Podcasts about Higher education

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Academic tertiary education, such as from colleges and universities

  • 3,338PODCASTS
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  • Oct 27, 2021LATEST
Higher education

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Best podcasts about Higher education

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Latest podcast episodes about Higher education

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 241】#635 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【德國央行總裁離任的背後;能源供給 vs. 氣候變遷;美國高教的傳承錄取;聯合國維和部隊】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 29:20


❗⁠您的一杯咖啡錢 = 我們遠大的目標!捐款支持我們:https://pse.is/3jknpx

The Ivy Podcast
Benefits of College and University Rankings with Mandy Mok – Founder and CEO of AppliedHE

The Ivy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 22:45


Mandy Mok has three decades of corporate experience driven by a deep passion for the advancement of Higher Education. Joining […]

365 Stories I Want To Tell You Before We Both Die

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The Takeaway
The Role Facebook Played in the Attack on the U.S. Capitol 2021-10-26

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:47


The Role Facebook Played in the Attack on the U.S. Capitol This week, Facebook is facing its latest round of scrutiny after a collaboration involving journalists from 17 American newsrooms started publishing a series of stories that they are calling The Facebook Papers. These newsrooms are sifting through thousands of pages of internal documents initially obtained by Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, who testified earlier this month before a Senate subcommittee. The New York Times report shows that employees repeatedly raised red flags about the mismanagement of content and far-right groups. For more on this, The Takeaway speaks with Ryan Mac, technology reporter at The New York Times. Admissions and the Value of Higher Education A conversation about the college admissions process and the value of higher education with Jeff Selingo, author of the book Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions. Howard Students Protest University Living Conditions Students are protesting poor housing conditions at the well-known, historically Black university. For Black people, proper housing has been an issue since the country was founded. Biden Administration Dials Back Promise to Invest in HBCUs President Biden promised to allocate $20 billion exclusively to HBCUs, but since the reconciliation process it's now more like $2 billion.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The Indigo Podcast
Matt Jordan on Higher Education and the Humanities

The Indigo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 67:41


What value is there in thinking deeply about life's persistent questions? It's tremendous, according to Matt Jordan--and we agree. Matt is the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Dean and Chair for the Humanities at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, and he joined us to discuss the purpose of higher education, and more specifically, about the value of the humanities. We talked about living the good life, being a thoughtful person, how the humanities can foster civil discourse, and so much more.  Links and Other Information Check out Matt and his co-hosts on the Three Questions, Three Drinks Podcast Matt Jordan's book chapter, “Inquiry as Occupation” - click here The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Humanities Center at Cuyahoga Community College - click here  All episodes of The Indigo Podcast Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

Wired Ivy
Ocean Onliners (Elizabeth Sanli, Memorial University - Newfoundland and Labrador)

Wired Ivy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:28


As universities attempt to turn away from the remote emergency instruction of 2020 and return to seat-based classes, here at Wired Ivy we're taking a decidedly contrarian approach. Since everyone else seems to be talking about a return to campus, we're trading the Ivory Tower and for the deep blue sea.The Marine Institute at Memorial University - Newfoundland and Labrador's University offers undergraduate and graduate Maritime Studies programs intentionally designed to serve working adults who are far from any of the institution's five land-based campuses. Online courses don't get much more remote than a ship in the middle of an ocean. But as our guest, Dr. Elizabeth Sanli, explains, geographically distant doesn't have to mean students are learning in isolation. Liz is more than qualified to make that claim… she's a self-identified learning geek who has experienced both sides of the online education experience, as an instructor AND as a student. 

NC Policy Watch Radio
UNC should part ways with meddlesome funder

NC Policy Watch Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 1:04


The post UNC should part ways with meddlesome funder appeared first on NC Policy Watch.

The afikra Podcast
JOHN WATERBURY | Higher Education in the Arab Region | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 30:34


In this Conversation, we talked to John Waterbury about his work as a leading source in politics in the Arab region, his 10-year journey as an AUB president, and higher education in the arab region.. Created & Hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Illuminate Higher Education
Accessible Education for Everyone with Pierre Dubuc, Co-Founder & CEO at OpenClassrooms

Illuminate Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 36:17


In this episode of Illuminate Higher Education, N2N Services CEO Kiran Kodithala speaks with Pierre Dubuc, Co-Founder and CEO at OpenClassrooms.Pierre Dubuc's mission with OpenClassrooms is to make education more accessible to all. And he's making big strides with the massive amount of open, online courses (aka MOOC courses) now available. They're a challenge to traditional higher education and an avenue for life-long learning in general.On top of that, we have a growing need to learn more. We need upskilling and rescaling programs because jobs and skills are changing like never before. The concept of customized learning within higher education has skyrocketed since Covid. As a result, full university experiences have moved online, giving students a partial or full online education opportunity that accommodates their schedules. We can definitively say that anybody can learn online in some form due to the popularity of MOOC courses and the adjustments that universities have made around the world.Connect with Pierre Dubuc: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pdubuc/Learn more about OpenClassrooms at https://openclassrooms.com/en/This episode is brought to you by N2N's Illuminate App, The iPaaS for Higher Education. Learn more at https://illuminateapp.com/web/higher-education/Subscribe and listen to more episodes at IlluminateHigherEducation.com

Latina South
Dr. Betina Kaplan on Enabling Access to Higher Education for Undocumented Students | Ep. 23

Latina South

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 25:01


"Anger is the spark.  You know, anger is good sometimes. It's good if it moves you to action." - Dr. Betina Kaplan, Co-founder, ULead Athens Dr. Betina Kaplan teaches Latin American cultures and literatures at the University of Georgia. In 2010 she became angered by the policies banning undocumented students from the top 5 public universities in Georgia. Betina shares how anger inspired her to take action - she became part of the founding group of Freedom University in Atlanta, a safe space for undocumented students to continue their education. In 2014, she also co-founded ULead Athens, a volunteer organization enabling college access for immigrant students and students from immigrant families - where she continues her work today. Thank you for supporting Latina South podcast! Please share the show with a friend or drop us a line: hola@latinasouth.com. Podcast Music: “The OGS Present Higher” Written by Divinity Roxx, Marcie Chapa, Katty Rodriguez, Nikki Glaspie, Tia Fuller Published by Hot Tottie Music (ASCAP), Wambui Publishing Company, I M A Funkateer (BMI) Used by permission. All rights reserved.  

