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  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about businesses

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Latest podcast episodes about businesses

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Jason Peterson and Jake Kheel

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 63:38


As Chairman of GoDigital Media Group (godigitalmg.com), Jason Peterson and his four other companies -- Cinq Music a multi-Grammy winning indie label, publisher and distributor (cinqmusic.com), Latido Music, the #1 Hispanic targeted multi-platform music television network with over 3 billion streams per month (latidomusic.com), ContentBridge and AdShare (adshare.tv) have blazed the path to re-monetizing the music industry. Five years ago, the music industry was the weak link in the entertainment industry, with revenues down over 50 percent. Peterson wondered where all the revenue went, since people were actually listening to more music, not less. While others spoke in apocalyptic terms about the music industry, Peterson knew that it could all be turned around, especially for the artist, and created a system. Peterson has been a major force in changing the way music is marketed, consumed and distributed around the world. The music industry is booming once again! Artists signed or catalogs acquired by Peterson include Janet Jackson, T.I., Master P, Jason Derulo and Daddy Yankee. He's produced dozens of major music videos that have won “Video of the Year” at the Gospel Music Awards, MTV Latin Video Music Awards as well as “Best Directorial Debut” at the MVPA awards. Most recently, he co-produced the video for Janet Jackson and Daddy Yankee's “Made for Now.” Peterson's Adshare was one of the first companies to monetize music videos on YouTube, giving artists what amounts to an annuity for life. GoDigital Media Group invests in music as intellectual property, making music catalogs an ever more popular alternative investment. Cinq Music now leverages social media in ways never thought possible to unite fans and globalize artists of all genres. Peterson was named Billboard's top 100 POWER PLAYERS for 2018, Media Play News Magazine's Top 40 under 40, the youngest producer to get a film accepted into Sundance, attended USC (Film Business) and obtained his law degree from Pepperdine University. He is on the Boards of the following music organizations:MERLIN: global collective bargaining organization for independent labelA2iM: the trade group for American independent labelsWIN: representing the global independent label communityEntertainment Merchants Association: representing the $43B/yr home entertainment industry City of Hope Music, Film & Entertainment Board: helping raise over $130M for cancer research The Recording Academy Government Advocacy CommitteeUSC Business Cinematic Arts Program Advisory BoardNamed Billboard's top 100 POWER PLAYERS for 2018Media Play News Magazine's Top 40 under 40http://godigitalmg.com/Jake Kheel is a sustainability innovator, author, and award-winning documentary filmmaker. For sixteen years he has confronted social and environmental challenges in the tourism industry as Vice President of Grupo Puntacana Foundation in the Dominican Republic. The foundation has pioneered numerous ground-breaking initiatives, launching the first Zero Waste project in the country, as well as leading one of the most expansive coral reef restoration initiatives in the Caribbean. Under his leadership, Grupo Puntacana Foundation has received numerous international awards for its environmental programs, including awards from World Tourism and Travel Council, Conde Nast Traveler, Travel & Leisure, and National Geographic Traveler. His book, Waking the Sleeping Giant: Unlocking the Hidden Power of Business to Save Our Planet, uses examples from his vast experience in Punta Cana to demonstrate how companies can drive breakthroughs in sustainability.Jake is on the Board of the Center for Responsible Tourism (CREST) and former President of the National Association of Businesses for Environmental Protection (ECORED) in the Dominican Republic, an association of nearly 100 prominent companies committed to sustainability.Jake co-directed and produced the award-winning documentary film Death by a Thousand Cuts, which explores Dominican-Haitian deforestation and escalating human conflict on the border. The film was acquired by Participant Media and Univision and screened at three dozen international film festivals. He is currently producing a hosted documentary series, Island Naturalist, to be released in 2022.Jake has a Master's in Environmental Management from Cornell University and a B.A. from Wesleyan University. http://www.jakekheel.com/ The Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
Why unifying your departments and data could be the biggest growth level you pull (with Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer at Tradeswell)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:03


“You need one single unified environment to manage your businesses” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's such a connectivity between how a digital commerce grows, and you really need to have all of that data in one environment.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“The digital commerce landscape has changed in terms of consumer expectations for speed and shipping costs.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's a great opportunity, I think, for innovation still with meeting that need for discoverability and experience for consumers.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“Everything can be measured. That's the beauty of digital.” @jbernard23 #DTCPODWe Speak About:[00:59] Julie introduces herself and Tradeswell [02:47] Marketing and how it relates to other departments of the business[05:40] Recording data and what to do with it [08:33] Key differences in how consumers buy[12:43] importance of embracing technology[16:24] The present and future role of AI [20:07] Businesses sizes and technology [22:07] internal business strategies to implement before technology[24:51] Key learnings working with brands post-pandemic [28:12] What's next for Tradeswell and where to find the brand, and Julie BernardHow Tradeswell helps brands create profit through data Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer of Tradeswell, joins the POD to give some insight on the business's actionable insights, customer experience, and marketing data & technology  Tradeswell is a company that helps brands unify data, leverage AI-generated insights and accelerate essential decisions to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape.Julie realizes that to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape, the data and business operations function better when unified.A unique approach is taken by creating a quantitative trading platform that implements real-time algorithms and insights, to uncover and execute the optimal actions companies need to growJulie recognizes that technology can help small businesses operate at the same level of sophistication as their larger business counterparts.Understanding you data, and drawing insights from it, is key to growthTradeswell stands out as a platform that simplifies the process for a brand to visualize the whole picture of their ecommerce business, while leveraging machine learning to receive insights and cross-channel operations.The company understands that the technologies that are out there are more cost effective, accessible, and sophisticated than ever, and the brand works to help others make informed decisions Julie takes the approach of integrating authentical actionable insights and team empowerment to achieve success within the business The brand further acknowledges that just because it can be measured through data, does not mean that it shouldJulie recommends to to draw some conclusions and have insights on the data that you do have rather than being on a perpetual pursuit of perfectionStay tuned as Julie discusses AI and post-pandemic business learnings. If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:Tradeswell Website: https://www.tradeswell.com/Julie Bernard's Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/jbernard23

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Businesses under pressure due to a chronic staff shortage - Бизнисите под притисок поради хроничен недостаток на персонал

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:02


The Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that unemployment is still at only 4.6 per cent - even though nearly 140,000 people lost their jobs last month.But businesses are grappling with staff shortages due to the pandemic-induced closure of international borders causing a plunge in Australia's migrant intake. - Австралиското биро за статистика известува дека невработеноста е сеуште на само 4,6 проценти - иако речиси 140.000 луѓе ги загубија своите работни места минатиот месец. Но, бизнисите се борат со недостаток на персонал поради затворањето на меѓународните граници предизвикани од пандемија, предизвикувајќи пад на внесот на мигранти во Австралија.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Should businesses go mask-optional if their employees are 100% vaccinated?

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Dr. Vishnu Chundi, chair of the Chicago Medical Society’s COVID-19 task force, joins Jon Hansen (filling-in for Steve Bertrand) on Chicago’s Afternoon News to explain why they are recommending eased masking requirements for businesses where their workers are 100% vaccinated. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @SteveBertrand Follow @kpowell720 Follow @maryvandeveldeFollow @LaurenLapka

Mafia Truths with John Alite
The Most Lucrative Money-Making Businesses For the Mafia - John Alite Talks Drugs and the Mafia

Mafia Truths with John Alite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:26


On this episode, John Alite goes into a host of subjects, including some of the most lucrative money-making businesses the mafia went into. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-johnny--gene-show/support

Business Innovators Radio
Dr. Ginger Bratzel Marketing Strategist-Helping Healthcare Providers & Service Based Businesses Attract Ideal Clients & Patients

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:38


Ginger started her professional career as a dentist where she developed systems and strategies to increase patient and client attraction to createbusiness growth. From Ginger's own success, soon health care providers and other service providers from around the country were asking her to work with them in their businesses, too, And she quickly began coaching private clients on how to do it, as well. Ginger was invited to consult and be the lead coach for one of the largest healthcare marketing companies in the nation to their top-level clients teaching them her proven step-by-step program to show owners exactly how to attract more of the right kind of patients, clients, and customers. Ginger is known for her “no holds barred and shoot straight from the hip” approach to business growth as well as getting and keeping clients.Learn More: https://gingerbratzel.com/standoutInfluential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/dr-ginger-bratzel-marketing-strategist-helping-healthcare-providers-service-based-businesses-attract-ideal-clients-patients

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Dr. Ginger Bratzel Marketing Strategist-Helping Healthcare Providers & Service Based Businesses Attract Ideal Clients & Patients

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:38


Ginger started her professional career as a dentist where she developed systems and strategies to increase patient and client attraction to createbusiness growth. From Ginger's own success, soon health care providers and other service providers from around the country were asking her to work with them in their businesses, too, And she quickly began coaching private clients on how to do it, as well. Ginger was invited to consult and be the lead coach for one of the largest healthcare marketing companies in the nation to their top-level clients teaching them her proven step-by-step program to show owners exactly how to attract more of the right kind of patients, clients, and customers. Ginger is known for her “no holds barred and shoot straight from the hip” approach to business growth as well as getting and keeping clients.Learn More: https://gingerbratzel.com/standoutInfluential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/dr-ginger-bratzel-marketing-strategist-helping-healthcare-providers-service-based-businesses-attract-ideal-clients-patients

The Business Lounge Podcast
Legal Issues When Working From Home

The Business Lounge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:15


Businesses should be aware that even though their employees are working from the comfort of their homes, workplace policies still apply. In this video is a series of topics that employers and employees should consider when operating in a work-from-home environment. Read the full article here: https://www.oflaherty-law.com/learn-about-law/legal-issues-when-working-from-home O'Flaherty Law now serves over 105 counties across Illinois, Iowa, and Indiana. If you have any questions regarding a case or would like to speak to one of our attorneys after watching a #LearnAboutLaw video, give us a call at (630) 324-6666 or send us an email at info@oflaherty-law.com to get in contact with someone from our team. Subscribe to our channel for daily videos dedicated to all things law and leave a comment with any questions about this topic. Find us online for more legal content and to stay connected with our team - Website: https://www.oflaherty-law.com/ - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/oflahertylaw - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oflahertylaw - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oflahertylawGroup/ **None of the content in this series is intended as paid legal advice. This video will provide a legal checklist for employers and employees in a remote working environment. We will cover the following topics: Maintaining nondiscriminatory work-from-home policies, How to monitor employee productivity and communications, Proper timekeepingIs overtime still applicable for remote work?, Enforcing breaks, Are employers required to provide equipment for remote workers?, Sick pay, OSHA requirements when working from home, Maintaining disability accommodations, and Work-from-home versus remote work

Why We Plan
What Business Owners Don't Know About Their Businesses…The Big Picture

Why We Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 19:46


Business owners often don't know where to turn to start the planning process. The advisors that are making a real impact today are taking a step back and talking about the big picture with their business owner clients. For many owners, this is their first time exiting a business. They don't know what they don't know. Tune in to learn how you can help fill in the gaps for your owner clients.

