated action. The better the capacity to learn and make adjustments together, the better the capability to recognize and seize opportunities, and to act at co-ordinated speed. Those who can handle the rate of change fastest will be the most successful. The originator of the OODA loop model, John Boyd, synthesized thinking from multiple sources about this problem. In business, we can call it the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method. The loop is triggered by uncertainty, or what is referred to in the model as VUCA: Volatility — circumstances change abruptly and unpredictably; Uncertainty — knowledge is incomplete and the future is indeterminate; Complexity — we are individuals in a dynamic interconnected whole with emergent outcomes; Ambiguity — multiple interpretations from multiple observers, and multiple conclusions. VUCA enters the OODA loop as unfolding interaction with the ever-changing external environment or market, as information and data coming into the company, and as unfolding circumstances, whether these are the company's own sales trends and customer relationships or the activities of competitors. VUCA is the state of the universe. It's the normal condition that entrepreneurs should assume as the basis for action. It also creates an exciting state of opportunity in which dynamically adaptive entrepreneurial businesses can thrive. OODA is a feedback loop. OODA stands for observing, orienting, deciding, acting — a continuous process. [[{"fid":"126373","view_mode":"image_no_caption","fields":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"The OODA Loop","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"image_no_caption","alignment":"center","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"The OODA Loop","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_caption_text[und][0][value]":"","field_image_file_link[und][0][value]":""}},"attributes":{"alt":"The OODA Loop","class":"media-element file-image-no-caption media-wysiwyg-align-center","data-delta":"1"}}]] Orientation is critical to successful operation of the model. For a firm or for an individual entrepreneur, orientation is a mélange of inputs: mindset, personality, our way of thinking and interpreting, previous experiences and how we've processed them, our ability to process new information, our ability to handle change, our ability to analyze and break things down while simultaneously piecing things together and synthesizing them into an insight or construct that never existed before. Orientation houses all our biases, and all our cognitive models. It's how we perceive and how we experience the world. It determines how we process all the information we observe. Decisions are hypotheses. From our orientation-determined analysis and synthesis of incoming data, we envision a future state: what could happen if we did something? In Misesian terms, we imagine what it would be like in the future if we were able to address our own uneasiness — if we were to change our current state and trade it for another one. Any action that follows must be preceded by a decision, a hypothesis of what we think might happen. Action is an experiment to test the hypothesis. In applying the OODA loop, entrepreneurs demonstrate a bias for learning and a bias for action. We learn by testing what happens when we act and making new observations of the outcomes of the action. These outcomes will give us new signals to employ in re-orienting to ensure that our decisions and actions are well-aligned with reality. The OODA loop model is consistent with the Explore and Expand approach to business strategy. At Economics For Business, we have frequently urged entrepreneurial firms to abandon business school strategic thinking and replace it with an Explore-And-Expand approach, running many fast, low-cost exploratory experiments and quickly expanding investment in those that work, discarding others. In OODA loop, experiments are decisions and actions, and re-orientation results in expanding application of the successful ones. In OODA, we continuously build and re-build our perception of the VUCA world and attempt to match our perception with reality through exploration and expansion. We aim to ensure our orientation is attuned to the way the world is and not to the way we want it to be or imagine it to be. The more we learn, the more we build and re-build, the faster we can advance. Speed of learning is important, so long as it is based on well-processed information. Guidance and control. In the OODA loop graphic, there are two areas designated “implicit guidance and control”: our actions and our observations. Our orientation implicitly guides and controls both. Our orientation as entrepreneurs or as economists will always affect how we perceive things. Where some might see an obstacle, others see an opportunity. That's orientation at work. On the action side, orientation implicitly guides and controls our actions. There are some things we can do automatically, employing heuristics or procedures that we don't stop to think about. This also is orientation at work — and at speed. Continuous testing. The OODA loop, processing VUCA information into decisions and action via continuous reorientation, is a test. An entrepreneur is always being tested. As time moves unstoppably forward, new challenges continuously emerge. It's the ceaseless flux of human affairs, as Mises put it in Human Action. If we maintain an open and flexible or agile approach or orientation to this continuous testing, we'll avoid failure. Focusing on a well-understood purpose will eliminate wasted time and wasted action. The Adaptive Entrepreneurial Model has three major elements: VUCA, the way the world is; OODA, as described above; and IOT. IOT stands for In Order To: the purpose or mission. As we deal with VUCA, and continuously change our orientation as we learn from our decisions and experiments, quickly finding out what works and what doesn't, we must never lose sight of our purpose and our intent. What are we trying to accomplish? Everyone in our firm, or on our team, must share the same purpose and be able to articulate it in the same way. When that's the case, creative and co-ordinating action can move forward without instruction: we don't have to tell people what to do when they're in the middle of VUCA so long as they have the same shared purpose in mind. Everyone focuses on what needs to happen and why. There's never action for action's sake; it's always with a shared purpose. If team members do not share the same understanding of purpose, then they're creating more VUCA. If they do share understanding, the orchestration of their individual efforts produces harmony. People, ideas, things — in that order. All action is human action, all decisions are human decisions, all teams are human teams. When orientations are aligned, harmonious co-ordinated action is possible. There's a high priority on relationships — with teammates, colleagues, customers, vendors, partners. In a business utilizing the OODA model, people always come first because they are the ones who act. Ideas follow, judged through the lens of helping people to decide and act. Things — technology, property, money — are at the third priority level to ensure they support people and enable their ideas. "A sound understanding in application of these comments will yield geometric results." Improved results are the repayment for the effort expended to study the Adaptive Entrepreneurial Method. Additional Resources "The Adaptive Entrepreneurial Model — Core Thesis" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_138_PDF John Boyd's "OODA Loop Graphic" (PPT): Mises.org/E4B_138_PPT "The Epistemology of the OODA Loop" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_138_PDF2 "Destruction And Creation" by John R. Boyd (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_138_Boyd The Theory Of Dynamic Efficiency by Jesús Huerta De Soto: Mises.org/E4B_138_deSoto The Ultimate Foundation Of Economic Science by Ludwig von Mises: Mises.org/E4B_138_Mises