How to College: First Gen
E66: Giving Back to the First Gen Community via Student Affairs & Programs in Higher Education

How to College: First Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 29:04


In this episode, Luz chats with newly appointed board member Mac as he walks us through his journey to and through college and in finding his passions with helping and mentoring students via student affairs, service, and civic engagement. Tune in to learn from his lessons learned along the way and as he shares valuable advice for students.

Careers in Higher Education
Working in EdTech for Student Success with Dr. Jacob Bonne

Careers in Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:54


This week I am joined by Dr. Jacob Bonne, Analytics Consultant for Steppingblocks.com. Prior to joining the team at Steppingblocks, Dr. Bonne worked in Higher Education for 10 years in Housing and Residence Life and student success. He completed his Ed.D. in Education Leadership-Higher Education from the University of Central Florida where his dissertation explored first-year student transitions and parental engagement via smartphone. His last position was as the director of the office of data and strategic projects where he led first-year student retention efforts. It was through this position he discovered his love of data, analytics, and technology to support student success. Despite not directly working for a university any longer, he is very excited to remain in Higher Education through his work at Steppingblocks.

Let’s Talk About Skills, Baby
6. How Pursuing Multiple Interests Makes You More Employable

Let’s Talk About Skills, Baby

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 9:26


The Skill: Blending your various interests into one niche perspective.  This week, we're diving into Season 1 Episode 2 of Let's Talk About Skills Baby. In this episode host, Kelly Ryan Bailey speaks with Tony Tsai, Director of Leadership Development at University of Utah's School of Medicine about the changes to higher education that he feels would most benefit students. Tony believes that while every student chooses a degree to pursue, they are still responsible for their own skillset. It is not enough to just take the classes offered in your program, you really have to take command of your own education, pursue things that interest you, and get a well-rounded exposure to different areas of study.  Key Takeaway: Higher Education no longer draws a straight line to employment, rather it is a training ground for life's more durable skills – like how to think critically, manage time, and navigate competing perspectives and deadlines.   Learn more at https://my.captivate.fm/skillsbaby.com/gotskills%C2%A0%C2%A0 (skillsbaby.com/gotskills)

MPR News with Angela Davis
What declining community college enrollment means for higher education

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:00


Enrollment at colleges across the nation decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, and community colleges have seen the steepest declines. Overall college attendance decreased by 5 percent last spring compared to the year before. At community colleges, enrollment was down by 9.5 percent. Enrollment at Minnesota's community colleges has declined steadily over the past decade. But during the COVID-19 pandemic, those declines became more sharp. Last fall, enrollment decreased 5 percent, according to data from Minnesota State Colleges and Universities.  Host Angela Davis discussed enrollment trends at community colleges in Minnesota with Minnesota State Colleges and Universities chancellor Devinder Malhotra, and asked a higher education reporter what community college enrollment says about higher education.  Guests:  Devinder Malhotra is the chancellor of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities.  Lee Gardner is a senior writer for the Chronicle of Higher Education.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

Campus Technology Insider
Embracing Innovation, Technology and Culture Change for the Sake of Access

Campus Technology Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:13


The pandemic accelerated digital transformation and the adoption of new learning models at many colleges and universities — but higher ed culture has some catching up to do. While institutions traditionally measure change in decades, we're now in a time when flexibility, innovation and risk-taking are key to student access and opportunity as well as institutional survival. We spoke with Dr. Mark Lombardi, president of Maryville University, about why the business model of higher ed is broken, the importance of lifelong learning and technology's role in moving universities toward a better future. Resource links: Maryville University Digital Development Project Music: Mixkit Duration: 29 minutes Transcript

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast
OTC From the Field: Launching a Financial Wellness Course

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 24:50


This week on "Off The Cuff," Justin is joined by Emma Crawford, manager of financial aid and financial wellness at the University of Wisconsin, where she works with medical students advising them on financial budgeting and creating a plan to pay off their student loans. Along with University of Wisconsin medical student Chris Rufus Sweeney, the group discusses the financial wellness course they helped launch at Wisconsin, the impact it's had, and how students are utilizing the information to help budget for paying their student loans. Plus, Owen and Justin recap the latest higher education and financial aid news.

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: Civic Engagement in Higher Education