My First Million
Near Death Accidents, Hitting $1B ARR, and Selling Like the Grateful Dead with Brian Halligan, Founder & Executive Chairman of HubSpot

My First Million

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 56:55


Brian Halligan (@BHalligan), founder & executive chairman (and former CEO) of HubSpot, joins Sam (@TheSamParr) and Shaan (@ShaanVP) to discuss what he learned from nearly dying in a snowmobile accident, how he took HubSpot from nothing to $1 billion in ARR, and what he learned about marketing from the Grateful Dead. He also discusses what he does day-to-day, why he has always preferred inbound marketing, how to manage creatives, and much more. --------- * Do you love MFM and want to see Sam and Shaan's smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel. * Want more insights like MFM? Check out Shaan's newsletter. --------- Show Notes: * (1:37) Brian's snowmobiling accident that nearly killed him * (7:18) How Brian's life has changed since * (13:07) What Brian actually does day-to-day * (28:39) Why has always Brian preferred inbound marketing * (32:00) Businesses that can be built on top of HubSpot * (33:34) Org chart business opportunities * (36:14) Climate Tech Opportunities * (50:50) How to Manage Creatives * (55:35) What the Grateful Dead can teach us about marketing

Exit Stories
Basis State's Paolo DiVincenzo on his own experiences founding, growing, and exiting sub-scale businesses

Exit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 43:34


Paolo DiVincenzo, Co-founder and Managing Partner of Basis State, joins host Kevin Mosley. They run through Paolo's vast founding and exiting experiences with his own companies. Poalo also talks about his more recent endeavor with Basis State, helping sub-scale tech businesses find their strategic exit.

The Ag View Pitch
An Economic Outlook and How Our Businesses Might be Impacted

The Ag View Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:43


Chris talks with Dr. Bill Conerly who will be one of the outstanding speakers at the Ag View Executive Business Conference in Phoenix, Arizona on January 26, 27, and 28th. Bill is a business economics consultant, a Senior Contributor to Forbes and a Duke University Ph.D. He has worked in economics and corporate planning at two Fortune 500 corporations and at a major bank, where he was senior vice president. Chris and Bill discuss numerous factors currently influencing the economy including inflation, supply chain disruptions, interest rates, managing working capital, labor issues, trade, and the potential impacts from various tax increase proposals. 

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
244 Digital and Analog Businesses with Robert Siegel, VC and Author of “The Brains and the Brawn Company”

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Most businesses are now a hybrid of analog and digital. The question is, how do we get the right mix? Also, how do we know what and when to digitally transform, or keep parts of our business analog? These are just some of the questions that board CEOs and executive teams are grappling with. In this episode of Follow your Different, Robert Siegel will help us get a better grasp at it. Robert Siegel is a Venture Capitalist and a Stanford lecturer. He has a new book out called The Brains and Brawn Company, and it cracks open many of these kinds of questions. It also provides real research and insight from leading companies in their respective industries, coupled with Robert's years in Silicon Valley and the entrepreneurial world. If you're building companies today, or you want to build a legendary company heading into the future, you're going to love everything about our dialogue.   Robert Siegel on Digital Transformation Digital Transformation seems to have become a catch-all phrase that people in the industry use to describe new technology or migrating certain things online. While it may not seem like much of an issue. It becomes a problem when the supposed “experts” start suggesting that undergoing a Digital Transformation should be done ASAP to improve your company. “I think that what I've learned in my time as a venture capitalist, and also in the teaching that I do at Stanford, is that digital transformation is kind of necessary, but not sufficient. That the world that we're living in, is increasingly a blend of digital and physical. And so if you only talk about digital transformation, everything talks about the ones and zeros. Everyone talks about software and connectivity. But people forget, we actually live in a physical world.” – Robert Siegel   The Brain and Brawn Company We then get into the discussion of Robert's new book, The Brain and Brawn Company. Robert explains that having both Brain and Brawns is necessary for a company. The Brain being the creative and analytical aspects of business, as well as the digital parts of it. While the Brawn is the physical aspects, like dealing with logistics, manufacturing, and such. So the optimal setup is having a good mix of “brains” and “brawn” in your company. According to Robert, they don't deal with those who wish to have a pure digital software platform, because that is not a sustainable model. “Those companies aren't going to be successful as we get into a world where things are increasingly blended between digital and physical, and every product and service that we make is connected. And every industry is going to be impacted from not only things like mobility, but healthcare, financial services, there really is education, there isn't an industry that won't be impacted by this blend of digital and physical.” – Robert Siegel Of course, there are business that can go pure digital, but companies in general still need a good blend of digital and analog systems in place to function efficiently.   The Right Mix of Digital and Analog That said, what is a good mix of digital and analog for a business? According to Robert, it depends for each business. One of the things to look at is how different systems work in your company. After understanding them, find out if going digital can improve the service, or make it more efficient in the long run. Of course, there are certain aspects that still need analog aspects, even within digital spaces. Take for instance ordering online. While the whole thing can be made digital nowadays, there are still analog competencies like logistics and customer experience that need to be accounted for. Or the opposite can also be true, like adding digital improvements to delivery tracking, so that customers know the real-time location of their on-going delivery. So in the end, it's best to find the right mix for your own company.   To hear more from Robert Siegel and how to find the right mix of digital and analog in your business,

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
244 Digital and Analog Businesses with Robert Siegel, VC and Author of “The Brains and the Brawn Company”

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Most businesses are now a hybrid of analog and digital. The question is, how do we get the right mix? Also, how do we know what and when to digitally transform, or keep parts of our business analog? These are just some of the questions that board CEOs and executive teams are grappling with. In this episode of Follow your Different, Robert Siegel will help us get a better grasp at it. Robert Siegel is a Venture Capitalist and a Stanford lecturer. He has a new book out called The Brains and Brawn Company, and it cracks open many of these kinds of questions. It also provides real research and insight from leading companies in their respective industries, coupled with Robert's years in Silicon Valley and the entrepreneurial world. If you're building companies today, or you want to build a legendary company heading into the future, you're going to love everything about our dialogue.   Robert Siegel on Digital Transformation Digital Transformation seems to have become a catch-all phrase that people in the industry use to describe new technology or migrating certain things online. While it may not seem like much of an issue. It becomes a problem when the supposed “experts” start suggesting that undergoing a Digital Transformation should be done ASAP to improve your company. “I think that what I've learned in my time as a venture capitalist, and also in the teaching that I do at Stanford, is that digital transformation is kind of necessary, but not sufficient. That the world that we're living in, is increasingly a blend of digital and physical. And so if you only talk about digital transformation, everything talks about the ones and zeros. Everyone talks about software and connectivity. But people forget, we actually live in a physical world.” – Robert Siegel   The Brain and Brawn Company We then get into the discussion of Robert's new book, The Brain and Brawn Company. Robert explains that having both Brain and Brawns is necessary for a company. The Brain being the creative and analytical aspects of business, as well as the digital parts of it. While the Brawn is the physical aspects, like dealing with logistics, manufacturing, and such. So the optimal setup is having a good mix of “brains” and “brawn” in your company. According to Robert, they don't deal with those who wish to have a pure digital software platform, because that is not a sustainable model. “Those companies aren't going to be successful as we get into a world where things are increasingly blended between digital and physical, and every product and service that we make is connected. And every industry is going to be impacted from not only things like mobility, but healthcare, financial services, there really is education, there isn't an industry that won't be impacted by this blend of digital and physical.” – Robert Siegel Of course, there are business that can go pure digital, but companies in general still need a good blend of digital and analog systems in place to function efficiently.   The Right Mix of Digital and Analog That said, what is a good mix of digital and analog for a business? According to Robert, it depends for each business. One of the things to look at is how different systems work in your company. After understanding them, find out if going digital can improve the service, or make it more efficient in the long run. Of course, there are certain aspects that still need analog aspects, even within digital spaces. Take for instance ordering online. While the whole thing can be made digital nowadays, there are still analog competencies like logistics and customer experience that need to be accounted for. Or the opposite can also be true, like adding digital improvements to delivery tracking, so that customers know the real-time location of their on-going delivery. So in the end, it's best to find the right mix for your own company.   To hear more from Robert Siegel and how to find the right mix of digital and analog in your business,

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP40: Using Marketing Feedback Loops and Hard Data to Drive Scalable Growth w/ Erik Huberman

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:09


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Erik Huberman, Founder & CEO of Hawke Media, a LA-based full-service marketing consultancy. The company has serviced over 2000 brands of all sizes, ranging from startups to household names like Red Bull, Verizon, and Alibaba.Businesses traditionally make annual plans for functions like Finance, HR and Marketing. Marketing, like everything else, is measured month-on-month. But this traditional way of planning and reporting could very well be holding you back. With access to tons of real time data and tools to analyse this data, the game has changed. If you aren't taking an iterative approach to your marketing plans then you risk getting left behind.In this episode, Kunle and Erik talk about leveraging marketing data to create an iterative marketing strategy. You will get to hear about the 3 pillars of the Hawke Method, fallout of privacy-driven changes, best channels for raising brand awareness and nurturing your audience, and what could be in store for us in Q4. This is a great episode for marketers and business owners.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

SBS World News Radio
Businesses under pressure due to a chronic staff shortage

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 2:57


Staff shortages are hindering many businesses from taking full advantage of the easing of restrictions as the economy opens up.