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 272 - The Best and the Brightest

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 77:42


Subscribe to the podcast We do it live.  We talk about our technical difficulties, Jamie Dimon, and how Bitcoin frees us. Items mentioned Jamie Dimon on Axios Learn about Bitcoin at a trickle BitcoinTrickle.com Sponsor Liberty Mugs Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Join our Sphinx Tribe Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @RolloMcFloogle @Slappy_Jones_2 Check us out on Patreon Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

Little Atoms
Little Atoms 719 - Sebastian Faulks' Snow Country

Little Atoms

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 28:24


Birdsong author Sebastian Faulks talks to Neil about his latest novel Snow Country, set in Austria between the wars, the second novel of an Austrian trilogy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Composers Datebook
Korngold makes a Snowman

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 2:00


Synopsis On today's date in 1910, a young Austrian composer had his first major work staged at the Vienna Court Opera. It was quite a prestigious affair, all in all, with the Vienna Philharmonic in the pit and none other than Franz Josef, the Austrian Emperor, in the audience. All that was enough to go to any young composer's head – and the composer in question, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, was very young indeed. He was just 13 when his ballet-pantomime entitled “The Snowman” premiered in Vienna. Actually, he'd written the piano version of “The Snowman” back in 1908, when he was all of 11. Korngold's teacher, the composer Alexander von Zemlinsky, orchestrated the piece for the Vienna Court Opera performance, but it wasn't very long before little Erich was preparing his own orchestrations, thank you very much. By his 20s, Korngold was celebrated throughout Europe as composer of operas and concert hall works. Korngold settled in Hollywood in the late 1930s, as his Jewish heritage made a career in Nazi Europe impossible. His film scores for classic Errol Flynn adventure movies – “SVASH-booo-klers” as Korngold called them in his thick Viennese accent – made him famous in America. Music Played in Today's Program Erich Wolfgang von Korngold (1897 – 1957) — The Snowman (Northwest German Philharmonic; Werner Andreas Albert, cond.) CPO 999 037 Erich Wolfgang von Korngold (1897 – 1957) — Violin Concerto in D, Op. 35 (Chantal Juillet, violin; Berlin Radio Symphony; John Mauceri, cond.) London 452 481