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Brian Mateo, associate dean of civic engagement and director of strategic partnerships in Bard College's Globalization and International Affairs Program and security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, discusses how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to reference after today's discussion. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. So with that, I'm delighted to have the pleasure of introducing Brian Mateo to talk about how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues. We've shared his bio with you, so I'll just give you a few highlights. Mr. Mateo serves as associate dean of civic engagement at Bard College, where he works with faculty and students across the Open Society University Network on experiential learning and civic engagement opportunities. Previously he worked with public diplomacy programs sponsored by the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs on U.S. foreign policy and engagement. He's also a security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a trained climate reality leader under former Vice President Al Gore. So, Brian, thank you very much for being with us. If we could just dive right in to talk about what is the role of higher education in civic engagement? How do you define it, and how do you encourage administrators and students to get more involved? MATEO: Thank you very much for having me here today at the Council on Foreign Relations, Irina. I'm very excited for this opportunity. So, yes, what is the role of higher education institutions when it comes to civic engagement? So the American Psychological Association defines civic engagement as individuals and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern. At the core of Bard's mission is to be a private college in the public interest. And how we do that is by providing access and education, especially for students that are underrepresented or may not have access to a liberal arts education. This is evidenced by our Bard Early Colleges, which are high school—which are for high school aged students that can take up to a year or two years of free college credit to be able to accelerate their college career. It's also evidenced by our Bard Prison Initiative, which is the largest prison education program for incarcerated individuals in the nation. So when we think about how do we do this, I see—I can't help but think about Astin's model of student development, which says that for students that are hyper-involved in their institutions, they get to be more engaged and involved, and the quality of their involvement goes up. And if we provide high level of programs and resources, students are more likely to be engaged. And then Astin also encourages us to make sure that we are providing resources and programmatic efforts that are meeting the needs of the students today. And I will begin to talk about how we do this from the student level, the faculty/staff level, institutionally, and also talk about how we work with communities. And before I begin, Bard also is a founding member of the Open Society University Network, which is comprised of over forty academic and research institutions. So not only are we also collaborating with our local communities, we also have a transnational network that we're working with. So how do you engage students? We do this by making sure that we're merging the curricular and co-curricular learning. This is also evidenced by our Certificate of Civic Engagement Program, which is a structured path for undergraduate students that are interested in deepening their knowledge and understanding of civic engagement and community engagement. And students are able to participate in this program and also earn a certificate that will also be added to their transcript. We also provide students with grants and opportunities to pursue internships that are unpaid, which are—which are called Community Act Awards. So students that find unpaid internships related to civic engagement and also social justice issues can apply for a grant to be able to supplement that, and making it more equitable for our students. We also provide what are called microgrants, which are seed funding for students that want to be able to do community-based projects. For faculty and staff, we encourage them to teach courses on experiential learning. And these courses enable students to not only work with the community but bring the community also into our classroom. And looking at David Kolb's experiential learning cycle, where students need—where students start with concrete experience, work on reflection, and also thinking about the experience while then planning and learning what they've—and executing what they've learned, is very important when it comes to civic engagement work because students are—students are introduced to some of these issues in the classroom, and then they have the ability to work through those issues with a professor and community members as well. And some example of these courses are—I teach a course on civic engagement myself, where the course is historical, theoretical, and experiential. And we look at social movements in America that help effect change. And we look at the civil rights movement, women rights, LGBT rights, climate activism and climate action, as well as the role of the media and what is misinformation and disinformation. And in this course, students also have to conduct what's called the Community Needs Assessment. And the Community Needs Assessment, students come with a research question and then work to interview community members to see what are the issues that are happening there. For faculty that also want to learn more about how to create courses on experiential learning, we also offer an experiential leaning institute where faculty from the OSUN network can participate. And then students—examples of work that faculty have done with students have been implementing a digital platform to assist with teaching or tutoring practices, historical tours and workshops, and also storytelling and interviews of community partners as well. Faculty that teach experiential learning, students say that about 89 percent of them say that engagement this way has helped their awareness to social justice and community issues. And in 2020 we had over eight hundred students that participated in about eighty courses. And those courses worked with ninety-five community agencies or organizations. We also help faculty and graduate students on conducting engaged research and scholarship practice. So some of examples of these are looking at LGBT issues in South Africa, the intersection of how music supports education with people—with people with disabilities, and also peacebuilding and storytelling as well. And we also help staff and faculty create civic action plans, which help colleges around the OSUN network institutionalize civic engagement and strategically think of how these four pillars can work together. While working with community partners, we're also very intentional in making sure that we have equitable practices. We developed what's called the Principles of Equity, where faculty/staff and community members can read on our website on how we work with the community, and making sure that it's reciprocal, making sure that it's—that we're deepening and creating sustainable partnerships while also engaging community with resources and developing shared resources as well that can benefit both the community and students and the institution. When it comes to institutional engagement, I gave examples of the Bard Early Colleges and Bard Prison Initiative. Bard has also been able to work with student-led—with other student-led initiatives that have become part of the institution. Examples of these as well are Brothers At, which is a mentoring and college-readiness program nationwide for young men of color, as well as Sister to Sister, that does similar work but with young women of color. And recently, Bard also has worked with trying to evacuate nearly two hundred Afghan students and helping them get an education throughout our network as well. So those are some examples of institutional engagement at Bard—at Bard as well. And I constantly think to myself: What is it that we want our students to gain when they participate in our—in our program, or engage with our network? And looking back at Astin's theory of student involvement, we see that Astin talks about inputs, which are what students come with, the environment, what is it that we're providing for our students, and the outputs. As a result of a student attending our universities, what is it that we want them to get out of this, aside from just, you know, the academic knowledge. But how do we want them to be involved? And in my opinion, I feel like there's a few outputs that we would want, as higher education administrators. And I'll state them and then conclude my presentation. So I strongly believe that, you know, we want them to be critical thinkers. We want them to understand and practice equity, be strategic problem solvers, understand the power of reflection and active listening, community builders, practice empathy, be lifelong learners, and also ultimately be engaged individuals. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Brian, thank you very much. Let's go to all of you now. (Gives queuing instructions.)  