The My Future Business™ Show

Jimmy St Louis Franchise123 Interview with Franchise123 CEO Jimmy St Louis #Franchise #Franchise123 # JimmyStLouis On today's My Future Business Show I have the pleasure of welcoming to the show, CEO of Franchise123 Jimmy St Louis to talk about franchising, the franchise development industry, and how franchise123 is changing the way franchisors and franchisees connect. Businesses operating in the franchise space are experiencing a wave of major change, as is the franchising trade at large. Accelerated and elevated adoption of technology; consumer demand for more efficient and on-demand service; and employee appeals for greater flexibility are among the many industry pivots that are evolving seemingly by the day. These and other kinds of changes and challenges each have their own implications within the franchise space, a sector projected to open more than 26,000 locations and nearly 800,000 new jobs, employ nearly 8.3 million people and contribute $477 Billion to the U.S. GDP by 2021-year end. The problem, and opportunity, is that the franchise development industry has never experienced the collective and global transparency of franchise data that is now underway. Franchise brokers, consultants and online franchise portals currently dominate the franchise development industry, but these outdated methods do not adequately meet the needs of modern investors. Enter Franchise123. Franchise123 sets out to disrupt the franchise industry, whilst opening the door of opportunity to both franchisors and franchisees by providing a level playing field on which to post franchises and help franchisees make informed decisions about franchising opportunities. To learn more about Franchise123, or to contact Jimmy directly, click the link below. Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored post.” The company who sponsored it compensated My Future Business via a cash payment, gift, or something else of value to produce it. My Future Business is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Upon Arrival | Events & Incentives with Adelaine Ng
Ep 56 The social media opportunity that most hospitality and events businesses are ignoring with Sabrina Meyers

Upon Arrival | Events & Incentives with Adelaine Ng

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:17


You'd think that event profs and hospitality services aimed at business events would be lighting up their social media with their offerings and experiences. But while many have social media accounts, most of the feeds offer irregular and lacklustre content. Sabrina Meyers' mission is to inspire confidence in the industry with strategies to optimise their social platforms and win more clients. Sabrina Meyers is a visibility coach and strategist to the Event Industry on all things social media. She is the Founder of Hot Hospitality Exchange and The Get Visible Collective, an online community for event and hospitality professionals learning how to level up their social media to maximise online engagement, reach and growth. Sabrina is also an experienced speaker and event moderator for in-person, hybrid and virtual events.Quotes from Episode:"Do not post and ghost. You need to start engaging with people. You need to start going to other people within your space, within your industry, and say hi... It's still the same rules. If you're not going to engage with other people, they're not going to follow you.""(When it comes to social media with our industry), I want to say we're at fetal stage. That's bad. And I'm honest about it because I've been banging on about this for years. I don't think we  come anywhere near comparable to business travel or leisure travel.""It doesn't take that much to be visible, considering where our industry is at, in terms of adoption to social media. It's very low hanging fruit." -Sabrina MeyersDon't miss:-How Sabrina's career evolved from working with the top hotels in London to becoming the industry's social media queen-How the absence of social content in event planning is a huge opportunity for smaller players right now-How venues can do so much more to expand their story  on social media-Social media as the best and easiest way to build your thought leadership presence-Can you get away with posting the same content on multiple platforms?-How to start building your presence on social media, if you haven't already-Going viral isn't your goal-How to be efficient with your time on social media-Every day is Event Day on social media Sabrina's Recommendations:Social PlatformsPlanolyLaterBufferHootsuiteSprout SocialFaceBook Business ManagerBooksInfluencer: Building Your Personal Brand in the Age of Social Media by Brittany HennessyThe Art of Social Media: Power Tips for Power Users by Guy Kawasaki and Peg FitzpatrickConnect with Sabrina:LinkedIn: @sabrinameyers Facebook: @hothospitalityexchange   YouTube: www.youtube.com/hothospitalityexchangeTwitter/Instagram/TikTok: @hothospitalitye     Get Visible Collective: www.sabrinameyers.com Connect with Adelaine / Sign up for her newsletter:Email: uponarrivalpodcast@gmail.com

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio
Texas governor bans vaccine mandates for private businesses

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:01


Texas Governor Greg Abbott has banned vaccine mandates for private businesses. Will Arizona Governor Doug Ducey do the same? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sales vs. Marketing
Aaron Marino, Alpha M & Serial Entrepreneur | How to Launch Multiple Businesses Off a Personal Brand

Sales vs. Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:13


➡️ Like The Show? Leave A Rating: https://ratethispodcast.com/successstory ➡️ About The Guest For almost 15-years, Aaron Marino has worked with thousands of men from around the world, helping them with their personal style, grooming, fashion, image, wardrobe, and even dating. Aaron Marino has not only expanded his reach with his viral videos but also with a variety of products such as the now-retired style system that was featured on the ABC's Shark Tank. He had a second appearance on Shark Tank with his men's grooming company, Pete & Pedro. Other companies that he owns include Tiege Hanley, MENfluential Media, and ENEMY. ➡️ Talking Points 00:00 - Intro. 11:15 - On pursuing opportunities. 19:29 - Building a personal brand from scratch. 24:10 - The Shark Tank experience. 30:32 - On connecting with the right people. 39:31 - From 2x Shark Tank, to building multiple brands. 49:42 - Why you have to keep moving forward. ➡️ Show Links https://www.youtube.com/user/AlphaMconsulting https://www.instagram.com/aaronmarino/ https://twitter.com/alphamimage ➡️ Podcast Sponsors 1. Better Help —Virtual Therapy & Mental Wellness https://betterhelp.com/scottclary — 10% Off First Month 2. Uprising Food —Healthy & Delicious Low Carb Bread/Food  https://uprisingfood.com/successstory — $10 Off Starter Bundle 3. Nutrafol —Increase Hair Thickness & Volume https://nutrafol.com/ (CODE: successstory) — $15 Off First Month

The Jeff Ward Show
Texas Businesses Oppose Abbott

The Jeff Ward Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:54


Jeff Ward's experience, insight, and unique perspective on football is always in demand. The audience starves for his fearless, agenda-free, and irreverent take on the teams and storylines that matter most. Now, fans can get a steady diet of his football knowledge with regular segments titled “Six Minutes of Football." Follow The Jeff Ward Show on social media: Twitter Instagram Facebook   Jeff Ward is a highly decorated former NCAA football player with extensive ties to the University of Texas. He's been nominated as an Outstanding Young Texas Ex, and while a student at The University of Texas, he was a four-year Letterman in football, a football team captain, a member of the Athletics Director's Academic Honor Roll, a three-time all-conference football player, and a two-time All-American football player. He's among the top five all-time leading scorers at The University of Texas, and he's the NCAA record holder for game-winning field goals. He was selected in the 1988 NFL Draft to play football professionally. The podcast market is oversaturated with NCAA and NFL football content but with Jeff, you get the educated perspective of someone who's lived it.    Jeff has been appearing on both national news and local (Texas-based) news platforms to discuss sports, politics and economics for over 20 years. Jeff's time at The University of Texas provided him with knowledge of worldwide economics, marketing strategies and the economics of sports, particularly with NCAA Football. With the NCAA always finding itself involved in hot-button issues, Jeff Ward explains what's going on behind the scenes.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Miami Global Net
Business | Expanding Operations at an international level w Mike Morroni from TMF Group in Miami & EACC Florida

Miami Global Net

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:47


Businesses are often keen to add to their footprint overseas. International expansion can unlock many benefits, such as increasing brand exposure and customer base, taking advantage of the attractive incentives on offer in certain regions, or enjoying geographical advantages that facilitate an easier flow of goods and services across borders. Mike Morroni, Global Clients Leader and North America Head of Business Development at TMF Group joins us today to talk about Expanding Operations. Qs: miamiglobalnet@gmail.com Guest Contact & links: European American Chamber of Commerce - Florida www.eaccfl.com

DiscoPosse Podcast
Ep 195 Randy Herbertson on Storytelling, Brand, and Identity for Entrepreneurs and Businesses

DiscoPosse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 74:51


Randy is a recognized brand strategist, conceptor, and creative director with over twenty-five years of marketing and innovation experience in the client, agency and media worlds, from entrepreneurial to corporate environments. We discuss the power and importance of storytelling, the choice of medium (and platform), plus core lessons and fundamentals that every entrepreneur or business needs to embrace to successfully amplify their message and value. Check out The Visual Brand here: https://www.thevisualbrand.com/  This episode is brought to you by Veeam Software and the 4-Step Guide to Delivering Extraordinary Software Demos that Win Deals and Diabolical Coffee plus the great folks over at Fiverr!  Want to ensure real privacy online? Check out ExpressVPN and keep your online life protected. 

Landscape Business Course
10 REASONS WHY LAWN CARE BUSINESSES FAIL! (and how to avoid them)

Landscape Business Course

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 13:28


Watch the full video: https://youtu.be/Cvkde88BJn8

The Mark Davis Show
October 13, 2021 9am Hour

The Mark Davis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:18


Businesses thwarting Greg​ ​Abbott executive order; a visit with Gary​ ​Puckett of Union Gap fame See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rise Guys
THE RISE GUYS: HOUR ONE: 10/13/21

The Rise Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 34:56


Businesses that share the same name but are completely different messes with you right? It did with Mattman yesterday Headlines has a interesting Michael Myers fact that you probably didn't know Sports with more Jon Gruden fallout plus the Braves going to the NLCS See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cold Email Outreach with Jeremy & Jack
#225 - Buying Businesses With Cold Email

Cold Email Outreach with Jeremy & Jack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:14


Today we talk about how to run a cold email campaign that buys businesses. The case we are discussing is a family owned business, because they are more challenging from a list building perspective since they are less visible online. HERE'S‌ ‌WHAT‌ ‌WE‌ ‌COVER‌ ‌IN‌ ‌THIS‌ ‌EPISODE: How and where to find contact details of family owned business What to tell them to pick their interest How to convince them that you're placing a serious offer and not only fishing for leads What to do if they don't reply to your first email Why you should make sure it is not now or never tone in your email As Gary Halbert used to say, there is no boring way to win the lottery. So take this advice and have fun with your serious emails.   At https://course.quickmail.io/ all of these nuggets are taken to the next level. If you like the podcast, this will be your follow up conversation. Happy cold emailing! Jeremy and Jack

TIME's The Brief
Why Big Businesses in Texas Are Ignoring Gov. Abbott's Vaccine Mandate Ban... and More Stories

TIME's The Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:58


Included in this episode: 1. Why Big Businesses in Texas Are Ignoring Gov. Abbott's Vaccine Mandate Ban 2. An Innovative Washington Law Aims to Get Foreign-Trained Doctors Back in Hospitals 3. U.S. Task Force Reconsiders Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Use for Preventing Heart Attacks in Adults Over 60 4. Prince Harry, Meghan Join New York Investing Fund as ‘Impact Partners' .