SOAR (SCN) Podcast
SCN 1000 ChangeAgent Series - Claudia Körbler

SOAR (SCN) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:32


SCN Change Agent Interview Series - Meet Claudia Körbler Claudia Körbler is a Policy Development and Outreach Specialist at the United Nations in Washington, D.C. Claudia's passion of eradication of hunger, elimination of poverty and creating social impact speaks through her engagements. Before joining the FAO, she worked at the World Bank Group as a Knowledge Management professional with an emphasis on South-South Capacity Building programs in the Latin-American and Africa regions. Her driving force is enunciating change and creating an impact through supporting developing nations. She is a Senior Advisor of the steering committee of the Youth2Youth Community (Y2Y) of the World Bank Group and the co-chair of the Youth Innovation Fund. The Y2Y community enables her innovative talent, efficiency and passion for creating an impact on youth to increase employability, community engagement, and life skills in developing nations. Additionally, as an Adult Third Culture Kid and cross-cultural mediator and trainer, she serves as the membership chair of an NGO called Families in Global Transition (FIGT) to promote and engage in the storytelling of the global nomad. As an Austrian-born global citizen and has lived and worked in the U.S., Spain, UK, and Italy and speaks five languages including German, English, and Spanish. Claudia has refined her skills in cross-cultural communication and continues to enjoy the beauty, challenges, and difficulties of living and working in different cultures. Her professional career in the US is based in the diplomatic service. She has served her native Embassy of the Republic of Austria and the Royal Netherlands Embassy in Washington, D.C. in different capacities. At the Embassy of the Republic of Austria, Claudia acted in an advisory role for the Cabinet of the Austrian Minister of Finance on trans-cultural communication and investment opportunities for Small and Medium Enterprises in the United States and globally. https://claudiakoerbler.com/ The SC Nebula is a global online (and offline - Washington, DC area) hub where conscious leaders from corporate, spiritual, nonprofit and civic groups can connect, collaborate and create more social impact together. Interested in becoming a SC Nebula Member? info@soarcommunitynetwork.com Nominate a Change Agent for our Interview Series. https://nebula.soarcommunitynetwork.com In an effort to promote global champions of change, we have set an extraordinary goal of interviewing 1000 people this year who are change agents in their communities. Tune in as our interview guests share how they are contributing their gifts, skills, experiences, resources and wisdom to create a better world. Learn about the different causes and initiatives they care about. If theses causes resonate with you, reach out to our interviewees and offer up your superpowers. Join us. Let's not just stand for something ... let's do something!

Target Market Insights: Multifamily Real Estate Marketing Tips
Protecting Springsteen, Aretha, and Investors with Tom Laune, Ep. 335

Target Market Insights: Multifamily Real Estate Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 33:49


