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Visual artwork in two-dimensional medium

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Latest podcast episodes about Drawing

New Books in African American Studies
Tyler D. Parry, "Jumping the Broom: The Surprising Multicultural Origins of a Black Wedding Ritual" (UNC Press, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 118:56


In Jumping the Broom: The Surprising Multicultural Origins of a Black Wedding Ritual (UNC Press, 2020), Tyler D. Parry untangles the convoluted history of the "broomstick wedding." Popularly associated with African American culture, Parry traces the ritual's origins to marginalized groups in the British Isles and explores how it influenced the marriage traditions of different communities on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. His surprising findings shed new light on the complexities of cultural exchange between peoples of African and European descent from the 1700s up to the twenty-first century. Drawing from the historical records of enslaved people in the United States, British Romani, Louisiana Cajuns, and many others, Parry discloses how marginalized people found dignity in the face of oppression by innovating and reimagining marriage rituals. Such innovations have an enduring impact on the descendants of the original practitioners. Parry reveals how and why the simple act of "jumping the broom" captivates so many people who, on the surface, appear to have little in common with each other. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 357: Mark Strand & Vladimir Nabokov

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 57:18


“The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness." - Vladimir Nabokov"If every head of state and every government official spent an hour a day reading poetry we'd live in a much more humane and decent world." - Mark Strand"If you get a stye, you'll know you're not alone." -MeLINKS:Buy Mark Strand's Collected Poems: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/236122/collected-poems-by-mark-strand/Buy Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/236122/collected-poems-by-mark-strand/Send your questions to: info@robynoneil.comMy website: www.robynoneil.comMe on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robyn_oneil/?hl=enMe on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Robyn_ONeilHandwritten Notes: https://www.instagram.com/handwrittennotesontv/

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
JobMakers: Rodrigo Souza Cooks Up Success (#40)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 22:23


This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Rodrigo Souza, immigrant from Brazil and owner of Comeketo Brazilian Steakhouse in Leominster, Massachusetts. Drawing on the resourcefulness and doggedness of his Brazilian culture, Rodrigo built a successful business here in the United States, creating around 400 jobs since his restaurant opened in 2009. Offering rodízio-style service, Comeketo won the People's Choice Award […]

Sound & Vision
Cheryl Donegan

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 100:23


Cheryl Donegan received her B.F.A. in Painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and an M.F.A. at Hunter College in New York. In her breakthrough videos of the 1990's, Donegan combined time-based, gestural media of performance and video with forms such as painting, drawing, and installation. Her work has been exhibited internationally, most recently in her first career survey at Kunsthalle Zurich (summer 2017). In June 2018, Cheryl opened another survey of her works from 2009 to present at the Aspen Museum of Art, traveling to Contemporary Art Museum in Houston in 2019. Other venues include a one person exhibitions at The New Museum, New York City (2016), the 1995 Whitney Biennial, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Tang Museum of Art, New York Film and Video Festival, 1993 Venice Biennale, and the1995  Biennale d'Art Contemporain de Lyon, France, in addition to many individual and group exhibitions in Europe and America. Cheryl was a faculty member in the Fine Arts Department at the School of Visual Art, New York from 1997-2013. She has been a seminar leader and guest critic at Yale University, was a faculty member at Skowhegan School of Drawing and Painting, Summer 2011 and a visiting artist/lecturer at numerous art programs in the United States. She lives in New York and in Istria. Sound & Vision is sponsored by www.goldenpaints.com and fulcrumcoffee.com You can visit Fulcrum and get the new tin I made artwork for on their site.

Locked On Gators - Daily Podcast On Florida Gators Football & Basketball
Florida Gators Quarterback Anthony Richardson Scouting Report - Senior Bowl, Gators vs Volunteers

Locked On Gators - Daily Podcast On Florida Gators Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 28:24


Florida Gators Head Coach Billy Napier is looking for his starting quarterback, and he may have it in Anthony Richardson. Drawing comparisons to Cam Newton, Josh Allen, Patrick Mahomes, and Tim Tebow leaves Richardson with high expectations. Three Florida Gators will be represented at the Senior Bowl. The Florida Gators men's basketball team lost once again, this time to the Tennessee Volunteers. Just how good is Anthony Richardson? Which Florida Gators player will shine at the Senior Bowl? Can the Florida Gators men's basketball team rebound? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. GetUpside Just download the FREE GetUpside App and use promo code SCORE to get 25 cents per gallon or more cash back on your first tank. Florida Gators Quarterback Anthony Richardson Scouting Report - Senior Bowl, Gators vs Volunteers Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Art Prof
Soft PASTEL Drawing Tutorial: Food Illustration

Art Prof

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 66:16


This video is a step by step drawing demo of soft pastel techniques for drawing a still life scene. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/2cXlA23Bfnw. The development of the drawing is explained from scratch, explaining in depth the technical aspects of the drawing process and the creative decisions that are made along the way. Demo led by Art Prof Clara Lieu. Support Art Prof on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/artprof  or make a one-time donation: https://www.paypal.me/artprof 

Captivate the Room
The Real You with Laura Schoenfeld

Captivate the Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 67:11


Welcome to the show! You are in for a treat today!. One of my former students, Laura Schoenfeld is with me today and she is really bringing some amazing wisdom about business and voice to the conversation. In today's episode, Laura and I have a candid talk about all things business, business as an expectant mother, and the voice traps that have the potential to cost us. We decided toward the end of the conversation that all the themes of this episode seemed to be pointing back to how essential it is to show up as the real you. I LOVE this conversation and I know you will too!   Laura's Bio Laura Schoenfeld is a Registered Dietitian (RD), women's health expert, and business coach for integrative and functional dietitians and nutritionists. Her mission is to educate women on how to nourish their bodies, minds, and spirits and help nutrition professionals grow and scale a successful business.  A specialist trained in functional medical nutrition therapy, she has helped hundreds of women optimize their hormone and gut health while allowing for flexibility in their diet and lifestyle choices. Drawing on her background as a teaching assistant and mentor for the Kresser Institute's ADAPT functional practitioner program, Laura has coached dozens of dietitians and nutritionists on how to grow their businesses for financial success. She has contributed to Prevention Magazine, Reader's Digest, MindBodyGreen, and Experience Life Magazine, and been featured on The Listen To Your Body Podcast, Fertility Friday, Ben Greenfield Fitness, The Paleo Solution Podcast, and the Food Heaven Podcast. Find out more about Laura and her upcoming program at: https://www.lauraschoenfeld.com Follow Laura on Instagram at: @lauraschoenfeldrd

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: Russian troops have occupied since 2014. @PaulR_Gregory @HooverInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 9:30


Photo:  Nicholas Samokish. Drawing from the album "Maneuvers in the South-Western Territory in 1890". Edition of the cartographic institution A. Ilyin #Ukraine: Russian troops have occupied since 2014. @PaulR_Gregory @HooverInst https://thehill.com/opinion/international/591150-negotiating-with-a-liar-putins-dog-is-a-cat?rl=1

Draws in Spanish |  Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers
10: Argentinian Cartoonist & Illustrator Pepita Sandwich

Draws in Spanish | Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 71:43


Pepita Sandwich grew up feeling like she couldn't be an artist because her work wasn't realistic enough. Josefina — who goes by her nickname Pepita Sandwich — is a Brooklyn-based illustrator and cartoonist who loves to capture “crappy magic” and nostalgic emotions with her creative work.She was raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina and grew up visiting art museums and eating endless amounts of ice cream at her grandfather's ice cream shop. Pepita pursued a degree in Fashion Design from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, but after graduation, she quickly followed her passion for illustration and comics.Once she published Survival Diaries in 2016, she made her way to the US to pursue an MFA in cartooning at The Center for Cartoon Studies in Vermont. While studying for her MFA, she wrote and published her second book, Women Move Mountains, with Penguin Random House. She's gone on to work with clients such as The Washington Post, The New Yorker, and Adidas.In this episode, we go over how she discovered cartooning and illustration, why she decided to move to the US, the pressure that comes with sharing your work on social media, and why she just loves to cry.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Growing up in Buenos Aires with an Art Historian mother and Engineer FatherFrequenting Art Museums in her childhood and how it impacted her workFeeling the pressure of being a “Fine Artist”Graduating with a Fashion Design degree from Universidad de Buenos AiresHow to explain a creative career to your parents and familyThe pros and cons of the rise of social mediaDealing with social media comparison and toxicityPursuing an MFA in Comics at The Center for Cartoon Studies in VermontPublishing Women Move Mountains in 2019 and Survival Diaries in 2016Experiencing culture shock from moving from Buenos Aires to VermontThe origin story of the name Pepita SandwichMaking bilingual comics in order to expand her audience and reach the US marketDeveloping a book on crying and the associated taboos of cryingLaunching her new class about having a visual diary to capture a feelingGuest InfoCheck out Pepita's Instagram, Patreon, and new visual diary course on Domestika.Special OfferListeners of the podcast can get a free, undated weekly and monthly planner inspired by the show from our website here.Follow Host Fabiola Lara between episodes:InstagramYoutubeTikTok

Screaming in the Cloud
Drawing from the Depths of Experience with Deirdré Straughan