Good Deeds Note Investing Podcast
Strategies And Tips For Note Investing Businesses With Richard Thornton

Good Deeds Note Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 57:29


In any business, you have to be very careful in taking risks. It's very critical to set goals and plan ahead. In this episode, Richard Thornton explains note investing and how you could succeed in yours. He has invested in senior housing facilities, flipped houses, and currently invests in mortgage notes, and is the managing principal of American Note Capital. Richard discusses better ways to spend your time when diving into this business. He mentions that he's focusing more on larger notes right now in California. Find out why and learn a lot more techniques in this conversation.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://7einvestments.com/podcast/

TIG Talks
Why Businesses Need To Pivot And Differentiate From The Competition With Kelly Perkins

TIG Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:59


For a company to pivot and shift its focus takes a lot of confidence and risk. But that is what being an entrepreneur means. It's all about taking risks in action. This is what Kelly Perkins did with her company, Spinster Sisters Co. Join your host Elliot Begoun as he talks to Kelly Perkins about her shifted focus into plant-based skincare. Learn how to differentiate yourself in a very competitive market, such as the skincare industry. Learn how to raise capital as an entrepreneur, especially in these trying times. And find out some tips from Kelly herself on how to build a well-respected company.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! tigbrands.com/tig-talks/

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

“Every company is its own work of art, and the founder is the artist.” – James Currier James Currier (@JamesCurrier) is General Partner of NFX, an early stage VC firm with a focus on startups with potential for network effects. Before founding NFX, James co-founded four successful companies: Tickle (acquired by Monster), Wonderhill (merged with Kabam), IronPearl (acquired by PayPal), and Jiff (merged with Castlight). Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/james-currier1-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: James' background and journey to NFX Defining network effects and why they are so powerful Virality vs. network effects Examples of businesses with network effects Tweaking rules and systems to take advantage of network effects Networks effects as a business strategy Investing in network effects businesses Advice for founders Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Auckland mayor urges govt help businesses in lockdown

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:03


Auckland businesses are crying out for help to survive, nine weeks into lockdown. While they are able to cash in the wage subsidy and the business support payments, they're also having to raid retirement funds and remortgage properties just to stay afloat. They want to know what the retail and hospitality will look like when the city finally starts to reopen. Auckland mayor Phil Goff talks to Lisa Owen.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Auckland businesses using retirement funds, mortgages to survive

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:19


As Auckland heads into its ninth week of tight Covid restrictions some Auckland business owners are having to re-mortgage their homes, dig into retirement funds or simply ignore the bills stacking up to stay afloat. A number of them are calling for more targeted funding for those hardest hit or a guarantee of the wage subsidy even when the supercity finally gets to level 2. Auckland alert level settings will be reviewed by Cabinet again on Monday but with consistently high case numbers businesses cannot see an end in sight.  

The Ernie Brown Show
Governor Greg Abbott Defends His Executive Order That Prohibits Texas Businesses From Mandating COVID Vaccines For Employees

The Ernie Brown Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 11:45


Ernie Brown talks one on one with Abbott and asks all the good questions...  Governor Abbott: "I am the governor for all Texans and so this is a prohibition against any entity of any kind; federal, state, or out of state entity, from requiring a Texan to be mandated to get a COVID vaccine " See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The National Intel Report with John Stadtmiller
The National Intel Report with John Stadtmiller, October 12, 2021 Hour 1

The National Intel Report with John Stadtmiller

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Guest: Roger Landry - TheLibertyBeacon.com & TLBtalk.com | COVID MANDATES, GOVERNMENT OVERREACH & TYRANNY, BUSINESSES, LIES & PROPAGANDA

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
DTC Finds: SMS templates you have to steal + how to turn returns into exchanges

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:57


“Returns don't necessarily mean that someone didn't like your product, it might be that it just wasn't the right product for them.” @jayde3sai #DTCPOD“Having a really good process in place for potential exchanges or even outlining that policy is something all stores should be thinking about.” @jayde3sai #DTCPODWe Speak About:[01:52] SMS templates you need to steal[03:55] A product that will help you turn returns into exchanges to save revenueCheck out these DTC finds for SMS and returnsIn today's episode of DTC finds, we're looking at some great SMS templates and an awesome tool to use for saving lost revenue from returns.Everyone knows that having a strong playbook for marketing is important for success. Instead of just trying SMS without a proven playbook, we'll share a resource with you that can help take your SMS to the next level.We'll also share with you a must-use resource for returns and talk through return strategy as a way to grow your business.Stay tuned as we dive into awesome SMS strategies and useful tool for maintaining revenue and customers.If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:SMS strategies: https://sms-templates.com/A product to help with your returns strategy: https://www.loopreturns.com/

Atlanta Business Radio
VISUALIZING VALUE FOR YOUR VENTURE

Atlanta Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


To have an understanding of what something is worth, you need to have an understanding of how much someone would pay to buy it. Businesses aren't any different. To know how much your business is worth, consider how much you could sell it for. But, that begs the question: Is your business worth what you […] The post VISUALIZING VALUE FOR YOUR VENTURE appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

WSJ Minute Briefing
Texas Governor Bans Covid-19 Vaccine Mandates at Businesses

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:14


In China car sales drop as the industry deals with the impact from the global chip shortage. The board of the International Monetary Fund backs the head of the fund, Kristalina Georgieva, following an investigation into her role in a data-rigging scandal at the World Bank. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Secureworks' Wendy Thomas on Securing Human Progress

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:51


Wendy Thomas, CEO of Secureworks, joins Channelnomics's Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to discuss how security services are instrumental in helping businesses keep up with the security arms race. Security is an arms race. With each advancement in technology, hackers find ways of one-upping the defenders of a business's digital frontiers. Security breaches always have consequences. In the past, a compromise could mean losing access to files or being blocked from mission-critical applications, both of which can lead to lost revenue. Today, though, in the increasingly digitalized world, the consequences of security breaches are increasing in the way of losses and costs – including putting national security at risk and human life in danger. Innovation is bringing more resources and benefits to the world. This technical innovation, though, is creating more risk. The market doesn't have enough security professionals to staff the end-to-end needs of businesses and individuals. Businesses struggle to acquire the technology and support required to protect their digital assets adequately. Evolution, it seems, has a downside. A potential solution to the security conundrum is managed security services. Through the aggregation of technology and human-based expertise, managed security service providers (MSSPs) provide customers with access to leading technology and resources that cost-effectively scale. A leader in providing and supporting MSSPs is Secureworks, which is making securing human progress a cornerstone of its mission. Wendy Thomas, CEO and President of Secureworks, joins Channelnomics' Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to discuss the evolving security needs of businesses, how managed security can scale to meet those evolving needs, and the role partners play in the delivery of security services. Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe!  Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/   LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli   Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics      Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production  Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics – the voice of thought leadership – we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.       Episode Resources  Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa    Guest Wendy Thomas: https://www.linkedin.com/in/wendy-thomas-7133283/ Credits   Production: Changing Channels is produced by Modern Podcasting. For virtual content capture and video-first podcasts, check out http://www.modpodstudio.com.   Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa   Voice-Over: Denise Quan   

Software Engineering Daily
Getting Businesses Unstuck with Jon Dwoskin

Software Engineering Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:36


The expression firing on all cylinders dates back to the early 1900s and refers to a function of the internal combustion engine.  This expression poetically applies to successful businesses as well.  Each department must operate at peak performance and the couplings between departments need optimization as well. In this episode, I interview business coach Jon The post Getting Businesses Unstuck with Jon Dwoskin appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Packy McCormick - Founder of Not Boring Ep #49

