Podcasts about Austrian

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Best podcasts about Austrian

Show all podcasts related to austrian

Latest podcast episodes about Austrian

Ridiculous Romance
An Artist & His Polar Bear Fur Sofa Sex Doll

Ridiculous Romance

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 69:47


Oskar Kokoschka was an Austrian painter, poet, and playwright who channeled his romantic experiences into his unconventional art. First an extremely NSFW "children's poem", then his riot-causing experimental play about gender warfare, and finally a nightmarish sex doll replica of his evil ex-girlfriend, Alma Mahler!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live Your RAW Life
Episode #112 | Transcend the Body Through The Body with Thalia Devi

Live Your RAW Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:50


In this week's episode, Rachel is joined by Thalia Devi. Devi begins our conversation by sharing a bit about her background, how she landed in Mexico, and how she landed into the work that she does today. Her work really is about using pleasure, specifically sexuality, as a way of healing.She shares how our sexual energy is our life force energy. With her understanding of the ancient Tantric ways and beliefs, she explains how we have the power to rebirth through consciousnessTantra massage was the final piece that she had been searching for on her own personal journey. Devi explains what Tantra massage is and how it allows energy, stagnant or otherwise to be aroused. Her deep work on this topic allows you to understand what is possible through the use of Tantra and Yoni massage. Along with that she shares more about her “Pleasure Priestess” program and how it can allow you to connect more with your pleasure and mystical and spiritual aspects of yourself. The portal is NOW open if you would like to apply.You can connect with Devi through the following links:Website: https://www.thaliadevigne.com/IG:@thaliadevi.tantraRachel would love to hear what you enjoyed most about this conversation. Let her know through the following:IG: @liveyourrawlifeF: Live Your RAW Life Y: Live Your RAW LifeE: liveyourrawlife@gmail.comWeb: www.liveyourrawlife.comIf you'd like to support this AD-FREE podcast you can do so through:Patreon link:https://www.patreon.com/liveyourrawlifeIf something resonated with you from this week's episode please subscribe to the show and leave a review while you are there. Every time a review or rating is received it opens up the platform that allows the show to reach a wider range of listeners. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Rock Yarns Podcast with Peter Strachan
ADX Energy has more than doubled its Austrian exploration

Rock Yarns Podcast with Peter Strachan

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 21:10


In this episode Peter chats to Ian Tchacos, executive chairman at ADX Energy (ASX:ADX).

Any Given Runway
Episode 509: Marc-André Teruel - Austrian Double Bassist

Any Given Runway

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 28:55


Marc-André Teruel, a double bassist from Vienna joins the show to talk about his career. 

Holding Court with Patrick McEnroe
The tables are turned as Pete Bodo, American sportswriter and author interviews Patrick on this Tennis Tuesday edition of Holding Court

Holding Court with Patrick McEnroe

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:48


The tables are turned as Pete Bodo, American sportswriter and author interviews Patrick on this Tennis Tuesday edition of Holding Court.Peter Bodo is an Austrian born American sportswriter and author, and Senior Editor/Blogger at Tennis Magazine. He is also an occasional columnist for the "Outdoor" section of The New York Times and for the Atlantic Salmon Journal. He won the WTA Tour Award for "Best Writer of the Year" twice, in 1979 and 1981.

Mises Media
Annika Steiber: Rendanheyi is the Most Radically Disruptive Organizational Innovation

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


Innovation in organization is at least equal in importance to technological innovation and product / service innovation. It tends to get less attention, which is a great opportunity for imaginative entrepreneurs to implement change for competitive advantage. Dr. Annika Steiber has studied organizational innovation for over twenty years and is a global authority. She shares her insights with Economics For Business, including her analysis of the most dramatic organizational innovation of all, Rendanheyi. Professor Steiber's most recent book is Leadership For A Digital World (Mises.org/E4B_170_Book1), and is her most comprehensive guide yet for business management in the digital age. She's the author of eleven books, including The Google Model (Mises.org/E4B_170_Book2) and The Silicon Valley Model (Mises.org/E4B_170_Book3). Her Menlo College Rendanheyi Silicon Valley webinars are available at Menlo.edu/Webinars. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Organizational innovation doesn't get the attention it merits, even though it can contribute greatly to customer value generation. Innovation thinking tends to focus on technology innovation and product/service innovation, with the definition of innovation as the successful introduction of new customer value to markets. Organizational innovation is not often seen through that lens. But it should be. We can reframe the problem this way: does bad organizational structure subtract from the customer value experience? We can all think of ways in which it might do so: for example, poor customer service when customer-facing employees are not empowered, and layers of bureaucracy that impede responsiveness to customer needs. In those cases, organizational innovation could readily generate improved customer experiences and enhanced customer value. Dr. Steiber had made organizational innovation her research focus for over two decades. There are a small number of organizational innovators, and a lot of imitators. Google has been one of the originators of new organizational models. Many organizational innovations are pre-packaged — LEAN is an example — and implementers are following someone else's lead. Others are long drawn out evolutions of incremental improvement without a great burst of innovation. One example of what Dr. Steiber calls "an entirely new animal" in organizational innovation can be found in the early years of Google, which she studied first hand — she was embedded in Google as an independent researcher. She observed a different management model than anything she had seen before anywhere in the world. From this research, Professor Steiber developed six new management principles, published in her book The Google Model, and summarized in our free PDF (Mises.org/E4B_170_PDF). Silicon Valley companies employed and expanded on the Google Model. Dr. Steiber studies the peers of Google in Silicon Valley and found that they all adopted the Google Model and its six principles, some more slowly than others. Interestingly, her research pointed to a DNA advantage for Silicon Valley going back to the gold rush: it was a location that attracted and was populated by innovative and entrepreneurial people who were capable of building businesses and new institutions from scratch in the late 19th Century, and in the 20th Century, it was the place where Information Technology emerged, was expanded and accelerated and first put to use in business. Knowledge and knowledge flow replaced management structures and face-to-face administration, including at early pioneers such as Hewlett-Packard. Read "The HP Way"—an early Silicon Valley organizational innovation manifesto (Mises.org/E4B_170_PDF2). The six management principles Dr. Steiber describes are: Dynamic capabilities. Ability to integrate, develop, and reconfigure internal and external competencies in order to meet rapidly changing surroundings. A continuously changing organization. Instead of waiting and springing into action after needs become pressing, a company should ensure that its organization is permeated with a proactive approach to change. A people-centric approach. People-centric, focusing on the individual and liberating their innovative power and providing them with a setting in which they can express their creativity. An ambidextrous organization. Two different forms of organizational logic within the same organization: daily production, which works best with a conventional planning-and-control approach, and innovation, which requires greater freedom, flexibility, and a more open attitude toward experimentation. An ambidextrous organization must successfully handle and utilize the energy inherent in the contrast between these two forms of logic. An open organization that networks with its surroundings. Permeable boundaries and a constant and conscious exchange of information with the surroundings. Long-term survival requires that companies develop into more open networking systems. A systems approach. A holistic view of the system and understanding that the system can spontaneously develop new characteristics that can be difficult to predict. These new characteristics can be positive, negative or a combination of the two, creating a demand for additional measures, such as decreasing the fallout from unexpected negative system effects. We highlighted a couple of these new management principles. A continuously changing organization The most successful companies are designed for constant renewal. They expect change all the time, and they lead its development. They aim for excellence on every dimension, applying three layers of expertise: Be proactive: Search for change internally and externally. Embrace it and practice it.Experimentation culture: Try every initiative assuming that it could be a new opportunity. Mobilize fast.Don't follow. Take the lead, change the standard, be disruptive rather than disrupted, practice creative destruction. These companies never lose external focus, continuously monitoring developments and competitors that could disrupt them, and constantly market-testing new initiatives. They have highly developed sensing capabilities. An ambidextrous organization Combining the two logics of flawless daily execution for known established businesses and exploratory experimentation seeking unknown new business innovation is an organizational breakthrough. It's a systemic view of an organization combining different kinds of leadership for the two styles, different cultural signals, different milestones, different incentives, and different evaluation criteria. One system is designed for stability and one for change. Rendanheyi: the most radically entrepreneurial organizational innovation. True organizational innovation is very rare, but there is a new one that Professor Steiber described for E4B called Rendanheyi. Rendanheyi is an organizational innovation for the network age in which a large company (Haier, the Chinese company that first instituted the model has 70,000 employees) splits itself into hundreds of microenterprises of averagely 60-70 people — but could be as low as 10 or so - each enterprise performing as its own entrepreneurial business with its own P&L, its own customer base, and control over hiring, budget, and distribution of profit, and over its own value-adding line of business. Defining characteristics include: No bureaucracy, hierarchy, or pyramid forms of organization; no managers.Employees are not referred to as such — everyone can be an entrepreneur is the mantra; they choose which microenterprise to work in. The focus is on the customer or end-user and not on pleasing the manager above. Incentive systems reward all employees for value creation, and all individual employees are constantly trying to understand how to increase value for customers. Increased value creation is rewarded, and so wealth generation is democratized.Zero distance to the end-user: this is a Rendanheyi principle that brings the consumer or customer inside the microenterprise to co-create new value in the form of new products and services and solutions. Wholesalers and retailers, for example, can inject distance between a Haier micro-enterprise and its users; the enterprise might look to digital solutions to eliminate that distance. Generally, they seek to identify barriers to zero distance to the users and get rid of them.End-user is a general term, so that those micro-enterprises that are serving other businesses rather than consumers can nevertheless practice the zero distance principle. For example, there may be a marketing micro-enterprise within Haier that serves a manufacturing micro-enterprise and a sales micro-enterprise. All can be aligned with zero distance and can work to fulfill end-users' needs.Paid-by-user. This principle focuses micro-enterprises on end-user value by emphasizing that all businesses live or die based on whether the end-user pays them for value perceived, or not. It's Austrian customer sovereignty in action. The general tendency in paid-by-user is away from transactional relationships to extended relationships across multiple purchases in ecosystems and via subscriptions and memberships. Relationships are an important focus, and the focus is on creating life-time users. A sports team on the playing field is a sound analogy for Rendanheyi. There is no central control, each team member is collaborating and combining specialized skills for a team result. There is only limited call for corporate functions at the center of the Rendanheyi organization. There is a role for developing and furthering vision that crosses multiple micro-enterprises, and for portfolio decision-making as to where to invest resources. Some orchestration functions can be assigned to the center — for example, furthering ecosystem thinking whereby micro-enterprises serving a consumer domain such as the kitchen can develop multiple services including information services and integration services across multiple appliances, tasks, and problems for the kitchen ecosystem. The result of the Rendanheyi model is the animation of a living system, a superorganism. Rendanheyi provides a genuinely new and different perspective on entrepreneurial organization at scale. Additional Resources "Six Organizational Principles for Adaptive Entrepreneurial Models" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_170_PDF Rendanheyi Silicon Valley Center: Mises.org/E4B_170_Rendanheyi Menlo College Rendanheyi Silicon Valley Webinars: Menlo.edu/Webinars Menlo College Digital Management Courses and Webinars: Executive.Menlo.edu