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 41:12


About DeirdréFor over 35 years, Deirdré Straughan has been helping technologies grow and thrive through marketing and community. Her product experience spans consumer apps and devices, cloud services and technologies, and kernel features. Her toolkit includes words, websites, blogs, communities, events, video, social, marketing, and more. She has written and edited technical books and blog posts, filmed and produced videos, and organized meetups, conferences, and conference talks. She just started a new gig heading up open source community at Intel. You can find her @deirdres on Twitter, and she also shares her opinions on beginningwithi.comLinks: “Marketing Your Tech Talent”: https://youtu.be/9pGSIE7grSs Personal Webpage: https://beginningwithi.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/deirdres TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is, in AWS, with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem, and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai, and Stax have seen significant results by using them, and it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the best parts about running this podcast has been that I can go through old notes of conferences I've went to, and the people whose talks I've seen, the folks who have done interesting things that back when I had no idea what I was doing—as if I do now—and these are people I deeply admire. And now I have an excuse to reach out to them and drag them onto this show to basically tell them that until they blush. And today is no exception for that. Deirdré Straughan has had a career that has spanned three decades, I believe, if I'm remembering correctly.Deirdré: A bit more, even.Corey: Indeed. And you've been in I want to say marketing, but I'm scared to frame it that way, not because that's not what you've been doing, but because so few people do marketing to technical audiences well, that the way you do it is so otherworldly good compared to what is out there that it almost certainly gives the wrong impression. So, first things first. Thank you for joining me.Deirdré: Very happy to. Thank you for having me. It's always a delight to talk with you.Corey: So, what is it you'd say it is you do, exactly? Because I'm doing a very weak job of explaining it in a way that is easy for folks who have never heard of you before—which is a failing—to contextualize?Deirdré: Um, well, there's one—you know, I was until recently working for AWS, and one of the—went to an internal conference once at which they said—it was a marketing conference, and they said, “As the marketing organization, our job is to educate.” Now, you can discuss whether or not we think AWS does that well, but I deeply agree with that statement, that as marketers, our job is to educate people. You know, the classical marketing is to educate people about the benefits of your product. You know, “Here's why ours is better.” The Kathy Sierra approach to that, which I think is very, very wise is, don't market your product by telling people how wonderful the product is. Tell them how they can kick ass with it.Corey: How do you wind up disambiguating between that and, let's just say it's almost a trope at this point where someone will talk about something, be it a product, be it an entire Web3 thing, whatever, and when someone comes back and says, “Well, I don't think that's a great idea.” The response is, “Oh, no, no. You just need to be educated properly about it.” Or, “Do your own research.” That sort of thing. And that is to be clear, not anything I've ever seen you say, do, or imply. But that almost feels like the wrong direction to take that in, of educating folks.Deirdré: Well, yeah, I mean, the way it's used in those terms, it sounds condescending. In my earliest, earlier part of my career, I was dealing with consumer software. So, this was in the early days of CD recording. We were among the pioneering CD recording products, and the idea was to make it—my Italian boss saw this market coming because he was doing recording CDs as a service, like, you were a law firm that needed to store a lot of data, and he would cut a CD for you, and you would store that. And you know, this was on a refrigerator-sized thing with a command-line interface, very difficult to use, very easy to waste these $100 blank CDs.But he was following the market, and he saw that there was going to be these half-height CD-ROM drives. And he said, “Well, what we need to go with that is software that is actually usable by the consumer.” And that's what we did; we created that software. And so in that case, there were things the customer still had to know about CDR, but my approach was that, you know, I do the documentation, I have to explain this stuff, but I should have to explain less and less. More and more of that should be driven into the interface and just be so obvious and intuitive that nobody ever has to read a manual. So, education can be any of those things. Your software can be educating the customer while they're using it.Corey: I wish that were one of those things we could point out and say, “Well, yeah, years later, it's blindingly obvious to everyone.” Except for the part where it's not, where every once in a while on Twitter, I will go and try a new service some cloud company launches, or something else I've heard about, and I will, effectively, screenshot and then live tweet my experiences with it. And very often—I'll get accused of people saying, “Ahh, you're pretending to be dumb and not understanding that's how that interface works.” No, I'm not. It turns out that the failure mode of bad interfaces and of not getting this right is not that people look at it and say, “Ah, that product is crap.” It's that, “Oh, I'm dumb, and no one ever told me about it.”That's why I'm so adamant about this. Because if I'm looking at an interface and I get something wrong, it is extremely unlikely that I'm the only person who ever has. And it goes beyond interfaces, it goes out to marketing as well with poor messaging around a product—when I say marketing, I'm talking the traditional sense of telling a story, and here's a press release. “Great. You've told me what it does, you told me about big customers and the rest, but you haven't told me what painful problem do I have that it solves? And why should I care about it?” Almost like that's the foregone conclusion.No, no. We're much more interested in making sure that they get the company name and history right in the ‘About Us' at the bottom of the press release. And it's missing the forest for the trees, in many respects. It's—Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: —some level—it suffers from a similar problem of sales, where you have an entire field that is judged based upon some of the worst examples out there. And on the technical side of the world—and again, all these roles are technical, but the more traditional, ‘I write code for a living' types, there's almost a condescension or a dismissiveness that is brought toward people who work in sales, or in marketing, or honestly, anything that doesn't spend all their time staring into an IDE for a living. You know, the people who get to do something that makes them happy, as opposed to this misery that the coder types that we sometimes find ourselves trapped into. How have you seen that?Deirdré: Yeah. And it's also a condescension towards customers.Corey: Oh absolutely.Deirdré: I have seen so many engineers who will, you know, throw something out there and say, “This is the most beautiful, sexy, amazing thing I've ever done.” And there have been a few occasions when I've looked at it and gone, you know, “Yes, I can see how from a technical point of view, that's beautiful and amazing and sexy, but no customer is ever going to use it.” Either because they don't need it or because they won't understand it. There's no way in that context to have that make sense. And so yeah, you can do beautiful, brilliant engineering, but if you never sell it and no one ever uses it, what's the point?Corey: One am I of the ways that I've always found to tell a story that resonates—and it sometimes takes people by surprise when they're doing a sponsorship or something I do, or whatnot, and they're sitting there talking about how awesome everything is, and hey, let's do a webinar together. And it's cool, we can do that, but I'd rather talk to one of your customers because you can say anything you want about your product, and I can sit here and make fun of it because I have deep-seated personality problems, and that's great. But when a customer says, “I have this problem, and this is the thing that I pay money for to fix that problem,” it is much harder for people to dismiss that because you're voting with your dollars. You're not saying this because if your product succeeds, you get to go buy a car or something. Now, someone instead is saying this because, “I had a painful point, and not only am I willing to pay money to make this painful thing go away, but then I want to go out in public and talk about that.”That is an incredibly hard thing to refute, bordering on the impossible, in some circumstances. That's what always moved me. If you have a customer telling stories about how great something is, I will listen. If you have your own internal employees talking about great something is, I have some snark for you.Deirdré: And that is another thing AWS gets right, is they—Corey: Oh, very much so.Deirdré: —work very hard to get the customer in front of the audience. Although, with a new technology service, et cetera, there was a point before you may have those customers in which the other kind of talk, where you have a highly technical engineer speaking to a highly technical audience and saying, “Here's our shiny new thing and here's what you can do with it,” then you get the customers who will come along later and say, “Yes, we did thing with the shiny new thing, and it was great.” An engineer talking about what they did is not always to be overlooked.Corey: Your career trajectory has been fascinating to me in a variety of different ways. You were at Sun Microsystems. And I guess personally, I just hope that when you decide to write your memoirs, you title it, The Sun Also Crashes. You know, it's such a great title; I haven't seen anything use it yet, and I hope I live to see someone doing that.And then you were at Oracle for ten months—wonder how that happened? For those who are unaware, there was an acquisition story—and then you went to spend three-and-a-half years running educational programs and community at Joyent, back before. Community architect—which is what you were at the time—was really a thing. Community was just the people that showed up to talk about the technology that you've done. You were one of the first people that I can think of in this industry when I've been paying attention, who treated it as something more than that. How do you get there?Deirdré: So, my early career, I was living in Italy because I was married to an Italian at the time, and I had already been working in tech before I left the United States, and enjoyed it and wanted to continue it. But there was not much happening in tech in Italy then. And I just got very, very lucky; I fell in with this Italian software entrepreneur—absolute madman—and he was extremely unusual in Italy in those days. He was basically doing a Silicon Valley-style software startup in Milan. And self-funded, partly funded by his wealthy girlfriend. You know, we were small, scrappy, all of that. And so he decided that he could make better software to do CD recording, as these CD-ROM drives were becoming cheaper, and he could foresee that there would be a consumer market for them.Corey: What era was this? Because I remember—Deirdré: This—Corey: —back when I was in school, basically when I was failing out of college, burning a bunch of CDRs to play there, and every single tool I ever used was crap. You're right. This was a problem.Deirdré: So, we started on that software in, ohh, '91.Corey: Yeah.Deirdré: Yeah. His goal was, “I'm going to make the leading CD recording software for the Windows market.” Hired a bunch of smart engineers, of which there are plenty in Italy, and started building this thing. I had done a project for him, documenting another OCR—Optical Character Recognition—product, and he said, “How would you like to write a book together about CD recording?” And it's like, “Okay, sure.”So, we wrote this book, and, you know, it was like, basically, me reading and him explaining to me the various color book specs from Philips and Sony that explain, you know, right down to the pits and lands, how CD recording works, and then me translating it into layman's terms. And so the book got published in January of 1993 by Random House. It's one of the first books, if not the first book in the world to actually be published with a CD included.Corey: Oh, so you're ultimately the person who's responsible—indirectly—for hey, you could send CDs out, and then the sea of AOL mailers showing up—basically the mini-frisbee plague that lasted a decade or so, for the rest of us?Deirdré: Yeah. And this was all marketing. For him, the whole idea of writing a book was a marketing ploy because on the CD, we included a trial version of the software. And that was all he wanted to put on there, but I thought, “Well, let's take this a step further.” This was—I had been also doing a little bit of work in journalism, just to scrape by in Italy.I was actually an Italian computer journalist, and I was getting sent to conferences, including the launch of Adobe PDF. Like, they sent me to Scotland to learn about PDFs. Like, “Okay.” But then it wasn't quite ready at the time, so I ended up using FrameMaker instead. But I made an entire hypertext version of that book and put it on that CD, which was launched in early '93 when the internet was barely becoming a thing.So, we launched the book, sold the book. Turned out the CD had been manufactured wrong and did not work.Corey: Oh, dear.Deirdré: And I was just dying. And the publisher said, “Well, you know, if you can get ahold of the readers, the people”—you know, because they were getting complaints—they said, “If you can reach the readers somehow and let them know, there's a number they can call and we'll send them a replacement disk.” We had put our CompuServe email address in the book. It's like, “Hey, we'd love to hear from you. Write to us at”—Corey: Weren't those the long string of numbers as a username.Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: Yeah.Deirdré: Mm-hm. You could reach it via external email at the time, I believe. And we didn't really expect that many people would bother. But, you know, because there was this problem, we were getting a lot of contacts. And so I was like, I was determined I was going to solve this situation, and I was interacting with them.And those were my first experiences with interacting with customers, especially online. You know, and we did have a solution; we were able to defuse the situation and get it fixed, but, you know, so that was when I realized it was very powerful because I could communicate very quickly with people anywhere in the world, and—quickly over whatever the modem speed was [laugh] at that time, you know, 1800 baud or something. And so I got intr—I had already been using CompuServe when I was in college, and so I was interested in how do you communicate with people in this new medium.And I started applying that to my work. And then I went and applied it everywhere. It's like, “Okay, well, there's this new thing coming, you know, called the internet. Well, how can I use that?” Publishing a paper manual seems kind of stupid in this day and age, so I can update them much more quickly if I have it on a website.So, by that time, the company had been acquired by Adaptec. Adaptec had a website, which was mostly about their cables and things, and so I just, kind of, made a section of the website. It was like, “Here is all about CDR.” And it got to where it was driving 70% of the traffic to Adaptec, even though our products were a small percentage of the revenue. And at the same time, I was interacting with customers on the Usenet and by email.Corey: And then later, mailing lists, and the rest. And now it—we take it for granted, but it used to be that so much of this was unidirectional, where at an absolute high level, the best you could hope for in some cases is, “I really have something to say to this author. I'm going to write a letter and mail it to the publisher and hope that they forward it.” And you never really know if it's going to wind up landing or not? Now it's, “I'm going to jump on Twitter and tell this person what I think.”And whether that's a good or bad change, it has changed the world. And it's no longer unidirectional where your customers just silent masses anymore, regardless of what you wind up doing or selling. And I sell consulting services. Yeah, I deal with customers a lot; we have high bandwidth conversations, but I also do an annual charity t-shirt drive and I get a lot of feedback and a lot of challenges with deliveries in the rest toward the end of the year. And that is something else. We have to do it. It's not what it used to be just mail a self-addressed stamped envelope to somewhere, and hope for the best. And we'll blame the post office if it doesn't work. The world changed, and it's strange that happens in your own lifetime.Deirdré: Yeah. And there were people who saw it coming, early on. I became aware of The Cluetrain Manifesto because a customer wrote to me and said, I think you're the best example I see out there of people actually living this. And The Cluetrain Manifesto said, “The internet is going to change how companies interact with customers. You are going to have to be part of a conversation, rather than just, we talk to you and tell you what's what.” And I was already embracing that.And then it has had profound implications. It's, in some ways, a democratization of companies and their products because people can suddenly be very vociferous about what they think about your product and what they want improved, and features they'd like added, and so forth. And I never said the customer is always right, but the customer should always be treated politely. And so I just developed this—it was me, but it was a persona which was true to me, where I am out here, I'm interacting with people, I am extremely forthcoming and honest—Corey: That you are, which is always appreciated, to be clear. I have a keen appreciation for folks who I know beyond the shadow of a doubt will tell me where I stand with them. I've never been a fan of folks who will, “I can't stand that guy. Oh, great, here he comes. Hi.” No.There is something very refreshing about the way that you approach honesty, and that you have always had that. And it manifests in different forms. You are one of those people where if you say something in public, be it in writing, be it on stage, be it in your work, you believe it. There has never been a shadow of doubt in my mind that someone could pay you to say something or advocate for something in which you do not believe.Deirdré: Thanks. Yeah, it's just partly because I've never been good at lying. It just makes me so deeply uncomfortable that I can't do it. [laugh].Corey: That's what a good liar would say, let's be very clear here. Like, what's the old joke? Like, “If you can only be good at one thing, be good at lying because then you're good at everything.” No.Deirdré: [laugh].Corey: It's a terrible way to go through life.Deirdré: Yeah. And the earn trust thing was part of my… portfolio from very early on. Which was hilarious because in those days, as now, there were people whose knee-jerk reaction was, if you're out here representing a company, you automatically must be lying to me, or about to lie to me, or have lied to me. But because I had been so out there and so honest, I had dozens of supporters who would pile in and say, “No, no, no. That's not who she is.” And so it was, yeah, it was interesting. I had my trolls but I also had lots of defenders.Corey: The real thing that I've seen as well sometimes is when someone is accused of something like that, people will chime in—look, like, I get this myself. People like you. I don't generally have that problem—but people will chime in with, like, “I don't like Corey, but no, he's generally right about these things.” That's, okay, great. It's like, the backhanded compliment. And I'll take what I can get.I want to fast-forward in time a little bit