So I'm going to go first go to Manuel Montoya. Please unmute yourself and tell us your institution. Q: Yeah. Hello. My name's Manuel Montoya and I am from the University of New Mexico. Thank you, Irina, for setting this up. I think this is an important discussion. And thank you, Mr. Mateo, for your presentation. I'm pleased to hear all the work that you're doing. That's inspiring. I will, I guess, do two parts. I will share some of the work that I've done and then share a question that I think is germane to this particular issue. We recently set up a global experiential learning curriculum at the university that is designed to get students to merge theory with practice and some sort of practical impact in terms of the global economy and other things. And we have a—we have a group of students that work with the largest folk art market in the world, which is based in Santa Fe. And we're trying to get them to work with indigenous communities throughout the world to try to have a larger platform for market entry. And we're—we've been in talks for the past four years to try to get the Olympic games to have some sort of mini pop-up folk art market that represents these types of market activities. And inside of that there is a lot of issues about human rights, but also about the value of crafting economy. There's all sorts of things that students are trying to engage with that require a liberal arts education. My question, or my frustration, often happens at places that aren't like Bard College, places that don't necessarily see community-engaged learning as having some sort of incentive structure for faculty. I'm one of many faculty members that does that, likely because I care about the issues and also because I think that it does make research and other forms of academic and intellectual contributions valuable. So my question to Mr. Mateo, or just generally to whoever's participating, is how are we creating an incentive structure for faculty and for other people who are engaged within the university system to make this transition to do the kind of work that Mr. Mateo is talking about? And what is that—what is that going to take in places that are embedded a little bit more traditionally in the way that higher education either incentivizes or evaluates faculty and stuff in more traditional ways? MATEO: Yes. Thank you so much for your question. And it's a question that we're all grappling with, right, as well. Some of us—some of us are doing the work deeper and, you know, sometimes taking risks, and others are in the inception piece. So I'll elaborate by saying this: Students more and more are asking how do I apply what I'm learning in the classroom to a job? How do I make sure that, as a result of me attending this institution, I'm also going to be competitive or be able to contribute to society, right? So I think that—I think that more and more institutions and faculty are thinking about this, because you—you know, students are less inclined to go be taught something and not be able to apply it. At the same time, students also want to see themselves, their history, and also what's going on in the community into the curriculum too. So this is also driving the conversation. It is not easy to teach courses on experiential learning. It takes a lot of time. It also takes resources. And you have to embed reflection and community engagement into the syllabus. And sometimes when you're teaching two days a week for an hour or an hour and a half—you know, fifteen-week curriculum for the semester, that can be difficult to do. So what we've done is that we've developed an experiential learning institute to help faculty understand how to bring this thing into it, how to work with community, how to start that timeline. Because it's very different to develop a syllabus than to bring in community, because you sometimes have to start setting that up earlier. And also, we provide grants to support them to be able to do either—to buy resources for transportation, if they need to hire a student intern to help them with this work as well. So those are some of the ways that we have tried to do this. I also want to talk about data and assessment, because I can't stress enough how much—how important that is. Because when you're measuring students' learning and you see that their learning has grown exponentially from an experiential based course, you cannot argue with that, right? So we try to do our best to make sure that we are—that we're also assessing learning and making sure that when—that when we are asking for funding or that when we are trying to create new programs and initiatives, that we are doing this not only evidence-based in theory and practice, but also on the data that proves that this is something that is of a benefit to the community, to our students, and our institution. Q: Thank you, Mr. Mateo. I guess I have one follow-up question, if it's permissible, Irina. FASKIANOS: Sure. Go ahead, Manuel. Q: Yeah, yeah. So I think you're entirely right. I think that assessment at the student level and the student engagement level, being able to see how this connects to the vocational and even their social destinies is a really, really important factor. I've noted that many institutions across the country are having a great difficulty trying to incorporate or embed community engagement as how they evaluate their faculty. And I'm a tenured faculty at the university, and it's a research one institution. It's not a liberal arts institution. But, you know, publish or perish becomes still one of the ways in which I'm evaluated. So I have to—I have to attend to this kind of master of publishing in peer-reviewed journals, while at the same time my heart and really the most effective work that I do is during community engagement work. So I guess my question is also fundamentally about how we're—how we're transforming institutions to be able to adapt and really incorporate the type of community engagement work that you're talking about, Mr. Mateo, while at the same time valuing and validating its value with the assessment of faculty every year. Because I would say that you'd get a ton of faculty who'd be really good at doing this kind of work, but they're disincentivized to do it because they're only evaluated by their peer-reviewed journal work. So how does one connect the two? What is the frontier for that in higher education that you guys have seen? And I'd really, really like to know, because I think that's going to be a really important part of the frontier of what higher education is dealing with. MATEO: Well, yes, thank you. And, you know, as a field of higher education we're here not only teach, but provide knowledge, and hopefully that that knowledge helps better communities or help create an awareness, right? So that's something that needs to—that needs to be a driving source and conversation because, you know, what we try to do is to incentivize faculty whenever they aren't conducting research, and also students as well, when they want to do community-based work, to see who they can partner with, how they can go about and do that. And making sure that we're amplifying voices and showing the level of work that people are doing so, like, that their work can be recognized and that it also shows that there's a value to this as well. So that's what I would say there. It's still something that I think institutions grapple with, but more and more I believe that as institutions begin to see the value of being civically engaged, because at the end of the day, you know, we all also exist in the community. Our colleges and our campuses are within our community, within a community, within a domestic national and international realm. And, you know, what is it that we want to do? We want to contribute. And that's one of the reasons why we also provide engaged research grants for faculty too. So I hope that that answers your question, Manuel, and I'm happy to elaborate more. Q: I'll yield to other questions. But thank you very much. I appreciate it. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Laila Bichara, who has a raised hand. And if you could unmute and identify your institution. Q: Hi. Well, I work for SUNY Farmingdale. And generally speaking, I teach with experiential learning. I use all kinds of newspapers and case studies and current affairs to make sure that the theory we cover in global business, you know, management and all other courses are, you know, applied and showing the results and what's going on. That said, I am currently serving on an adjunct staff to work on couple of issues. One is social mobility and the second is community engagement, and I see a lot of interrelation between this and experiential learning. And I just wanted to see if there is any work done or papers done in the social mobility, because our students are typically first-generation college students. They don't have role models at home and they rely heavily on us to guide them, and they're usually kids or, you know, students in their twenties that have two or three jobs to pay for their education. So any ideas, any links, any guidance for me to start to make advancement in that project and help my students. MATEO: Great. Thank you. So what I hear you say is that looking at the linkages between social mobility, community engagement, and which one was the third one? Q: Experiential learning as well. MATEO: Experiential learning. Yes. Q: Yeah. It's all a kind of, like, spiral to me. You know, that's how I see it. MATEO: Yes. So when allowing students to do experiential learning into the classroom and bringing into the classroom, you're also helping them get applied skills, and yes, so there is at times a level of—a disadvantage when a student is working three jobs while also studying and then you're telling them like, oh, go volunteer, or go do this, right. By embedding experiential learning into the curriculum, you're still teaching students with some of these applicable skills that they can use as a part of a resume and also can speak to in an interview and saying, like, this is how I was able to do this as evidenced by that, right. And that, in turn, helps students to be able to find other opportunities as well. In terms of links, so we do have resources at our Center for Civic Engagement website, which is cce.bard.edu, and there's a resource link there, and then we also have resources as well on our OSUN website, osun.bard.edu. So those are—those are places that you that you can find some of these resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And we'll send out after this a link to this webinar as well as with those URLs so that people—websites so people can go back and dig deeper. So I'm going to go next to David Kim's written question. He's an