Interviews
Annika Steiber: Rendanheyi is the Most Radically Disruptive Organizational Innovation

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


Innovation in organization is at least equal in importance to technological innovation and product / service innovation. It tends to get less attention, which is a great opportunity for imaginative entrepreneurs to implement change for competitive advantage. Dr. Annika Steiber has studied organizational innovation for over twenty years and is a global authority. She shares her insights with Economics For Business, including her analysis of the most dramatic organizational innovation of all, Rendanheyi. Professor Steiber's most recent book is Leadership For A Digital World (Mises.org/E4B_170_Book1), and is her most comprehensive guide yet for business management in the digital age. She's the author of eleven books, including The Google Model (Mises.org/E4B_170_Book2) and The Silicon Valley Model (Mises.org/E4B_170_Book3). Her Menlo College Rendanheyi Silicon Valley webinars are available at Menlo.edu/Webinars. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Organizational innovation doesn't get the attention it merits, even though it can contribute greatly to customer value generation. Innovation thinking tends to focus on technology innovation and product/service innovation, with the definition of innovation as the successful introduction of new customer value to markets. Organizational innovation is not often seen through that lens. But it should be. We can reframe the problem this way: does bad organizational structure subtract from the customer value experience? We can all think of ways in which it might do so: for example, poor customer service when customer-facing employees are not empowered, and layers of bureaucracy that impede responsiveness to customer needs. In those cases, organizational innovation could readily generate improved customer experiences and enhanced customer value. Dr. Steiber had made organizational innovation her research focus for over two decades. There are a small number of organizational innovators, and a lot of imitators. Google has been one of the originators of new organizational models. Many organizational innovations are pre-packaged — LEAN is an example — and implementers are following someone else's lead. Others are long drawn out evolutions of incremental improvement without a great burst of innovation. One example of what Dr. Steiber calls "an entirely new animal" in organizational innovation can be found in the early years of Google, which she studied first hand — she was embedded in Google as an independent researcher. She observed a different management model than anything she had seen before anywhere in the world. From this research, Professor Steiber developed six new management principles, published in her book The Google Model, and summarized in our free PDF (Mises.org/E4B_170_PDF). Silicon Valley companies employed and expanded on the Google Model. Dr. Steiber studies the peers of Google in Silicon Valley and found that they all adopted the Google Model and its six principles, some more slowly than others. Interestingly, her research pointed to a DNA advantage for Silicon Valley going back to the gold rush: it was a location that attracted and was populated by innovative and entrepreneurial people who were capable of building businesses and new institutions from scratch in the late 19th Century, and in the 20th Century, it was the place where Information Technology emerged, was expanded and accelerated and first put to use in business. Knowledge and knowledge flow replaced management structures and face-to-face administration, including at early pioneers such as Hewlett-Packard. Read "The HP Way"—an early Silicon Valley organizational innovation manifesto (Mises.org/E4B_170_PDF2). The six management principles Dr. Steiber describes are: Dynamic capabilities. Ability to integrate, develop, and reconfigure internal and external competencies in order to meet rapidly changing surroundings. A continuously changing organization. Instead of waiting and springing into action after needs become pressing, a company should ensure that its organization is permeated with a proactive approach to change. A people-centric approach. People-centric, focusing on the individual and liberating their innovative power and providing them with a setting in which they can express their creativity. An ambidextrous organization. Two different forms of organizational logic within the same organization: daily production, which works best with a conventional planning-and-control approach, and innovation, which requires greater freedom, flexibility, and a more open attitude toward experimentation. An ambidextrous organization must successfully handle and utilize the energy inherent in the contrast between these two forms of logic. An open organization that networks with its surroundings. Permeable boundaries and a constant and conscious exchange of information with the surroundings. Long-term survival requires that companies develop into more open networking systems. A systems approach. A holistic view of the system and understanding that the system can spontaneously develop new characteristics that can be difficult to predict. These new characteristics can be positive, negative or a combination of the two, creating a demand for additional measures, such as decreasing the fallout from unexpected negative system effects. We highlighted a couple of these new management principles. A continuously changing organization The most successful companies are designed for constant renewal. They expect change all the time, and they lead its development. They aim for excellence on every dimension, applying three layers of expertise: Be proactive: Search for change internally and externally. Embrace it and practice it.Experimentation culture: Try every initiative assuming that it could be a new opportunity. Mobilize fast.Don't follow. Take the lead, change the standard, be disruptive rather than disrupted, practice creative destruction. These companies never lose external focus, continuously monitoring developments and competitors that could disrupt them, and constantly market-testing new initiatives. They have highly developed sensing capabilities. An ambidextrous organization Combining the two logics of flawless daily execution for known established businesses and exploratory experimentation seeking unknown new business innovation is an organizational breakthrough. It's a systemic view of an organization combining different kinds of leadership for the two styles, different cultural signals, different milestones, different incentives, and different evaluation criteria. One system is designed for stability and one for change. Rendanheyi: the most radically entrepreneurial organizational innovation. True organizational innovation is very rare, but there is a new one that Professor Steiber described for E4B called Rendanheyi. Rendanheyi is an organizational innovation for the network age in which a large company (Haier, the Chinese company that first instituted the model has 70,000 employees) splits itself into hundreds of microenterprises of averagely 60-70 people — but could be as low as 10 or so - each enterprise performing as its own entrepreneurial business with its own P&L, its own customer base, and control over hiring, budget, and distribution of profit, and over its own value-adding line of business. Defining characteristics include: No bureaucracy, hierarchy, or pyramid forms of organization; no managers.Employees are not referred to as such — everyone can be an entrepreneur is the mantra; they choose which microenterprise to work in. The focus is on the customer or end-user and not on pleasing the manager above. Incentive systems reward all employees for value creation, and all individual employees are constantly trying to understand how to increase value for customers. Increased value creation is rewarded, and so wealth generation is democratized.Zero distance to the end-user: this is a Rendanheyi principle that brings the consumer or customer inside the microenterprise to co-create new value in the form of new products and services and solutions. Wholesalers and retailers, for example, can inject distance between a Haier micro-enterprise and its users; the enterprise might look to digital solutions to eliminate that distance. Generally, they seek to identify barriers to zero distance to the users and get rid of them.End-user is a general term, so that those micro-enterprises that are serving other businesses rather than consumers can nevertheless practice the zero distance principle. For example, there may be a marketing micro-enterprise within Haier that serves a manufacturing micro-enterprise and a sales micro-enterprise. All can be aligned with zero distance and can work to fulfill end-users' needs.Paid-by-user. This principle focuses micro-enterprises on end-user value by emphasizing that all businesses live or die based on whether the end-user pays them for value perceived, or not. It's Austrian customer sovereignty in action. The general tendency in paid-by-user is away from transactional relationships to extended relationships across multiple purchases in ecosystems and via subscriptions and memberships. Relationships are an important focus, and the focus is on creating life-time users. A sports team on the playing field is a sound analogy for Rendanheyi. There is no central control, each team member is collaborating and combining specialized skills for a team result. There is only limited call for corporate functions at the center of the Rendanheyi organization. There is a role for developing and furthering vision that crosses multiple micro-enterprises, and for portfolio decision-making as to where to invest resources. Some orchestration functions can be assigned to the center — for example, furthering ecosystem thinking whereby micro-enterprises serving a consumer domain such as the kitchen can develop multiple services including information services and integration services across multiple appliances, tasks, and problems for the kitchen ecosystem. The result of the Rendanheyi model is the animation of a living system, a superorganism. Rendanheyi provides a genuinely new and different perspective on entrepreneurial organization at scale. Additional Resources "Six Organizational Principles for Adaptive Entrepreneurial Models" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_170_PDF Rendanheyi Silicon Valley Center: Mises.org/E4B_170_Rendanheyi Menlo College Rendanheyi Silicon Valley Webinars: Menlo.edu/Webinars Menlo College Digital Management Courses and Webinars: Executive.Menlo.edu

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 305 - Chillderburg Vier Hype Episode with Jacob Linzy

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 128:02


Subscribe to the podcast We meant for this to be a Chillderburg Vier hype episode, but we ended up talking about everything else. Chillderburg information Chillderburg.com Donate to Chillderburg Donate Bitcoin Chillderburg Chillderburg on Twitter Follow Jacob TastingAnarchy.com Tasting Anarchy on Twitter Sponsor Liberty Mugs McFloogle Merchandise Store Get a free sticker Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @libertymugs @Slappy_Jones_2 Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 908 Elmar Hofer | Wine, Food & Travel With Marc Millon

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 22:46


Welcome to Episode 908 Marc Millon interviews Elmar Hofer, in this episode of Italian Food & Wine with Marc Millon on the Italian Wine Podcast. More about today's guest: Elmar was born and raised in the northern part of South Tyrol, Italy, close to the Austrian border. As a child growing up in the mountains, very early he found his passion for skiing and by the age of 14 he became a professional athlete. During his career he competed in several World Cup downhill races, such as Val Gardena, Bormio and Wengen, additionally winning the Italian downhill championship. After quitting his career as a professional athlete in 2011 he was looking for new passions and challenges. He found himself embarking on a new career in the wine industry, which came naturally growing up in a family with passion for food and wine. He became a certified AIS Sommelier in 2016. Additionally, he is an Italian Wine Ambassador through the Vinitaly International Academy and a WSET L3 holder. He gained special experience in the beauty of Hungarian wines while living abroad. Elmar still has the attitude of a professional athlete and believes in lifelong learning and improving. Therefore, he began his studies at the Court of Master Sommeliers with the Introductory Sommelier Course and the Certified Sommelier Course. More about St. Hubertus: St. Hubertus *** is the first and only three Michelin star restaurant in Alto Adige and part of 11 restaurant awarded with three star in Italy. The team was awarded with the green Michelin star for sustainable cuisine in 2020. The philosophy of the chef Norbert Niederkofler reflects the location of the restaurant, the heart of the Dolomites. The Cook the mountain philosophy represents local traditions and ingredients by bringing the nature on the plates of the guest. Elmar is part of the team since 2019 as a Sommelier and starting he's new position as Head Sommelier in May. If you want to learn more you can by visiting: Website: https://www.st-hubertus.it/en/ Instagram: hoferelmar Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elmar-hofer-7b000299/ Facebook: Elmar Hofer More about the host Marc Millon: Marc Millon, VIA Italian Wine Ambassador 2021, has been travelling, eating, drinking, learning and writing about wine, food and travel for nearly 40 years. Born in Mexico, with a mother from Hawaii via Korea and an anthropologist father from New York via Paris, he was weaned on exotic and delicious foods. Marc and his photographer wife Kim are the authors of 14 books including a pioneering series of illustrated wine-food-travel books: The Wine Roads of Europe, The Wine Roads of France, The Wine Roads of Italy (Premio Barbi Colombini), and The Wine Roads of Spain. Other titles include The Wine and Food of Europe, The Food Lovers' Companion Italy, The Food Lovers' Companion France, Wine, a global history. Marc regularly lectures and hosts gastronomic cultural tours to Italy and France with Martin Randall Travel, the UK's leading cultural travel specialist. He is soon to begin a regular series on Italian Wine Podcast, ‘Wine, food and travel with Marc Millon'. When not on the road Marc lives on the River Exe in Devon, England If you want to learn more about today's guest, you can by visiting: quaypress.uk/ marcmillon.co.uk vino.co.uk quaypress.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/marc-millon-50868624 Twitter: @Marc_Millon Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Off the beaten track with Kennedy Warne

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 8:34


Kennedy Warne visits the Hundertwasser Art Centre in Whangarei, initiated in 1993 and which finally opened in February this year. Austrian-born Friedensreich Hundertwasser lived the last 30 years of his life in New Zealand, and was a conservation pioneer as well as a brilliant artist and visionary architect. The centre expresses his philosophy that nature, art and life are a seamless and beautiful whole.