from the era of mailing books with CDs in them, and then having to talk to people via other ways to get them in CompuServe to 2013 when you gave a talk at one of—no, I'm not going to say, ‘one of.' It is the best community conference of which I am aware. Monktoberfest as put on by our friends at RedMonk. It was called “Marketing Your Tech Talent” and it's one of those videos it's worth the watch. If you're listening to this, and you haven't seen it, you absolutely should fix that. Tell me about it. Where did the talk come from?Deirdré: As you can see in the talk, it was stuff I had been doing. It actually started earlier than that. When I joined Sun Microsystems as a contractor in 2007, my remit was to try to get Sun engineers to communicate. Like, Sun had done this big push around blogging, they'd encourage everybody to open up your own blog. Here's our blogging platform, you can say whatever you want.And there were, like, 3000 blogs, about half of which were just moribund; they had put out one or two posts, and then nothing ever again. And for some reason—I don't know who decided—but they decided that engineers had goals around this and engineering teams had to start producing content in this way, which was a strange idea. So, I was brought on. It's, like, you know, “Help these engineers communicate. Help them with blogging, and somehow find a way to get them doing it.”And so I did a whole bunch of things from, like, running competitions to just going and talking to people. But we finally got to where Dan Maslowski, who was the manager who hired me in, he said, “Well, we've got this conference. It was the SNIA, the Storage Networking Industries Association Conference. We're a big sponsor, we've got, like, ten talks. And why don't you just go—you know, I'm going to buy you a video camera, go record this thing.”And I'd used a video camera a little bit, but, you know, it's like, never in this context, so it's like, okay, let's figure out, you know, what kind of mic do I need? And so I went off to the conference with my video blogging rig, and videoed all those talks. And then the idea was like, “Okay, we'll put them up on”—you know, Sun had its own video channels and things—“We'll put it out there, and this information will then be available to more people; it'll help the engineers communicate what they're doing.”And the funny part was, I run into with Sun, the professional video people wanted nothing to do with it. Like, “Your stuff is not high enough quality. You don't meet our branding guidelines. You cannot put this on the Sun channels.” Okay, fine. So, I started putting it on YouTube, which in those days meant splitting it into ten-minute segments because that was all they would give you. [laugh]. And so it was like, everything I was doing was guerilla marketing because I was always in the teeth on somebody in the corporation who wanted to—it's like, “Oh, we're not going to put out video unless it can be slickly produced in the studio, and we're only going to do that for VPs, not for engineers.”Corey: Oh, yeah. The little people, as it were. This talk, in many ways—I don't know if ever told you this story or not—but it did shape how I approached building out my entire approach: The sponsorship side of the business that I have, how I approach communicating with people. And it's where in many ways, the newsletter has taken its ethos. One of the things that you mentioned in that talk was, first, you were actually the first time that I ever saw someone explicitly comparing the technical talent slash DevRel—which is not a term I would call it, but all right—to the Hollywood model, where you have this idea that there's an agent that winds up handling these folks that are freelancers. They are named talent. They're the ones that have the draw; that's what people want, so we have to develop this.Okay, what why is it important to develop this? Because you absolutely need to have your technical people writing technical content, not folks who are divorced from that entire side of the world because it doesn't resonate, it doesn't land. This is I think, what DevRel was sort of been turned into; it's, what it DevRel? Well, it's special marketing because engineers need special handling to handle these things. No, I think it's everyone needs to be marketed to in a way that has authenticity that meets them where they are, and that's a little harder to do with people who spend their lives writing code than it would be someone who is it was at a more accessible profession.But I don't think that a lot of it's being done right. This was the first encouragement that I'd gotten early on that maybe I am onto something here because here's someone I deeply respect saying a lot of the same things—from a slightly different angle; like I was never doing this as part of a large technology company—but it was still, there's something here. And for better or worse. I think I've demonstrated by now that there is some validity there. But back then it was transformational.Deirdré: Well, thank you.Corey: It still kind of is in many respects. This is all new to someone.Deirdré: Yeah. I felt, you know, I'd been putting engineers in front of the public and found it was powerful, and engineers want to hear from other engineers. And especially for companies like Sun and Oracle and Joyent, we're selling technology to other technologists. So, there's a limited market for white papers because VPs and CEOs want to read those, but really, your main market is other technologists and that's who you need to talk to and talk to them in their own way, in their own language. They weren't even comfortable with slickly produced videos. Neither being on the camera nor watching it.Corey: Yeah, at some point, it was like, “I look too good.” It's like, “Oh, yeah. It's—oh, you're going to do a whole video production thing? Great.” “Okay. [unintelligible 00:24:13] the makeup artists coming in.” Like, “What do you mean makeup?” And it's—Deirdré: Oh, it was worse at Sun. We wasted so much money because you would get an engineer and put him in the studio under all these lights with these great big cameras, and they would just freeze.Corey: Mmm.Deirdré: And it's like, you know, “Well, hurry up, hurry up. We've got half an hour of studio time. Get your thing; say it.” And, [frantic noise]. You know, whereas I would take them in some back conference room and just set up a camera and be sitting in a chair opposite. It's like, “Relax. Tell me what you want to tell me. If we have to do ten takes, it's fine.” Yeah, video quality wasn't great, but the content was great.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key or a shared admin account isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And no, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: Speaking of content, one more topic I want to cover a little bit here is you recently left your job at AWS. And even if you had not told me that, I would have known because your blog has undergone something of a renaissance—beginningwithi.com for those who want to follow along, and of course, we'll put links to this in the [show notes 00:25:08]—you've been suddenly talking about a lot of different things. And I want to be clear, I don't recall any of these posts being one of those, “I just left a company, I'm going to set them on fire now.”It's been about a variety of different topics, though, that have been very top-of-mind for folks. You talk about things like equal work for equal pay. You talk about remote work versus cost of commuting a fair bit. And as of this recording, you most recently wound up talking specifically about problematic employers in tech. But what you're talking about is also something that this happened during the days of the Sun acquisition through Oracle.So, people are thinking, like, “Wait a minute, is she subtweeting what happened today”—no. These things rhyme and they repeat. I'm super thrilled whenever I see this in my RSS reader, just because it is so… they oh, good. I get I'm going to read something now that I'm going to enjoy, so let me put this in distraction-free mode and really dig into it. Because your writing is a joy.What is it that has inspired you to bring that back to life? Is it just to having a whole bunch of free time, and well, I'm not writing marketing stocks anymore, so I guess I'm going to write blog posts instead.Deirdré: My blog, if you looked at our calendar, over the years, it sort of comes and goes depending what else is going on in my life. I actually was starting to do a little bit more writing, and I even did a few little TikTok videos before I quit AWS. I'm starting to think about some of the more ancient history parts of my career. It's partly just because of what's been going on in the world. [Brendan 00:26:35] and I moved to Australia a year ago, and it was something that had been planned for a long time.We did not actually expect that we would be able to move our jobs the way we did. And then, you know, with pandemic, everything changed; that actually accelerated our departure timeline because we've been planning initially to let our son stay in school in California, through until he finished elementary, but then he wasn't in school, so there seems no point, whereas in Australia, he could be in a classroom. And so, you know, the whole world is changing, and the working world is changing, but also, we all started working from home. I've been working from home—mostly—since 1993. And I was working very remotely because I was working from Italy for a California company.And because I was one of the first people doing it, the people in California did not know what to make of me. And I would get people who would just completely ignore any emails I sent. It was like as if I did not exist because they had never seen me in person. So, I would just go to California four times a year and spend a few weeks, and then I would get the face time, and after that it was easy to interact any way I needed to.Corey: It feels like it's almost the worst kind of remote because you have most people at office, and then you have a few outliers, and that tends to, in my experience at least, lead to a really weird team dynamics where you have almost a second class of folks who aren't taken nearly as seriously. It's why when we started our company here, it was everyone is going to be remote all the time. We were distributed. There is no central office because as soon as you do, that's where things are disastrous. My business partner and I live a couple states apart.Deirdré: Yeah. And I think that's the fairest way to do it. In companies that have already existed, where they do have headquarters, and you know, there's that—Corey: Yeah, you can't suddenly sell your office space, and all 300,000 employees [laugh] are now working from home. That's a harder thing, too.Deirdré: Yeah. But I think it's interesting that the argument is being framed as like, “Oh, people work better in the office, people learn more in the office.” And we've even had the argument trotted out here that people should be forced back to the office because the businesses in the central business district depend on that. It's like—Corey: Mmm.Deirdré: —well, what about the businesses that have since, you know in the meantime sprung up in the more suburban centers? Now, you've got some thriving little cafes out there now? Are we supposed to just screw them over? It's ultimately people making economic arguments that have nothing to do with the well-being of employees. And the pandemic at least has—I think, a lot of people have come to realize that life is just too short to put up with a lot of bullshit, and by and large, commuting is bullshit. [laugh].Corey: It's a waste of time, it's not great for the environment, there's—yeah, and again, I'm not sitting here saying the entire world should do a particular thing. I don't think that there's one-size-fits-everyone solutions possible in this space. Some companies, it makes sense for the people involved to be in the same room. In some cases, it's not even optional. For others, there's no value to it, but getting there is hard.And again, different places need to figure out what's right for them. But it's also the world is changing, and trying to pretend that it hasn't, it just feels regressive, and I don't think that's going to align with where the industry and where people are going. Especially in full remote situations we've had the global pandemic, some wit on Twitter recently opined that it's never been easier for a company to change jobs. You just have to wait for the different the new laptop to show up, and then you just join a different Zoom link, and you're in your new job. It's like, “You know, you're not that far from wrong here.”Deirdré: [laugh]. Yep.Corey: There's no, like, “Well, where's the office? What's the”—no. It is, my day-to-day looks remarkably similar, regardless of where I work.Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: That means something.Deirdré: I was one of the early beneficiaries as well of this work-life balance, that I could take my kid to school in the morning, and then work, and then pick her up from school in the afternoon and spend time with her. And then California would be waking up for meetings, so after dinner, I'd be having meetings. Yeah, sometimes it was pain, but it was workable, and it gave me more flexibility, you know, whereas the times I had to commute to an office… tended to be hellish. I think part of the reason the blog has had a lot more activities I've just been in sort of a more reflective phase. I've gotten to this very privileged position where I suddenly realized, I actually have enough money to retire on, I have a husband who is extremely supportive of whatever I want to do, and I'm in a country that has a public health care system, if it doesn't completely crumble under COVID in the next few weeks.Corey: Hopefully, we'll get this published before that happens.Deirdré: Yes. And so I don't have to work. It's like, up to this point in my career, I have always desperately needed that next job. I don't think I have ever been in the position of having competing offers. You know, there's people who talk about, you know, you can always go find a better offer. It's like, no, when you're a weirdo like me and you're a middle-aged woman, is not that easy.Corey: People saying that invariably—“So, what is your formal job?” Like, “Oh, SDE3.” Like, okay, great. So, that means that they're are mul—not just, they don't probably need to hire you; they need to hire so many of you that they need to start segregating them with Roman numerals. Great.Maybe that doesn't apply to everyone. Maybe that particular skill set right now is having its moment in the sun, but there's a lot of other folks who don't neatly fit into those boxes. There's something to be said for empathy. Because this is my lived experience does not mean it is yours. And trying to walk a mile in someone else's shoes is almost increasingly—especially in the world of social media—a bit of a lost skill.Deirdré: [laugh]. I mean, it's partly that recruiters are not always the sharpest tools in the shed, and/or they're very young, very new to it all. It's just people like to go for what's easy. And like, for example, me at the moment, it's easy to put me in that product marketing manager box. It's like, “Oh, I need somebody to fill that slot. You look like that person. Let's talk.” Whereas before, people would just look at my resume and go, “I don't know what she is.”Corey: I really think the fact that you've never had competing offers just shows an extreme lack of vision from a number of companies around what marketing effectively to a technical audience can really be. It's nice to see that what you have been advocating for and doing the work for, for your entire career is really coming into its own now.Deirdré: Yeah. We'll see what happens next. It's been interesting. Yeah, I've never had so much attention from recruiters as when I got AWS on my resume. And then even more once it said, product marketing manager because, you know, “Okay. You've got the FAANG and you've got a title we recognize. Let's talk to you.”Corey: Exactly. That's, “Oh, yay. You fit in that box, finally.” Because it's always been one of those. Yeah, like, “What is it you actually do?” There's a reason that I've built what I do now into the last job I'll ever have. Because I don't even know where to begin describing me to what I do and how I do it. Even at cocktail parties, there's nothing I can say that doesn't sound completely surreal. “I make fun of Amazon for a living.” It's true, but it also sounds psychotic, and here we are. It's—Deirdré: Well, it's absolutely brilliant marketing, and it's working very well for you. So [laugh].Corey: The realization that I had was that if this whole thing collapsed and I had to get a job again, what would I be doing? It probably isn't engineering. It's almost certainly much more closely aligned with marketing. I just hope I never have to find out because, honestly, I'm having way too much fun.Deirdré: Yeah. And that's another thing I think is changing. I think more and more of us are realizing working for other people has its limitations. You know, it can be fun, it can be exciting, depending on the company, and the team, and so on. But you're very much beholden to the culture of the company, or the team, or whatever.I grew up in Asia, as a child, of American expats. So, I'm what is called a third culture kid, which means I'm not totally American, even though my parents were. I'm not—you know, I grew up in Thailand, but I'm not Thai. I grew up in India, but I'm not Indian. You're something in between.And your tribe is actually other people like you, even if they don't share the specific countries. Like, one of my best friends in Milan was a woman who had grown up in Brazil and France. It's like, you know, no countries in common, but we understood that experience. And something I've been meaning to write about for a long time is that third culture kids tend to be really good at adapting to any culture, which can include corporate cultures.So, every time I go into a new company, I'm treating that as a new cultural experience. It's like, Ericsson was fascinating. It's this very old Swedish telecom, with this wild old history, and a footprint in something like 190 countries. That makes it amazingly unique and fascinating. The thing I tripped over was I did not know anything about Swedish culture because they give cultural training to the people who are actually going to be moving to Sweden.Corey: But not the people working elsewhere, even though you're at a—Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: Yeah, it's like, well, dealing with New Yorkers is sort of its own skill, or dealing with Israelis, which is great; they have great folks, but it's a fun culture of management by screaming, in my experience, back when I had family living out there. It was great.Deirdré: One of my favorite people at AWS is Israeli. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. And it's, you have to understand some cultural context here. And now to—even if you're not sitting in the same place. Yeah, we're getting better as an industry, bit by bit, brick by brick. I just hope that will wind up getting there within my lifetime, at least.I really want to thank you for taking the time to come on the show. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Deirdré: Oh. Well, as you said, my website beginningwithi.com, and I am on Twitter as @deirdres. That's D-E-I-R-D-R-E-S. [laugh]. So.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:36:23].Deirdré: So yeah, I'm pretty out there, pretty easy to find, and happy to chat with people.Corey: Which I highly recommend. Thank you again, for being so generous with your time, not just now, but over the course of your entire career.Deirdré: Well, I'm at a point where sometimes I can help people, and I really like to do that. The reason I ever aspired to high corporate office—which I've now clearly I'm not ever going to make—was because I wanted to be in a position to make a difference. And so, even if all the difference I'm making is a small one, it's still important to me to try to do that.Corey: Thank you again. I really do appreciate your time.Deirdré: Okay. Well, it was great talking to you. As always.Corey: Likewise. Deirdré Straughan, currently gloriously unemployed. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that you mailed to me on a CDR that doesn't read.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast
Catia Chien - The Intuitive Illustrator

