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Latest podcast episodes about businesses

Greater LA
Omicron has businesses rethinking in-person work

Greater LA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 30:09


With Omicron, many offices resemble ghost towns again, and questions emerge about the future of in-person work. It's especially true in Culver City. “Salt in My Soul” is a documentary and book about former KCRW intern Mallory Smith, who died of cystic fibrosis at age 25. Her mom Diane is raising awareness about CF and the new medical technologies to fight it. Marty Roberts — of the beloved jazz lounge duo Marty and Elayne — passed away this week. His wife Elayne says, “The two of us were like a unit. We didn't really need anything else.”

Acquisitions Anonymous
Two Manufacturing Businesses for Sale - Brent Beshore - Founder and CEO at Permanent Equity - ep61

Acquisitions Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 48:02


Joined this week by Brent Beshore (Founder and CEO at Permanent Equity), we talk about two businesses for sale in the manufacturing space. Thanks to our sponsors this week: MoreNow.co: We help owners build a high functioning, experienced team by leveraging the top manager/director talent in the Phillippines. Go to morenow.co and fill out the form. Or email hire@morenow.co. Mention this pod for 20% of your first hire. CloudBookkeeping.com: With over 100 years of combined experience, the team at CloudBookkeeping provides dedicated financial management services and valuable insights so you can grow your business! Give CloudBookkeeping a call or visit their website at CloudBookkeeping.com to learn more about their custom solutions to strengthen your business. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dealtalk/support

Business Lunch
Creative Ways to Acquire Businesses and How to Invest with No Money Down with Joey Gilkey

Business Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 21:08


When it comes to acquiring businesses, the best (and most fun) way to do it is to think outside the box.   On today's episode, host Roland Frasier sits down with Joey Gilkey, Founder and CEO of Sales Driven Agency, a company that builds sales operations specifically for digital marketing agencies. Historically, marketing agencies are creative strategists, Joey says, not sales people. They've never built a sales operation or hired salespeople successfully. The agency space is unique in that they don't have the same kind of margins as other companies and need to operate differently. They need the kind of help Joey has to offer.    There's more to Joey than what he's doing now. He says he picked this niche because he has a grander plan than just helping agencies with sales. His big plan involves acquiring businesses in some pretty creative ways.   Listen in and be inspired.   The Bigger Plan   Joey has been in the agency space for a decade. He knows agencies super well. He even has a mastermind for 7- and 8-figure agencies. He knows how to grow revenue. He can add 7 figures to an agency by building out a sales operation, but there are areas where he can't help—operations and fulfillment, for example. That's his next problem to solve. He personally doesn't have that background, but he can buy a company that does.   His bigger picture is to become a super company for agencies. He wants to do it all—sales operations, fulfillment, sourcing fractional accounting that serves agencies, etc. He's acquiring for growth.    Someone else has put in the hard work of building an audience and trust, and they don't know how to use/monetize it. Joey has plenty of offers. He would love to cut a deal and work something out, where they either drive their people to his offer or he just takes it over completely.   The Offer In the Works   He's done a lot of creative deal structuring. For example, he once bought a Facebook group from someone. Talk about an innovative way to acquire someone's work and audience. How did he structure the deal? He offered them 10% of everything he makes from people in the group.   He's under contract right now with a company that does fulfillment and operations. They serve the same clients he does, but they have a bigger list. They've been working together so well that he thought to himself: instead of making a referral fee, why not own the company I refer people to?   He threw out a simple offer to get the ball rolling ($3.9 million), and they came back with $4.2 million. He said it wasn't worth that and got creative. He offered a 10-year seller finance, 10% down payment, 5-year balloon, 4% interest, at a $4.5 million valuation with a 6-month deferred down payment. They said it was too complex, and they went back to his original offer but kept some commissions. They made a few other compromises and had a deal.   Moral of the story? Get creative and get it done.   RESOURCES: salesdrivenagency.com   OUR PARTNERS: 7 Steps to Scalable workbook Get a free proposal from Conversion Fanatics Get 3% cash back on your ad spend with AdCard Get Roland's book, Zero Down, FREE  

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Where Is the Eviction Tsunami?