assistant professor at UCLA. Thank you for this discussion. I'd like to hear more about insights into community engagement on an international or global level. What are some best practices when faculty, communities, and students work across borders—international borders? How are they different from community engagement at a local or national level? MATEO: Thank you. So we have to be aware of, you know, what we can provide and also what is it—what are some of the needs or how it can be reciprocal. So a lot of listening and intentionality has to be brought into it because sometimes, you know, we can come in with our own mindset of, oh, this is how we do it and we do it well, and then you meet other counterparts and then they're, like, well, but this is also another way of doing it. So there has to be a collaborative and reciprocal way or a mutual, respectful, reciprocal way of engaging, and, typically, you know, how we've done that is that we've partnered with other universities. We've also seen who are the community partners that are there in the international realm and how we can work around that, too. So I would say being intentional, making sure that you have capacity for what you are doing so, like, that you can deliver and also having a mutual reciprocal approach as well as active listening, and be willing to learn also from our international partners, too. FASKIANOS: I think, Brian, you mentioned that you were looking at LGBTQ+ issues in South Africa. Do you have any partnerships? Can you sort of give us examples of how you're doing that? MATEO: Yes. That's one of the research grants that we have provided to someone to be able to do that research. So the individual there is partnered with organizations and are conducting that research, and once that research is done we will make sure to publish it. FASKIANOS: Great. OK. I'm going to go next to Isaac Castellano from Boise State University. Our career center just landed a grant to pilot a program to pay students for their internship experiences. For us, a lot of students—our students have to work and this is another way beyond embedding experiential learning into their coursework. So I think he's sharing more than asking a question, but maybe you have a reaction to that. MATEO: Yes, and thank you so much, Isaac. So yeah. So we piloted this a couple of years ago and it's been very successful, and the way that it—the way that it works is it's for summer internships and students can request up to $3,000 for any unpaid internship. And we have them submit an application as well as a supervisor form and an agreement of what the students will be doing for that organization. And then, in return, the students will write one to two reflection papers on their experience, and then when they come back to campus the next semester they get to present about their experience and what they've done for that internship. So that's how we—that's how we run our community action awards, and it's been super successful. It has been able to provide access to students that wouldn't otherwise be able to do an unpaid internship, and the students submit a budget of up to $2,000 and then we see how we can—how we can help fund that. So I highly encourage you to definitely do that pilot, and if you do want any other insight or how to be able to do that, I'm happy to share my email as well with Irina when she sends out the resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And Isaac has a follow-up. Where does the money come from, that paid summer program that you're talking about? MATEO: It could—grants. We also try to fund—try to find funding and resources as well. So it comes through various sources, and so that's how we try to support our students. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. OK. So the next question is another written question. And people can ask their questions, too, but this is from Chip Pitts at Stanford University. Have you encountered obstacles in this environment characterized by major demographic changes and increasing polarization, e.g., mandates against critical race theory, based on the perceived political nature, even leftist nature of, quote/unquote, “social justice” and “human rights” or “environmental community engagement efforts”? And if so, or for those in places where there are more conservative values, what have you seen or would you suggest to shore up and spur more courage and leadership among the reluctant or shy faculty and administrators and overcome and avoid such blockages? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Thank you. So you have to meet communities where they're at, right, and making sure that they also understand that we're here to work with them, too, and this is why active listening and making sure that there is a reciprocal approach to this is important. And it's not—sometimes it can be fairly easy to be able to say, hey, we want to collaborate with you, and other times it can be extremely difficult and tenuous. But continuing to demonstrate and show the level of learning or how that community is continuously being engaged is something that's very important because, in my opinion, I think that sometimes, you know, we have a hard time of showing all the great work that we're doing, and in order for us to be able to partner and work more with community members we also have to show the research and demonstrate and be able to present this so people understand what we are trying to do. So there are times that it is challenging, and there are some things that will work with some communities and some things that will not. So where then are you able to then find what can work and how you can make it happen, and then from there be able to build up from there—from the ground up. So yeah, so there are some communities where you can do, like, one to ten things and then other communities that you can do one to three things and, hopefully, that you can start to do four or five, but then how do you still provide that access and education and equity as well. FASKIANOS: Brian, what would you say are the—in your opinion, the global issues students are most interested in? And, you know, if a college can only take on or faculty can only take on one issue that they're trying to push, you know, what would be the one, or to drive a—foster more civic engagement? What do you think would be a viable and a good starting—steppingstone to sort of expand this into their community and both on campus and off? MATEO: Wow. That's a great question, Irina. I would say that students are very interested in gender equity, LGBT. They're also very interested in making sure that underrepresented populations are included in conversations, as well as awareness in disability. An all-encompassing issue that students are also passionate about because most of them experience this globally every day is climate change, and making sure that, you know, how we can engage students through there. So that—so out of everything that I mentioned, this also encompasses these issues as a major one, and Bard, through the Open Society University Network, is actually having a global teach-in, which is—you can find this in the Solve Climate by '30 and I can send the link to Irina as well—where all colleges and universities can come in and do a global teach-in and as well get resources, and we're providing opportunities for students around the world to also be able to receive opportunity to get engaged, too. So we're doing this in March, and we're trying to get a robust number of institutions to participate in this because climate doesn't only affect, you know, our living environment, but it also affects students' educational pursuits. Harvard conducted a study called Heat and Learning that showed that for every degree Fahrenheit that goes up student learning goes down by 1 percent. It's also shown disparities that—you know, climate change also has, you know, a disproportionate effect on young people of color because of regions where people live in cold and hot environments, as well as disparities when it comes to gender. Women are more likely to be taken out of the classroom when there are climate change disasters to be caretakers, and we're also seeing a rise in child marriages because of that, too. You know, it also—you also talk about sanitation when it comes to climate change and educational environments. You know, if you start to—if your building starts to get moldy and also if students start to get sick because of the infrastructure or it gets too hot, you're going to see an increased rate of students showing up—not showing up and being absent or dropout rates as well. So climate change exacerbates or, as it's called, a threat multiplier, and this is something that as higher education administrators we have to also make sure that we are—that we're constantly thinking and showing how can we, based on students' interests, can help to solve climate as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So if others have questions—Manuel, I don't know if you had a follow-on. You said you would cede the floor but you can come back on. You can raise your hand or write—type your question in the Q&A box, or I could ask more. Just waiting to see if Manuel wanted to come back in. OK. There is a—oh, Manuel said his question was answered. OK. Great. So—sorry, I'm just looking—toggling a lot of things. All right. So my next question would be—you did talk about this earlier—you know, there has been a lot written about what is a college education worth, and I think this connection of the critical thinking and the internships and the experiential learning. But could you talk a little bit more about students' educational performance and career path and how they can leverage these—you know, what they're doing, civic engagement, into their future career plans? MATEO: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: And then I have another random question. Mmm hmm. MATEO: Yes. So helping students to understand that some of the work that they do outside of a classroom could also translate both inside as well because when I have—when