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 79:48


In this episode, illustrator Cátia Chen joins Jake Parker and Lee White to discuss art school, balancing parenthood and a career, and how what you do matters more than what you say.Sign up for SVSLearn's 30 Day Trial: https://courses.svslearn.com/bundles/30-days-free3 Point Perspective Podcast is sponsored by SVSLearn.com, the place where becoming a great illustrator starts!Click here for this episode's links and shownotes.

The John Batchelor Show
Texts from Tonga. @CleoPaskal @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 9:40


Photo:  Drawing of the coast of Niuatoputapu, in Tonga. Texts from Tonga. @CleoPaskal @FDD https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/business/article257613788.html

What The Func?!
EPISODE 94: THE MENTAL SIDE OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, WITH PHYSICAL THERAPIST DR. DAVID MEYER

What The Func?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 64:17


Laura and Clayton chat with sports and mental performance physical therapist and author Dr. David Meyer. Drawing from his experience as a former MLB Rehab Coordinator, David integrates the mental side into physical rehabilitation and helps Laura and Clayton think about healing in a new way. On What The Health?!: Splish, splash I was taking a bath... in a forest. What The Func?! is produced by the Functional Medicine Coaching Academy.  Heal your gut this year. Try Gut Garden for a 15% discount: Code WTF15 at https://gut-garden.myshopify.com/?rfsn=5804301.343c4a  Follow Dr. David Meyer on IG @davemmeyer Follow us on IG @whatthefunc

The Inner Cities Podcast
You're On Your Own

The Inner Cities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 73:07


Tochi and Zell grade 46's first year in office. They discuss Biden's (almost) 2 hour long press and rate his accomplishments and mistakes. Plus, Microsoft's $68B+ purchase of gaming giant, Activision/Blizzard, what it means for gamers and the "metaverse." Also, all this month you can enter to win a signed copy of Tochi's new book, GOLIATH. Tweet about one of the topics from this week's show using #InnerCitiesPod and tag @azellwill and you'll be entered to win. One entry per Twitter account per week. All entries must be sent by 2/3 at 12PM PST.  Drawing for the 5 signed copies will happen on 2/5.We want to hear from you! Let us know if you agree, disagree, or have question for Tochi or Zell. InnerCitizens@gmail.com. Thanks for subscribing, downloading, and listening! Text the show to your friends and tell them to check it out.Follow Tochi & Zell:On Twitter and Twitch:@TochiTrueStory@AZellWillOn Insta:@Treize64@AZellWill

Straight White American Jesus
J6 ONE YEAR LATER, Ep. 4: Shofars, Flags, and a Declaration of War

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 51:54


Dr. Leah Payne is a historian of Pentecostalism and other Christian traditions in the United States. She speaks with Brad about the overwhelming presence of charismatic Christians at the Insurrection. Drawing on her insider-scholar perspective, Dr. Payne helps decode some of the religious elements at at J6: the shofars (the horns used as instruments to declare war), the flags, and other symbols. She also explains why charismatic Christianity became such a prominent part of Trump's presidency and MAGA Nation as a whole. To Donate: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/BradleyOnishi For an ad-free experience and to support SWAJ: https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/straight-white-american-jesus-premium To become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/straightwhiteamericanjesus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Davos Man: How the Billionaires Devoured the World by Peter S. Goodman

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 54:14


Davos Man: How the Billionaires Devoured the World by Peter S. Goodman From the New York Times's Global Economics Correspondent, a masterwork of explanatory journalism that exposes how billionaires' systematic plunder of the world—brazenly accelerated during the pandemic—has transformed 21st-century life and dangerously destabilized democracy. "Davos Man will be read a hundred years from now as a warning. ... Deliciously rich with searing detail, the clarity is reminiscent of Tom Wolfe." —EVAN OSNOS The history of the last half century in America, Europe, and other major economies is in large part the story of wealth flowing upward. The most affluent people emerged from capitalism's triumph in the Cold War to loot the peace, depriving governments of the resources needed to serve their people, and leaving them tragically unprepared for the worst pandemic in a century. Drawing on decades of experience covering the global economy, award-winning journalist Peter S. Goodman profiles five representative "Davos Men"–members of the billionaire class–chronicling how their shocking exploitation of the global pandemic has hastened a fifty-year trend of wealth centralization. Alongside this reporting, Goodman delivers textured portraits of those caught in Davos Man's wake, including a former steelworker in the American Midwest, a Bangladeshi migrant in Qatar, a Seattle doctor on the front lines of the fight against COVID, blue-collar workers in the tenements of Buenos Aires, an African immigrant in Sweden, a textile manufacturer in Italy, an Amazon warehouse employee in New York City, and more. Goodman's rollicking and revelatory exposé of the global billionaire class reveals their hidden impact on nearly every aspect of modern society: widening wealth inequality, the rise of anti-democratic nationalism, the shrinking opportunity to earn a livable wage, the vulnerabilities of our health-care systems, access to affordable housing, unequal taxation, and even the quality of the shirt on your back. Meticulously reported yet compulsively readable, Davos Man is an essential read for anyone concerned about economic justice, the capacity of societies to grapple with their greatest challenges, and the sanctity of representative government.