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 5:49


Warnings about an “eviction tsunami” have yet to materialize. Extended moratoriums and rental assistance programs have delayed evictions in some areas, some housing experts had predicted 40 million evictions last fall. As reported by the news blog, fivethirtyeight.com, those experts are “still waiting.”Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Some renter protections are still in place or just now expiring in some states and jurisdictions, so an eviction surge could be looming in those areas. But housing experts had expected a U.S. eviction tsunami in September, after the national eviction moratorium was lifted. Although there's been an increase in evictions, it hasn't resulted in a tsunami, so far.Evictions at Low LevelsThe fivethirtyeight article cites information from a website called “Eviction Lab” which tracks eviction data that's been made public. That data doesn't cover the entire nation, but it shows that, as of October of last year, evictions in most parts of the country were 40% lower than an historical average, and have not returned to pre-pandemic levels.So what's going on? It's difficult to know for sure, but there are various theories. Some housing experts think that some renters are still enjoying the benefits of the stimulus payments, extended unemployment insurance, and rental assistance programs, along with the moratoriums. There's also a theory that many “mom-and-pop landlords” have worked out deals with renters to avoid evictions. And there are some who feel that the eviction data just hasn't been very accurate. The fivethirtyeight authors believe it's probably a combination of those three, but there is no nationwide database to track that data. They say as many as one-third of U.S. counties don't publish an annual report on the number of evictions that make their way through courts. And then there are the so-called “informal evictions,” which are not tracked at all. That happens when landlords refuse to make repairs or abruptly change the locks on rental units. The blog suggests that informal evictions could be five times more common than the formal ones.Predictions Were Likely ExaggeratedDespite the lack of solid figures for the current status of U.S. evictions, the warning about a tsunami of 40 million evictions was very likely exaggerated, by a lot. That figure was largely based on something called the U.S. Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey which asks Americans how confident they are in paying their rent, on a weekly basis. And then week-after-week, between 25 and 33% didn't think they'd make rent.That survey was used by the Aspen Institute and the COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project to come up with projections about how many households were at risk. The figure was between 12.6 million and 17.3 million households or 30 to 40 million renters. That made for some big headlines and the passage of legislation for almost $50 billion dollars in rent assistance.The government hand-out probably protected a lot of renters. But as the fivethirtyeight blog points out, the legislation was probably “based on an overestimate” that was determined by renter confidence levels, and not facts. The Aspen researchers included responses from people with no confidence, a slight amount of confidence, and a moderate amount of confidence in being able to pay rent. Plus, they included not just the people who were already behind on the rent, but those who were up to date and just feeling worried.As the blog points out, while a third of the renters said they were not feeling very confident about paying rent, only 13.9 percent were both low on confidence AND behind on their rent. So how many renters were truly at risk? Fivethirtyeight calculated that number at 6 million households and 14 million renters. That's less than half of what Aspen had predicted, at the low end.The Aspen research grabbed the most headlines, but there were other estimates that came out a lot lower. The Urban Institute crunched the numbers from the Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey but only included people who were already behind on their rent. That report determined that 10 million renters were at risk of eviction. The National Multifamily Housing Council estimates were also showing lower numbers, although that organization only covers multi-family.Single-Family EcosphereBut the single-family ecosphere also fared well. We were reporting on how well our affiliates were doing with rent collection during the pandemic. Our affiliate in Jacksonville, who renovates and manages a large number of single-family rentals, says he hasn't noticed a big surge in evictions. He attributes that to Florida's landlord and business-friendly environment.He says: “Since the outbreak of Covid, we have remained in one of the strongest rental markets I have experienced in 25 years as a professional landlord. Businesses, families, homeowners, and renters are moving to Florida because of these fundamentals which allows our state and real estate markets to continue to grow both on the equity and rental side of the business.”You can read more about this topic by following the links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com.You can also join RealWealth, for free, to learn more about residential real estate investing in landlord and business-friendly markets. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources. That includes experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke. Links:1 - https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-happened-to-the-eviction-tsunami/

Care More Be Better: Social Impact, Sustainability + Regeneration Now
Why We Need To Support Female-Owned Businesses With Sarah Dusek Of Enygma Ventures

Care More Be Better: Social Impact, Sustainability + Regeneration Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 44:50


How are we to address the blatant inequality during our time? One of the things we can do is to support female-owned businesses. Corinna Bellizzi's guest in this episode is Sarah Dusek, the founder of Enygma Ventures. Sarah laments that only 2% out of 100% of all the venture capital funding goes to women-led businesses in the US. As women, it's our duty to champion one another. Do you want to know how you can help balance the scale? If you say “YES,” you'd love to tune in this episode. Enjoy!Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, & share! https://caremorebebetter.com About GuestSarah Dusek is a venture capitalist and co-founder of Enygma Ventures, a venture capital fund. She invests in women-led businesses in Southern Africa, creates solutions to wealth disparity, and provides access to capital for women. In 2017, after successfully selling her company, Under Canvas, for more than $100 million, Sarah launched Enygma Ventures. - Guest LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-dusek-0b630ab/ - Guest Website: https://www.enygmaventures.com/ Additional Resources Mentioned: n/a Show Notes:00:11:43: Traditional VCs vs. Enygma Ventures 00:16:53: Funding Statistics For Female-Led Business In The US 00:26:56: We Need Collaboration With All People 00:32:45: Connecting Different Companies 00:37:40: What Makes A Great Investor 00:46:23: Money Is A Byproduct Of Doing Something Great Join the Care More. Be Better. Community! (Social Links Below)Website: https://www.caremorebebetter.comYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCveJg5mSfeTf0l4otrxgUfgInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/CareMore.BeBetter/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CareMoreBeBetter LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/care-more-be-better Twitter: https://twitter.com/caremorebebettr Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/care-more-be-better Support Care More. Be Better: A Social Impact + Sustainability Podcast Care More. Be Better. is not backed by any company. We answer only to our collective conscience. As a listener, reader, and subscriber you are part of this pod and this community and we are honored to have your support. If you can, please help finance the show (https://www.caremorebebetter.com/donate). Thank you, now and always, for your support as we get this thing started!

Black Entrepreneur Experience
BEE 313 Kickfurther Account Executive, Sandra Hamlett ~ Innovative Thinker

Black Entrepreneur Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 42:53


https://www.kickfurther.com Sandra Hamlett grew up in New York City and focused her interests on a career in the arts, especially in the area of creative writing and journalism. After getting a job while in college working with a printing brokerage firm she found herself thrust into the world of sales.   What was supposed to be a receptionist role, turned into client acquisition and vendor relationship pro. She loved helping clients tell their stories to their customers. This led to a career in publishing sales working at METROPOLIS Magazine where she focused her attention on helping small businesses to find their markets to grow. After a move to Buffalo, NY, Sandra found a natural fit with Kickfurther's mission of giving  start-ups the resources they need to scale.       About Kickfurther:  Kickfurther is the world's first online inventory financing platform that enables companies to access funds that they are unable to acquire through traditional sources. We connect brands to a community of eager buyers who help fund the inventory on consignment and give brands the flexibility to pay that back as they receive cash from their sales. This alleviates the cash-flow pinch that lenders can cause without customized repayment schedules, allowing your brand to scale quickly without impeding your ability to maintain inventory or financial flexibility. Kickfuther supports women-owned, minority-owned and veteran-owned businesses by creating special funding on its pay as you grow Kickfurther Pro Subscription Program. Businesses with 50% ownership or greater by either a person of color, woman or US veteran are eligible to receive up to 80% off unlimited funding starting as low as $400/month. This program is revenue based and allows companies to fund more inventory while paying on financing.

Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
Nagraj Kashyap (SoftBank Vision Fund) - His Three Consumer Investment Themes, How Fund 2 is Different From Fund 1, and How He Invests in Tech and Non-Tech Businesses

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 48:22


Our guest today is Nagraj Kashyap, Managing Partner of SoftBank's Vision Fund one of the world's largest venture capital fund, with over $100 billion in capital. Nagraj leads their consumer investment practice for north America. It was amazing chatting with him about how Vision Fund 2 is different from fund 1, his thesis around the future of healthcare the ecommerce stack and how he thinks about scale for non-tech consumer businesses. WIthout further ado, here's Nagraj. What was your initial attraction to investing in consumer focused businesses? How did you end up joining Softbank? How is Vision Fund 2's focus different from Fund 1? Why should founders partner with the Vision Fund? What is your decision-making process? How do you get to a decision quickly in today's market? How do you leverage your platform? Walk us through your due diligence process. When a founder comes to you, how do you think about the size of problem they are solving? How are you thinking about today's market climate? Do you think valuations are high? What's your target cadence for consumer investments? There's been alot of investment in direct-to-consumer healthcare. What's your thesis around the future of healthcare?Wellness and preventative care Where is the opportunity when it comes to the ecommerce stack serving consumer brands? How do you think about scale in non-software businesses/consumer brands? I.e. Vuori What's one thing you would change about venture capital? What's one book that inspired you personally and one book that inspired you professionally?Professionally: Innovator's Dilemma Personally: American Sickness What's one piece of advice you have for founders?

The Brian Lehrer Show
Businesses: What's the Most Unfair Fine You've Received From the City?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 14:01


Eric Adams is asking heads of city agencies to review the fines they issue business and offer recommendations on how to reform the penalty system. Business owners call-in with their stories about the most unfair fine they've received from the city.  

During the Break
Mike Costa - Costa Media Advisors! His Business Is Helping Other Businesses!

During the Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 35:33


Let's catch up with business owner and business developer - Mike Costa! Mike was in the corporate media world helping build and market businesses for decades. Now, he is building his own company; again - helping businesses! We will talk about corporate media - being a business owner - advertising/marketing - podcasting - and who knows what else. He is BACK on DTB! === THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Granite Garage Floors of Chattanooga: https://granitegaragefloors.com/location/chattanooga Vascular Institute of Chattanooga: https://www.vascularinstituteofchattanooga.com/ MedicareMisty: https://medicaremisty.com/ The Barn Nursery: https://www.barnnursery.com/ Guardian Investment Advisors: https://giaplantoday.com/ Please consider supporting the podast by becoming a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/duringthebreakpodcast This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Hour 1, 01-17-22: Trump ripping DeSantis behind the scenes?, Vivek wants businesses to ignore SCOTUS decision, and CDC says no to cloth masks

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 34:23


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Legally Brief
Bonus: Three Ways Businesses and Institutions can Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr.

Legally Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 9:46


Learn more about Judie Saunders, Esq., and how she works with companies; conducting internal investigations that address toxic work cultures so that businesses can restore productivity, employee trust and transparency. This podcast is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this podcast is legal advice, counsel or guidance. No offer, statement or representation has been made to serve as your attorney in any capacity.   No attorney-client relationship has been created. This information is general and may not be applicable to your particular circumstances. You must review your particular circumstances with a licensed attorney. 

The Chad Benson Show
Supreme Court blocks nationwide vaccine and testing mandate for large businesses

The Chad Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 110:09


Supreme Court blocks nationwide vaccine and testing mandate for large businesses. NFL Wild Card Weekend. Prince Andrew stripped of his military titles amid sex abuse lawsuit. Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin still pushing hard against Build Back Better. Food prices up 12%. Sirhan Sirhan denied parole.

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1042 - Helping Veteran-Owned Businesses Grow with Bunker Labs' Blake Hogan

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 20:23


In this episode of the Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks to the CEO of https://bunkerlabs.org/ (Bunker Labs), Blake Hogan.  Bunker Labs is a national nonprofit organization that works with veterans and their families to help them start their own businesses and pursue their dreams. They run three small cohort based programs for their veteran entrepreneurs.  Blake shares thoughts on how you need a mission-focused mindset to succeed in business and entrepreneurship can be just the calling for veterans and military families. Blake shares some entrepreneurial wisdom and says to have grit and be resilient. You'll make mistakes and encounter gray areas, but military veterans are built with the grit needed to enter entrepreneurship.  Bunker Labs wants to rally smart thinkers and civic leaders around veteran entrepreneurs to help these companies grow and thrive. Blake also shares that you don't need to get started with a lot; an idea, some research, and the determination and willingness to succeed are all it takes to start.  Josh and Blake also explore how these veterans can use the grit they learned through their military service and translate that into successful entrepreneurship. Blake shares that if you have that grit and drive, go and join their community. He shares that taking action, showing up, and connecting with one person is truly how you can make a difference. Networking, especially in the veteran entrepreneurial space, is a major way these businesses grow. Help other veterans grow their businesses, and they'll help you grow yours.  Josh also shares some wisdom to other veteran entrepreneurs like himself. He stresses that if the resources are there for you because of your military service, take them! Don't let pride hold off any growth or networking that's in your best interest (or your business's.) Blake explains that networking is vital, and veterans are the business owners and entrepreneurs people want to connect with because they're also business leaders.  The three main programs Bunker Labs facilitates are the Veterans in Residence program, the CEOCirlce Growth program, and the Ambassador program.  Blake shares where Bunker Labs intends to grow and how they will continue to offer amazing experiences for their members. He shares the visions behind his programs and which business owner is fit for each program.  Blake also reminds us that it's not about offering charity to veteran entrepreneurs – these are simply remarkable leaders that you'll want to work with. If you're not a veteran, you can do your part and help just by looking for connections in the veteran space.  Learn more about Bunker Labs at their website https://bunkerlabs.org/ (https://bunkerlabs.org/).  Check out Bunker Labs on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/company/bunkerlabs/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/bunkerlabs/).   Check out Blake Hogan on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/blakehogan/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/blakehogan/).  Don't forget to subscribe to The Thoughtful Entrepreneur and thank you for listening. Tune in next time! More from UpMyInfluence: ✅ We are actively booking guests for our DAILY Entrepreneur Success Podcast.https://upmyinfluence.com/guest ( Schedule HERE). ✅ Are you a 6-figure consultant? Let us fill your sales schedule and move you to 7-figures.https://upmyinfluence.com/b2b ( Learn more here). ✅ Check out our freehttps://upmyinfluence.com/1 ( Authority Transformation Masterclass).