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:03


Anatoly (00:09):Hey, folks. This is Anatoly and you're listening to The Solana Podcast, and today, I have with me, Packy McCormick, author of Not Boring. Hey, man. Good to have you.Packy McCormick (17:27):Good to be here. Thanks for having me on.Anatoly (00:21):So, You're an author and you're also an investor. How did you get into crypto?Packy McCormick (00:26):Yeah. So, I got into crypto back in 2013. I read Fred Wilson's blog post on investing in Coinbase, bought a bunch of Bitcoin, I think 38 Bitcoin, and then I went on a trip to Oktoberfest, and I felt bad about it, I had just quit my job, so I was like, "You know what, instead of spending money when I'm unemployed, let me just sell this stupid Bitcoin and I will pay for the trip."So, because of that, because of the pain of selling then, I avoided it until earlier this year, later last year, and really, really got back into it as I was talking to a couple companies that I was thinking about investing in and thinking about the intersection of crypto and the metaverse and how an open economy just fits so much better with that vision, since then, I've just gotten deeper, and deeper, and deeper down the rabbit hole.Anatoly (01:18):So, you held Bitcoin because you can sell it? That's just too big of a pain in the ass.Packy McCormick (01:24):I felt so bad about selling it and missing out. I think at the peak, it was like a two million dollar plus mistake, and so I was like, "You know what? I'm out of this for a little while."Anatoly (01:34):That's funny. What do you guys invest in?Packy McCormick (01:39):Yeah. So, I run a small 10 million dollar fund called Not Boring Capital, and we really invest across stages, across geographies, across verticals. For the first, I'd say, half of the fund, it was really traditional investments, I'd say for the second five million in the fund, it's been pushing up against the 20% non qualifying limit. I'm actually investing in my first Solana based project this week, which is yet to be announced, so can't talk about it, but something in the real estate space and something I'm super excited about. But doing as much crypto as I can in there, but I still think some use cases are perfectly well suited to crypto and some are really not. There's plenty of things in Web 2.0 that I'm super excited about as well, so really trying to balance investing across both.Anatoly (02:27):So, by traditional businesses, you mean like software internet based ones?Packy McCormick (02:32):Exactly.Anatoly (02:33):Cool. I mean, I've been in crypto for like the last... I can't remember... it feels like a decade, and I can't imagine what the world is like. So, what are people building?Packy McCormick (02:48):It's a good question. So, today, I talked to a company, for example, that is making it a lot easier for a restaurant to order the food that they need. So, right now, if you're a restaurant and you're ordering food, you're getting a bunch of PDFs from suppliers every week that aren't even searchable, and then you're going through the 6,000 items on there and picking something. So, there are still a bunch of these huge unsexy categories that are completely ripe.There's some security stuff that bridges into crypto, but there's one, again, stealth right now, but is also dealing with some Solana projects on the security side that I'm really, really excited in, but they're also securing Web 2.0 projects. There's some FinTech stuff I wrote about a company called Uni, yesterday. There's definitely a little bit of mental gymnastics that I have to do to be super bullish on FinTech and super bullish on crypto, but I really think adoption cycles are going to be super long and there are some really huge opportunities on that side too. I think everybody is trying to make the existing system that doesn't work, make it work better for people, and so I'm all for things, on either the Web 2.0 Side or in crypto, that make finance better for people.Anatoly (04:01):The mental gymnastics are curious about. I always thought that crypto is just part of this general story of software eating the world. Is that your take on it too?Packy McCormick (04:12):Totally. I mean, I wrote about Solana and I wrote this in the piece, but then I'm a maximalist-minimalist, and that's cross chain, but that's also I don't think crypto is going to eat everything yet or maybe ever. Just like on the internet, Web 3.0 is really about the dynamic interfaces where you could interact with each other. While there are companies like Facebook and Twitter and all of this social media companies that were more interactive, there were a ton of huge companies built during the Web 2.0 Era that weren't social media, that weren't real-time interactive at all, and I think the same thing will play out. I think you need to pick the best stack for whatever you're building at the time. And so I think we'll see a world where a lot of stuff moves to Web 3.0, And hopefully, even things that don't incorporate crypto become a little bit more liquid, a little bit more decentralized, a little bit better for people, but I don't think that crypto is the answer to every problem that the world has.Anatoly (05:05):So, when you look at a company that is building out the basic, "Let's convert PDFs to a searchable interface," that feels like something that should have happened 10 years ago, right, in your mind, at least?Packy McCormick (05:23):Totally. I mean, I think there have been attempts in that space actually, and some of them haven't worked. There have been different approaches. People have tried to do marketplaces and different things like that. I think what changed in that particular case is that over the past year, one, restaurants are super cognizant of cutting costs and getting profitability to the best possible spot, and so they're more willing to try new things. These people are taking an interesting approach without actually changing the interface that the restaurants interact with at all, they're just making everything behind it more powerful. So, things have been tried... there's people that are trying new approaches every day. I mean, I'd say 80%, because that is the literal max that I'm allowed to do is 20% crypto out of my fund, so 80% of my investments are non-crypto, and there's a bunch of stuff that's growing fast and is really exciting.I think the other interesting thing is that there are a bunch of companies that aren't going fully decentralized but are incorporating maybe a DAO in one aspect, where they have members who might be running something and want to vote on what that thing is coming up, or will incorporate NFTs in a particular part of the business where it makes sense. So, I think we'll see that blur a little bit more, but even within companies, they'll be doing some Web 2.0 Stuff and some Web 3.0 Stuff.Anatoly (06:32):So, I guess, in a way, you're bullish on non-crypto on the rest of the world as an investor?Packy McCormick (06:41):Yeah, my worldview is bullish tech and innovation, and I think if you're talking on the... I have a medical device company in the portfolio and a machine learning company that helps make sense of medical documents, and all that kind of stuff, I don't see a need yet for crypto, and maybe there's better decentralized storage of that information in the future, so it's not a centralized entity. And so over time, I think more, and more, and more of it will potentially become decentralized as the tools catch up, but for right now, that's just stuff that needs to improve.There's a company called NexHealth that I invested in that has really complex long term plan to first, sell SAAS into doctor's offices, use that to connect the EHRs, use that to build out APIs, use that to build out a platform, to ultimately try to make it easier for people to just hack on medical products, because right now it's such a pain in the ass to do anything in the medical space. I am super bullish on that kind of innovation because if you ask me what doctor I went to two years ago, I'd have no idea, if you asked me what my stats were, I'd have no idea. So, anybody fixing any of those kinds of things, I'm super bullish on.Anatoly (07:52):Man, I mean, the internet is basically 30 years old, right, at this point, and it's wild to think that we're still connecting just data...Packy McCormick (08:00):Totally.Anatoly (08:02):... data to format.Packy McCormick (08:03):It's why I'm going to be bullish on all of this. The internet is still early in terms of penetration, and then crypto is a tiny, tiny, tiny percentage of that, so there's just a lot of room for all of this to run.Anatoly (08:13):It feels then like everything is happening at the same time, we're still onboarding the world to the internet or now, part of the internet is being on boarded to crypto. Is that something that you first saw? What do you think about that?Packy McCormick (08:29):Yeah. I mean, I think most of the world... I think well over 50% nowadays is internet connected. I think it's just more and more things that were not internet connected are being tackled. I think a lot of the big obvious opportunities get taken and then people realize like, "Oh, shoot." I think I've seen, in the past week, a couple of companies that are making it easier for truckers to pay for gas and track those expenses. There's just all these big things that touch the physical world, where primitives needed to be built first, you needed banking as a service type things to make it really easy for companies to issue cards, to build it for specific use cases, so I think it's all just a matter of what primitives have been built and then what you can do on top of that. That's one of the reasons I'm so excited about crypto is because you and other folks in the space are building such interesting things for other people to build on top of.Anatoly (09:15):Since you have, I think, a more maybe practical or realistic view, since you're dealing with non-crypto projects that are trying to get revenue, right? That's generally the pitch to an investor.Packy McCormick (09:33):Yes. Over a long enough time horizon, some of them need to get revenue.Anatoly (09:36):What do you see in crypto itself as promising to use crypto in a way that actually increases revenue for that business? What are those things?Packy McCormick (09:48):Yeah. I don't know. One of the fun things about exploring both sides is that I really try, when I look at any crypto project, to understand what business physics laws it's enhancing. Businesses are businesses because people buy things the same way all over the place or people like to make money. People are the same, and I think all of this comes down to people, obviously. Solana comes down to how many developers build on top of it and how many people use that. And so obviously, I think one of the big important things is the ability to build network effects by giving people ownership. And I think the idea of using ownership in crypto to even have negative customer acquisition costs, to be able to essentially make the price of something negative to be able to get adoption, to use crypto tools for retention and network effects I think is one of the big things that excites me.I think it's also just moving way, way, way faster. I mean, look at Ethereum and Solana, right? Ethereum, strong network effects, people building on top of it, and then Solana comes in and looks like the same chart but faster. And so you can get these network effects, but then somebody else will come in with network effects that are even faster, and I think it's going to be interesting to see how those types of things play out.Anatoly (11:05):Negative acquisition cost is a really interesting topic because that's basically yield farming, right, like DeFi? The foundation of DeFi, how I get users is, a lot of these projects give away their coin. Do you think those patterns is something that you're going to start seeing in traditional businesses, like AMC popcorn, if you buy AMC stock is some form of liquidity mining, right?Packy McCormick (11:39):I think the challenging part, right, is that people want either money pretty immediately or they want ownership in something, and it's really hard for Web 2.0 Companies to give away ownership, there's a ton of paperwork involved. There are platforms that are trying to make that a little bit easier, but it's still really hard for them to give away ownership the way that, if you're a DeFi protocol, you can give away your token to attract users in the beginning.So, maybe there will be some things that Web 2.0 Companies steal and bring over from crypto, but I do think that's one of the uniquely beautiful things about it, is that it's this... I mean, we'll see. It's still so early, right? But that it's this beautiful thing where because you're early, you're able to earn more, and then because you were there, you actually support the network and make the network more secure and all that. So, there's actual justification for it, but it's just that shift in who gets the ownership of things, which I think is kind of beautiful.Anatoly (12:35):Do you think that the Web 2.0 properties, or like Facebook, Twitter, that those are at risk for being disintermediated by crypto?Packy McCormick (12:44):Yes. On a long enough time horizon, absolutely. I don't know what it looks like, and I think the early attempts to do it have been a bit skeuomorphic, and that's one of the things that interest me here is that BitClout was, I guess, interesting, but it was Twitter with coins, and I don't think that the next social network will look like Twitter with coins, I think it will look like something that is maybe wallet first, or maybe in the 3D world, or something that looks different but then achieves a very similar end. And so I think, yes, 100% they're at risk, but I don't think that they're at risk from something that looks like a clone but adds a token.Anatoly (13:23):Man, I love that word, skeuomorphic, because that's how I started thinking about it as I'm talking to a bunch of projects that are trying to shove crypto into what is a Web 2.0 thing, a Web 2.0 product. Do you as an investor see that as a red flag or like, "Okay, maybe this might work and you should try it, but clearly, you're going to have to iterate away from it"?Packy McCormick (13:46):I think it comes down to what you're trying to do. I talked to an investor who is way smarter than I am about this the other day, and she was like, "You know what, actually for me, because I invested in the series A and beyond, if one of my portfolio companies came to me and said that they're going to incorporate crypto at this point, that would be a red flag because that means that they don't have product-market fit and they're trying to figure out how to get product-market