Make Art Not Content
'Balance' Is A Dirty Word

Make Art Not Content

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 8:01


Work/Life balance doesn't work for artists. There's a better way. Want proof? Hajime Sorayama, Emma Chamberlain, Nicky Minaj, and Dan Pena. (From 'The Book Of Transformation')

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur
Len Herstein – Author of “Be Vigilant!

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 43:48


In this episode of the Road to Growth podcast, we are pleased to introduce you to Len Herstein. Len knows the danger of complacency. He just wishes he had known earlier. Now, as the author of Be Vigilant! Strategies to Stop Complacency, Improve Performance, and Safeguard Success. Your Business and Relationships Depend on It, he's on a mission to empower organizations and individuals to safeguard the success they've worked so hard to achieve.  Len has a 30+ year history in business, marketing, and entrepreneurism. Before founding ManageCamp Inc and producing 19 annual iterations of the world-acclaimed Brand ManageCamp marketing conference, Len worked in brand marketing and innovation for Coca-Cola, The Campbell Soup Company, and Nabisco.  In 2015, Len answered a higher calling to public service when he became a Reserve Sheriff's Deputy with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office in Colorado. In this volunteer position, he works up to 850 hours a year as a State-certified peace officer on the patrol team – for free. Inspired to make a positive contribution to the safety and well-being of the citizens of Douglas County, Len works to be part of the solution of creating better relationships between police and the community.  It wasn't long before Len realized he was learning valuable lessons through his law enforcement training that could be applied directly back to his business. The most important lesson, and one of the very first he learned, was the concept that complacency kills and vigilance saves. Now Len has developed actionable strategies to help business leaders stop complacency, improve performance, and safeguard success through vigilance. Drawing on his past role as a client-side brand marketer as well as his vast experience in planning and producing successful conferences (while working with some of the best speakers in the world), Len brings the principles of Be Vigilant! to life on stage to deliver transformational, entertaining, inspiring, and actionable performances, filled with engaging stories, that will amaze your audience and gives them the tools they need to recognize complacency in their business and in their life and fight it with vigilance every day.  Len received both his BS and his MBA in Marketing from Cornell University. A fan of The Leicester City Foxes of the English Premier League, The Denver Broncos, and poker, Len lives in Colorado with his wife, two daughters, and their Australian shepherd.   Learn more and connect with Len Herstein by visiting him on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lenherstein/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lenherstein Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LenHerstein Website: https://lenherstein.com/       Be sure to follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/to_growth on Facebook: facebook.com/Road2Growth   Subscribe to our podcast across the web: https://www.theenriquezgroup.com/blog Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Cdmacc iTunes: https://apple.co/2F4zAcn Castbox: http://bit.ly/2F4NfQq Google Play: http://bit.ly/2TxUYQ2 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA?view_as=subscriber   If you are looking to be a Guest on Podcasts please click below  https://kitcaster.com/rtg/  **************************************************************************** For any San Diego Real Estate Questions Please Follow Us at web: www.TheEnriquezGroup.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA or Call : 858 -345 - 7829 Recently reduced properties in San Diego County * Click **** bit.ly/3cbT65C **** Here* ****************************************************************************

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 7:34


Photo:  Mount St. Bernard dog 4/4  A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff  Hardcover – October 26, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-World-Imagining-without-Humans/dp/0691196184 What would happen to dogs if humans simply disappeared? Would dogs be able to survive on their own without us? A Dog's World imagines a posthuman future for dogs, revealing how dogs would survive―and possibly even thrive―and explaining how this new and revolutionary perspective can guide how we interact with dogs now. Drawing on biology, ecology, and the latest findings on the lives and behavior of dogs and their wild relatives, Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff―two of today's most innovative thinkers about dogs―explore who dogs might become without direct human intervention into breeding, arranged playdates at the dog park, regular feedings, and veterinary care. Pierce and Bekoff show how dogs are quick learners who are highly adaptable and opportunistic, and they offer compelling evidence that dogs already do survive on their own―and could do so in a world without us. Challenging the notion that dogs would be helpless without their human counterparts, A Dog's World enables us to understand these independent and remarkably intelligent animals on their own terms.

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 13:01


Photo:  "Artificial Woolly Figures by Tobias Stimmer and Christoph Maurer, 1605" 3/4  A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff  Hardcover – October 26, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-World-Imagining-without-Humans/dp/0691196184 What would happen to dogs if humans simply disappeared? Would dogs be able to survive on their own without us? A Dog's World imagines a posthuman future for dogs, revealing how dogs would survive―and possibly even thrive―and explaining how this new and revolutionary perspective can guide how we interact with dogs now. Drawing on biology, ecology, and the latest findings on the lives and behavior of dogs and their wild relatives, Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff―two of today's most innovative thinkers about dogs―explore who dogs might become without direct human intervention into breeding, arranged playdates at the dog park, regular feedings, and veterinary care. Pierce and Bekoff show how dogs are quick learners who are highly adaptable and opportunistic, and they offer compelling evidence that dogs already do survive on their own―and could do so in a world without us. Challenging the notion that dogs would be helpless without their human counterparts, A Dog's World 

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 8:22


Photo:   Advertisement for dogs showing „Tyras“, a dog given by Wilhelm II. to Bismarck as a birthday present in 1889 2/4  A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff  Hardcover – October 26, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-World-Imagining-without-Humans/dp/0691196184 What would happen to dogs if humans simply disappeared? Would dogs be able to survive on their own without us? A Dog's World imagines a posthuman future for dogs, revealing how dogs would survive―and possibly even thrive―and explaining how this new and revolutionary perspective can guide how we interact with dogs now. Drawing on biology, ecology, and the latest findings on the lives and behavior of dogs and their wild relatives, Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff―two of today's most innovative thinkers about dogs―explore who dogs might become without direct human intervention into breeding, arranged playdates at the dog park, regular feedings, and veterinary care. Pierce and Bekoff show how dogs are quick learners who are highly adaptable and opportunistic, and they offer compelling evidence that dogs already do survive on their own―and could do so in a world without us. Challenging the notion that dogs would be helpless without their human counterparts, A Dog's World enables us to understand these independent and remarkably intelligent animals on their own terms.

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 10:23


Photo:    Tikhmenev (18??) Dogs driving lynx 1/4  A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans, by Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff  Hardcover – October 26, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-World-Imagining-without-Humans/dp/0691196184 What would happen to dogs if humans simply disappeared? Would dogs be able to survive on their own without us? A Dog's World imagines a posthuman future for dogs, revealing how dogs would survive―and possibly even thrive―and explaining how this new and revolutionary perspective can guide how we interact with dogs now. Drawing on biology, ecology, and the latest findings on the lives and behavior of dogs and their wild relatives, Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff―two of today's most innovative thinkers about dogs―explore who dogs might become without direct human intervention into breeding, arranged playdates at the dog park, regular feedings, and veterinary care. Pierce and Bekoff show how dogs are quick learners who are highly adaptable and opportunistic, and they offer compelling evidence that dogs already do survive on their own―and could do so in a world without us. Challenging the notion that dogs would be helpless without their human counterparts, A Dog's World enables us 

Rock Talk with Mitch Lafon
Set It Off join us to talk hit song "Skeleton" and New Album "Elsewhere"

Rock Talk with Mitch Lafon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 36:58


Alternative trio  @Set It Off  delivers the high energy single/music video “Projector” on January 21st, available worldwide via Fearless Records. Following their single “Skeleton,” “Projector” further teases their upcoming album Elsewhere, which premieres on March 11th. Elsewhere promises to divulge an unseen vulnerability to Set It Off's musicality, in addition to varied moods and worlds for listeners. #SetItOff is composed of singer/lyricist  @Cody Carson  , guitarist Zach DeWall, and drummer Maxx Danziger. Drawing inspiration from a diverse swath of influences like Anderson Paak. and Michael Jackson, the genre-bending trio has never been your standard Emo band, Pop group, or even Pop-Punk band. They are all of those things and more, having developed a signature style that shakes Alternative to its core. PLEASE LIKE AND SUBSCRIBE! Donate to the channel to help create new content! https://www.paypal.me/jeremywhitepodcast The Mitch Lafon and Jeremy White Show is FREE and ON DEMAND, stream now on iHeart Radio, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts and tell your Smart Speaker "Play The Mitch Lafon and Jeremy White Show". Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jeremywhitemtl Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jeremywhitemtl Subscribe on YouTube: http://youtube.com/JeremyWhiteShow Subscribe to The Mitch Lafon and Jeremy White Show for exclusive content and interviews. © 2021. Jeremy White. All Rights Reserved. Help support the show. Please consider a donation: https://www.paypal.me/MitchLafon See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in African American Studies
Sarah Jane Cervenak, "Black Gathering: Art, Ecology, Ungiven Life" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 61:21


In Black Gathering: Art, Ecology, Ungiven Life (Duke UP, 2021), Dr. Sarah Jane Cervenak engages with Black artists and writers who create alternative spaces for Black people to gather free from interruption or regulation. Drawing together Black feminist theory, critical theories of ecology and ecoaesthetics, and Black aesthetics, Cervenak shows how novelists, poets, and visual artists such as Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison, Clementine Hunter, Samiya Bashir, and Leonardo Drew advance an ecological imagination that unsettles Western philosophical ideas of the earth as given to humans. In their aestheticization and conceptualization of gathering, these artists investigate the relationships among art, the environment, home, and forms of Black togetherness. Cervenak argues that by offering a formal and conceptual praxis of gathering, Black artists imagine liberation and alternative ways of being in the world that exist beyond those Enlightenment philosophies that presume Black people and earth as given to enclosure and ownership. Brittney Edmonds is an Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies at UW-Madison. I specialize in 20th and 21st century African American Literature and Culture with a special interest in Black Humor Studies. Read more about my work at brittneymichelleedmonds.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Social Pros Podcast
How to Use Analytics to Make Better Social Media Decisions

Social Pros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 42:03


Neil Hoyne, the Chief Measurement Strategist at Google, joins the Social Pros podcast to talk about the untapped potential of data and how marketers and social pros alike can leverage it. Huge thanks to our amazing sponsors for helping us make this happen. Please support them; we couldn't do it without their help! This week: Salesforce Marketing Cloud Full Episode Details Neil Hoyne, Chief Measurement Strategist at Google and author of the book Converted: The Data Driven Way to Win Consumers' Hearts, is on the Social Pros podcast to address an issue plaguing most organizations today — what do we do with all this data? Neil explains that the journey from one data driven decision to ten of them is a gradual and progressive one. He also discusses the need to use timely and relevant data on account of the dynamism of customer behavior. Drawing from a few excerpts from his book, Neil answers seemingly simple but pertinent questions such as “why marketers don't as the right questions” and “whether aspiring marketers should dabble in courses like psychology.” In This Episode: 06:31 - What it takes to handle the monumental amount of data available today 10:16 - Neil highlights the importance of having real-time consumer data 13:15 - Three reasons why marketers don't ask the right questions 16:07 - What prevents companies from embracing lifetime value 19:55 - How to demonstrate the lifetime value of social media without the math 22:41 - How social pros can successfully chase the same objective as other parts of an organization 26:02 - Neil's take on whether social media practitioners should also do measurement and analytics 29:59 - Why Neil believes acquisition is the best way to build your business using social media 32:38 - Why all organizations need some semblance of a Chief Digital Officer role 34:46 - Why Neil advises marketing students to work across disciplines 37:08 – Neil's top tip for those looking to become a social pro Resources Get the new State of Marketing report for free from Salesforce Grab the Social Pros Turns 500 free commemorative eBook Neil Hoyne's Twitter Converted: The Data-Driven Way to Win Customers' Hearts Visit SocialPros.com for more insights from your favorite social media marketers.