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S30E27 - Helping Coaches, Experts, & Consultants to Scale their Businesses, with Michelle Hext

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 36:07


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Michelle Hext about helping coaches, experts, and consultants to scale their businesses. See the video here: https://youtu.be/qZcyEMZVHKQ. Michelle Hext (https://www.linkedin.com/in/michellehext/) is the CEO at The Luxe-Preneur, where over the last 20 years they have trained over 8,200 Coaches, Experts & Consultants to scale their businesses through high-ticket offers. She started her career in the Martial Art's when she was 22 years of age and holds a 5th Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo and she is also in the Australasian Martial Arts Hall Of Fame. She owned martial arts schools and online fitness businesses, then she had to learn how to get more clients and she did it and then started also teaching it.  Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter: https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/alchemizing-human-capital-6884351526333227008/. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The US Supreme Court hands down two major rulings on Biden's mandates one is cheered by businesses all over the nation BUT the other is likely a death sentence to American healthcare

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber FIERCE AND FEARLESS – the relentless Pursuit of the truth—   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer is the focus of increased scrutiny again—as a report from the Auditor General says the state undercounted Covid deaths in Nursing homes—   TWO— Another monumental blow is delivered to Democrats who think they can bully their way to socialism— Senator Kyrsten Sinema—is saying again—she will not support weakening or changing the filibuster   THREE— The United States Supreme Court hands down two major rulings on President Bidens mandates—one is cheered by businesses all over the nation—   BUT the other is likely a death sentence to American healthcare—unless Congress acts quickly—because the 5-4 ruling with John Roberts and Brett Kavanaugh joining the majority will lead to bankrupting small hospitals—and healthcare clinics across America—   And it won't take very long—   Let me explain

The Full Voice Podcast With Nikki Loney
FVPC #154 Online vs Brick and Mortar Businesses, Agents & Managers, Online Performance Opportunities

The Full Voice Podcast With Nikki Loney

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:17


In episode 154, Michelle Markwart Deveaux discusses the difference between online and brick and mortar businesses, specifically for teachers transitioning to online lessons offerings. Phyllis Horridge talks about managers and agents and how teachers can productively work with them. Nikki shares successful online group performance opportunities for vocalists of all ages. In this podcast 154 Online vs. Brick/Mortar Business with Michelle Markwart Deveaux (4:33) Michelle discusses the differences between online teaching businesses vs. brick and mortar businesses and specifically how these types of businesses are marketed. Find and follow Michelle: https://thespeakeasycooperative.com/ Working with Managers and Agents with Phyllis Horridge (39:46) Talented students in your studio may have an additional team of professionals. Phyllis Horridge helps us understand the differences between agents and managers and how we can work productively with these industry professionals. Find and follow Phyllis https://www.instagram.com/phyllis.sings/ Online Group Performances for All Ages with Nikki Loney (50:13) Opportunities for our students to perform are essential offerings for the music teacher. Nikki shares successful online group singing activities for all ages in your studio.

Action and Ambition
Nicole Tabs on Balancing Between So Many Businesses That Exist in Many Different Verticals

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 40:23


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Nicole Tabs, Co-Founder, and CEO of the business development agency Monarchy Media. She is also the Co-Founder of the modern business brand, Uplifts and Co-Founder of Serendipity Group Inc, a film production company that just launched its first show with ABC. Nichole is a master of starting, scaling and, managing businesses from the ground up. Tune in to learn more!

Guy Benson Show
Guy Benson Show - Supreme Court blocks Biden's COVID rules for businesses

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 109:52


Guy Benson Show - 1-13-2022 [00:00:00] 3:06 pm - Bad Week For The Biden Admin [00:14:18] 3:25 pm - Kamala...You Are Not Helping [00:18:22] 3:35 pm - Josh Kraushaar, Politics Editor at N [00:35:59] 3:56 pm - Kyrsten Sinema says Pound Sand! [00:36:44] 4:06 pm - Josh Kraushaar, Politics Editor at N [00:47:12] 4:21 pm - Covid 19 By The Numbers [00:55:00] 4:35 pm - We need more hearings [01:11:33] 4:55 pm - Psaki pushes back on criticism of Bi [01:13:18] 5:06 pm - Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) [01:24:46] 5:22 pm - Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) [01:31:36] 5:35 pm - Charles Hurt, FNC Contributor [01:39:42] 5:47 pm - The Show is down to Guy & Cookie!