Economics Explained
The Go Woke, Go Broke hypothesis w/ Darren Brady Nelson - EP139

Economics Explained

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 59:06


Companies are being pushed by their employees and by influencers to take positions on social issues - to go woke, so to speak. Sometimes, as occurred for Gillette and Nike, for example, such a strategy can backfire. Is it true that, if you go woke, you go broke? A conversation between Economics Explored host Gene Tunny and returning guest Darren Brady Nelson, Chief Economist of LibertyWorks, an Australian libertarian think tank. About this episode's guest - Darren Brady NelsonDarren Brady Nelson is an Austrian school economist who serves as the chief economist at LibertyWorks and as an associate scholar with the Center for Freedom and Prosperity. Nelson is also a policy advisor to The Heartland Institute.He is the author of the book Ten Principles of Regulation & Reform (Connor Court 2017), and is a frequent public speaker and media commentator.Darren has bachelor's degree in economics (cum laude) from the Australian National University, where he majored in economic history. Nelson also earned a master's degree in commerce (magna cum laude) from the University of New South Wales, where he majored in business law.This is Darren's tenth appearance on Economics Explored. Links to his previous appearances are available on the Regular guests – Economics Explored page.Links relevant to the conversationGillette faces backlash and boycott over '#MeToo advert'When brands go woke, do they go broke? | CIM Exchange'Go woke go broke': New survey find most Brits dislike businesses preaching about 'social issues' | Sky News AustraliaGo Woke, Go Broke | Frontier Centre For Public PolicyDisney Drops Gina Carano From The Mandalorian After Controversial Social Media PostESG and Financial Performance - NYU SternThanks to the show's audio engineer Josh Crotts for his assistance in producing the episode. Please consider signing up to receive our email updates and to access our e-book Top Ten Insights from Economics at www.economicsexplored.com. Also, please get in touch with any questions, comments and suggestions by emailing us at contact@economicsexplored.com or sending a voice message via https://www.speakpipe.com/economicsexplored. Economics Explored is available via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, and other podcasting platforms.

Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #528 - Democrats FAIL To Pass Abortion Expansion, Roe Is DONE w/Julio Rosas

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 129:24


Tim, Ian, Seamus of FreedomToons, and Lydia join journalist and on-the-ground reporter Julio Rosas to discuss the GOP and Joe Manchin stopping the expansion of abortion 'rights', the Austrian clinic reporting American women attempting to illegally obtain abortion drugs internationally, the pro-abortion protestors surrounding Pelosi's home, how BLM numbers crashed during leftist rioting and the BLM leader spending donated funds to party. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

We Have Ways of Making You Talk

The internment of German, Italian and Austrian civilians on the Isle of Man was one of the most controversial decisions taken in wartime Britain. Al Murray and James Holland are joined by writer Simon Parkin to discuss the events which inspired his new book, The Island of Extraordinary Captives.A Goalhanger Films productionProduced by Harry LinekerExec Producer: Tony PastorTwitter: #WeHaveWays @WeHaveWaysPodWebsite: www.wehavewayspod.comEmail: wehavewayspodcast@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Lex Fridman Podcast
#284 – Saifedean Ammous: Bitcoin, Anarchy, and Austrian Economics

Lex Fridman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 261:08


Saifedean Ammous is an Austrian economist and author of The Bitcoin Standard and The Fiat Standard. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – GiveWell: https://www.givewell.org/ and use code LEX – Scale: https://scale.com/lex – Uncruise: https://uncruise.com/pages/lex – BiOptimizers: http://www.magbreakthrough.com/lex to get 10% off – Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/lex and use code LEX to get 1 month of fish oil EPISODE LINKS: Saifedean's Twitter: https://twitter.com/saifedean Saifedean's Website: https://saifedean.com The Bitcoin Standard podcast: https://saifedean.com/podcast Books & resources mentioned: The Fiat Standard (book): https://amzn.to/3FmNfsy The Bitcoin Standard (book): https://amzn.to/3LRrcwA The Blocksize War (book): https://amzn.to/3LORQ9o The Theory of Money and Credit (book): https://amzn.to/3ykreZT

Awkwardly Social Podcast
Episode 274- Austrian Adjacent Accent

Awkwardly Social Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 60:37


On this episode, terrible accents, reviewing petty employers, sleeping naked, terrible sex advice on another podcast, going all in on your passions, and more! Follow Aerial and Jose: @aerial_washington and […]

RNZ: Checkpoint
Bob Harvey backs Auckland gondola idea

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 4:40


Fancy the idea of being ferried across the Waitemata Harbour while avoiding swells sea sickness? Or maybe you're just sick of sitting in traffic. Austrian firm Doppelmayr is proposing an alternative - looking at the feasibility of a $200 million gondola across the harbour. It says its technology can move 6,000 people an hour in each direction, with cabins arriving every 15 seconds. They say it would run from the Akoranga bus exchange on the North Shore to downtown Auckland. One of the people backing the idea is former Waitākere City Mayor Sir Bob Harvey. He talks to Lisa Owen.

Think About Eurovision
The DNQ Files - Bonus Episode 24 - First Semi Final 2022

Think About Eurovision

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:29


In this episode Kris forgets the format of the show, Chrissy gets serenaded to about the joys of veggies and…. *ahem*, and Matti puts on his director hat when discussing the Austrian act. As a bonus game, see if you can hear when Kris is drinking his whiskey on ice close to the microphone Enisa - American Song Contest, a New York artist with Albanian heritage Ronela - Sekret - National Final performance Eurovision Stage Issues Rainbow - Since You've Been Gone Rainbow - Childrens TV programme Why the Intelligent Music Project may not tour Spain any time soon Paula Seling & OVI - Miracle Danie on Pia Maria's vocals Mia/TaySway and plagiarism accusations Fyr Og Flamme - Øve Os På Hinanden Mika on Eurovision previously Love, Love, Peace, Peace

Interviews
Jeff Arnold: A Passionate Entrepreneur Profitably Redesigns The Insurance Experience

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022


Is there any industry a passionate entrepreneur can't improve and enhance by elevating the customer experience? The answer is clearly no. Economics For Business talks to Jeff Arnold, who finds insurance fun, exciting, and a source of inspiration, and who is advancing profitably towards the new future he's imagining, where buying insurance is so enjoyable that customers will stop shopping on price and clamor for the new experience he is designing. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Passionate, creative entrepreneurs can deliver profitable innovation to any industry, no matter how static and rigid it may seem. Jeff Arnold loves insurance. He told us he finds it fun, awesome, and exciting. Studying the intricacies of contractually trading and transferring risk for payment generated a lifetime interest and passion in him. He's turned that passion into revenue and profit by delivering new value to customers in aspect of their life or their business that is extremely important to them. As a good Austrian, Jeff Arnold views his industry first from the customer's perspective. Customer-first. That's the Austrian way of business. When Jeff thinks about insurance, he thinks from the consumers' perspective. They pay hundreds of thousands of dollars over a lifetime for insurance of many kinds: house, automobile, business, medical care, and more. Do they know exactly what they are buying — or, perhaps more importantly, not buying because of exclusions buried deep in the small type of the appendices to an insurance policy agreement? How do they feel about the customer interface, including call center phone trees and hard-to-decipher policy documents? From this perspective, he is able to develop design principles for an insurance business with a better customer experience: Help customers to think about a systematic lifetime plan for all their insurances;Help them develop the knowledge required to properly understand insurance offers and alternative policies;Give them the opportunity to customize insurance products for their needs as opposed to buying a commoditized vanilla product;Help them to get the exchange value from the purchase that is right for them.Give them an interpersonal experience that's much better than the industry norm. Jeff focuses his customers on value, not price. Most often, buyers approach an insurance purchase with a transactional frame of mind: how can I pay the lowest price. They'll shop around to find it. Jeff wants to put an end to “price shopping”, to be replaced with a value calculation: what coverage do I need, how did I get it, and who is the best provider? The value calculation often entails discovering and eliminating exclusions — coverages that are excluded in the fine print of the contract. These exclusions occur in home insurance (which is especially hard to read and understand) auto insurance (there are 12-14 exclusions to look for according to Jeff) and commercial or business insurance (where many coverages are automatically excluded and must be built back in item by item, with careful attention to detail). The value solution lies in the integration of technology and personal service. Jeff's latest business, RightSure, aims to get individuals the right insurance by using A.I. in combination with “famously friendly humans”, i.e., staff carefully selected and trained to deliver knowledge and service in an amenable way. The A.I. can provide a preliminary phone interface, a chatbot interface on the website, and can do an excellent job of matching customer needs to the right policies. Famously friendly people can patiently explain all the policy options, point out what's covered and what's excluded, answer customer questions, and help them to make informed decisions. They're good at listening, exhibit high empathy, and can help customers navigate from suspicion to trust. The combination of A.I. and famously friendly humans delivers a superior customer experience while also achieving high levels of efficiency. The return on investment in human capital is as high as the return on technology capital. The combination generates brand uniqueness. Jeff represents entrepreneurship in action in the insurance industry. Jeff Arnold is a quintessential entrepreneur. He's driven by a passion for his industry, where he spent a career in multiple roles before launching his current business. He gathered knowledge he learned from others and from his own experience in those various roles. He innovates by having a more highly developed customer focus than others, and commits to a better experience for his customers than they can expect elsewhere. And he knows how to combine and recombine assets and resources in new ways to deliver that better experience. He continuously monitors the customer experience and customer sentiment to keep improving. His primary skill are empathy and imagination — understanding the experience customers prefer and designing it in his mind before bringing it to life. He doesn't need technology expertise to bring his vision to life; he can buy that on the market. It is the human factors of empathy and imagination that lie behind his superior product. Imagining the future drives product and service innovation. After a lifetime in the insurance industry and informed by hundreds and thousands of conversations with consumers, Jeff can accurately identify current dissatisfactions and easily imagine future products and services to address some of those satisfactions. Some of the ones he mentioned in our conversation were: The macro policy: Why do customers have to buy home and auto and business and medical insurance I separate policies and separate transactions. What if there could be one macro policy for a family, adjustable to new needs as life goes on yet still a “one policy” solution for managing all the risks a family faces? Expanding liability coverage: It seems like lawmakers and courts are continuously finding new things the rest of us are guilty of, like saying bad things on social media. Liabilities are expanding — Jeff called it social inflation. What if our policies could keep up without us having to adjust them in new transactions? New payment systems: What if we bought automobile insurance by the mile instead of in a lump? Or what if we got refunds based on good driving habits (which is beginning to happen with telematics)? Generally, the payment system of lump sums for coverage over a time period can be replaced by behavioral measures of consumption. These are the kinds of innovation Jeff is imagining, and working hard on bringing to market. Entrepreneurs make the world a better place. Additional Resources Jeff Arnold's author page on Amazon.com: Mises.org/E4B_169_Author Jeff's website, Ambassador For The Insurance Industry: JeffArnold.com The Art Of The Insurance Deal by Jeff Arnold: Mises.org/E4B_169_Book RightSure.com