Untold Italy travel podcast
The Unmissable Tastes of Sicily

Untold Italy travel podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 48:26


Sicilian food is one of life's great pleasures. Drawing on the layers of history and occupants of the island over many centuries, it has character, nuance and flavor that sets it apart from dishes from the Italian mainland.Sicily expert Karen La Rosa joins us to discuss the mouthwatering tastes you can expect to enjoy when you visit the island - from the important local produce, cheese and pasta dishes to its iconic favorite sweet - cannoli!Discover the tastes of Sicily on our inaugural Untold Italy tour of Sicily in collaboration with La Rosa Works Sicily > detailed tour itinerary. You'll find full episode show notes, including the details of the dishes to try in Sicily here > untolditaly.com/107Want a deeper connection with Italy and help to plan your travels? Join the friends of the podcast here > untolditaly.com/amici Support the show (https://untolditaly.com/amici)

Outlook
The freediver who found salvation underwater

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 23:36


Alenka Artnik grew up in Slovenia in a loving but complicated family. Her father was an alcoholic, and her brother was addicted to drugs. Years of pain and grief meant that Alenka found herself feeling lost and alone. But then, just when she most needed it, when she'd thought about taking her own life – she found freediving and sanctuary in an underwater world. Drawing on her own personal, physical and mental strength, she is now a world champion freediver. Last year she broke world records by diving to an astonishing 122 metres. If you are affected by issues raised in this programme there is confidential support on the BBC Action line website, or at Befrienders.org Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producers: May Cameron and Andrea Kennedy (Photo: Alenka Artnik. Credit: DaanVerhoeven)

Hustling with Vivica A. Fox
Mishel Prada Drawing On Strength

Hustling with Vivica A. Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 60:05


We are getting down to self-love and gratitude today with the beautiful and talented Actress Mishel Prada! You've seen her on “Fear the Walking Dead: Passage,” which was a spinoff of the popular series “The Walking Dead,” and starring as Emma Hernandez in the leading role on the drama series “Vida” on Starz.  She is currently joining us from Budapest on the set of “The Continental”, a prequel story to the Keanu Reeves' John Wick films. https://twitter.com/mishelprada https://www.instagram.com/mishelprada/?hl=en https://www.facebook.com/MishelPrada https://www.vivicafox.com/ https://www.instagram.com/msvfox/  https://www.facebook.com/VivicaAFox https://twitter.com/msvivicafox  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Conversations
The ballad of Ally Colquitt

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 48:01


When stripper and tattoo artist Ally Colquitt was arrested for drug dealing, it became a turning point. Inside her jail cell, she began reading, drawing, and embarked on the painstaking process of rebuilding her life from its ashes (CW: mentions suicide, grief and loss, drug use)

Ayn Rand Institute Live!
The Nature of Evil by Gregory Salmieri

Ayn Rand Institute Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 91:27


A theme in Ayn Rand's fiction is that the failure to understand evil is a source of error and unhappiness for good people. Drawing on the Objectivist corpus this talk will explore the nature of evil, including: the ways in which actions, motives, ideas and people can be evil; the respects in which evil is and is not important; and how understanding evil can help us to appreciate the good and to foster the best in ourselves and others. Recorded live as part of The Objectivist Conference on September 01, 2021.

Audio Branding
Dangerous Beeps: An Interview With Michael Schutz - Part 1

Audio Branding

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 34:23


“Ultimately the sound is almost irrelevant to the musical experience, with the important caveat that what matters about the sound is the psychological process it triggers in the mind of the listener. So it obviously plays an important role there, but what really matters is how it's being perceived and how it's being heard. So if there's something like a gesture that can change the perception, then you have changed the music, because music is something that really exists only in the mind of the listener.” --  Dr. Michael Schutz   This episode's guest is the Associate Professor of Music Cognition/Percussion at McMaster University.  Drawing on his interdisciplinary training in music, psychology, and computer science, he directs the MAPLE Lab, which researches Music, Acoustics, Perception, and Learning, while also conducting the McMaster Percussion Ensemble and serving on faculty at the Honors Music Institute in Pennsylvania.  Designated a "University Scholar" in recognition of his innovative merging of music performance and perception, he's received the Ontario Early Researcher Award and the 2019 Alumni Award from the Penn State School of Music, as well as numerous grants to support his research. Before McMaster, he spent five years as Director of Percussion Studies at Longwood University, taught percussion at Virginia Commonwealth University, and performed frequently with symphonies. His https://youtu.be/Ap8geRll6F0/ (TEDx Talk “Death by Beep”) is now available on the TED website and the below YouTube link. His name is Dr. Michael Schutz and you'll want to hear his suggestions about how to fix a very real problem that's happening right now in hospitals all over the world. As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you're welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes.  If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you'll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.   Listening to the Echoes The show starts with Dr. Schutz recounting a memorable early experience with sound, how he first discovered the mystery of echoes as a child by dropping his lunchbox and listening to the sound bounce off a neighbor's house, and then the day that he received his first drumset, a Rototom that sparked his passion for music. “I just remember,” he recalls, “at the moment thinking that there's something really fascinating about these percussive musical sounds.”   Questions of Psychology We continue with his introduction to psychology, and how his early skepticism about the importance of body language while playing the marimba gave way to the understanding that music and psychology have a lot in common, and that in some ways music stands at the forefront of psychology. “I realized,” he tells us, “that a lot of the things that we spend a lot of time exploring as musicians are, essentially, you can think about them as questions of psychology.”   Magic Between the Ears Dr. Schutz goes on to talk about the McGurk Effect, a dramatic example of how what we're seeing can quite literally change the way we perceive sound, and the surprisingly complex and active role that the listener plays in a musical performance. "Music is something that really exists only inside the mind of the listener," he explains. "Outside our minds, it's a bunch of sound waves, a bunch of air molecules bumping together. The magic happens between the ears."   A Musical Perspective The first part of our interview concludes with a look at the limitations of audio research and how his team is working to bring a musical perspective into the medical field and find ways to reduce the stress, turmoil, and even accidental deaths that hospital alarms can still cause. “The...

Optimal Health Daily
1608: An Excerpt from The Survival Paradox: Reversing the Hidden Cause of Aging and Chronic Disease by Isaac Eliaz

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 13:05


Isaac Eliaz shares an excerpt from his book, The Survival Paradox: Reversing the Hidden Cause of Aging and Chronic Disease Episode 1608: An Excerpt from The Survival Paradox: Reversing the Hidden Cause of Aging and Chronic Disease by Isaac Eliaz Cancer. Organ failure. Accelerated aging. Can a single “survival molecule” fuel our most deadly and devastating health concerns? The truth is, the very biochemical mechanisms the body uses to survive are actually making us sick. This is the survival paradox. When our body's survival response is triggered, there is a cost: pain, inflammation, and life-threatening disease. But there is a way to overcome it. Drawing on inspirational healing stories and cutting-edge research, integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz presents a roadmap to master your biochemistry and overcome this paradox. The result? Healing and transformation on every level: physical, mental, and emotional. The Survival Paradox offers a groundbreaking new perspective in medicine—and the key to unlocking your infinite healing potential. More about the book can be found here: https://www.amazon.com/Survival-Paradox-Reversing-Chronic-Disease/dp/1544519524/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Isaac+Eliaz&qid=1642441233&s=books&sr=1-1  Once you download the Headspace app and try their mindfulness routines, it takes just a few minutes a day to change your relationship with stress and anxiety to start feeling better. For one month of free access to their entire library, visit Headspace.com/OHD Pendulum Therapeutics is the first and only biotech company to isolate an important beneficial bacterial strain and put that strain into a convenient new probiotic-rich capsule that is formulated to help manage Type 2 diabetes and nurture your body's microbiome. Use code OHD at Pendulumlife.com to get 20% off all products Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast

Celebrate the 100th episode of 3 Point Perspective with Jake Parker, Lee White, and Will Terry as they answer audience questions live. From daily art practices to the business of illustration, this episode is jam-packed with resources, advice, and wisdom.Sign up for SVSLearn's 30 Day Trial: https://courses.svslearn.com/bundles/30-days-free3 Point Perspective Podcast is sponsored by SVSLearn.com, the place where becoming a great illustrator starts!Click here for this episode's links and shownotes.

Curious Minds: Innovation in Life and Work
CM 205: Claudia Goldin on Women, Careers, and Greedy Work

Curious Minds: Innovation in Life and Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 56:53


For women who want a career and a family, we might expect things would be easier today. After all, women have greater access to education and job opportunities. We've seen advances in reproductive health. And we've made inroads in anti-discrimination laws and policies. Yet gaps in pay and promotions remain a problem. Today's guest, Claudia Goldin, is a Harvard University economist who's spent her career studying women in the workplace. She believes there's an important factor we've overlooked, namely, greedy work. These are jobs with lots of financial upside and promotion potential for employees who can log long hours and take on big assignments at a moment's notice. And it's the work that women with children often take less advantage of compared to their partners. As a result, ambitious career women can find themselves stalled out and earning less. In her book, Career and Family: Women's Century-Long Journey Toward Equity, Claudia traces how women got here. Drawing on extensive data sets, she reveals five patterns in women's career and family behaviors: for women graduating from 1900-1910s, it was either career or family; for 1920-1930s graduates, jobs then families; with 1950s graduates, families then jobs; women graduating in the 1970s had careers then families; and, for women graduating in the 1980s-1990s it's been careers and family. Yet, for today's ambitious career women juggling career and family, it can mean increasing dissatisfaction with both. And in analyzing the way many careers today are structured, Claudia helps us understand why. It's an insightful way to understand a problem we've been living with for a long time. Episode Links The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi The Other Side of the Mountain: Women's Employment and Earnings over the Family Cycle Assessing Five Statements about the Economic Impact of COVID-19 on Women Marriage Bar The Group by Mary McCarthy The Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family  The Team Learn more about host, Gayle Allen, and producer, Rob Mancabelli, here. Support the Podcast If you like the show, please rate and review it on iTunes or wherever you subscribe, and tell a friend or family member about the show. Subscribe Click here and then scroll down to see a sample of sites where you can subscribe.