Coronavirus Daily
The Supreme Court strikes down Biden's vaccine mandate for businesses. Plus, nurses protest in California

Coronavirus Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 18:02


The Supreme Court strikes down President Biden's vaccine mandate for businesses with 100 or more employees. But the justices are allowing a mandate for healthcare workers to stand. President Biden is pledging more free at-home tests and high-quality masks for Americans as the Omicron surge continues. Many hospitals are at a breaking point right now. And nurses in Southern California are unhappy with new rules allowing them to come back to work after testing positive for Covid-19 if they don't have any symptoms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Liberty Before Lipstick
End Your Toxic Relationship w/ the Government: Supreme Court Blocks Biden Mandate for Businesses, Inflation, Congress Insider-Trading, & More

Liberty Before Lipstick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 39:38


Liberty Before Lipstick T-shirts: MakeMakeupGreatAgain.comSupport My Show By Joining My Patreon! Your contribution allows me to continue making Freedom Fighting content: www.patreon.com/AmandaEnsingDon't forget to Download, Subscribe, & Share this Podcast so it spreads far and wide! God is elevating voices and uniting His people for such a time as this.God Bless!---- Instagram: AmandaEnsing- Youtube.com/AmandaEnsing- Facebook.com/TheAmandaEnsing- Telegram: https://t.me/amandaensing- MakeMakeupGreatAgain.comSupport the show (https://Patreon.com/AmandaEnsing)

Acquisitions Anonymous
Two Vice Businesses for Sale - Acquisitions Anonymous - e60

Acquisitions Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 41:05


This week we review two businesses for sale in the Vice sector. No guest so you get us 100%! ================== Thanks to our sponsors! David C Barnett Small Business Podcast - If you're interested in learning about buying, selling, financing and managing small and medium sized businesses then you should check out the David C Barnett Small Business and Deal Making Podcast on YouTube and all the major podcast apps. David is offering our listeners a FREE copy of his book; 21 Stupid Things People Do When Trying to Buy a Business. You can find links to download your copy and find David's YouTube channel in the show notes below.” Trout CPA is a full-service accounting firm offering M&A specific services of valuations, quality of earnings studies, and due diligence review services. =================== --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dealtalk/support

Social Media Marketing Podcast
Social Tokens: What Businesses Need to Know

Social Media Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 51:19


Are you wondering what creator coins are? Are you thinking of starting your own token? To discover what social tokens are, how they work, and why they're important to the future of business, I interview Joe Pulizzi.Sponsor: Visit Iconosquare.com/sme | Guest: Joe Pulizzi | Show Notes: socialmediaexaminer.com/493Review our show on Apple Podcasts.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Empowered Business
52: The Power of the Pivot: The Importance of Being Adaptable In The Online Space with Megan Flatt

Empowered Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 48:18


When you run an online business, you really do need to roll with the punches. The online space saw more changes in 2021 than in the previous five years before. Crazy right?! Businesses were thrown for a loop and scrambling to determine their next move.    Needless to say, being flexible in your business and willing to pivot when needed is a vital trait to have if you want to be successful in business these days. In this episode of the Empowered Business podcast, I brought on my very first business coach, Megan Flatt, to talk about finding success through pivoting.    Megan Flatt is the CEO of Let's Collective, a business growth strategy firm devoted to making entrepreneurship easier. She is also the founder of Focus Sessions, a virtual coworking and accountability membership to get your most important work done. Let's Collective's mission is to help small businesses scale without burning out through strategic planning, revenue-focused decisions, and science-backed accountability.   Megan is obsessed with lattes, post-it notes and helping women make money. When not doing that, she's hanging with her husband and two kids, probably near the water, in the San Francisco Bay Area.    Megan knows first-hand the impact that you can have on your business by being open to new ideas and not being afraid to learn something new and go for it. It is so important as an online business owner that you can shift into something new when what you're doing doesn't work anymore.    Tune in to hear her share her tips for shifting from a high-ticket business model to a low-ticket business model, how she plans ahead by working backwards, and so much more.  Resources Mentioned:  Try out Focus Sessions and get $10 off your first month with special code “EMPOWERED” Follow Focus Sessions on Instagram Follow Megan on Instagram Check out Built To Sell: Creating A Business That Can Thrive Without You   I would love to connect on Facebook or Instagram! Show notes available at www.monicafroese.com/52

Pep Talks for Side Hustlers
Ep. 373 - How Entrepreneurs Just Like You Have Built Successful Businesses with Paul Klein of Bizable TV

Pep Talks for Side Hustlers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 45:07


Get access to our free trainings for web designers and DIYers at https://shannonmattern.com/free Leave a Rating + Review! Get the full transcript at shannonmattern.com/373 Bio: Meg Casebolt is the founder of Love At First Search, an agency singularly devoted to helping online businesses get found in search results (like Google, YouTube & iTunes) & turn those new readers into leads, subscribers, and sales. Meg's clients are entrepreneurs who are too busy changing the world to worry about things like website conversion rates and search traffic ... but still want their websites to get found on Google for their brilliance and turn readers. SEO is our vehicle for amplifying female entrepreneurial voices and empowering women to help their families, communities, and the wider world flourish. Connect with Paul: Website Instagram YouTube Free SEO Starter Kit

The Journey
To Have Success, The Choice Needs to Be Yours with Hilary Coles, Co-founder of hims and hers

The Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 15:45


When we're growing up, we're always told that we can be what we want, we can do what we love, and we can have anything as long as we work for it. The harsh reality, though, is that for many people, the options are limited. When it comes to things like jobs, homes, or other huge aspects of life, there's no Cheesecake Factory menu of choices for most people to select from. This is especially true in healthcare, where major industries, governments, and regulators have made it nearly impossible to choose the healthcare you want — or to choose anything at all. “I had a boss who was doing a really important speech, and I knew that he was typically a little bit nervous about speaking in public and he had Propranololl, which is a beta beta blocker and took it and crushed the speech and it was no big deal,” Hilary Coles says. “And it made me think about how many people would never say yes. So few people are given the opportunity to speak, right. And then how many people wouldn't even be able to say yes to that? I think a light bulb really went off then, it was a very impressionable moment for me to think through how you design your life and what capacity, or, or limits you set for yourself based on what you think is possible. What do you choose for yourself when you think that you're not gonna be a good lover in a relationship because you're not in control of your sexual function, what kind of an employee are you gonna be when you have untreated depression and no one to talk to you about and don't feel comfortable sharing that. Like, what are the limits that you set for yourself?”Coles is the co-founder & SVP Brand & Innovation at hims & hers, a company that is bringing the power of choice back into the world of healthcare. But it's not just in business that options matter. Throughout Coles's life, she has found that having options, being given opportunities, and opening up doors is necessary to find success. And when those options aren't there for you, maybe you just have to create them yourself. This is The Journey.Key Takeaways:The Same, But Different: Every person is unique, but their basic needs are all the same. Businesses are similar. Each company has differentiating factors, but at the end of the day, the goal is to meet the needs of and solve problems for customers. When you recognize what those needs are, you will be able to serve them better.Freedom To Choose: Too often, businesses or entire industries put a cap on consumers by limiting the options available to them. Instead, when you open the door to consumers and provide them choices, they feel more empowered and have a better experience, thus making them more loyal.Keep Knocking: Your ideas might be bold, and they might push boundaries, and when they do, you'll likely get shut down again and again. It's important to have conviction and keep pressing forward, even if it means creating a path for yourself.---This season of the Journey is produced by Mission.org and brought to you by UPS. To learn how UPS can help your small business, go to UPS.com/pivot.