I see students when they're thinking about their career path, they're like, oh, but I've never done an internship before, or, oh, but I've never actually had a job here or there. But then when you start to look at the classes that they're taking and the application piece in those courses, you can sort of say, yes, but you also in this course did storytelling of a community and also created a podcast. So this is also an application piece where you can add to your resume, too. So helping students to think and link experiential learning to application, and demonstrating that is definitely an added plus, and this is why a lot of these courses are also very popular and very highly rated for students because they're starting—they start to see that they're also gaining transferable skills while engaging in these courses, too, that they can then add to their resume and be able to speak to at an interview as well. Like, I'll give you the example of the community needs assessment that the students that I work with conduct. You know, they can talk about research. They can talk about, you know, being able to work with communities. They also have to interview a leader in that community, whether that be a politician or a school leader or anyone. You know, so there are skills that they can then say here are some tangible outcomes as a result of this assignment, and that's why experiential learning can also help when it comes to merging career paths for students. FASKIANOS: Great. So a few more questions in the chat. Jim Zaffiro, who is at Central College, has asked what recommendations would you have for incorporating civic engagement into a common first-year experience course? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Yes. So looking back at Astin's model of input-environment-outputs, right, so we need to figure out, like, you know, how can we create a baseline for students to best understand what it means to be civically engaged and the environments piece of it. So what I would say, making sure that they understand the community they're a part of, what are some of the issues and needs, providing reflection for them to talk about how they have been engaged, how do they see themselves as engaged citizens and providing opportunities for them to get exposure to working with community members and working outside of the community as well. So we do this starting from our orientational language and thinking, where we start to not only provide articles and readings on this but we're also getting students to volunteer and get—and having students to think about how they want—how they want to be involved, and showing them a lot of the student-led initiatives that we offer that they can either get involved or start on their own. And then throughout the first year they also have what's called the Citizen Science Program, which is a January term, where students start to see how science and citizenship come together and work together. And during that time, we also have our MLK Day of Engagement, which is a day for students to also go out and volunteer into the community and reflect on their volunteer work as well. So that's kind of how we've embedded a lot of engagement for our first-years to making sure that we're providing them with engagement, adding courses for them to think about what does it mean to be engaged in either a civic engagement course or experiential learning courses and opportunities throughout the year for them to be involved, which, ultimately, we were then promoting for them how they can—how they can apply for these community action awards and also for the summer, but also what are ways for them to get engaged through the broader OSUN network. FASKIANOS: Great. How has the pandemic exacerbated preexisting community needs? How have you at Bard deepened students' civic engagement in order to help alleviate the pandemic-related effects that we are seeing in our communities? MATEO: Yes, and as we all know, when it comes to community-based work in civic engagement, you know, we all had to, you know, come indoors, and we had this notion that we had to be there to be able to engage with the community. So we developed—and this is also part of our civic engagement website—a tool kit on how to do engagement virtually, how to be able to do blended learning as well, and making sure that we still had a commitment to our community leaders. And our community partners also were able to come into our classes via Zoom and engage with students as well, and we helped students find virtual engagement, whether it be tutoring, whether it be, you know, helping to analyze something and sending it back. So these were some of the ways. But it did definitely create a halt, though we quickly found ways to not only build and provide resources but also pivot and making sure that we provide opportunities for students that were online and making sure that we showed a commitment to our partners as well. FASKIANOS: So John Dietrich at Bryant University asks for examples, more examples in practice of bringing experiential learning into the classroom, so if you could put some— MATEO: Yes. Yeah, so we have a course that's called All Politics is Local and what we do in that—and what the faculty members do in that course is that they're able to pair students with local internships in different government organizations, so not only are students learning about local government in the class but they're actually interning at the same time in different local governments. Another example of a professor that teaches studio arts is a class called Portraits and Community where they get to talk to community members and identify the history of that community, also talk with Congress—with a member of Congress while painting these community members and learning their stories, learning how to tell their stories but using art as a way of engagement. Another example is being able to develop tool kits, so, for example, looking at, you know, if you're a professor in biology or in chemistry and you have a local river or you have, you know, an ecosystem or environment, you know, how has that changed throughout the years and how can students create experiments and be able to then provide knowledge for local leaders or community members to see if there has been change that has been happening there? So I hope that this gives you some examples of community-based learning and education when it comes to doing it in the classroom. Podcasts have also been something that have been very important because students not only learn the skill on how to run a podcast and how to do a podcast, but then they also get to interview community members and do it—and be able to speak and provide the opportunity for storytelling as well. FASKIANOS: Can you talk a little bit about the role civic engagement plays in international students' educational experience? I mean, a lot of campuses have international students, and what does it mean for them and what are they taking back to their countries? MATEO: Yeah, so working with the OSUN network I've learned a lot about what other campuses have been doing and how they do civic engagement, and at some campuses civic engagement is embedded from the beginning. They are taking courses, they have to graduate with a certain amount of hours to be able to get their degree, you know, and some institutions in the United States do that, some don't per se, you know, so—and then also thinking about what—so for them also thinking about what does it mean to be engaged in their communities, and what are some of the work that they are doing as well? So civic engagement can look differently, so some of it can be tutoring. Some of it can be, you know, mostly youth engagement. A lot of it can be gender equity and working to raise awareness on gender issues. So there has been a great sense of education knowledge on my part on seeing how other institutions work on civic engagement. At the same time, it's also great because we're able to talk about civic engagement and develop that baseline and learn how we can grow together, and what are some things that they're doing that we can do and vice versa? So that—so I would say that in some institutions globally, civic engagement is embedded from the beginning and students have to make sure that they are taking courses on engagement. Some of them have, like, first-year sophomore-, junior-, senior-level seminars on engagement, and then others, you have to have a requirement of graduation for a certain amount of hours. So that's how, kind of, it's worked. FASKIANOS: Brian, you talked about inputs and outputs and metrics, so have you measured how civic engagement, the programs that you're doing are affecting students' perspectives on diversity, equity, and inclusion? MATEO: Yes, we have, actually, and—I have this here in my notes—yes, and 89 percent of them say that it has created an awareness of social justice issues and it has also enhanced their learning. So we're seeing that this is something that is showing and demonstrating that by engaging, and also at times engaging with difference, it has helped their learning. And over 90 percent of students say that they would continue to engage our—engage with arts and science courses or experiential courses as a result of that. FASKIANOS: Do you do that survey after each semester or is it at the end of the academic year? How are you doing that? MATEO: Yeah, so we do that survey at the end of each semester when it comes to faculty courses. When it comes to the engagement that students are doing outside of the classroom we also try to assess that, too, which I do midway and also at the end, and some students also do culminating projects, as well, that they are incorporating—at the end of their academic career they are talking about how civic engagement has helped them. So an example of that is—and this is the certificate in civic engagement that we've recently launched. You know, students will be able to apply for what's called an engaged senior project grant that they can get funding to be able to add civic engagement into their