fit by doing something else shiny." There are other projects, like there was something that I was talking to her that was totally Web 2.0 Based but that asked people for feedback, they were having challenges with retention, they were asking users to submit information, they were thinking about how to reward them, and for something like that, particularly when it's so early, I do think that adding crypto into the project makes a ton of sense.If you're trying to incentivize contribution and improve retention, crypto is an amazing tool for that for the right type of community. So, I really think it depends on what type of product it is, and some things I think skeuomorphic might work in some cases where you're ripping out an internal reward point and replacing it with crypto, I think that can make sense, but when you're trying to just shove money into something to see if you can attract more users, that's when I feel like there's a bit of a problem.Anatoly (14:59):So, Reddit Coins, do you think that's going to work?Packy McCormick (15:02):I mean, they're at least early and I feel like they're such an interesting community of people, and the idea of karma has existed in Reddit for a while, so maybe making that a little bit more fungible and exchangeable is interesting. I mean, there's a bunch of behavioral economics on the idea that if you just pay people for stuff, you actually fuck up incentives in a bunch of different ways that are hard to predict, so it could be tough. When you actually assign a dollar value to something, you make people think about it in terms of the dollar value, and they're like, "Wait, I just spent a day moderating the subreddit for $1? Are you kidding me?" So, I think you need to get that part right, right? Where you can give them a million karma points and it doesn't matter, but then it becomes $1 then there's an issue? So, I think people need to be wary of that, but certainly where there are internal scoreboards, giving people a way to actually monetize that I think is interesting.Anatoly (15:56):Have you looked into play-to-earn stuff?Packy McCormick (16:00):Yeah.Anatoly (20:39):Okay.Packy McCormick (16 :02):I wrote a piece on Axie. I think it's so fascinating.Anatoly (16:05):I'm terrified of a world where everything we do is like, "You got to do this to get your 20 extra cents on your dollar." Right? It just sounds like a nightmare.Packy McCormick (16:15):I know. I mean, I am of the mind that dystopia is probably overstated because people have to opt in at every gate, and so I've had conversations with people where they're like, "Isn't it wild that we'd be spending time in the metaverse? Isn't that dystopian?" And then you think about how we spend a lot of our time right now, we're in a two dimensional screen. Wouldn't it be more fun if there was an immersive environment that we were interacting with here, and would we just continue to choose to do the 2D version until the 3D version got realistic and fun enough that we made the shift? And so there's going to be those gates at all times where people can opt in or not.A lot of the people playing Axie right now are in the Philippines, were unemployed, thanks in large part due to COVID, and so their options were, "Don't do this and figure out some other way to make money or start playing this game, that you might be playing anyway, and actually make money while doing it." So, that's an incredible option that people have, but you also don't see a ton of people in the West flocking to Axie to make a couple of bucks because the trade-off doesn't make sense for them. And so I think the trade-offs have to make sense for people but everybody has agency, to some extent, and will opt in to the things that make sense for them.Anatoly (17:29):When I played Ultima Online, I bought digital items in that game on eBay with a cashier's check. So, I get this idea that you can get really into a game.Packy McCormick (17:41):Totally. And then you stop playing Ultima Online and that money is just wasted, right? And so the idea that you could easily transfer that item to the next generation or person that wants to go all in on the game is nice, it means that you're accumulating something while you play. I think, over time, those experiences will fade more and more into the background and it will feel less like play-to-earn and will probably just be play-and-earn, but there's going to be a transition period where you have to just be bold about it and the play-to-earn piece has to be front and center, but I don't know.We can go to deep down the philosophical rabbit hole on all of this, but there is a point at which, at some point in the future... and I know this is debatable... but at some point in the future, we're not going to have to actually work to eat, to shelter ourselves, to have clothes, all of that, and so what do you do that provides meaning, right? I don't think we're going to evolve into a world where we feel comfortable not having to work for anything, and so people will find new ways to make meaning.Anatoly (18:47):We're going to be NPCs in each other's games.Packy McCormick (18:51):Seriously.Anatoly (18:53):How much do you pay attention to the regulatory side of it? Do you think World of Warcraft is going to have to file W-2s?Packy McCormick (19:06):Man, I do not envy the IRS or the SEC trying to keep up with... I do this all day, every day. I'm fascinated by it and I can't keep up with everything. There's going to, obviously, need to be a total paradigm shift in the way that this stuff is tracked and managed, even taxes. I am going to figure out, at the end of the year, whatever the best tax software that I should use to make sense of everything that I've done all across Web 3.0 This year, but if I didn't, the chances that somebody sitting in the IRS for my small potatoes amount of money is actually going to be able to go and figure out what I did is minuscule. So, I don't know how they're going to do it, but there needs to be a common sense way that doesn't end up in just this constant clash.Anatoly (19:54):Yeah. All my Degen Ape trades.Packy McCormick (24:36):Seriously. I mean, there's a thread that went viral on Twitter a couple weeks ago that was someone being like, "Hey, by the way, did you know essentially that when you buy an NFT, you're also selling your coins at a game and you're going to have to pay taxes on that?" There's going to be a lot of people who get hit pretty hard at the end of the year.Anatoly (20:15):Yeah. I'm curious how that's going to play out. That's wild. I mean, like one of the investments should be like, "Here's tax software for all your crypto shit." That seems obvious one.Packy McCormick (20:28):Yeah, there are a few people working on that. I mean, the other one that I really want to see... I had mentioned this 20% limit. So, if you're not an RAA, if you're not a registered investment advisor and you manage over X dollars, you can only buy 20% non qualifying, and crypto is included in that. I really want to see someone build RAA in a box, and RAA means that you need a chief compliance officer and you need all this stuff. And so somebody who makes that easier to do and easier to set up crypto funds I think is going to make a killing as well.Anatoly (20:58):I mean, that seems like something that the smart contracts should be doing, right? If you're investing purely... Most of that compliance is just transparency, right? It's like, "Am I doing the thing that I said I was going to do?"Packy McCormick (21:10):Totally. But some of it is, "Is there a person here looking over what I'm doing?" The rules are written for a world in which it makes sense for a person to look over something instead of computers talking to each other. So, there's going to be a transition period there, but over time, yes, it makes a lot more sense as a smart contract, and I'm interested to see.Are you familiar with Syndicate protocol?Anatoly (21:33):I'm not.Packy McCormick (21:34):So, Syndicate protocol is I think mostly on Ethereum at this point, but it makes it easy to set up investment clubs, SPVs, a bunch of other things, and so brings a lot of the group investing activities on chain. Is there anything similar on the Solana side?Anatoly (21:50):I don't know yet. The network exploded in terms of people building on it to the point that I can't track.Packy McCormick (21:57):That's awesome. That's a milestone.Anatoly (22:00):Yeah, that's a milestone. It's just like, "Pooh," so now I'm like, "Okay, go back into the weeds, back into optimizations."Packy McCormick (22:08):Yeah. Sorry to turn the mic on you, but I'm very curious. How do you balance your time right now?Anatoly (22:14):Poorly, I would say. I think there was an effort to get the word out to as many developers out there that this is how you build stuff and these are the reference implementations, and now that that's moving on its own, I almost feel like me putting energy there is going to have such a small amount of gain. So, I think of it in value against replacement terms, which is a very dumb engineer perspective, or maybe that's a pretty good one. I don't know.Packy McCormick (22:48):No. I mean, if you can view yourself from a remove like that. I mean, that's the goal of running a company or an organization or a protocol is, "How can I replace myself in as many different spots as possible?" But are you in the Discords? Are you getting Degen on some of these projects and stuff?Anatoly (23:07):I used to be more Discord just telling devs, "This is where the doc started, this is how you unblock that compiler error or whatever." I was in there, and now there's enough people doing that, I'm like, "Okay, I'm useless here." So, in the early days of Metaplex, helping out people set up their Heroku servers or whatever, I spent a little bit of time doing that, but then all of a sudden, our engineers took off with it.I'm curious how you think about DAOs? Are these truly amorphous blobs where nobody knows anyone else and there's some voting mechanism that you trust, or as normal people actually that do this stuff, it feels to me that they are humans that are all know each other and they're coordinating with software?Packy McCormick (23:54):Yeah. There's been a meme going around, I feel like this week, again, on Twitter, where people have been talking about like, "Oh, it's impossible to get fired by a DAO. Why not just get hired by a DAO and then don't do anything because who's going to fire you?" I love the idea, and I love the fact that crypto makes it possible to organize and incentivize huge groups of people across the world and get them to work in the same direction, I also think there's going to be a ton of challenges.People are very used, for the past at least couple 100 years since the dawn of the corporation, people are very used to working in hierarchical structures where there's somebody making a decision. And so I think there will be a balance that gets struck in a lot of cases, like delegation I think will get more, and more, and more popular. And ideally, there's some projects being worked on that I'm excited about where people's on-chain contribution and activity and resume is almost tracked, and maybe you give more power to the people who've contributed the most and proven expertise in a certain area, and all of that. So, I think a lot of things need to be worked out there.I think that we're in the stage now, frankly, where a lot of DAOs will not do as well as a centralized thing would have done, but then some DAOs will just do this crazy emergent stuff that never would have been possible in a normal structure that was a little bit more hierarchical. So, I think we're in the, let 1,000 flowers bloom, phase of DAOs right now where emergence will produce some really interesting stuff, and then emergence will also produce some total failures, and we'll see where it all shakes out.Anatoly (25:25):Corporations have politics, right? There's definitely politics in large corpse, and I feel like small DAOs have politics, and that's typically not true of a startup.Packy McCormick (25:39):Yeah, I think that's true. Although it can happen faster to startup, but the interesting thing that happens at a startup is, if the CEO allows it to be political, it can get political really quickly. And so it's interesting, in the DAO structure, when you don't have a "CEO," that either the community ethos will be away from politics and you'll get shunned and banned or whatever for politicking, or there's no one to say, "Don't do that," in which case, it can get out of hand really quickly. So, if you have a bad CEO, it's probably better to be a DAO, and if you have a really good CEO, there are advantages to having somebody making the decisions.I'm also fascinated to see... and I don't know if you've seen anything on this side yet... but can a DAO build products that are as good as something with a little bit more centralized control? Like products are traditionally made by a visionary, and then a team, who has a clear roadmap and all of those types of things, and is it possible to do that in a more decentralized way?I mean, even Solana itself, one of the things that attracts me about the project, and again, not a decentralization maxi by any stretch of the imagination, is that you were involved, right? And when there were code errors, you were getting in there, you were telling people how to fix them and all of that. And I've talked to a bunch of people, since I read that piece, who were building things on Solana, who site that as one of the reasons that they like building on Solana, is that the team is there to help when there are errors and help direct them towards best practices. So, I don't know. I think something like that model is probably going to succeed.Anatoly (27:18):I can only get blamed myself.Packy McCormick (27:21):Exactly.Anatoly (27:23):At the end of the day, yeah. Balaji had this quote that I've used it a bunch of times, that decentralization is not the absence of leadership but it's the abundance of leadership, and I love it. I also feel like that because of Bitcoin and it's like history. People started assuming that disorganization also was required for decentralization, which I think is bullshit too.Packy McCormick (27:52):Yeah. How do you view DAO versus social token, or I guess more just governance versus upside sharing?Anatoly (27:59):I think tokens are social networks, almost first, and then anything else later, because any community, it's all contracts. All this open source software is reusable. I can take Uniswap, fork it, and then stick some random token on it, and it's as good as Uniswap. You cannot tell me that it's worse in any way, right? It's the same thing, right?Packy McCormick (28:27):Someone should do that.Anatoly (28:29):Yeah. And then that community takes it in a different