Side Hustle School
#1838 - Q&A: “An old-school magazine about old-school businesses…”

Side Hustle School

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 6:14


This caller wants to start a print publication—nothing digital! What's the business model of this potential business magazine?  Side Hustle School features a new episode EVERY DAY, featuring detailed case studies of people who earn extra money without quitting their job. This year, the show includes free guided lessons and listener Q&A several days each week. Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.

The $100 MBA Show
MBA1960 Q&A Wednesday: My first 3 businesses failed. Is business right for me?

The $100 MBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 14:51


Fact: entrepreneurship is not for everyone. The truth is that not everyone is right for independent business. Some people thrive more, contribute more, and live more happily by working a conventional job.  But how do you know which category you fall into? It’s Q&A Wednesday, and we’ve got a listener with several business failures under […] The post MBA1960 Q&A Wednesday: My first 3 businesses failed. Is business right for me? appeared first on The $100 MBA.

Mark Simone
Hour 2 Bob Saget's cause of death still unknown.

Mark Simone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 33:07


Businesses are rallying against Alvin Bragg. Howie Carr interview

Morning Shift Podcast
Chicago Businesses Weigh In On City Vaccine Mandate

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:32


It's been one week since Cook County and Chicago rolled out a vaccine mandate for most indoor spaces. The order requires customers five and older to show proof of vaccination at restaurants, bars, gyms and movie theaters. Reset checks in with several business owners and staff for an update on how they're handling the mandate.

Framework with Jamie Hopkins
Phil Loughlin: Investing in Founder-Led Businesses

Framework with Jamie Hopkins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 43:56


This week, Jamie Hopkins and Ana Trujillo Limon talk with Phil Loughlin, Managing Director at Bain Capital Private Equity, about what it takes to be a successful founder, why investors go for founder-led businesses, and why reciprocal partnership is needed between the investor and the founder. You can find show notes and other information at CarsonGroup.com/Framework.

Action and Ambition
Alexa D'Agostino Helps Other Entrepreneurs Scale Their Businesses By Giving Them The Skill Set Needed To Get To The Next Level

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:03


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Alexa D'Agostino, a serial 8-figure entrepreneur, business coach, consultant, investor, and higher education executive. She is a forward-thinking technology enthusiast who uses the combined power of technology, creativity, messaging, and data to bring forth a new strategic marketing class to grow organizations. Alexa has owned 15 businesses with five exits. 300+ businesses scaled to 6,7,8 and 9 figures. Don't miss a thing on this!

Success Profiles Radio
Adam Shaffer Discusses Starting, Scaling, and Selling Successful E-Commerce Businesses

Success Profiles Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 58:31


Art Marketing Podcast: How to Sell Art Online and Generate Consistent Monthly Sales
#39 Our Top 10 Takeaways from GROWING Art Businesses in 2021

Art Marketing Podcast: How to Sell Art Online and Generate Consistent Monthly Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 98:53


Where to go from here? Have a question of your own? Join us for an Art Business Workshop. 3x Weekly Zoom calls where you can join other artists and photographers as we discuss the business of selling art both online and off. Come with your questions and get some free consulting. You can register here.

The Joe Pags Show
The Supreme Court listens to oral arguments on vaccine mandates for large businesses

The Joe Pags Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 110:16


It's a Free Speech Friday. What's really going on with Coronavirus in America? Dr. Brett Giroir will be on to talk about that. Ken Cuccinelli comes on to talk about the border and voting integrity, and Rudy Giuliani on Jan 6th.