Mises Media
Jeff Arnold: A Passionate Entrepreneur Profitably Redesigns The Insurance Experience

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022


Is there any industry a passionate entrepreneur can't improve and enhance by elevating the customer experience? The answer is clearly no. Economics For Business talks to Jeff Arnold, who finds insurance fun, exciting, and a source of inspiration, and who is advancing profitably towards the new future he's imagining, where buying insurance is so enjoyable that customers will stop shopping on price and clamor for the new experience he is designing. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Passionate, creative entrepreneurs can deliver profitable innovation to any industry, no matter how static and rigid it may seem. Jeff Arnold loves insurance. He told us he finds it fun, awesome, and exciting. Studying the intricacies of contractually trading and transferring risk for payment generated a lifetime interest and passion in him. He's turned that passion into revenue and profit by delivering new value to customers in aspect of their life or their business that is extremely important to them. As a good Austrian, Jeff Arnold views his industry first from the customer's perspective. Customer-first. That's the Austrian way of business. When Jeff thinks about insurance, he thinks from the consumers' perspective. They pay hundreds of thousands of dollars over a lifetime for insurance of many kinds: house, automobile, business, medical care, and more. Do they know exactly what they are buying — or, perhaps more importantly, not buying because of exclusions buried deep in the small type of the appendices to an insurance policy agreement? How do they feel about the customer interface, including call center phone trees and hard-to-decipher policy documents? From this perspective, he is able to develop design principles for an insurance business with a better customer experience: Help customers to think about a systematic lifetime plan for all their insurances;Help them develop the knowledge required to properly understand insurance offers and alternative policies;Give them the opportunity to customize insurance products for their needs as opposed to buying a commoditized vanilla product;Help them to get the exchange value from the purchase that is right for them.Give them an interpersonal experience that's much better than the industry norm. Jeff focuses his customers on value, not price. Most often, buyers approach an insurance purchase with a transactional frame of mind: how can I pay the lowest price. They'll shop around to find it. Jeff wants to put an end to “price shopping”, to be replaced with a value calculation: what coverage do I need, how did I get it, and who is the best provider? The value calculation often entails discovering and eliminating exclusions — coverages that are excluded in the fine print of the contract. These exclusions occur in home insurance (which is especially hard to read and understand) auto insurance (there are 12-14 exclusions to look for according to Jeff) and commercial or business insurance (where many coverages are automatically excluded and must be built back in item by item, with careful attention to detail). The value solution lies in the integration of technology and personal service. Jeff's latest business, RightSure, aims to get individuals the right insurance by using A.I. in combination with “famously friendly humans”, i.e., staff carefully selected and trained to deliver knowledge and service in an amenable way. The A.I. can provide a preliminary phone interface, a chatbot interface on the website, and can do an excellent job of matching customer needs to the right policies. Famously friendly people can patiently explain all the policy options, point out what's covered and what's excluded, answer customer questions, and help them to make informed decisions. They're good at listening, exhibit high empathy, and can help customers navigate from suspicion to trust. The combination of A.I. and famously friendly humans delivers a superior customer experience while also achieving high levels of efficiency. The return on investment in human capital is as high as the return on technology capital. The combination generates brand uniqueness. Jeff represents entrepreneurship in action in the insurance industry. Jeff Arnold is a quintessential entrepreneur. He's driven by a passion for his industry, where he spent a career in multiple roles before launching his current business. He gathered knowledge he learned from others and from his own experience in those various roles. He innovates by having a more highly developed customer focus than others, and commits to a better experience for his customers than they can expect elsewhere. And he knows how to combine and recombine assets and resources in new ways to deliver that better experience. He continuously monitors the customer experience and customer sentiment to keep improving. His primary skill are empathy and imagination — understanding the experience customers prefer and designing it in his mind before bringing it to life. He doesn't need technology expertise to bring his vision to life; he can buy that on the market. It is the human factors of empathy and imagination that lie behind his superior product. Imagining the future drives product and service innovation. After a lifetime in the insurance industry and informed by hundreds and thousands of conversations with consumers, Jeff can accurately identify current dissatisfactions and easily imagine future products and services to address some of those satisfactions. Some of the ones he mentioned in our conversation were: The macro policy: Why do customers have to buy home and auto and business and medical insurance I separate policies and separate transactions. What if there could be one macro policy for a family, adjustable to new needs as life goes on yet still a “one policy” solution for managing all the risks a family faces? Expanding liability coverage: It seems like lawmakers and courts are continuously finding new things the rest of us are guilty of, like saying bad things on social media. Liabilities are expanding — Jeff called it social inflation. What if our policies could keep up without us having to adjust them in new transactions? New payment systems: What if we bought automobile insurance by the mile instead of in a lump? Or what if we got refunds based on good driving habits (which is beginning to happen with telematics)? Generally, the payment system of lump sums for coverage over a time period can be replaced by behavioral measures of consumption. These are the kinds of innovation Jeff is imagining, and working hard on bringing to market. Entrepreneurs make the world a better place. Additional Resources Jeff Arnold's author page on Amazon.com: Mises.org/E4B_169_Author Jeff's website, Ambassador For The Insurance Industry: JeffArnold.com The Art Of The Insurance Deal by Jeff Arnold: Mises.org/E4B_169_Book RightSure.com

MOVING THE NEEDLE : The Andrew Neethling Podcast
#62. Clemens ”C Dog ” Kaudela: Pushing the limits of Freeride MTB

MOVING THE NEEDLE : The Andrew Neethling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 104:27


Clemens Kaudela known as C dog is becoming one of the biggest names in freeride mountain biking.  The humble Austrian started out as a DJ and slopestyle rider but has moved onto the big bike. He is one of the top riders at events like Darkfest and Audi Nines. These events push what is possible on a MTB.  C dog is also one of the best MTB builders at the moment putting his name to trails and events like Darkfest.  Episode Sponsor: Kenda Tires : https://www.kendatire.com/en-eu/ With 60 years of experience in manufacturing tires, Kenda has been offering high-quality rubber products for bicycles, cars, light trucks, motorcycles, ATVs, trailers, karts, golf carts, lawn and garden, wheelchairs, and agricultural vehicles since 1962. Kenda distributes its products globally and employs more than 10,000 people to produce more than 800,000 tires and tubes daily.  Listen on:  Itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/moving-the-needle-the-andrew-neethling-podcast/id1510362033 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0nJAawq5Q08NJIlz559paI?si=3dbf7101314344b6        

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 304 - An Episode about Nothing (It's about Bitcoin)

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 65:06


Subscribe to the podcast We don't exactly have a topic, so we just talk off the tops of our heads about Bitcoin. The conversation includes the sinking price, why people are still resistant to buying Bitcoin, and how Slappy thinks penalty kicks in soccer are really easy. Learn about Bitcoin at a trickle BitcoinTrickle.com Sponsor Liberty Mugs Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @libertymugs (Rollo), @Slappy_Jones_2 Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

The Pro Audio Suite
Austrian Audio - In Da House

The Pro Audio Suite

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 22:41


Following the closure of the AKG offices in Vienna, a bunch of Ex-Employees set out to create something new, challenging, and respectful to their heritage, and Austrian Audio was born. They may be relatively new, but the skill, knowledge, and tradition live on at Austrian Audio, backed by over 350 years of cumulative engineering experience. The product is quite simply stunning, and this week we unbox a few of their products to take a closer look (and listen)...  P.S. They're also the newest sponsors of our show.. A big shout out to our other sponsors, Tri Booth. As a part of their generous support of our show, they're offering $200 off a brand new booth when you use the code PAP200. So get onto their website now and secure your new booth... https://tribooth.com/   We have launched a Patreon page in the hopes of being able to pay someone to help us get the show to more people and in turn hopefully help them with the same info we're sharing with you. If you aren't familiar with Patreon, it's an easy way for those interested in our show to get exclusive content and updates before anyone else, along with a whole bunch of other "perks" just by contributing as little as $1 per month. Find out more here..   https://www.patreon.com/proaudiosuite   If you haven't filled out our survey on what you'd like to hear on the show, you can do it here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZWT5BTD Join our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/proaudiopodcast And the FB Group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/357898255543203 For everything else (including joining our mailing list for exclusive previews and other goodies), check out our website https://www.theproaudiosuite.com/ “When the going gets weird, the weird turn professional.”  

FM4 Reality Check Podcast
Monday 9th May, 2022

FM4 Reality Check Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 12:02


*Putin's Victory Day speech* *Austrian politics: Köstinger resigns - will more from the ÖVP follow?* *Philippines Presidential Election: the return of the Marcos family?*

Cryptic Canticles presents Dracula
Dracula Episode: May 7th

Cryptic Canticles presents Dracula

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 16:55


The Count returns late in the day to find Jonathan passing the time in his library. The Count presses Jonathan to stay with him for a while and help him improve his English so as to eradicate his accent. He welcomes Jonathan to explore his home, but cautions him to avoid any locked doors. When asked, Dracula explains that the blue flames in the woods denoted the location of buried treasure, left over from an ancient war between the native peasants and Austrian and Hungarian invaders. Jonathan and the Count pour over maps and deeds to a house that the Count is purchasing, called Carfax. When the Count finally concluded business and conversation, it was again early morning. Follow us on Twitter.com/CryptiCanticles, Facebook.com/DraculaRadioPlay, and at crypticcanticles.com

Euromaxx
Viennese Chic: The Fashion Designs by Susanne Bisovsky

Euromaxx

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 4:45


"Viennese chic" is how Austrian fashion designer Susanne Bisovsky describes her style. She is giving traditional costumes an avant-garde makeover with her unique and colorful touch.