product direction, right, for whatever reason. I think that really fast fail is probably the most important part of decentralization. Anybody can fork you and then just take it in a different direction and form a community around it.Packy McCormick (28:50):I agree. Which project was it that Justin Sun tried to take over and then everybody just stopped using it?Anatoly (28:50):Steem.Packy McCormick (28:55):Yeah.Anatoly (28:57):And that is, I think, part of the beauty of the space, right, is you can only be a benevolent dictator. As soon as you lose the benevolent part, they're like, "Well, everything's open. F off."Packy McCormick (29:12):It's amazing.Anatoly (29:13):Yeah. Did you follow the SUSHI saga?Packy McCormick (29:19):I didn't follow in real-time. I went back and looked at it after the fact, but I would not consider myself a SUSHI expert.Anatoly (29:26):Do you think that we're going to see these communities stick around for the long haul, like Uniswap, etc?Packy McCormick (29:33):I think that is the billion dollar, trillion dollar, whatever number you want to put on it, question. I mean, I was alluding to it before with these network effects being replaced by things that pick up network effects even faster and faster. I think that's the blessing and the curse that I was talking about. You could remove every single person working on Facebook except for the person who made sure that the servers were up, and people would keep using it for a long, long time. If the people disappeared from Sushiswap or Uniswap or wherever, it just fades away and they move on to the next thing, and that takes off. So, I think virality in crypto has been proven. You can get viral really, really quick. Defensibility over a very long time horizon I think is still TBD.Anatoly (30:19):Where does defensibility come from in Facebook, in your mind?Packy McCormick (30:24):In Facebook, Facebook has a clear network effects, one where I guess if the people on the network decided to stop using it, it would go away, but there's not a clear place that you would all go when you have... Maybe there's switching costs too because you have your whole network mapped, and they won't actually let it be portable. To your point, you can fork anything... you should be able to fork the relationship graph and all of that over time as people build new mechanics to make that happen, and when you can just bring your whole relationship graph with you across Web3, then maybe you just all go to the next place, or maybe there's not even a place, and it is just that your wallet, at some point, keeps track of all the connections that you have, so maybe the wallet is the central point where a lot of the value accrues and the thing that makes everything portable, but I'm not exactly sure. What do you think?Anatoly (31:22):When I first saw Facebook, I thought, "This is a shitty news group. I can run my own mail server and ask my friends." And then you realize that normal people don't want to run their own mail servers or news groups, but you centralize around convenience. Where things centralize around convenience in crypto has, for me, been really tough to pin down. NFTs especially are a really good example of people jumping from one set to another but still maintaining both, right? They're able to be in multiple places at the same time.Anatoly (36:44):I can be a Degen Ape and like a Monkey MBS member at the same time.Packy McCormick (32:12):Where do you think that ends up? Where do you think people end up centralizing, or do they not?Anatoly (32:18):I'm not sure. This is like, again, a trillion dollar question. I feel like if we get to, three, 400 million people self custody with wallets that are doing stuff, we'll start seeing those patterns of like, "Okay, this is like the Facebook, it's a social graph or the... I don't know... the super connected now," something.Packy McCormick (32:42):Yeah. I wrote about this a couple weeks ago, I wrote a piece called the Interface Phase, and it was a little bit like a high kid post where I was like, "What are the interfaces going to be?" But just the fact that the first internet needed Netscape and needed a graphical interface, Web 2.0 needed things like Digg and Facebook that were interactive for that kind of capability, the read-write interface to really be there, and I don't think Web3 has gotten there yet. I do think that either a wallet based thing, and I don't know what that looks like, and I'm not smart enough to figure out what that looks like, or the kind of metaverse. And I think it's such an interesting mistake of history or just a coincidence of history that the tech for the metaverse and Web 3.0 Are peaking at the same time, but a world in which...One of the things I think crypto does well is give physical-ish characteristics to digital things, and so I think a interface that makes that clear will have a lot of value in just making a lot of the stuff that feels a little more ethereal feel more real and tangible, and actually, there will be physical places that people meet up and all that.Anatoly (38:28):So, I think what's interesting about crypto is that it's more like Ultima Online. When I was playing the game, I got a mental model of the map and the ownership of those items because it was persistent. I would go to the thing and I would change something and then come back and it was still there, and your brain, I think, just rapidly just plugs it into the rest of the stuff that it interacts with. If you got a lot of humans all doing this together, I think they'll start forgetting that it's nothing more than a bunch of computers.Packy McCormick (34:23):Totally. I mean it's interesting. I forget the name of the book, but there's a book about the memory competitions and the world memory championships, and the way that they memorize things is by putting different objects throughout a house and then walking through that house, So, we are, I think, a lot better at memorizing things and grokking things spatially than we are... and maybe this is just me talking as a non technical person, but just picturing computer networks without some physical reference point.Anatoly (34:54):I don't have as good of a mental model of space crypto Twitter or like social networks. It's not a map to me in my mind. But with something like experiments like DeFi land and stuff, I think that actually might bridge that because of this ownership thing. And I don't still think it's the fact that I can modify stuff and come back and see it and feel that I'm doing it.Packy McCormick (35:20):Totally. Yeah, people like building, and showing progress, and all of that. I'm going to turn the mic again. How do you view Solana at this point in terms of DeFi versus the cultural side of things or the metaverse side of things?Anatoly (35:37):We don't. I think, to us, DeFi was always I thought was an important part because you look at any kind of markets, NASDAQ, those are the obvious ones, "Oh, yeah, that's probably going to be on some blockchain," but advertisement, right? It's like Google Search shows you a page, they take your data, sell it on an Ad Exchange, and that to market, that's centralized right now, how do you disintermediate it? Oh, you can do that with cryptography, right? And a replicated censorship resistant database. That's it.You can break those things down into marketplaces and remove the middleman. And that, I think, is how we think about it, is like, where does that make sense? And culture NFTs are I feel like that non skeuomorphic social networks. It's not somebody that stuck Twitter with coins, these organically sprung up, right? It's like lodges in the whatever, 1700s, like I'm part of this Masonic Lodge or this club or whatever, right? Now, I'm Degen Ape or whatever.Packy McCormick (36:57):Totally. And right now, I guess, that often manifests itself in Discord where people are hanging out. I've had this conversation with people before in this debate. Do you think there needs to be a decentralized Discord where this lives or where do you think all of this ends up living?Anatoly (37:12):I don't think so. Like a year ago, I thought somebody needs to build a decentralized Twitter, a decentralized Instant Messaging, and the working mechanics of it, being decentralized or on chain, don't change the social impact of it. You're still talking to people. Why does it matter where you talk to them, right? Who cares?Packy McCormick (37:34):Totally.Anatoly (37:37):It's like, I think, stuff where you can start making connected modifications of the same state, that mental model of like, "Hey, we're all doing this thing over here." That becomes a place and that's where people actually do things, but here's where they talk about it.Packy McCormick (37:56):Yeah. And I don't think you can find a more minimally extractive corporation than Discord, and they make less dollars per user than anybody.Anatoly (38:06):Yeah, they're pretty awesome. Also, yeah, the high fidelity audio and stuff like that I think is pretty cool. I think they built it for gamers.Packy McCormick (38:19):Yeah. It's so interesting, and I'm probably going to write about Discord at some point here too, but I've written something called The Great Online Game before, which is essentially we're all just playing this big video game across the internet. And so it's really funny that Discord, which was built for gamers, is where all of this activity is... If you're playing a big video game and the chat app designed for video games, it makes sense as the place that people go.Anatoly (38:43):Yeah. Crypto and the internet is... at least the internet part of crypto is very much a big video game.Packy McCormick (38:49):Exactly.Anatoly (38:50):Are you investing mostly in the US, US companies or all over the place?Packy McCormick (38:54):I'm investing mostly in the US but have done a few in India, I've done Sweden, I've done Canada, very open to doing anywhere on the world.Anatoly (39:06):Do you feel like there's been a shift towards everything becoming Silicon Valley, that it doesn't really matter anymore at this point?Packy McCormick (39:13):The internet is Silicon Valley. A more amorphous idea is Silicon Valley at this point, but I'm in New York, I'm probably 30 minutes away. I'm in Park Slope and the crypto hub has become Williamsburg, and I talk to all those people all the time, and I never take the 30 minute trip over to Williamsburg because I have Twitter, and I have Discord, and I'm pretty much right there with them. So, I don't think physical place matters nearly as much. Gathering in physical places is awesome. I think the idea of conferences, and quarterly team meetups, and all of that kind of stuff is absolutely going to explode. There's a really fun thing about only knowing somebody on the internet and then meeting them in person and feeling like you've known each other for a long time, but I don't think the physical place where you all live all the time matters that much.Anatoly (40:03):Yeah. I think what's weird is like I have a sneaking suspicion that the remote work worlds, everybody's working remote is actually going to mean more people travel and get together.Packy McCormick (40:17):And it's not just going to be like FaceTime and waiting around the office and sitting. When you're together, you're together, and then when you're working, you're heads down working, and I kind of like that.Anatoly (40:26):Do you think people are more efficient that way or is that the natural state?Packy McCormick (40:30):It depends how many Discords. Before this call, I was supposed to be writing and I've gotten obsessed with the Wanderers NFT projects, so I just bought another Wanderer and then was trying to figure out how to display it in my cyber gallery. So, I think there's not somebody looking over my shoulder, so in that sense, maybe it allows you to get a little bit more distracted. But I also think a lot of things coming together at the same time, more and more people are responsible for themselves, and so if I don't work now, then I'm working all weekend, and I have to get the same stuff done anyway. And so I do think that's, hopefully, the natural state of things, is that people are allowed to get their shit done when they want to.Anatoly (41:12):Are NFTs what you're looking at mostly in crypto? Is that the most exciting part?Packy McCormick (41:16):NFTs are, I think, very exciting to me. My first internship was on an energy trading desk. I should want to get into DeFi and I feel like I'm going to get wrecked unless I can spend all of my time getting into DeFi, so I've largely steered clear. I do think that NFTs are super interesting for the reasons that you suggested, and I think that they are a little bit like a social network. I think it's going to be really fascinating to see how these things evolve and the worlds that get built around them. And they're the most tangible crypto thing out there, right? You have an item. I like these Wanderers because there's audio, and they're these eight second clips, and so the richer that you can make them, I think the better, and over time, more, and more, and more things will just be ownable digitally, and I think that's very cool.Anatoly (42:09):I love the trend of like 2DR first, like really low res, because it's like a forcing function in creativity, right? It's actually hard to make something look good with that low fidelity.Packy McCormick (42:22):Totally.Anatoly (42:25):So, I'm a fan of watching the space self, almost evolve, right? This is definitely going to get better, right? You're going to have full scale renders with 3D models and high production stuff in a few years, but it's exciting to see what it is now, right?Packy McCormick (42:42):Totally. I have another portfolio company called Arco that's doing... essentially, it's trying to replace the design software that companies use. So, Autodesk has Revit to do 3D modeling, they're doing the Figma version of that, but then could you just take this physical building that somebody's designed for the real world, turn it into an NFT and let somebody bring it into the digital world? I would love to own the Chrysler Building and then bring it into my world.Anatoly (43:10):Skeuomorphism.Packy McCormick (43:14):I thought about that too when I was trying to write about the interfaces, I was like, "Why are we even thinking about buildings and worlds at all? If you don't have to follow the rules of physics, then why do you?" But I do think, through our conversation earlier about maps, reference points are also important, so you need to, one step at a time, go away from things that people are familiar with.Anatoly (43:34):Yeah. Cool, man. So, this is a really awesome conversation. Thank you so much for being on the show and really getting into it.Packy McCormick (43:43):100%. This was fun. Thank you.