Tactical Leadership
Tactical Friday: Do the Math to Score Business Success

Tactical Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 16:29


“A video allows you to meet someone's interest and build business development funnels and not just be out there making videos.” - Andrew Myers Welcome to this episode of Tactical Friday! In today's episode, Andrew Myers is back to tell us how video-making benefits organizations. By employing practical knowledge and skills, not necessarily professionally done, businessowners can take advantage of this tool to reveal the formula for business success. Andrew had his home security camera video go massively viral in 2017. He was seen wrestling to the ground an intruder who was about to break into his home. As a Military Paratrooper veteran, Andrew happened to have the skills needed to hold down the assailant until the police arrived. The original video gained over 10 million views and gave Andrew his 15 minutes of fame by appearing on many of the morning talk shows to discuss what happened. He took his shrewd business and marketing skills and turned the attention to a much needed cause. Knowing full well the unfortunate number of veterans who take their own lives each year, Andrew partnered with Paws and Stripes who offer an emotional support dog that can help keep more veterans alive. Watch his recap video (631k views) on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/watch/?extid=SEO----&v=1820801874613145 (https://www.facebook.com/watch/?extid=SEO----&v=1820801874613145)  “Thieves should never take for granted that behind that door they want to break into might not be a paratrooper just like me willing to push the line of confrontation and be more prepared for a fight than they are.” BIOGRAPHY Andrew began in sales and marketing at 16 years old selling toys door to door and eventually stumbled into the world of selling cars at staffed event sales all over the country. Both jobs required a keen understanding of short, succinct, powerful sales language that worked more often than not! In 2008, he explored a passion for making videos and successfully started a nationally recognized custom video studio with his brother in the heart of Seattle that was focused on the Automotive Industry and creating strong sales-optimized videos. What's Next Media was later purchased by an automotive advertising company. His second venture was systematically built to address all the problems he encountered in the large agency setting and doubled down to be an even more video-centric organization. He focused on using a series of video ads in concert with each other to digitally mimic the naturally more conversational sales process, rather than just producing “one-off” offer announcement type ads. The new idea helps small business owners build a system for their brand's prospects where they are consistently seeing the right ad, served at the right time, with the right messaging to influence and engage anywhere in the purchase journey. While training clients and their staff, Andrew began teaching across the country the skills needed for business people to create their own ad content he uses in-house to populate the ads his agency creates. Providing quality training and removing this large barrier for both salespeople and organizations to create or obtain quality video content was key to finding success. Combining his extensive knowledge of selling people, not products and a videographer's storytelling ability he has compiled an extensive library of tips, tricks and examples to help anyone with a cell phone make “videos that don't suck” that influence prospects and provide a more engaging experience.     [00:01 - 00:40] Opening Segment If you have a platform and you want to create content that DELIVERS, go over tohttp://knightly.productions/ ( knightly.productions)! For the first part of my interview with Andrew, tune in to last Monday's episode    [00:41 - 14:06] How Impactful is Creating Videos for Businesses? How video rules everything The juice is worth the squeeze. Professional skill is not needed It is not...

Tough Business
Constantly upgrade your businesses aesthetic | TB131

Tough Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 41:45


On this episode of "Tough Business," John Fosco is talking about the importance of visuals in your business. From the look of your business's website all the way down to the cleanliness of the bathroom. He shares how you subconsciously build trust and comfort with customers based on your presentation to them. (directly & indirectly) Don't be a lazy business owner! Subscribe: Tough Business

eCommerce Lifestyle
Will Supply Chain Issues Disrupt Dropshipping Businesses?

eCommerce Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 10:42


Will supply chain issues disrupt dropshipping businesses? When will supply chain issues disappear? What can you do about supply chain issues today to keep sales coming in? Anton answers these questions and more in today's episode of the eCommerce Lifestyle Podcast. -- If you'd like a free trial (no credit card required) for Shopify you can join through our partner link here: https://www.shopify.com/free-trial/dropshiplifestyle If you'd like more advanced training you can register for my upcoming webinar here: http://www.dropshipwebinar.com

TED Talks Daily
What makes a job "good" -- and the case for investing in people | Warren Valdmanis

TED Talks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 11:22


Businesses need to stop cutting labor costs and start investing in people, says social impact investor Warren Valdmanis. In this perspective-shifting talk, he breaks down the essential ingredients of a "good" job -- which is more than just the size of a paycheck -- and shares why they're key to building great companies.

TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What makes a job "good" -- and the case for investing in people | Warren Valdmanis

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 11:22


Businesses need to stop cutting labor costs and start investing in people, says social impact investor Warren Valdmanis. In this perspective-shifting talk, he breaks down the essential ingredients of a "good" job -- which is more than just the size of a paycheck -- and shares why they're key to building great companies.

TED Talks Daily (HD video)
What makes a job "good" -- and the case for investing in people | Warren Valdmanis

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 11:22


Businesses need to stop cutting labor costs and start investing in people, says social impact investor Warren Valdmanis. In this perspective-shifting talk, he breaks down the essential ingredients of a "good" job -- which is more than just the size of a paycheck -- and shares why they're key to building great companies.

Acquisitions Anonymous
Two MRO Businesses for Sale - Josh Schultz (ENCORE episode) - e59

Acquisitions Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 45:14


This week's episode is one of our favorites for the year. Josh Schultz (twitter: @joshuamschultz) who helps us through two deals in the MRO (maintenance, repair, operations) equipment space. Fascinating one. Check it out on your podcast app! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dealtalk/support

Best Morning Routine, Ever!
Bootstrapping Businesses From Zero Revenue To Profitability w/ Bryan Clayton

Best Morning Routine, Ever!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 24:38


Bryan Clayton is CEO and cofounder of GreenPal an online marketplace that connects homeowners with Local lawn care professionals. GreenPal has been called the “Uber for lawn care” by Entrepreneur magazine and has over 200,000 active users completing thousands of transactions per day. Before starting GreenPal Bryan Clayton founded Peachtree Inc. one of the largest landscaping companies in the state of Tennessee growing it to over $10 million a year in annual revenue before it was acquired by Lusa holdings in 2013. Bryan‘s interest and expertise are related to entrepreneurialism, small business growth, marketing and bootstrapping businesses from zero revenue to profitability and exit. Let's see how he Get up, Dress up, and Show up! CONNECT WITH HIM https://www.yourgreenpal.com/ Personal transformation takes time, subscribe now, and let's grow together!  ----------------------------------------­­­­­­­----------------

Breaking Banks Fintech
Episode 423: 2022 Year of Small Business(es) Globally

Breaking Banks Fintech

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 59:58


Three visionaries leading payments and financial services forward are spotlighted in today's episode with hosts JP Nicols and Amber Buker. Hany Fam, Founder and CEO, Markaaz whose mission is to connect every small business on the planet with a game changing platform that protects and helps businesses grow with a trusted network of suppliers so small business clients can focus on THEIR mission -- growing customers and revenue. Then John Sun, Founder, Spring Labs, who is looking to a future of secure data exchange to unlock data's value for a more inclusive, efficient and secure global financial ecosystem for all, to include 'thin file' or 'credit invisible' consumers, by creating incentives for institutions to provide data not previously factored into the credit reporting ecosystem. Finally, Itamar Jobani, Co-Founder, PayEm, a spend and procurement platform designed to take the pain out of monthly reimbursements, managing requests and invoices, while billing and sending payments globally and in a wide variety of currencies. A little something for everyone to start the year off right! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URxg0S_iBNQ