The Daily Gardener
May 6, 2022 Jean Senebier, Joseph Joubert, Sigmund Freud, Mirei Shigemori, The Layered Garden by David Culp, and Versailles

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 21:25


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events Compost Awareness Week   1742 Birth of Jean Senebier, a Swiss pastor and botanist. Where would we be without Senebier? We'd still be breathing, but we'd lack the knowledge that carbon dioxide is consumed by plants and, in turn, that plants produce oxygen as part of the process of photosynthesis. In a nutshell, Senebier's work is crucial because he had learned the function of leaves: capturing carbon for food. Before Senebier, the purpose of leaves and what they did for plants and people was unknown. It was Jean Senebier who said, Observation and experiment are two sisters who help each other.   1754 Birth of Joseph Joubert, French moralist and essayist. Remembered mainly for his Pensées ("Pon-see") or (Thoughts), which were published posthumously, he once wrote, All gardeners live in beautiful places because they make them so.   1856 Birth of Sigmund Freud (books about this person), Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Freud once offered this humorous insight: Common sense is a rare flower and does not grow in everyone's garden.   Freud offered up a few dispassionate observations regarding the natural world.  He once wrote,  Beauty has no obvious use, nor is there any clear cultural necessity for it. Yet civilization could not do without it.   And he also wrote, Flowers are restful to look at. They have neither emotions nor conflicts.   Online there are many photos of Freud and his family in the garden of their home in London. The Freuds left their home in Austria to escape the Nazis with the help of Princess Marie Bonaparte (books about this person), known as Princess George of Greece and Denmark. In 1938, there was a photo of Sigmund with his daughter Anna and Martha in the garden of Marie Bonaparte's house in Paris after arriving on the Orient Express from Vienna. Anna looks happy, Martha looks at a flower, and Sigmund has a little snooze in his garden bed. The Freud home in London was much larger and nicer, and there was a large backyard with a garden.  The property still boasts Freud's rose garden and is now the Freud Museum at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, London NW3, England. In 2008, the French botanist and biologist Francis Hallé wrote, Everyone knows that going to the garden does not solve the problems of everyday life, yet it relativizes them and makes them more bearable.  Sigmund Freud had this late regret: 'I lost my time; the only important thing in life is gardening.'   1925 On this day, at the age of 29, the great twentieth-century reformer of Japanese gardens, Mirei Shigemori (books about this person), changed his name from Kazuo ("Kah-zoh") to Mirei (“me-RAY”).  The name change was a tribute to the 19th-century French painter of pastoral landscapes and daily life, Jean Francois Millet (books about this person), who once said, It is the treating of the commonplace with the feeling of the sublime that gives to art its true power.   In 1932, Mirei founded the Kyoto Garden Society. Mirei practiced the art of tea - Chado ("Cha-doe") and the art of flower arranging - Ikebana ("ick-aye-bah-na").  Mirei once advised, People who try to do research on the garden have to very seriously study the way of tea.   Mirei wrote eighty-one books, including the Illustrated Book on the History of the Japanese Garden in 26-volumes, released in 1938. Mother Nature played an important role in shaping Mirei's life when the Muroto Typhoon destroyed much of Kyoto in 1934. Many sacred temples, shrines, and gardens were wiped out in the life-altering storm. In response, Mirei took action.  He used his own money and became one of the first designers to survey every garden in Japan - creating records for restoration if they were ever damaged or destroyed. The tour provided a valuable service to his country and was also a means for Mirei to learn garden design - with a particular focus on incorporating rocks and stone. As a garden designer, Mirei was entirely self-taught. Throughout his fifty-year career, Mirei designed over two hundred gardens, including the checkerboard North Garden/Moss Garden at Tofukuji ("Tofu-kah-gee") Temple, Kyoto (1939), the dry landscape at Zuiho-in ("zwee-ho een" (1961), and the garden at the oldest shrine in Kyoto City, the Matsuo Taisha ("maht-sue-oh Ty-sha"(1975). The shrine is dedicated to the gods of water in western Kyoto and was an important place for sake-brewing families to worship over the centuries. In 2020, the second edition of landscape architect Christian Tschumi's book, Mirei Shigemori - Rebel in the Garden, was released.  In it, Christian breaks down the profound influences and meanings behind Mirei's most iconic gardens. Christian once wrote, Shigemori's body of work is a compelling manifesto for continuous cultural renewal.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Layered Garden by David Culp This book came out in 2012, and the subtitle is Design Lessons for Year-Round Beauty from Brandywine Cottage. Well, I'm a huge David Culp fan, and I feel like I'm telling you about this book just in time for summer because this book can help you set the stage for how you want your garden to look all year long. And since the summer lays entirely before us, this book is just in time for you. If you're planning a new garden or a garden redesign, you could do a lot worse than having David Culp be your guide. Laura Springer Ogden wrote a review that's right on the cover of the book, And it says, Garden-making in its finest form is a celebration of life and love - and David and this book epitomize this. I couldn't agree more. And by the way, you'll probably recognize the photographer's name for David's book as well -  it's Rob Cardillo. Rob always does such a fantastic job photographing gardens, so this book's photos are top-notch. Now David kicks things off in this book with a quote from Francis Bacon, it's from Of Gardens (1625) - and it's one of my favorite garden quotes: There ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which severally things of beauty may be then in season.   Of course, this sets the stage for what David is trying to teach us: how to have a garden that looks good all year long. Now I thought I would share this quick little sweet story that David shares at the beginning of his book. It gives all of us some great ideas - especially if you have young gardeners in your life. David wrote One fall, when I was about nine years old, my grandmother Thorpe gave me a bag of bulbs and said, "you go out and plant them." I felt more than a little trepidation. I had never planted anything without her supervision. But she reassured me. "You can do it. You won't go wrong." Her generosity could have been ruinous to her flower border. But I got the bulbs planted with no mishaps. The next spring, when they bloomed, I almost burst with pride. When she told all her friends, "David did that."  And from that moment, I knew I was a gardener.  And after all these years, it remains the core of how I define myself.   I love that story for a couple of different reasons. Number one, it really does tee up what David is talking about here in The Layered Garden because as a gardener, if you dismiss specific categories of plants out of hand, like the flowers that you get with spring bulbs, then you'll likely miss one of the layers that can help make your garden beautiful all through the year. Now the other reason I like this story is for practical purposes. I hear all the time from new gardeners who are so anxious about planting bulbs, And now I'm going to say, "Hey, if David Culp - as a nine-year-old - can do it, you can too. And then last but not least, I hope this plants a tiny seed with all of us that if we are interacting with kids in the garden, we definitely need to introduce them to planting spring-flowering bulbs because the result in the spring is just so impressive and unique. It also instills that sense of pride that you can get when your garden work goes to plan, and you experience that first flush of color. It's so wonderful. Throughout David's book, he reinforces this concept of the layered garden, but I will give you just a little snippet of how he introduces it here. He goes into much more detail and offers many more tips - wonderful little nuggets and tiny ideas - for making this look work for you. Here's how he introduces the concept in his book. Garden layers are made up of a variety of plants- some with complimentary or contrasting colors, others with interesting shapes or textures. Layers are more than just perennials or annuals or bulbs or ground covers. They're more than just the ground layer of plants. That's the sole focus of many gardens. Beautiful combinations are certainly possible, even in the tiniest scale. Think of dwarf Solomon's Seal underplanted with moss - that makes a precious six-inch-high picture. But to get the most interest from any garden, all the layers need to be considered from the ground level to the middle level of shrubs and small trees up to the canopy trees. Growing plants on vertical surfaces, walls, fences, trellises, arbors, and other supports even climbing up trees, when we can be sure that they will do no harm, adds to the picture by bringing flowers and foliage to eye level and above.   So there you go. An introduction to what David is talking about when he says The Layered Garden. You might be intuitively doing some layering already in your garden as you look for more ways to garden - looking for different plants - or finding and curating other ideas that you can put in your garden. But I think what David adds is his mastery because he knows how to make all of this work in a very cohesive way that's pleasing to the eye. David's book talks about how to do a layered garden and design it - which is probably the key for most of us because we often don't think about that. If we layer the garden, it can just happen organically. But then, sometimes, we can end up with a little bit of a confused look. Next, David talks about maintaining the layered garden, which is very important. Now there are two other aspects of this book that I want to share with you. So the first chapter talks about the layered garden, and it walks you all through that. But The second chapter introduces you to his garden at Brandywine Cottage. This is important because you get a garden tour here, and David shows you how he's put this layered garden technique to work right on his property. By the way, this is not David's first at-bat gardening; he's designed many gardens. So, all of his work is coming together, culminating at Brandywine. And then the last chapter, I think, is one of the most important chapters of the book. Here David shares his signature plants that he advises we consider incorporating into our gardens throughout the seasons. So, this is a great list. This is a list of plants from a garden designer - a garden lover - and someone who works in gardens every day. So right there, that's an invaluable part of this book. This book is 312 pages of layered gardening, the beauty of the garden at Brandywine, and then some of David's most treasured garden design secrets and favorite plants. You can get a copy of The Layered Garden by David Culp and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $18.   Botanic Spark 1682 On this day, Louis XIV (books about this person) of France moved his court to the Palace of Versailles. Originally, Versailles was built as a country house. Nine miles from Paris, Versailles was ideally situated near neighboring forests for hunting. Today Versailles is known for its opulence - the Hall of Mirrors, stunning art, and lush gardens. The massive gardens at Versailles are the most famous in the world. The garden is home to over 1,000 statues, and in the Facebook group for the show, I shared a stunning photo of the garden sculptures at Versailles surrounded by sandbags for protection during WWII. In 2006, Ian Thompson wrote a fantastic book called, The Sun King's Garden: Louis XIV, Andre le Notre and the Creation of the Gardens of Versailles. Ian believes that Louis XIV may also have been history's most passionate gardener. Louis, the absolute monarch, was known as the “Sun King,”  specifically designed the central axis to be east-west to track the sun's path across the garden. Louis worked closely for forty years with the low-born gardener André Le Nôtre to devise the original design and geometrical layout. Temperament-wise, André and Louis could not have been more different. Louis was driven and merciless. André was funny, thoughtful, insightful, and easy-going. In 1979, Versailles, including the garden, was declared a World Heritage Site. And in 2014, Alain Baraton wrote Gardener of Versailles: My Life in the World's Grandest Garden. As the gardener-in-chief, Alain lives on the grounds at Versailles. Alain has worked in the gardens, orchards, and fields for four decades. This memoir reveals Alain's connection to the grandest garden in the world. And in case you're wondering, Alain believes fall is the best time to visit. Alain oversaw the recovery from the worst natural disaster ever to hit Versailles. On Christmas night through the 26th of December in 1999, a monster winter storm with winds of up to 105 mph struck the grounds of Versaille. Alain watched in horror as century trees let go of the earth in response. In a little over an hour, the storm felled 10,000 trees at Versailles, including two tulip trees planted by Marie-Antoinette in 1783 in Trianon and a Corsican pine planted for Napoleon in 1810. Alain said, It was like the apocalypse. In one hour, 200 years of trees were destroyed.   But, miraculously, all of the statues survived unharmed. Although, there was one account that I read of a tree falling on one of the great statues. And as it hit the ground, the branches parted as if to spare that statue. It gave me chills just reading that. It was quite the story.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