final project too, so that's—we're measuring and seeing how many students are interested and want to be able to engage in that. So I would say all together we are doing—you know, and sometimes, you know, we capture a lot of data and sometimes, you know, so we try to make sure that we're doing it as holistic as possible but we do it at the end, so at the end of each semester if a course qualifies as experiential learning, we are doing—so it's a separate evaluation outside of the normal class evaluation, and then we start to see and look at the metrics and what students have learned and, like, now we can start to gather and tell stories behind, you know, what these courses are doing. FASKIANOS: Great. So we have a follow-up question from Manuel Montoya: How does experiential learning and community engagement avoid essentializing the communities you engage with? On a related note, how does one navigate who gets to represent community needs when working on issues of engagement? MATEO: Yeah, this is a very, very, very, like, a thin line. Right? And it comes, again, with mutual respect, reciprocity, active listening. Some of the time community partners come to us and say, hey, we have a need and then we evaluate it and see how we can help that need. Other times, faculty or even students are like, hey, here is something that we should be working on and then we do that. Right? So an example of that is the Bard Prison Initiative. A student came and said, hey, look, we should be working on this and then it became an institutional part of Bard and now it's one of the largest prison education programs for incarcerated individuals across the nation. You know, so—and it takes a lot of reflecting and making sure that the community's needs are also in the forefront, because we don't want to usurp or take on, you know, or say, like, oh, this is ours now. No, this is “in collaboration with.” This is not a “we do this” per se. So that's why we have developed the principles of equity, and I'll share that, as well, with Irina so you can get a sense—that talks about this is, how can we make this equitable? How can we acknowledge and reflect on the work that we're doing? How do we—how are we not making sure that we're showing up and saying, like, oh, look, we're here, as like, you know, how—saving a community. But no, we're here to help enhance a community while they're enhancing our learning and providing assistance for us as well. So it has to be reciprocal in order for you to maintain a deep and sustained relationship. FASKIANOS: Great. And I'm just going to flag—I don't know if people are looking at the Q&A but Chip Pitts was building on what you talked about the importance of climate as a health issue. There's a study that's worth looking at, www.thelancet.com/countdown-health-climate, so you can look there. MATEO: Thank you, Chip. FASKIANOS: We do have another comment. I've benefited immensely from this discussion, bringing to fore the relevance of community engagement for students and faculty. I'm seeing new areas I can suggest for experiential learning to my institution. Terrific. That's great. MATEO: Thank you. I'm glad. FASKIANOS: Really appreciate that from NenpoSarah Gowon—and the last name is cut off. All right, so I wanted to ask you about—in your view, do you—I mean, you've been doing this for a long time. What do you see as the challenges that you've faced in sort of bringing this along in your community? And what have been the unexpected surprises and the receptivity to this approach of experiential learning and critical thinking, et cetera? MATEO: Thank you. That's an excellent question and here's reflection, you know, as we talk about experiential learning. Right? So I would say that my—so I was—so I'm fortunate enough to be able to work with the OSUN network to be in—and become a lifelong learner myself and learn how other institutions have been doing this. And going back to what Manuel was alluding to is that when something is new it's hard to bring in change. Right? So when asking people, hey, do you want to teach a course on experiential learning or asking a student, hey, do you want to also do this type of civic engagement work, what sometimes is heard is, oh, this is more work; this is going to be too hard. Right? So how do you show those benefits, right? And in the beginning, initial stages, it's going to be an uphill battle. But once you have one or two or a group of people doing it and talking about how great it is and how their students are engaged—like, in some of the assessments students are asking for more time in those courses because they're like, this is so—this is great, that we want to make sure that we meet more or we want to make sure we have more time to do—to engage in these courses, so now we're seeing that students want more of these courses and not just of the courses in general but maybe adding a third section instead of just meeting two times a week per se. You know? And then—and funding can also be something that's very—that can be challenging because, you know, you need to make this a commitment in saying, like, yes, we are going to fund, let's say, for example, thirty student internships over the summer because we believe that this is going to help engage their learning. We believe this is going to create an opportunity for them moving forward. Right? So—and researcher—sometimes, you know, if you're in a metropolitan area, it's easier for you to say, yeah, we're going to go to a museum or we're going to go to this community because we can all just take public transportation. But if you're in a rural environment, you're relying on vans and buses and so on and so forth, and that can sometimes run you $500 to $2,000 per visit, you know. So you also have to think really strategically and think smarter, not harder, and how are you engaging? Right? Because one of the detriments is that great, we went to one community once and as a result of that, like, what would happen—because, again, it goes back to sustained, deepening relationships, so those are some of the things that can be some of the challenges. Some of the breakthroughs for me is when you start to see the learning connect, when a student's like, you know—you know, I once had someone from the New York City's mayor's office come speak to the students in my class and it really warmed my heart when a student was like, I didn't know that I had access; I didn't realize that someone like me could be able to speak to someone from the mayor's office. And I'm like, but you're also a citizen of New York City and this is what—you know, so there was that disconnect for the student; it was like, wow, I can do this. Another student wants to—is pursuing, you know, a degree in political science and stuff like that. You know, or even when a student did a research project on the tolls of the taxi in New York City because that student felt they had a personal connection to this, and then they were able to see how, you know, some stories were similar to what—to the narrative that they had and be able to then share some possible solutions and show that they can also be active citizens and engage and be empowered. That is the other piece that, like, once you see that people start to be empowered, they want to continue doing this work and it's, you know, my job and the job of others at other higher education institutions to continue to empower and continue to provide opportunities and shed light, you know, because some of this is also exposure. You know, thinking about outputs; it's like sometimes you know what you know, but then when you meet a professor that's doing some type of research that you're just like, wow, this is so intriguing; I never knew I could do this. That's something that is also very influential for the student. And I'll give you a personal anecdote about myself. I myself have been an experiential learner. You know, I went to college and I got my master's in higher ed administration, but all of a sudden I'm working with international communities, I'm also part of the Council on Foreign Relations doing research on climate, and teaching experiential learning. And that is as evidenced by Bard being a private college for public interest, and also enabling us to be a part of the system that we ourselves can be experiential learners and be able to do different things and sometimes, you know, like, not necessarily shift our careers but find new interests, because this is what we want to do and develop the system that can be reciprocal for our students, faculty, staff, and community. FASKIANOS: Well, with that, we've reached the end of our hour. Brain Mateo, thank you very much for sharing what you're doing at Bard, your stories, and we will circulate to everybody the resources that you mentioned, and, you know, just want to thank you for your dedication. And to everybody on this call, I mean, it really has brought home for me the important work that you all are doing to raise the next generation of leaders, and we need them and you all are role models for young adults who, as somebody said, their parents have never gone to college and really need some guidance on next steps. So thank you to you, Brian, and to everybody on this call for what you're doing in your communities. We will share Brian's email address and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianmateo. So I encourage you to follow him there. Our next Higher Education Webinar will be in November, and we will send the topic speaker and date under separate cover. And so I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic on Twitter, and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for more resources. And of course, as always, you can email cfracademic@cfr.org, with suggestions of future topics or speakers you would like to hear from. We're trying to be a resource for all of you and support you and the important work that you are doing. So Brian, thank you again. MATEO: Thank you. And I'll make sure to share resources with you. Have a great day. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. (END)