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
Privacy Legislation at the State Level with Justin Brookman (Ep. 253)

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:37


With Federal privacy regulation leaving much to be desired, it has fallen to individual states to make up the gap and establish their own privacy rules. This approach is problematic for many reasons, which is why Justin Brookman is on the show today. Correction: The name of the individual Joe referenced in the intro is Alex Stamos, from the Stanford Internet Observatory, not John Stamos as was stated in the episode Consumer Privacy Has a Home a Consumer Reports Justin Brookman is with Consumer Reports where he's the head of tech policy. He wrote an excellent paper several months ago on state privacy regulation (you can read it here). Justin is the Director, Consumer Privacy and Technology Policy, for Consumers Union, the policy and advocacy arm of Consumer Reports. In this new privacy role at CR, he will help the organization continue its groundbreaking work to shape the digital marketplace in a way that empowers consumers and puts their data privacy and security needs first. This work includes using CR research to identify critical gaps in consumer privacy, data security, and technology law and policy, as well as building strategies to expand the use and influence of the new Digital Standard  being developed by CR and partner organizations to evaluate the privacy and security of products and services. The Politics of Privacy If you keep up with the news of the day, you know that right now, everybody has had it with big tech companies, like Facebook. Consumers, politicians, the media and other businesses have been sounding off about the pitfalls of having big tech intrude into our lives. It's brought about a lot of policy proposals, but no comprehensive legislation that is likely to pass at the Federal level. This gaping hole has been filled in by the privacy legislation that is popping up at the state level. Legislation State By State As is often the case, California is one of the first states to come forward with privacy legislation of its own. The California Consumer Privacy Act has already been amended to make the legislation stronger than the original bill. Virginia also came forward with a bill, and Colorado quickly followed suit. We're also currently seeing legislative battles in New York and Washington State over privacy, and the proposals are really all over the place. The Federal Role of Privacy The Federal government has basically taken a hands off approach to the privacy legislation popping up around the country. Because all of the privacy laws ultimately center around the first amendment, the Federal government is reluctant to play a heavy handed role in the laws that are cropping up throughout the country. There have been some challenges to legislation around the first amendment and some have been rejected, as the judiciary is reluctant to regulate companies. Consumers vs. Businesses vs. Government Consumers don't want Facebook or their ISPs to track their every move and collect data on them. At the same time, the government doesn't want private data collected to be in the hands of these companies and outside of the reach of government agencies.  Many states are willing to take a more aggressive approach to privacy in light of the massive data breaches that consumers have experienced in recent years. Where are we now While it's clear that aggressive action needs to be taken to prevent data breaches, it's going to take regulatory agencies some time to catch up because Federal legislation moves so slowly.  Much of the existing legislation is unwieldy for the consumer. Whether it relies on a physical opt out by consumers or it goes state by state, it's just not that easy for consumers to actually protect themselves with the current regulations. State legislatures do not have the staff or the expertise to create the kind of legislation that is needed for consumers to truly be protected. We need to find a balance between what can effectively protect consumers, but also allow businesses to function in a way that doesn't put consumers at risk. Resources: Connect with Justin on Twitter @justinbrookman

Email Einstein | Ingenious Ecommerce Email Marketing
High-Ticket Sales: 3 Ways to Sell an Expensive Product

Email Einstein | Ingenious Ecommerce Email Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:28


66 - Businesses and marketers who want to conquer the luxury consumer market need to learn the new rules of communication, localization and design if they want to be successful. In this episode, you'll learnHow often to send emails if you sell a luxury productHow to keep the quality of your emails consistent with your products and customer experienceHow luxury brands are redefining the language of luxury today to serve millennials and gen zTune in here! 

RNZ: Checkpoint
Auckland businesses desperate for certainty, reopening targets

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:34


Newmarket Business Association chief executive Mark Knoff Thomas has told Checkpoint the government does not fully understand how small businesses in Auckland are suffering in the Delta outbreak lockdown. 

RNZ: Checkpoint
Govt finances healthy, but Auckland businesses desperate

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:41


There is a tale of two spreadsheets - one healthier than expected, the other needing urgent help. In Wellington, the government threw open its books, talking of reliance and pandemic bounce-back, with its bottom line considerable stronger than expected. But further up the island in Auckland, restaurants, bars, retail and other businesses have been locked down or in tight restrictions for almost nine weeks. There is no clear date yet for them to re-open to real life customers. Their books are looking considerably leaner. The government's financial statements to the end of June showed strong tax revenue, lower expenses, and less debt than forecast - but that is before the Delta outbreak cast a dark shadow over the coming months. National is warning things will get even more grim unless more is done to support Auckland businesses. Here's political reporter Charlie Dreaver.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 10.11 - Businesses Facing Backlash Over Vaccine Mandates

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:28


Hour 2 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including: Nick and Sarah talk about Dee Wampler's cat, Stop N' Friskie. The "Let's Go Brandon" chant. Southwest Airlines canceled more than 1,000 flights on Sunday. The airline said the delays were due to air traffic control and weather issues. However, that may not be the case. On October 4th, SWA announced a vaccine mandate. Merriam-Webster expanded the definition of the word “anti-vaxxer” to encompass people who do not believe government bureaucrats have the authority to force shot mandates on individuals. CBS News has a new biased poll on the 'Build Back Better' plan.

NO MORE EXCUSES! WAKE UP!
EP:24 Topic Entrepreneurship- Who I am . What I Do. The agencies I run under Stenell Myers Enterprises When and How I got started owning my businesses

NO MORE EXCUSES! WAKE UP!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:05


 On this episode of NO More Excuses Wake Up! Introducing the one and only me host Stenell Myers also known as Stenell The Money Therapist. We will be discussing Who I am . What I Do. The agencies I run under Stenell Myers Enterprises When and How I got started owning my businesses From this episode, you will learn:    The year I started both of my businesses JOY Making A Difference (nonprofit) After SchoolProgram and A Second Touch Support Coordination agency (for profit)      What I do in my businesses and the importance of running them togetherThe importance of having a person that walked the path before you to guide you in your business endeavorsThe dream God gave me that ended up being both businesses simultaneouslyHow many clients and staff do Ihave and what I do in both agenciesAdding on a new business DirectSupport (Community Base) to A Second Touch which is two separate businessesBreak down running a nonprofit agency, reimbursement, administration, and the overall duties that come with running a grant ran agencyBreaking down the difference between Stenell the Money Therapist and the Business owner that runs several businessesKnowing when to shut the doors of abusiness and being honest in your truth    Thinking outside the box and notletting the business world dictate who you areUnderstanding my specialty andbeing connected to me to better serve othersIncrease Ministries Rentals my investment property business as a landlord                                             MY PERSONAL FINANCIAL MANTRA  BUDGET   PAY DEBT  SAVE  INVEST   AND   LIVE     On each episode of No More Excuses. Wake Up! We will be talking about Money,Entrepreneurship & Life Skills that were not taught.            You can download my free budgeting spreadsheet at www.stenellthemoneytherapist.comwhile you are there watch my video as I portray Muhammad Ali showing you how Ikick down closed doors.              Book a 3-month 1-1 personal or business coaching call with mehttps://stenellthemoneytherapist.as.me/consultation                  Learn more about me and my agencies:                                www.stenellmyersenterprises.com      If you would like to be on No More Excuses. Wake Up! Podcast, please email me atcontact@stenellthemoneytherapist.com    Have a question? Want to share a topic you think I should discuss? Email me yourquestions and suggestions atcontact@stenellthemoneytherapist.com                               Connect with me atwww.stenellthemoneytherapist.comhttp://www.instagram.com/stenellthemoneytherapisthttp://www.facebook.com/moneytherapyinstitutehttps://linktr.ee/stenellthemoneytherapist       MONEY ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND LIFE SKILLS  THAT WAS NOT TAUGHT                                            &nb

New Books Network
Smith Yewell: Founder and CEO of Welocalize, One of the World's Largest Translation Businesses

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:56


In this episode Smith Yewell share's his route into translation and we hear how Smith's personal life intertwined with his need to communicate in other languages. We learn how his ROTC Military Scholarship was an entrepreneurial decision, and how the experience of combat helped harden him for coping with the pressures of the entrepreneurial journey. The impact of his military service on his awareness of leadership, leading him to conclude that everyone is a leader, which he defines as the ability to inspire others to achieve what they previously thought was impossible. He shares stories of a highly entrepreneurial childhood, cleaning out the yard, mowing lawns, selling goods at the side of the road, and the strong competitive ethic that stays with him even through the 2020/21 pandemic. He takes us through the “Welocalize” story, how is first client just wanted one word translated, and how his early insight into the potential of the internet, led him to set up an online marketplace which he was able to sell just before the first bubble burst, giving him to capital to make the first of many acquisitions. Thanks to translation memory technology he was able to be faster and lower cost than competitors, winning big contracts. The four pillars of the company are and were innovation, global teamwork, quality and customer service. Final advice was to always aim to work yourself out of a job, and at some stage, just “do it”, or as Smith puts it, at some stage you have to “Jump in the pool”. About Smith Yewell Smith Yewell is CEO of Welocalize, which he co-founded with Julia Yewell in 1997. Prior to establishing the company, Smith served as a Field Artillery Officer in the US Army and received a Bronze Star for service in Operation Desert Storm. Smith serves on the board of The Aslan Foundation and Color Me A Cure Foundation. He's also the lead guitarist in a band called Fuzzy Match, a nod to the industry The NBN Entrepreneurship and Leadership podcast aims to educate and entertain, sharing insights based on the personal story of our carefully selected guests aiming for the atmosphere of an informal conversation in a bar or over a cup of coffee. About Kimon Fountoukidis Twitter Linkedin Kimon is the founder of both Argos Multilingual and PMR. Both companies were founded in the mid 90s with zero capital and both have gone on to become market leaders in their respective sectors. Kimon was born in New York and moved to Krakow, Poland in 1993. Listen to his story here, About Richard Lucas Twitter Linkedin Richard is a business and social entrepreneur who founded or invested in more than 30 businesses, including investments in Argos Multilingual, PMR and, in 2020, the New Books Network. Richard has been a TEDx event organiser, supports the pro-entrepreneurship ecosystem, and leads entrepreneurship workshops at all levels: from pre- to business schools. Richard was born in Oxford and moved to Poland in 1991. Read more here. Listen to his story in an autobiographical TEDx talk here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Inventors Helping Inventors
#162 - Busy mom has 3 kids, 3 businesses, and 3 licensed inventions - Jenn Everett

Inventors Helping Inventors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:41


Alan interviews Jenn Everett. Jenn Everett grew up in Elkhorn, Nebraska and got a master's degree from the University of Nebraska, Omaha. A busy mom with 3 kids, she soon added 3 businesses, then 3 inventions that she licensed in 1 year! Tune in to learn how she licensed so quickly and how she balances it all! Make sure to subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts, so you won't miss a single episode. Email: MompreneurUnleashed@gmail.com

Business Coaching with Join Up Dots
Should We Push Kids To Start Businesses ?

Business Coaching with Join Up Dots

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 14:53


In todays episode of Join Up Dots we focus on a question posed to us by a listener of the show. Good afternoon David and sexy team , Would you ever advise your children to start up a business ? My eldest daughter is unsure what to do with her working life / career obviously listening to your podcasts about online business etc would it be advisable to push my daughter and any other young /adult children to start up on there own ?