UFO Paranormal Radio & United Public Radio
The Outer Realm Welcomes Guest Frank Jacob, May 5th, 2022

UFO Paranormal Radio & United Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 131:56


he Outer Realm With Michelle Desrochers and Amelia Pisano pStnse3  p00A a:1l 32g101r8iMta90Pcig  ·  Thursday night live, The Outer Realm welcomes special guest Frank Jacob. Short Bio Frank Jacob, Writer/Director/Producer/Lecturer: Frank Jacob is an international award-winning filmmaker, visual artist, musician and composer. Having teamed up with US motion picture production company Screen Addiction, his current focus explores the frontiers of consciousness-raising subjects in the films 'Solar (R)evolution', ‘The Klaus Dona Chronicles', and 'Packing For Mars'. Known for his enigmatic approaches, he has artistically realized many different subjects that would not ordinarily find their way into the audio-visual medium. This has included an exploration of blindness using visuals called 'Beating Darkness', for Austrian sight researcher Michaela Velikay-Parel, an after-life ‘Video Epitaph' depicting the work of deceased architect Herwig Illmaier, and an annual report in the form of a live cinema narrative entitled 'Information Is Art', which he performed live in 2007 at Carnegie Hall at the world-renowned 'Doctors Without Borders' benefit concert. Other highlights have included a first-of-its-kind ‘live cinema' feature called ‘LOOP Live Cinema', where musical stage performances where orchestrated in tandem with dynamic visual sequences projected as dramatic narratives. He was invited to conceive and perform a unique live cinema spectacle, in January 2010, in collaboration with a 65-piece symphony orchestra in Salzburg, the birth town of Mozart. During his years as a senior editor at the Red Bull Media House, Frank also began writing, directing and producing extreme sports films. He was director, producer, supervising editor and the prime contributor on season two and three of the hit Red Bull TV show ‘Ultimate Rush'. As a lecturer Frank's multimedia presentations take his audiences deep down the rabbit hole into hidden history, transhumanism, artificial intelligence, secret technology, human evolution, timelines and parallel worlds.

United Public Radio
The Outer Realm Welcomes Guest Frank Jacob, May 5th, 2022

United Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 131:56


he Outer Realm With Michelle Desrochers and Amelia Pisano pStnse 3 p 00 A a : 1 l 3 2 g101 r 8 i M t a 9 0 P cig · Thursday night live, The Outer Realm welcomes special guest Frank Jacob. Short Bio Frank Jacob, Writer/Director/Producer/Lecturer: Frank Jacob is an international award-winning filmmaker, visual artist, musician and composer. Having teamed up with US motion picture production company Screen Addiction, his current focus explores the frontiers of consciousness-raising subjects in the films 'Solar (R)evolution', ‘The Klaus Dona Chronicles', and 'Packing For Mars'. Known for his enigmatic approaches, he has artistically realized many different subjects that would not ordinarily find their way into the audio-visual medium. This has included an exploration of blindness using visuals called 'Beating Darkness', for Austrian sight researcher Michaela Velikay-Parel, an after-life ‘Video Epitaph' depicting the work of deceased architect Herwig Illmaier, and an annual report in the form of a live cinema narrative entitled 'Information Is Art', which he performed live in 2007 at Carnegie Hall at the world-renowned 'Doctors Without Borders' benefit concert. Other highlights have included a first-of-its-kind ‘live cinema' feature called ‘LOOP Live Cinema', where musical stage performances where orchestrated in tandem with dynamic visual sequences projected as dramatic narratives. He was invited to conceive and perform a unique live cinema spectacle, in January 2010, in collaboration with a 65-piece symphony orchestra in Salzburg, the birth town of Mozart. During his years as a senior editor at the Red Bull Media House, Frank also began writing, directing and producing extreme sports films. He was director, producer, supervising editor and the prime contributor on season two and three of the hit Red Bull TV show ‘Ultimate Rush'. As a lecturer Frank's multimedia presentations take his audiences deep down the rabbit hole into hidden history, transhumanism, artificial intelligence, secret technology, human evolution, timelines and parallel worlds.

Zócalo Public Square
A Special Zócalo Music Presentation: How Immigrants Composed L.A.

Zócalo Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 56:49


In 1933, Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg immigrated to the United States, settling in Los Angeles; he would spend the rest of his life writing music and teaching composition at USC and UCLA. Following him, in 1940, came Russian-born composer, pianist, and conductor Stravinsky, who settled in Hollywood after making the move from France. Then, in 1942, fellow Russian-born composer, pianist, and conductor Sergei Rachmaninoff arrived in Beverly Hills. These immigrants—and others who followed them—fused L.A.'s free-spirited culture with the traditions they brought with them from their homelands. A string quartet of four Los Angeles Opera musicians—cellist Evgeny Tonkha, violist Erik Rynearson, and violinists Roberto Cani and Ana Landauer—visits Zócalo to perform the music of L.A.'s immigrant composers, from Schoenberg to contemporary Indian American composer Reena Esmail, who continues in this proud tradition today by merging the worlds of Indian and Western classical music. This event was streamed live from the ASU California Center in Los Angeles, CA on April 28, 2022 in partnership with Artistic Soirées and the ASU Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Visit https://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/ to read our articles and learn about upcoming events. Twitter: https://twitter.com/thepublicsquare Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepublicsquare/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/zocalopublicsquare LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/z-calo-public-square

The Rebel Capitalist Show
Bob Murphy (Stakeholder Capitalism Deep Dive, Analysis Of Global Elite, Austrian Principles)

The Rebel Capitalist Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 64:24


✅ Get your tickets to Rebel Capitalist Live 3!! I'll see YOU in Miami!! ;) https://www.rebelcapitalistlive.com ✅ LYN ALDEN and I discuss portfolio that will HELP YOU profit from DOLLAR losing reserve currency status, click this link to check it out!!

CTO Confessions Brought to you by IT Labs
Episode 108: With Algorithms to Better Healthcare With Tamás Petrovics

CTO Confessions Brought to you by IT Labs

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 48:24


In this frantic age, in this frantic world, there is no shortage of demand for more, and more, and more – but what happens when an industry vital for the functioning of modern society is under sustained and increasing pressure? Tech jumps in to help it, ease the burden, and modernize it. Meet Tamás Petrovics, Co-founder & CEO at XUND - an Austrian healthtech start-up. Tamás and two of his friends decided to start a company that will help ease the burden on one of the biggest sectors in the world – healthcare. From how he leads his teams, all the way to his vision and mission for the company, our TC Gill had a good, long chat with Tamás about all of this, and much more. Key takeaways from the podcast are: • How prioritizing people and culture can set you up for long-term success • Make people passionate about what they're doing • Why scratching an idea itch is almost always a good idea Our Guest: Tamás Petrovics LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tamas-petrovics/ Website: https://xund.ai/ Intro and background music: Craig MacArthur - Power Shutoff (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x74iB_jtauw)

Mutual Exchange Radio
Abigail Devereaux on Complexity Economics

Mutual Exchange Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 67:56


Abigail joins Mutual Exchange Radio to discuss the connections between complexity economics, systems theory, emergent order, science fiction, and more. Dr. Abigail Devereaux is a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Economic Growth and Assistant Professor of Economics at Wichita State University. She's also affiliated with the Independent Institute, the American Institute of Economic Research, and NYU's Classical Liberal Institute. Abigail holds degrees in math in physics, both from Boston University, and had a career in high-tech focusing on complex systems science before getting her economics PhD from George Mason University. She fielded in complexity economics and Austrian economics. Her work these days is interdisciplinary and focused on two research programs: the mathematical and social implications of accelerating technological innovation, and the emergence of spontaneous orders.

The Bitcoin Standard Podcast
112. Who will build the roads? With Walter Block

The Bitcoin Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 89:49


April 27th 2022.Without government who would build the roads? Should prostitution, speculating and price gouging be outlawed? In this episode Saifedean discusses these questions with eminent Austrian School economist Dr Walter Block. They cover fundamental issues in economics such as whether there is such a thing as a “public good”, whether economics is an empirical science, and whether it is ethical to outlaw “victimless crimes”. Dr Block also shares the story of he became a libertarian and Austrian economist, including the roles played by Ayn Rand and Murray Rothbard in his intellectual journey.ResourcesAtlas Shrugged by Ayn RandEconomics in One Lesson by Henry HazlittDr Block's paper “The Minimum Wage Once Again” debunking a well-known 1994 study by Card and Krueger.Mises Institute article “The Phillips Curve Myth” on the relationship between inflation and unemploymentDr Block's book The Privatization of Roads and HighwaysDr Block's book Defending the UndefendablePrinciple of non-aggression explained on Mises WikiList of Walter Block's publications onlineDr Block's book Water Capitalism (2015)Saifedean's first book, The Bitcoin StandardSaifedean's second book, The Fiat Standard

Losers, Pretenders & Scoundrels
The Austrian Emperor of Mexico - Maximillian the First

Losers, Pretenders & Scoundrels

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 55:26


Maximillian I was the "other" Hapsburg son. The one who was born second and didn't get to be Emperor of Austria. But he thought he'd found the next best thing! Emperor of a country across an ocean who he had no common heritage or connection with. Unfortunately, the people of Mexico didn't agree. Heaton and Young explore this charismatic but ill-fated monarch.