Tom Laune is a leader in guiding investors in becoming their own banker by teaching them to grow their wealth and avoid lost opportunities using specially designed whole life insurance. Tom Laune heads up Stress-Free Planning using a unique strategy which he calls the Bulletproof Wealth Strategy. Tom is a student of the Austrian school of economics and the concept of Infinite Banking. He champions the use of a whole life insurance policy to create a vehicle that acts as a line of credit, essentially allowing real estate investors to act as their own banker.  John and Tom dive in on this wealth creation strategy and more insights to help you leverage your money to the fullest.   Announcement: Download Our Sample Deal and Join Our Mailing List   [00:01 – 07:14] Opening Segment  Tom talks about his background working in the music industry. What Tom does for real estate investors How Tom came up with the strategy “Bullet Proof Wealth” and what it does. [07:14 – 15:34] Specially Designed Whole Life Insurance What makes own-occupation designation different from any other How you can protect your ability to earn How whole life insurance works Why you need a whole life insurance What to do when getting a whole life insurance [15:34 – 26:18] The Magic of Growing and Compounding Your Money for the Rest of Your Life Term-life insurance vs. Whole life insurance How you can think like a bank and increase your returns How Tom helps real estate investors leverage their money to the fullest  Tom breaks down his strategy for incredible returns How your money can grow and compound for the rest of your life. What you need in your insurance policy to apply this strategy Contact Tom   [26:18 – 33:47] Bullseye Round Apparent Failure: Getting the wrong course and realizing it when it was done.   Digital Resource: Business Made Simple University   Most Recommended Book: The Case for IBC   Daily Habit:  Getting stuff scheduled   Curious About: How self storage investments work   I Wish I Knew When I Was Starting: How to put money into a whole life policy in my twenties   Best Place to Grab a Bite in Richmond Ted's Montana Grill   Contact Tom: Reach out to Tom at his website stressfreeplanning.com and don't forget to check out his educational content.   Tweetable Quotes: “In my mind, it all flows together to being a guide to help other people achieve their goals.” - Tom Laune “The third leg of my bullet proof wealth strategy is helping people understand the advantages of thinking like a bank.” - Tom Laune   Thank you for joining us for another great episode! If you're enjoying the show, please LEAVE A RATING OR REVIEW,  and be sure to hit that subscribe button so you do not miss an episode.

Interviews
Joe Salerno versus Paul Krugman on Austrian Business Cycle Theory

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


Using a recent Paul Krugman column as the jumping off point, the Mises Institute Academic Vice President Joe Salerno explains and defends Austrian business cycle theory. Mentioned in the Episode and Other Links of Interest: The YouTube version of this interviewBob's response to Krugman's NYT pieceJoe Salerno's 2012 QJAE article responding to ABCT criticsJoe Salerno's previous appearance on the Bob Murphy Show ep. 16Bob's critique of Selgin on Canadian fractional reserve banking ​For more information, see BobMurphyShow.com. The Bob Murphy Show is also available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, and via RSS.

Mises Media
Joe Salerno versus Paul Krugman on Austrian Business Cycle Theory

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


Using a recent Paul Krugman column as the jumping off point, the Mises Institute Academic Vice President Joe Salerno explains and defends Austrian business cycle theory. Mentioned in the Episode and Other Links of Interest: The YouTube version of this interviewBob's response to Krugman's NYT pieceJoe Salerno's 2012 QJAE article responding to ABCT criticsJoe Salerno's previous appearance on the Bob Murphy Show ep. 16Bob's critique of Selgin on Canadian fractional reserve banking ​For more information, see BobMurphyShow.com. The Bob Murphy Show is also available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, and via RSS.

Rick Steves' Europe Video
Hall in Tirol, Austria: A Tirolean Evening

Rick Steves' Europe Video

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 2:25


When traveling, it's easier than you think to find authentic cultural experiences. Join Rick at a family-run hotel in the Austrian town of Hall in Tirol for an evening of traditional Tirolean culture, from tasty spaetzle to rousing folk music and dancing. For more European travel information, visit ricksteves.com.

Democracy in Danger
S3 E4. Red Pill, Part IV – Drones of Combat

Democracy in Danger

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 33:44


In 1905, Austrian baroness Bertha von Suttner won the Nobel Peace Prize, which she had helped convince Alfred Nobel to establish. Largely forgotten among antiwar activists, she was an outspoken critic of efforts to make combat merely less brutal. Today, Yale legal scholar Samuel Moyn finds inspiration in Suttner's story for his own provocative stance against the logic of “humanizing” war with technological innovations like drone strikes. He says we're only making conflicts more frequent and longer-lasting.