The Past Lives Podcast
The Past Lives Podcast Ep194 Karen Joy

The Past Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 61:12


This week on The Past Lives Podcast I am talking to Karen Joy about her book 'Lost Soul, Wise Soul: How Challenging Past Lives Shape Our Future'.Drawing on her most compelling client cases, author Karen Joy shows you the natural arc of a soul's journey over many lifetimes—including violent or negative ones—until we finally come back to the light. This book reveals how souls begin, how they enter lives on earth, and how experiencing a diverse range of lives teaches them to be wiser and happier.Your soul's journey is sometimes burdened with difficult past lives, and they can cause your present self to replay or struggle with negative experiences. Through fascinating and inspiring case studies, Lost Soul, Wise Soul shows that you can overcome a history of unethical or shameful behavior and reconnect to your soul's source energy. This book helps you reclaim your power and step into joy.Karen Joy spent twenty years as a registered psychologist in her successful private practice. Like Dr Michael Newton, Karen accidentally regressed a client into a past life when she told the client, who was in trance, to go to the origin of the problem. Once the traumatic experience from the past life was resolved, the client had no more problems with the issue in her current life.She has many qualifications including,Certified as Life Between Lives Therapist with the Newton Institute for LBL HypnotherapyCertificate of Past Life Regression Advanced Hypnotherapy Techniques with the Holistic Healing Centre of New York (USA)She is co author of Llewellyn's Little Book of Life Between Lives and co author of Wisdom of SoulsCase Studies of Life Between Lives from the Michael Newton Institute.https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Soul-Wise-Challenging-Future-ebook/dp/B0965MR9LJ/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1642260018&sr=8-1http://www.pastliveshypnosis.co.uk/https://www.patreon.com/pastlivespodcasthttps://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/the-past-lives-podcast

The Inner Cities Podcast

Tochi & Zell wonder what Joe Biden is thinking. On this week's show, they discuss the President's poorly thougtout trip to Atlanta to... I guess stump for support of a voting rights bill... I think? Then they talk out Cuba's 5 COVID vaccines, why US media isn't talking about them, and what they could mean for the developing world. Also, all this month you can enter to win a signed copy of Tochi's new book, GOLIATH. Tweet about one of the topics from this week's show using #InnerCitiesPod and tag @azellwill and you'll be entered to win. One entry per Twitter account per week. All entries must be sent by 2/3 at 12PM PST.  Drawing for the 5 signed copies will happen on 2/5.We want to hear from you! Let us know if you agree, disagree, or have question for Tochi or Zell. InnerCitizens@gmail.com. Thanks for subscribing, downloading, and listening! Text the show to your friends and tell them to check it out.Follow Tochi & Zell:On Twitter and Twitch:@TochiTrueStory@AZellWillOn Insta:@Treize64@AZellWill

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio
Pirates Fan Forum: Drawing up plans for a successful foundation

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:24


On this episode Gary Morgan and Jim Stamm are joined by DK Pittsburgh Sports' own staff cartoonist, Rob Ullman. Rob joins the show to discuss the movement (or lack thereof) on the CBA negotiations and whether or not the Pirates have a foundation that will lead to success at the big league level or do they need to go back to the drawing board and come up with a new blueprint. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Throwing Fits
*PATREON PREVIEW* Drawing an Ass Crack in the Sand

Throwing Fits

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 11:13


Unbothered, happy, in our own lane, focused and flourishing. This week, Jimmy and Larry are linking up before vacation to talk starting off 2022 on the right foot, watching 210 movies in a year, a preview of next week's Jenna pod, the Drake blind item heard ‘round the timeline, a scientific discussion on safe sex, a tale of two asses, the upcoming Kanye doc, surrounding yourself with washed losers, democratizing aesthetics and recontextualizing high-fashion, Demna worship, copping jawnz that will never make it onto social media, Euphoria, Hype House, Wordle, plandids, photo dumps and much more. For more Throwing Fits, check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/throwingfits. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Strength Running Podcast
230. Coach Jason Answers Your Questions: Side Stitches, Cadence, Off-Season, and More

The Strength Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 46:13


This week's episode tackles a variety of questions about the training process, including off-season planning, the concept of sandwiching, addressing cramps and side stitches, and more! Drawing from Instagram and Twitter, Jason is directly answering your specific questions. We're going to discuss the “sandwiching” concept, side stitches, optimal cadence, off-season training, muscle cramps, and more. Thank you to the athletes who submitted their questions. If you want to contribute in the future, make sure you connect with Jason on Instagram and Twitter. Here's where you can find some of the questions I tackle on this episode: 3:03 - How should training plans vary for a road vs. a trail event? 6:25 - How often should you "sandwich" your runs with strength training? (hint: every run!) 13:48 - What you should do if the weather impacts your long run? 19:36 - How do volume and intensity fit into your running workload?  26:30 - What inexpensive options are effective if you're trying to do more strength training? 35:54 - What should an off-season look like to avoid losing too much fitness? Enjoy this week's questions and answer session! To get even more personal support from Jason, join Team Strength Running for live coaching sessions, a group of runners to support you, 30+ training plans, and more! Thank You Athletic Greens! Thank you to our newest sponsor, Athletic Greens! They are a health and wellness company that makes AG1. This is a category-leading greens mix that has 75 vitamins and minerals, prebiotics, probiotics, antioxidants, and adaptogens. One scoop per day is what I've been doing to help me fill in any nutrition gaps in my diet. It also provide a nice boost of energy and focus throughout the day. With all 3 of my kids in school, I know I need to support my immune system or else I'm getting sick and can't train. I also love that AG1 has changed over the last decade. Athletic Greens has made 53 improvements to the formula based on the latest research to make these nutrients more absorbable. For our listeners, they are offering a year's worth of free Vitamin D and 5 free travel packs of AG1 with your first purchase. You can sign up for single shipment or for a monthly drop - the choice is yours. Check out Athletic Greens to redeem your offer today.

Path 11 Podcast
375 Where Do Our Loved Ones Go After They Die? by Mariel Forde Clarke

Path 11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:35


A journey that will compel readers to view life after death in a completely different way. Where - do our loved ones go - After they die? This is the question that has traversed the universe for centuries and is considered one of life's greatest mysteries. While many of the world's renowned philosophers, scientists, theorists, doctors, and great mystics endorsed the existence of the afterlife, no one book has been available to explore it all, until now. Mariel Forde Clarke asserts that whether you believe in God or heaven, you can be comforted by the sense that an afterlife exists beyond the realm of one's physical comprehension. Drawing on the findings of patients who have had near-death experiences and visions, and on those of renowned scientists and doctors, Clarke helps the reader chart the journey of the soul and navigate their grief. http://marielfordeclarke.com ------------------------------------ Check out Molly Mandelberg's Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle Deck & Guidebook ------------------------------------

Rock Your Purpose Podcast
#161 Aligning with Flow with Dijana Llugolli of the Fearless & Successful Podcast

Rock Your Purpose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 38:50


As you have probably heard me say many times here on the show before, alignment is the new paradigm— it's the new hustle. Hustling and grinding— well, it's the old paradigm. On this episode of the podcast, I am in conversation with Dijana Llugolli all about flow and this new paradigm. We cover: Getting into flow Being a creator as a leader, rather than a consumer Creating consistency as a heart-centered leader How clarity creates confidence Working lunar cycles in your heart-centered business More about our guest: Dijana Llugolli is an award-winning international success and business coach who teaches online entrepreneurs to launch with love and scale with soul their online businesses, through aligned and inspired action. Drawing from her studies in business and nearly two decades of experience as a serial entrepreneur, she helps her clients Activate their potential and Flow their way to 10K. Her goal is to inspire millions of women to BE more and HAVE more without having to DO more. Connect with Dijana at www.dijanallugolli.com, on Instagram, and on Facebook. Mentioned in this episode: Announcing my newest workshop!!! The Rock Your Purpose Dream Business Manifestation Workshop is for coaches, spiritual leaders and healers. It's time, Luminary, to bring your calling into the world— to create that income and impact you've been feeling called to create. Join me for this powerful training where you'll clarify your dream & purpose and learn the steps to manifesting your calling while serving your vision. Learn more and save your seat: emilyperry.com/purpose .

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Citizen Cash: The Political Life and Times of Johnny Cash by Michael Stewart Foley

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 35:55


Citizen Cash: The Political Life and Times of Johnny Cash by Michael Stewart Foley A leading historian argues that Johnny Cash was the most important political artist of his time Johnny Cash was an American icon, known for his level, bass-baritone voice and somber demeanor, and for huge hits like “Ring of Fire” and “I Walk the Line.” But he was also the most prominent political artist in the United States, even if he wasn't recognized for it in his own lifetime, or since his death in 2003. Then and now, people have misread Cash's politics, usually accepting the idea of him as a “walking contradiction.” Cash didn't fit into easy political categories—liberal or conservative, Republican or Democrat, hawk or dove. Like most people, Cash's politics were remarkably consistent in that they were based not on ideology or scripts but on empathy—emotion, instinct, and identification. Drawing on untapped archives and new research on social movements and grassroots activism, Citizen Cash offers a major reassessment of a legendary figure.

The Shaun Tabatt Show
733: Amy Thomas Davis Unveils A Prophetic Blueprint Introducing the Coming Age

The Shaun Tabatt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 36:45


The entire world has entered into a new era – but how should Christians operate in this new landscape? In this day and age, God is calling you to a deeper level of surrender and holiness and inviting you into provocative new dimensions of Holy Spirit encounter. Sharing her own profound heavenly encounters, Amy Davis reveals the new levels of supernatural power available to you as an overcomer in this era. Drawing on the inspiration of great generals of the faith, including William Branham, Kathryn Kuhlman, Smith Wigglesworth, and John G. Lake, Amy points to fresh realms of divine wisdom, revelation, courage, and miracle-working power for you to walk in. Find out more at WhiteDoveMinistries.org. Resources mentioned in this episode: Divinely Powerful: A Prophetic Blueprint Introducing the Coming Age Get the White Dove Ministries App: iOS Android The Shaun Tabatt Show is part of the Destiny Image Podcast Network.

cocktailnation
Evenings At The Penthouse-Drawing

cocktailnation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 59:05


It's funny how some people can draw and others can't, I am in the non drawing camp, however I am really good at drawing conclusions and drapes. www.cocktailnation.net John Surman Trio-Concentric Circles Annie Ross-Don't Worry 'bout Me Dick Hyman- I Wish You Love Molotov Cocktail Piano-24K Magic Marty Paich Trio- Dusk Light Blossom Dearie- Boum Bill Evans- Jade Visions  Red Garland Trio-What's New Oscar Pettiford- Not So Sleepy  Dexter Gordon- Love Locked Out Alex Collins-Polka Dots and Moonbeams Chet Baker - Time On My Hands Johhny Hartman-For The Want Of A Kiss