The CyberWire
CISA reports progress on Log4j. The FTC warns US businesses about taking Log4j risk mitigation seriously. Gangland updates, and some notes on hybrid war.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 30:39


CISA says US Federal agencies are now largely in compliance with Log4j risk mitigation guidance. The FTC issues advice and a warning on Log4j to US businesses. A skimmer is installed through cloud-delivered video. The Vice Society's ransomware is meddling with supermarket operations in the UK. The Atlantic Council offers advice on strategy for the grey zone. Hacktivists are expected to punish greenwashing in 2022. Caleb Barlow on recent FBI PIN about how ransomware operators are looking for material non-public information to improve their chances of being paid. Our guest is Helen Patton from Cisco on her book, Navigating the Cybersecurity Career Path. And James Pond is the CEO of hybrid war! For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/3

That Entrepreneur Life
Episode 105 - Turning ADHD Into An Entrepreneurial Superpower with John Torrens

That Entrepreneur Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:57


Join Andrew Lees, Clint McPherson, and their guest John Torrens as they discuss how ADHD can be approached and maximized for entrepreneurial success. John shares his approach to leading as an entrepreneur with ADHD. He also reflects on the tricks that help work with—not against—ADHD and how the two types of ADHD impacts function in work and business. For John, it's important to respect how your teams work best as a leader. One way to do that is to refrain from delegating work during the weekends, especially at night. In this episode you will learn: Businesses aren't systemized to maximize talents with mental conditions The Inattentive and Hyperactive-Impulsive Types of ADHD Mindfulness helps ADHD Having a #2 in your organization is crucial Your team don't work the same way you do And so much more! About John Torrens: Dr. Torrens is an award-winning Professor of Entrepreneurial practice and two-time Inc. 5000 entrepreneur. He was diagnosed with ADHD as an adult and has experienced both the negative effects as well as the positive effects related to starting and growing a company. He is a healthcare and education entrepreneur with 25 years leading high-growth companies with experience in developing high-performing teams, raising capital, and both buy/sell-side M&A. Dr. Torrens is a faculty member of the Syracuse University Whitman School of Management's Department of Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises. He is a frequent guest speaker and executive education instructor in the areas of entrepreneurship, strategy, and corporate innovation. Dr. Torrens is a TEDx speaker (ADHD as an Entrepreneur's Superpower) and is quoted frequently in print media, has written several articles, and has delivered multiple presentations on the business of healthcare. Dr. John is an active member of the Young Presidents Organization (YPO) and served in multiple volunteer leadership positions, including a term on the International Board of Directors (2013-2015). You can find John Torrens on… LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmtorrens/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnMTorrens You can find That Entrepreneur Life on… Website: https://thatentrepreneurlife.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thatentrepreneurlife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatentrepreneurlifeusa/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThatEntreprene1 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFKPkF39Z6r2l9AT4k-tDtg --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/that-entrepreneur-life/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/that-entrepreneur-life/support

Powerful Ladies Podcast
Episode 149: The Power of Composting & Turning Habits into Businesses with Monique Figueiredo

Powerful Ladies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 69:44


Today we get to talk about DIRT, well technically soil, with Mo Figueiredo, the founder of Compostable LA, a community based composting company.  She never imagined she'd be an entrepreneur, let alone having a business in composting and yet, in this episode we discuss why it matters so much and how it's checking all her boxes for fulfillment and purpose. I hope you enjoy this episode as much as I enjoyed chatting with her.

Action and Ambition
TransPerfect Provides Language Services and Technology Solutions For Businesses Globally

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:19


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Phil Shawe, President, and CEO of TransPerfect. TransPerfect is a global family of companies and the world's largest privately-held provider of language and business services. Under Phil's leadership, TransPerfect has received numerous awards and distinctions. It is a seven-time honoree of the Inc. 5000 Award, a six-time honoree of the Deloitte Technology Fast 500, and has multiple Stevie Awards for Sales and Customer Service. Tune in to learn more on this!

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
Subscription-Based Businesses: How To Manage the Transition & Leverage Data w/ Robbie Kellman Baxte

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 29:57


Most people today have a subscription to some product or service. Or leaching a streaming subscription from a friend or family member… No judgment. But when we think about subscription services as a business, what keeps us renewing month after month and how can businesses continue to improve that experience? We speak with Robbie Kellman Baxter, Strategy Consultant at Peninsula Strategies, and author of "The Membership Economy" and "The Forever Transaction", about businesses transitioning to subscription-based, the associated benefits, and the challenges those businesses will have to navigate. In this episode, we discuss: Discussing a subscription based economy Cultural changes for businesses moving to subscription-based How to leverage data effectively Advice to the audience Now that you know the benefits of subscription-based and how to transition your business, are you ready to learn how to build trust and confidence with your content strategy or how to optimize your tech stack? Check out the full list of episodes: The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. 

The My Wife Quit Her Job Podcast With Steve Chou
386: What Sucked In 2021 What Went Well With Our Businesses With Steve Chou

The My Wife Quit Her Job Podcast With Steve Chou

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:58


Today I'm doing a solo episode to wrap up 2021! I talk about what went well in 2021 and what didn't work well. I'm also discuss my family life, what's been on my mind and what's in store for 2022 for both Bumblebee Linens and My Wife Quit Her Job. Enjoy the episode! What You’ll Learn A critical update that crippled our traffic and how we responded How we recovered from the many mishaps of 2021 What’s in store for 2022 for both businesses Other Resources And Books Create A Profitable Online Store Course Create A Profitable Audience Course Sponsors […] The post 386: What Sucked In 2021 What Went Well With Our Businesses With Steve Chou appeared first on MyWifeQuitHerJob.com.