Out of Bounds Podcast
E169 – Christoph Lentz is YOUR Boot Guy at Fischer Skis PLUS Chris Carleton at All Speed Cyclery & Snow

Out of Bounds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 75:20


YO! Back at it on this fine Tuesday with a double header! First I chat with Christoph Lentz from Fischer Skis about ski boots, the difference in Austrian and North American skiers, and so much... The post E169 – Christoph Lentz is YOUR Boot Guy at Fischer Skis PLUS Chris Carleton at All Speed Cyclery & Snow appeared first on Out of Bounds Podcast.

Bob Murphy Show
Ep. 215 Joe Salerno versus Paul Krugman on Austrian Business Cycle Theory

Bob Murphy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:36


Using a recent Paul Krugman column as the jumping off point, the Mises Institute Academic Vice President Joe Salerno explains and defends Austrian business cycle theory. Mentioned in the Episode and Other Links of Interest: The https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgGFi9vtEK8 (YouTube version) of this interview. https://mises.org/wire/rebutting-paul-krugman-austrian-pandemic (Bob's response) to Krugman's NYT https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/03/opinion/covid-recession-austrian-school-hayek.html (piece). Joe https://mises.org/library/reformulation-austrian-business-cycle-theory-light-financial-crisis-0 (Salerno's 2012 QJAE article) responding to ABCT critics. Joe Salerno's previous appearance on the https://www.bobmurphyshow.com/episodes/ep-16-joe-salerno-on-economic-calculation-fractional-reserve/ (Bob Murphy Show ep. 16.) https://youtu.be/3nG2G9uH218?t=372 (Bob's critique of Selgin) on Canadian fractional reserve banking. http://bobmurphyshow.com/contribute (Help support) the Bob Murphy Show. The audio production for this episode was provided by http://podsworth.com/ (Podsworth Media).

The John Batchelor Show
1718: J. H. Gelernter #Unbound. Napoleonic-era espionage. The complete, twenty-minute interview. May 3, 2021. LXX GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 23:41


Photo:  At the same time, Karl Ludwig Schulmeister (Charles Louis Schulmeister) (1770–1853) (also known as Carl Schulmeister or Charles Louis Schulmeister) was an Austrian double agent for France during the reign of Napoleon I. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow J. H. Gelernter #Unbound. The complete, twenty-minute interview. May 3, 2021. LXX GLXXG Hold Fast: A Novel.   Hardcover – May 4, 2021, by J. H. Gelernter  https://www.amazon.com/Hold-Fast-J-H-Gelernter/dp/0393867048 It's 1803. The Napoleonic Wars are raging, Britain is on her heels, and His Majesty's Secret Service has just lost its best agent, Thomas Grey. Deeply depressed by his wife's untimely death, Grey resigns from the service and accepts an offer to join a lumber firm in Boston. But when a sea battle with a privateer forces the ship carrying him west to make port in neutral Portugal, Grey is approached with a counteroffer: become a wealthy man by selling out Britain's spy network to France. The French take Grey for a disgruntled ex–naval officer, blithely unaware that Grey had lost his wife to an unlucky shot from a French cannon. Now, after many years serving King and Country, Grey seizes the opportunity to fight a covert war of his own. He travels to Paris, and―playing the part of the invaluable turncoat the French believe him to be―proceeds to infiltrate the highest levels of Napoleon's government. If he can outwit his handlers, outmatch his French counterparts, and outrun Napoleon's secret police, Grey may just avenge his wife's death and turn the tide of war in England's favor. Bursting with action and intrigue, Hold Fast sends readers headlong into an unrelenting spy thriller

Global News Podcast
Russia's parliamentary election begins

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 29:09


Google and Apple remove a tactical voting app from their online stores on the first day. Voting will last three days. Also: the Austrian government is taken to court over its handling of a covid outbreak at a ski resort, and the secrets behind the best ocean photograph of the year.