Rogue Learner
Raising Kids in a Consent-based Environment

Rogue Learner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 81:04


Guest  Sophie Christophy Sophie is the CEO for a charity called Phoenix Education. An organization that is working to change the education system so that schools are more collaborative and offer rights respecting spaces. She is also co-founder of ‘the Cabin', the first consent-based education setting in the U.K. - a self-directed learning community for children aged 5-11. She runs courses on consent based education and works with people of all ages on changemaking/education activism and paradigm shifting. All this is a move forward  toward a new paradigm in which children are respected, listened to and treated as whole people, where adultism is managed and de-escalated as much as possible, as a route to social justice. Sophie is an unschooling parent to two children who are 7 and 10.   Contact info: Twitter: @schristophy, Facebook: Sophie Christophy, by email: hello@sophiechristophy.com Show Notes Jenna welcomes everyone back to the podcast after a break in which she and her family moved back to the US from Europe. She catches us up on her own family's unschooling adventures and her future plans. These include plans to combine her love of documentary style family photography and unschooling. For more information check out Jenna's Instagram and click on ‘Join my Audience.'  Introducing Sophie Christophy: Read Her article from the Huffington Post    Sophie was referred to the podcast by Dr. Nickee Stopler in episode 9 of The Rogue Learner Podcast.  Sophie tells us that she became interested in unschooling after the birth of her daughter ten years ago. Always a curious child and life-long learner she credits the many educators in her family for her ability to trust her own instincts and problem solving skills.  She explains how having her daughter was a huge life shift. She found that she was extremely tuned in to her daughter's anxieties which brought her to a better understanding of just how differently we all see and experience the world around us. Knowing that she needed to be an advocate for her daughter as she felt that the social constructs of our society may not be the best for the mental and physical well being of people in general, especially a child.   One event that shaped her thinking about life and learning was when one of her parents came out as Trans. This opened her mind to better understanding the need for love and acceptance over prejudice and also that just as being a part of any marginalized group can leave one feeling vulnerable, the same can be said for unschoolers. A certain amount of bravery is called for.  Moving to the topic of deschooling. - Sophie says to begin with giving yourself permission to control your own situation. Recognize your fears. Ask yourself what is holding you back. Treat deschooling like a practice (she gives the example of yoga.) Do it daily to make it a practice. Be a conscious creator of your environment. Pay attention to what you surround yourself with. Question your motives. Make a commitment. Create an environment that will lead to success. Outcomes and variables are set.  Sophie and Jenna discuss these thoughts.  Institutions such as schools try to control the uncontrollable.  Be wary of falling into the trap of switching one dogma or philosophy for another rather than listening to your own intuition.  Continue your own self directed learning while you are facilitating your child's learning. Sophie discusses a new course that she offers in Deschooling the Body. In this class she teaches her students to bring their physical bodies into the decision making process by paying attention to the body's cues, responses and intuitions. Do you react to a statement physically? She goes on to say that if you feel your body react to a statement in an uncomfortable way, it may not be true for you. Feel it, breathe into it and find a way to loosen that energy, through movement etc.  Jenna asks Sophie to explain more about the Cabin.  Sophie created the Cabin with her partner Sarah Stollery in a local village hall. What started off as two days a week for twelve 5-11 year olds has grown since then adding more time and soon serving children through age sixteen. Some of the children come for one day or a few hours, some come every day that is available. Everything is consent based. Everyone self-directs and they use a democratic system of decision making. Rights and opinions are respected. Each day begins with an open Circle time led by a ‘trained chair' (someone who has been trained to facilitate.) All ages are represented. During this fifteen minute session, plans are discussed and problems are solved.  A variety of resources are available to the children / families participating. These are based on the requests of all involved. Some of the items might include: art and craft supplies, a library of books, games, den building materials, ropes and swings outside, gardening equipment and more. A list may be written on the board of things being offered that day such as field trips, musical events, plays, dances and/or classes offered by either children or adults. Classes are often offered as a result of a need. For example a class on Conflict was offered after an incident arose that exposed a need for that class. Facilitators often offer a class on something that they have experience with. No one is obligated to attend any class. The rest of the day includes lunch, more self-directed learning and a final closing meeting.  Sophie emphasizes that it is important that others build deschooling platforms even though it takes perseverance and trusting in your own self directed learning. She reminds us that it takes a deep commitment and confidence to invest in your own unschooling.  Phoenix Education: From their website: “Founded in 2000, Phoenix Education is committed to education transformation. We promote democratic, human-centred and rights-respecting practices and structures, where student voice matters, and young people influence their experience of education. We work with mainstream schools, as well as with progressive alternative settings and innovators, challenging and expanding norms of what school and education can be.”   Sophie describes her educational platform Phoenix Education as a place to help teachers and students create and collaborate. Drawing from such predecessors as the Sand School and Dartington Hall she has formed a network to connect mainstream schools with the concepts of self directed education. The mission is called Freedom To Learn UK. They have two main projects. For the adults, they help them to be education advocates and to be more socially responsible. Through workshops, talks and hands-on learning together. For students they have a Change-makers program which teaches children to be activists for themselves, their own education and acceptance of others regardless of differences.  Jenna ends the podcast by asking the four questions that she asks each of her guests.  What are you curious about? Sophie says that at the moment she is spurious about Kimchi. (How to make her own) She is also curious as to how everything will unfold as she opens a second learning facility this year. She is also curious as to where she will be in life in a year's time.     What is your favorite way to learn? Sophie tells us she loves to be a learner. She says she learns best through experiences, relationships and nature. Also learning through her kids and most of all, she likes learning through pleasure. Curiosity and imagination fuel her real world experimentation and taking action.  What is an educational resource you recommend? Sophie quickly names Youtube and Tik Tok. Jenna chimes in to suggest Netflix .. and they agree.  What is a book, podcast or blog that you recommend? Sophie states that she is really focused on things that de-stress her at the moment. She is finding that watching ‘Tattoo Fixes' on Netflix calms and amuses her. Another subject she is into would be Spirituality. Two of her favorites to follow are Christina Lopes DPT MPH and Martha Beck (The Gathering Room)     Helpful Resources Mentioned in Today's Show Introducing Sophie Christophy: Read Her article for the Huffington Post and Attachment Parenting UK. Dr. Nickee Stopler in episode 9 of The Rogue Learner Podcast.  Phoenix Education Sand School Dartington Hall  Freedom To Learn UK Ways to Connect Join me on the Show! Leave a voicemail! Email me: contact.roguelearner@gmail.com Facebook  Instagram Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rogue-learner/id1543224038 Google Play: https://podcasts.google.com/search/rogue%20learner Spotify: https://roguelearner.libsyn.com/spotify YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdCocbWsxxAMSbUObiCQXPg Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/rogue-learner

The Happy Pear Podcast
Finding Meaning with Jeff Krasno

The Happy Pear Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 77:45


How do you find meaning? In this weeks episode we speak to Jeff Krasno, entrepreneur, author, and podcast host.Hand-picked by Oprah Winfrey as one of her Super Soul 100 changemakers, Jeff helms Commune Media — offering an assemblage of in-depth wellness courses, podcasts, and other media featuring the field's foremost experts, including Deepak Chopra, Russell Brand, and Sharon Salzberg.Drawing on his former career running a record label and a youth spent traveling the globe with his parents, Jeff incepted and created Wanderlust — a series of more than 60 large-scale global events combining innovative yogic instruction and live music that saw thousands of attendees. Featured in media including The New York Times, the events spawned Jeff's debut book, “Wanderlust” (Rodale), which sold 35,000 copies worldwide.As host of the Commune podcast, and the author of three books, Jeff presents his audience with knowledge and guideposts to becoming their best selves. Classes, podcasts, and books offer a roadmap to creating a better society through compassion, community-building, and hands-on activism.Needless to say we go deep with Jeff, finding meaning is only at the helm of our discussion as we meander our way through what it is to truly be present, understanding compassion, trauma, mindfulness and so much more.We hope you enjoy this episode as much as we did.Lots of love,Dave & SteveTo find out more about Jeff visit his site: http://www.jeffkrasno.com/This episode was produced by Sara Fawsitt and Sean Cahill See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast
Larry MacDougall - The Persistent Illustrator

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 70:08


From building worlds to launching Kickstarters, illustrator Larry MacDougall is a treasure trove of imagination, artistic mastery, and down-to-earth practicality. Join Jake Parker and Will Terry to learn the keys to his success in this insightful episode.Sign up for SVSLearn's 30 Day Trial: https://courses.svslearn.com/bundles/30-days-free3 Point Perspective Podcast is sponsored by SVSLearn.com, the place where becoming a great illustrator starts!Click here for this episode's links and shownotes.

That Will Never Work
#32: It's Only a Service if People Will Pay For It

That Will Never Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 31:11


Congratulations! Drawing on your personal and professional experience, you've created a service that addresses an obvious market need. Now, who's going to pay for it? Sarah's solution for onboarding parents and nannies is a good one, and clearly has a lot of potential. But she needs to re-examine her business model to maximize the customer base without pricing out either party. Listen in as Marc negotiates this tricky balance with her.Want to be a guest on "That Will Never Work" and get help with your business issues? Head to https://marcrandolph.com/guest (https://marcrandolph.com/guest), fill out the form, and leave a voice message right there on the site. While there, you can also sign up for Marc's newsletter – or else connect with him on Twitter (@mbrandolph) or on Instagram (@ThatWillNeverWork).

Red Menace
Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of Our Planetary Future

Red Menace

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 117:13


In this episode of Red Menace, Alyson and Breht discuss and analyze "Climate Leviathan" by authors Geoff Mann and Joel Wainwright. Book description: "Despite the science and the summits, leading capitalist states have not achieved anything close to an adequate level of carbon mitigation. There is now simply no way to prevent the planet breaching the threshold of two degrees Celsius set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. What are the likely political and economic outcomes of this? Where is the overheating world heading? To further the struggle for climate justice, we need to have some idea how the existing global order is likely to adjust to a rapidly changing environment. Climate Leviathan provides a radical way of thinking about the intensifying challenges to the global order. Drawing on a wide range of political thought, Joel Wainwright and Geoff Mann argue that rapid climate change will transform the world's political economy and the fundamental political arrangements most people take for granted. The result will be a capitalist planetary sovereignty, a terrifying eventuality that makes the construction of viable, radical alternatives truly imperative." Support Red Menace and get access to bonus monthly content on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/TheRedMenace

Earth Ancients
Marco Vigato: The Empires of Atlantis

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 128:45


Establishes the historical and geological reality of Atlantis and reveals its continuing influence around the world• Traces the course of Atlantean civilization through its three empires, as well as the colonies and outposts formed by its survivors in Egypt, Göbekli Tepe, India, Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean, and North and South America• Shows how pyramids and other megalithic monuments testify to the survival of a “Sacred Science” of Atlantean origin and how this Sacred Science provided the foundation for esoteric traditions and secret societies throughout the ages• Draws on more than 500 ancient and modern sources and the author's own personal exploration of hundreds of archaeological sitesExploring more than 100,000 years of Earth's history, Marco Vigato combines recent discoveries in the fields of archaeology, geology, anthropology, and genetics with the mystery teachings of antiquity to investigate the true origins of civilization. Establishing the historical and geological reality of Atlantis stretching all the way back to 432,000 BCE, he traces the course of Atlantean civilization through its three empires, revealing how civilization rose and fell several times over this lengthy span of time.The author shows that Atlantis did not vanish “in one terrible day and night” but survived in a variety of different forms well into the historical era. He reveals how the first Atlantean civilization lasted from 432,000 to 33,335 BCE, the second one from 21,142 to 10,961 BCE, and the third Atlantis civilization--the one celebrated by Plato--collapsed in 9600 BCE, after the Younger Dryas cataclysm. The author examines the role of Atlantean survivors in restarting civilization in different parts of the world, from Göbekli Tepe and Egypt to India, Mesopotamia, and the Americas. He explains how they created colonies and outposts around the globe, as evidenced by the colossal network of pyramids, earthen mounds, and other megalithic monuments they left behind. He shows how these monuments testify to the survival of a “Sacred Science” of Atlantean origin, and he documents the survival of the primeval Atlantean Tradition through various secret societies into the modern era.Drawing on more than 500 ancient and modern sources and his own personal exploration of hundreds of archaeological sites around the world, the author shows not only that Atlantis was real but that the whole world is now being called to become a New Atlantis and awaken into a new Golden Age.