Mises Media
Anthony J. Evans: Markets for Managers and Entrepreneurs

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022


Markets are marvelous. They're the poetry of economics. They are one of the most remarkable technologies humans have ever built. Beautiful businesses develop new markets both outside and inside the firm. We discuss markets with Anthony J. Evans, a business school professor who teaches that all businesspeople must become economists. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights A business economist is an Austrian who looks at the fields of economics and business to see how one is best applied to the other. Aim to be a good economist and a good business practitioner. Managerial economics is the application of the economic way of thinking and the insights of economics to the managerial task of creating value. It was Shlomo Maital who wrote, “Managers can't just employ economists, they must become economists” (Mises.org/E4B_168_Book). Anthony Evans follows that direction and teaches his students at ESCP Business School that they'll be more productive and more capable as businesspeople as a result of learning and applying economics. Market system economics provides businesses with the best toolkit for success. Businesses are participants in the market system. Managerial economists study markets in order to find ways for businesses to use market insights, harness market mechanisms and understand the signals and information that markets provide. It's easy for firms to overestimate their ability to affect the markets in which they are participating, and don't sometimes they don't fully understand or properly analyze what market prices are telling them. Prices are the most important market signals, and they can transmit information about potential futures. They can guide firms on understanding how much value they are creating relative to competitors. They can provide signals about how to increase revenue by moving process higher or lower. They can help businesses understand opportunity costs and transaction costs. Markets are decentralized experimentation, and if some new experiments by disruptive competitors are commanding purchases from actual buyers today, that may signal more buyers and more transactions in the future especially after prices adjust to higher transaction volumes. Monitoring prices and reading the signals must be a core managerial skill. Market tests should be applied whenever feasible. Technology can help. Businesses should run a market test for every question that a market can answer: is this offering or initiative valued, is it preferred, can we put a price on it, will varying the price change the level of demand or acceptance, is the benefit greater than the cost, do some customers prefer a competitive offer? Run a market test — A/B test, pilot program, prototype evaluation, survey with customers, whatever is feasible. Today's technology provides tremendous help with low-cost digital testing methods, fast feedback loops, and efficient data processing. In fact, more and more, technology can relieve managers of the task of formulating their own understanding by automating the test procedures and the analytics and recommendations. Markets can be brought inside the firm to improve business performance. Markets stimulate innovation, lower costs, and efficiency because customers always want better, cheaper, and faster and competing entrepreneurial firms always want to provide those benefits in the search for profits. The same effects of the market order can be sought inside the firm. What is the market value and the right price for marketing services from the marketing department, or HR services or IT services? What's the marginal cost versus marginal benefit analysis for one more HR staff member, or the opportunity cost of one more IT system installation versus one more sales campaign? What's the value of the knowledge flowing through the firm? These are the kinds of questions that the market order can answer, and managers should always be asking them. Prices can be the metric for all learning. Market economics can also guide organizational design and processes. Markets are dynamic and ever changing. Businesses must reflect and emulate this dynamism. Organizational design and structures must be flexible enough to enable dynamism and not erect barriers to change and adaptation. What are the forces that make markets grow and decline, and what are the forces that have this effect on firms? Organization should harness the forces of market growth. Professor Evans' suggestion is a constitutional view of the firm. Let simple rules of conduct emerge from a shared sense of vision and mission, codify them, and then let decentralized teams run the experiments that feel constitutionally right to them given their reading of market signals. Subjective value is immeasurable, but can be gauged in market tests. The purpose of a firm is to generate subjective value, which is created by customers through their own experiences and co-created by the firms and brands and services that facilitate those experiences. Subjective value is intangible and immeasurable. But exchange value — what customers actually pay in an exchange transaction — can be a proxy in some cases. Subjective value is a hard concept to grasp for those who have been educated or trained to think of value in objective terms, as something inherent in a product. Professor Evans finds his students, when asked to describe the value of an offering or an idea, instinctively gravitate to the product-based view, citing attributes, features and performance benefits. Taking the customer perspective is very hard, and perhaps unnatural. The economic point of view is always to put the producer in the shoes of the customer, to take the customer's view and identify the customer's mental model for processing information and observation. It's hard to do, and requires significant cognitive effort. But done well, it's key to marketing, innovation, product improvement and competitive positioning. Empathically diagnosing subjective value is one of the greatest insights economics can give to business. Entrepreneurs thrive in markets. Markets are the place where entrepreneurs ply their skills, and the entrepreneurial role will never diminish. Their imagination of the future and anticipation of future demand – even under conditions of uncertainty – their creativity and their judgment will always be important in the context of dynamic interactions of multiple players, offerings, and institutions within markets. The human factor is the most important. Entrepreneurship is not an academic matter to be debated for the distinction of different nuances, but a practical matter of working and succeeding in markets. It concerns the identification of a profit opportunity via some kind of new product, service, method, or recombination of capital, and the ability to introduce this novelty into the marketplace, actively making decisions about resource allocation, cost, investment, communications and all the other elements of a business, overcoming obstacles and resolving difficult challenges. It is, as Professor Evans stated it, both ideational and implementational. Ambidextrous. And the common backdrop for all entrepreneurs and businesses of all kinds is continuous change. In his book Economics: A Complete Guide For Business (Mises.org/E4B_168_Book), Prof Evans states that, “Economic change will disintegrate existing combinations (of capital goods) and force entrepreneurs to find new ones”. This action, which Prof Evans refers to as “recalculation”, is core to the dynamics and agility of entrepreneurs in markets. Recalculation is the creative pulse that provides the energy for generating new capital structures out of old ones. Austrian economists have always been acutely aware of change as an economic factor. Perhaps the business world is catching up, but Austrians have always been ahead. It's the perspective that entrepreneurs and businesses can co-ordinate with each other fruitfully in markets where change is so pervasive and so fast that no-one has complete knowledge and yet must be able to act. Austrian economics demonstrates that good outcomes are possible, even in these conditions of bounded knowledge, for everyone participating in the market, so long as entrepreneurs are free to do their work without intervention. It's a very powerful message. People in business can be proud of acting as value generators and not feel any imposed need to “give back” or sacrifice themselves to artificially constructed restraints. Additional Resources Economics: A Complete Guide For Business by Anthony J. Evans: Mises.org/E4B_168_Book AnthonyJEvans.com

Interviews
Anthony J. Evans: Markets for Managers and Entrepreneurs

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022


Markets are marvelous. They're the poetry of economics. They are one of the most remarkable technologies humans have ever built. Beautiful businesses develop new markets both outside and inside the firm. We discuss markets with Anthony J. Evans, a business school professor who teaches that all businesspeople must become economists. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights A business economist is an Austrian who looks at the fields of economics and business to see how one is best applied to the other. Aim to be a good economist and a good business practitioner. Managerial economics is the application of the economic way of thinking and the insights of economics to the managerial task of creating value. It was Shlomo Maital who wrote, “Managers can't just employ economists, they must become economists” (Mises.org/E4B_168_Book). Anthony Evans follows that direction and teaches his students at ESCP Business School that they'll be more productive and more capable as businesspeople as a result of learning and applying economics. Market system economics provides businesses with the best toolkit for success. Businesses are participants in the market system. Managerial economists study markets in order to find ways for businesses to use market insights, harness market mechanisms and understand the signals and information that markets provide. It's easy for firms to overestimate their ability to affect the markets in which they are participating, and don't sometimes they don't fully understand or properly analyze what market prices are telling them. Prices are the most important market signals, and they can transmit information about potential futures. They can guide firms on understanding how much value they are creating relative to competitors. They can provide signals about how to increase revenue by moving process higher or lower. They can help businesses understand opportunity costs and transaction costs. Markets are decentralized experimentation, and if some new experiments by disruptive competitors are commanding purchases from actual buyers today, that may signal more buyers and more transactions in the future especially after prices adjust to higher transaction volumes. Monitoring prices and reading the signals must be a core managerial skill. Market tests should be applied whenever feasible. Technology can help. Businesses should run a market test for every question that a market can answer: is this offering or initiative valued, is it preferred, can we put a price on it, will varying the price change the level of demand or acceptance, is the benefit greater than the cost, do some customers prefer a competitive offer? Run a market test — A/B test, pilot program, prototype evaluation, survey with customers, whatever is feasible. Today's technology provides tremendous help with low-cost digital testing methods, fast feedback loops, and efficient data processing. In fact, more and more, technology can relieve managers of the task of formulating their own understanding by automating the test procedures and the analytics and recommendations. Markets can be brought inside the firm to improve business performance. Markets stimulate innovation, lower costs, and efficiency because customers always want better, cheaper, and faster and competing entrepreneurial firms always want to provide those benefits in the search for profits. The same effects of the market order can be sought inside the firm. What is the market value and the right price for marketing services from the marketing department, or HR services or IT services? What's the marginal cost versus marginal benefit analysis for one more HR staff member, or the opportunity cost of one more IT system installation versus one more sales campaign? What's the value of the knowledge flowing through the firm? These are the kinds of questions that the market order can answer, and managers should always be asking them. Prices can be the metric for all learning. Market economics can also guide organizational design and processes. Markets are dynamic and ever changing. Businesses must reflect and emulate this dynamism. Organizational design and structures must be flexible enough to enable dynamism and not erect barriers to change and adaptation. What are the forces that make markets grow and decline, and what are the forces that have this effect on firms? Organization should harness the forces of market growth. Professor Evans' suggestion is a constitutional view of the firm. Let simple rules of conduct emerge from a shared sense of vision and mission, codify them, and then let decentralized teams run the experiments that feel constitutionally right to them given their reading of market signals. Subjective value is immeasurable, but can be gauged in market tests. The purpose of a firm is to generate subjective value, which is created by customers through their own experiences and co-created by the firms and brands and services that facilitate those experiences. Subjective value is intangible and immeasurable. But exchange value — what customers actually pay in an exchange transaction — can be a proxy in some cases. Subjective value is a hard concept to grasp for those who have been educated or trained to think of value in objective terms, as something inherent in a product. Professor Evans finds his students, when asked to describe the value of an offering or an idea, instinctively gravitate to the product-based view, citing attributes, features and performance benefits. Taking the customer perspective is very hard, and perhaps unnatural. The economic point of view is always to put the producer in the shoes of the customer, to take the customer's view and identify the customer's mental model for processing information and observation. It's hard to do, and requires significant cognitive effort. But done well, it's key to marketing, innovation, product improvement and competitive positioning. Empathically diagnosing subjective value is one of the greatest insights economics can give to business. Entrepreneurs thrive in markets. Markets are the place where entrepreneurs ply their skills, and the entrepreneurial role will never diminish. Their imagination of the future and anticipation of future demand – even under conditions of uncertainty – their creativity and their judgment will always be important in the context of dynamic interactions of multiple players, offerings, and institutions within markets. The human factor is the most important. Entrepreneurship is not an academic matter to be debated for the distinction of different nuances, but a practical matter of working and succeeding in markets. It concerns the identification of a profit opportunity via some kind of new product, service, method, or recombination of capital, and the ability to introduce this novelty into the marketplace, actively making decisions about resource allocation, cost, investment, communications and all the other elements of a business, overcoming obstacles and resolving difficult challenges. It is, as Professor Evans stated it, both ideational and implementational. Ambidextrous. And the common backdrop for all entrepreneurs and businesses of all kinds is continuous change. In his book Economics: A Complete Guide For Business (Mises.org/E4B_168_Book), Prof Evans states that, “Economic change will disintegrate existing combinations (of capital goods) and force entrepreneurs to find new ones”. This action, which Prof Evans refers to as “recalculation”, is core to the dynamics and agility of entrepreneurs in markets. Recalculation is the creative pulse that provides the energy for generating new capital structures out of old ones. Austrian economists have always been acutely aware of change as an economic factor. Perhaps the business world is catching up, but Austrians have always been ahead. It's the perspective that entrepreneurs and businesses can co-ordinate with each other fruitfully in markets where change is so pervasive and so fast that no-one has complete knowledge and yet must be able to act. Austrian economics demonstrates that good outcomes are possible, even in these conditions of bounded knowledge, for everyone participating in the market, so long as entrepreneurs are free to do their work without intervention. It's a very powerful message. People in business can be proud of acting as value generators and not feel any imposed need to “give back” or sacrifice themselves to artificially constructed restraints. Additional Resources Economics: A Complete Guide For Business by Anthony J. Evans: Mises.org/E4B_168_Book AnthonyJEvans.com

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 303 - Get on Zero #20 - ACHoo!

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 60:53


Subscribe to the podcast Joinmarket Web GUI is awesome, ACH transfers while holding Bitcoin is pretty bullish, and people who author sTuDiEs are clowns. Learn more at GetOnZeroFiat.com. Learn about Bitcoin at a trickle BitcoinTrickle.com Sponsor Liberty Mugs Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @libertymugs (Rollo), @Slappy_Jones_2 Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

Crazy Wisdom
What is the Tirrel Corporation?

Crazy Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 69:53


Christian Langalis is the co-founder and C.E.O. of Tirell Corporation What is Orbis Tertiary? What is the Orbis Ledger? Are there any cyberpunk references for Urbit business? What is the distinction of cyber-punk? Dystopia. What is cypher-punk? Who are Timothy May and Satoshi Nakamoto What is the overreach of instrumentalization? What is the atomization of the social? How did computers atomize humans even further? In what ways has studying culture informed your world view? What is the ultimate holy grail for Tirrell? What is an interregnum? What is the role of Urbit in the Web 3.0 ecosystem? How do you maintain legacy systems on an entirely new system that is censorless? What is a Spot ETF and why is it important? What is Bitcoin's fifth pillar? (15 minutes) What is a cantalon insider? What is the New World Order that George H. W. Bush setup and how does it work now? What is the Minsky Movement? What is the Austrian tendency when it comes to economics? Who are Larry White and George Selgen? What is synthetic commodity money? What is the New Wyoming Bank Charter?  What are Full-Reserve Cryptocurrency Banks? What is the difference between a bank and a bitcoin wallet? What are interbank clearing systems? What is the difference between a deferred system and a credit card settlement? What is unchained capital multisig? What is an FBO? What are extant regulations? What is the Nick Land quote (“in the mouth of madness”) (25 minutes)? How did science fiction inform your life? Who is Phil Monk? Urbit strives to have a system that is human scale, that will never require the long-term intervention of a specialized third party. Why do people call Curtis Yarvin an authoritarian? What is peer discovery? What is the contained podcast and who is Barret (36 minutes)?  What are your favorite exclaves? How do I use Tirrell? Download the thing (find the thing). What is landscape (groups) programming language? What is the future of NFTs when it comes to fan groups? NFT's can be digital cellophane wrappers for an album. How many people are in the Tirell corporation? What should someone know about the Urbit foundation? What is Hoon School? Do you have any insight into the people aspect of doing business? How is Tirell corporation set up? What church do you belong to (55 minutes)? What is the correct view of Urbit?  What is the Jungen? What is Cottage Core? What is the relationship between Solipsism and being a Luddite?  Who is Junger? What is the naming scheme? ~tirrel ~pindet-timmut ~tirrel corporation tirrel.io

Filter: Biblical Clarity in a Confusing World
Tho Bishop on Austrian Economics, Understanding Inflation, and His Spiritual Journey

Filter: Biblical Clarity in a Confusing World

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 69:42


You've probably noticed the rising prices in the cost of living this year. Everyone is feeling the squeeze on pocketbooks as everyday essentials are becoming more and more expensive due to inflation. I'll be the first to admit a lack of knowledge in economics and the factors that drive inflation. That's why I'm glad to welcome Tho Bishop to the show today. Tho and I discussed a lot in this conversation. We began by talking about Ludwig von Mises and the Austrian school of economics. Tho then explain the bad monetary policies and history that have led to the economic woes we're facing now. We finished by talking about Tho's recent spiritual journey to Christianity and what he's learned. Tho Bishop is an assistant editor for the Mises Wire. Prior to working for the Mises Institute, he served as Deputy Communications Director for the House Financial Services Committee. His articles have been featured in The Federalist, the Daily Caller, and Business Insider. Check out the full show notes for this episode: https://tinyurl.com/yckrv7vk  SUPPORT THIS PODCAST: https://www.aaronshamp.com/support  This episode is sponsored by Zencastr. Get 30% off Zencastr Professional when you use my offer code: https://zen.ai/filterbiblicalclarityinaconfusingworld  –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Track: Perseverance — Land of Fire [Audio Library Release] Music provided by Audio Library Plus  –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/filterpodcast/message

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast
Arsenal leapfrog Tottenham, Everton keep survival hopes alive | Weekend Recap & Analysis (Soccer 5/1)

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 54:27


Arsenal beat the Hammers to reclaim fourth spot, but with a north London derby still to play Tottenham can still pip the Gunners to the Champions League. Luis Miguel Echegaray and Heath Pearce recap the day's Premier League drama and pick over the biggest stories from the rest of Europe. 4:50 -- Soccer mourns Mino Raiola's passing 6:30 -- Arsenal and Tottenham fight for 4th 16:30 -- Rangnick's Austrian side hustle 19:19 -- Everton & Burnley turn things around 26:25 -- Champions League preview 35:20 -- Milan close in on Serie A title 42:02 -- Bundesliga's UCL chasers 47:16 -- Old Firm, Trabzonspor, Angel City Qué Golazo' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Follow the Qué Golazo team on  Twitter: @quegolazopod, @lmechegaray, @MikeLahoud, @JimmyConrad, @FabrizioRomano, @Jon_LeGossip, @jamesbenge, @heathpearce, @LRoman32, @PartidoPooper Watch Qué Golazo on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/QueGolazo For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Audio Mises Wire
Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are "Profoundly Equitable"

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Jordan Peterson is turning his eye toward Austrian economics. Unlike the many conservatives who see free market advocacy as some sort of "dangerous fundamentalism," Peterson seems to get it. Original Article: "Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are 'Profoundly Equitable'" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Mises Media
Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are "Profoundly Equitable"

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Jordan Peterson is turning his eye toward Austrian economics. Unlike the many conservatives who see free market advocacy as some sort of "dangerous fundamentalism," Peterson seems to get it. Original Article: "Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are 'Profoundly Equitable'" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Young Americans Abroad: Weekly Soccer Report
YAA Weekly Report | Pulisic Heroics! Aaronson Wins Austrian League, Pefok Scores Again & Again!

Young Americans Abroad: Weekly Soccer Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 38:48


Find out what happens each weekend with the future of the USMNT during our weekly soccer report! If you like what you hear, please SUBSCRIBE and leave a REVIEW! Check out our MERCH!: https://young-americans-abroad.creator-spring.com/ Intro Song: YAA Anthem - KGB (Artists - Brandon Panetta & Brennan Carey)

The 2 Robbies
Man City-Real Madrid Goalfest, Liverpool Top Villarreal & Ronaldo Saves A Point For Man United Against Chelsea

The 2 Robbies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 48:57


Robbie Mustoe and Robbie Earle discuss the following:(1:20) Manchester City's 4-3 win over Real Madrid in the 1st leg of the Champions League semifinals (14:40) Liverpool overcoming a frustrating 1st half to win 2-0 against Villarreal at Anfield plus Jurgen Klopp extending his contract through 2026(30:20) Manchester United and Chelsea playing out a 1-1 draw at Old Trafford and what Ralf Rangnick potentially becoming the manager of the Austrian national team means for his future role moving forward with the club

Disenfranchised
086 - Killing Gunther (2017)

Disenfranchised

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 71:29


"I've been doing this for 50 years! How do you think I learned how to ram my fist into someone's stomach and to break their goddamn spine?"   Well, gentles and ladymen, we've come to the conclusion of "All About Arnold April" and our career retrospective on the iconic Austrian action hero! This week, we discuss Arnie's post-political movie career, the ups and mostly downs of the Terminator franchise, as well as how much of a blast the last 30 minutes of this movie are!   Join our Patreon!

Arts & Ideas
Rainer Maria Rilke

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 44:36


A New Age mystic who fell out of favour for his apolitical views - how true a characterisation is this of the Austrian poet Rainer Maria Rilke (1875 – 1926)? Anne McElvoy discusses the work and legacy of the visionary poet, from his idiosyncratic use of figures and images from both Classical mythology and Christianity to explore existential themes. Her guests are Lesley Chamberlain, author of a new biography; composer Ninfea Crutwell-Reade whose Vigil I is a setting of the first poem in the sequence 'Vigilien' by Rainer Maria Rilke; and New Generation Thinker Seán Williams, who lectures in German and European Cultural History at the University of Sheffield. In addition to discussing Rilke, Seán also sheds light on Walpurgisnacht Night and the folk traditions of the night before May Day when witches are said to meet on the Brocken Mountain. You can find more about Ninfea's music at https://ninfeacruttwellreade.com/ New Generation Thinker Seán Williams has made Sunday features for Radio 3 about ice skating https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0013837 and the history of luxury https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003rpl Lesley Chamberlain's biography Rilke: The Last Inward Man is out now http://www.lesleychamberlain.co.uk/ Producer: Luke Mulhall

NBC Meet the Press
April 17 — Austrian Chancellor Nehammer, Dr. Jha & Rep. Upton

NBC Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 47:37


NBC News Foreign Correspondent Matt Bradley reports on the latest in Ukraine. Austrian Chancellor Karl Nehammer joins Meet the Press exclusively to talk about Putin's state of mind and the international community's response to the war. Dr. Ashish Jha, the White House Covid coordinator, talks about the administration's perspective on the pandemic. In another exclusive interview, Representative Fred Upton (R-Mich.) talks about his decision to retire. Matthew Continetti, Eugene Daniels, Ruth Marcus and Amna Nawaz join the Meet the Press roundtable.

Sharon Says So
116. The Right: The Hundred Year War for American Conservatism with Matthew Continetti, Part 2

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 40:56


In the second part of a two-part conversation, Sharon continues her talk with journalist and author Matthew Continetti about the evolving history of conservatism over the past one hundred years. They pick up with some of the most important conservative thinkers in the second half of the 20th century, like founder of The National Review, William F. Buckley, the Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek, and American economist Milton Friedman. They also touch on the inner turmoil of the Democratic Party and how it helped usher in a “law and order” Nixon presidency, as well as topics like race, movement conservatism, and abortion. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.