Where We Live
The Stamford mayoral race heats up as big names throw their support behind State Rep. Caroline Simmons

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 49:00


Harvard grad and Yale School of Medicine policy advisor Caroline Simmons, State Representative for the 144th District since 2014, has won an endorsement from fellow Democrats Gov. Ned Lamont and former President Barack Obama for her candidacy as mayor of Stamford, one of the wealthiest and fastest growing cities in Connecticut. The Greenwich native is up against baseball legend Bobby Valentine, 71, who's running unaffiliated. Former Homeland Secretary Janet Napolitano, former Secretary of the Treasury Lawrence Summers, and Speaker of the House Matt Ritter are a few high profile donors to Simmons' campaign, which has raised $503,122 to date. So what's at stake? The unemployment rate at Stamford is at 6.2%, and the city's labor force contracted by 4,096, from 68,698 to 64,698 in the second quarter of 2021, compared to the same period the prior year. Also, mold in schools, housing affordability, and urban planning as the city continues to grow. GUESTS:  Rep. Caroline Simmons: Democratic Mayoral Candidate, Stamford. Co-Chair, Commerce Committee; Member, Committee on Human Services, and Member, Higher Education and Employment advancement Committee, Connecticut General Assembly. Senior Specialist, Policy Innovation and Impact, Yale School of Medicine. Brianna Gurciullo - Politics Reporter, Stamford Advocate Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Engineer of Finance
Conversation About Career & Technical Education with Jim Bologa - Episode 194

Engineer of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 36:07


Other than going to the university to get a degree, what are the other educational options for students? Ken welcomes Jim Bologa to talk about the career and technical education space. Jim is the President and CEO of Porter and Chester Institute which provides different career programs for students to acquire technical and professional skills essential for their chosen careers. Jim shares how career and technical education can create value for people. He also answers some of the most important questions: How long it will take a student to finish the course, the consulting and onboarding process, and most importantly, how much the salary will be after taking the program. Who is Jim Bologa? Jim joined PCI in 2007 as a consultant then became the Chief Operating office in 2009. He began serving as the President and Chief Executive Offer in 2012. Before joining PCI, he was the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of FamilyMeds, Inc. Prior to that, he spent over a decade in various executive management roles in the business services, automotive/aerospace, and technology industries. He began his career as a Certified Public Accountant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, where he served for ten years with his last role as a Senior Manager in PwC's Transactions Advisory Group. Jim received a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from Elmira College in Elmira, New York, and completed his fifth year accounting requirement at Saint Leo University and the University of South Florida. He is a former board member and school commissioner of Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC), a former board member of Career Education Colleges and Universities (CECU), a former board member of the Association of Connecticut Career Schools (ACCS), and a former board member and President of the Massachusetts Association of Private and Career Schools (MAPCS), subsequently reorganized into the New England Private School Association (NEPCSA) What is Porter and Chester Institute? Porter and Chester Institute (PCI), a private sector, a post-secondary technical institution founded in 1946 with twelve campuses throughout Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, featuring twenty-four different career programs, supports committed students in achieving the technical and professional skills essential for their chosen career through industry-modeled, student-centered education and training. Porter and Chester Institute is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC), authorized by the Connecticut Office of Higher Education, and licensed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Division of Professional Licensure, Office of Private Occupational School Education, approved and licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, State Board of Private Licensed Schools. Links and Resources from this Episode DISCLAIMER For resources and additional information of this episode go to http://engineeroffinance.com https://wti.edu/ Connect with Ken Greene http://engineeroffinance.com Office 775-624-8839 https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-greene https://business.facebook.com/GreeneFinance Connect with Jim Bologa https://www.bls.gov/ http://www.porterchester.edu/ jbologa@porterchester.com  Book a meeting with Ken If you liked what you've heard and would like a one-on-one meeting with the Engineer Of Finance click here Show Notes The different topics to cover. - 2:32 What the career and technical education is about and how it can create value for people. - 4:24 How long does it take a student to finish the different programs and course offerings? - 9:30 The consulting and onboarding process. - 17:15 Is there an option to get information on how much their salary will be after taking the program? - 20:45 Micro jobs are a huge proponent of career and technical education because they're so needed and important. - 27:31 There's a lot of interesting value to an individual in a sense of accomplishment if you can build something, service something or fix something. - 29:15 Where can people reach out to Jim and Porter and Chester Institute? - 33:36 Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS 

SA Voices From the Field
Working with Foster Care & Foster Students

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:41


Today on SA Voices from the Field we are talking with Dr. Sarah Jones or the University of West Georgia about working with foster care and foster students. Originally we learned about Dr. Jones in a blog she wrote on the NASPA website entitled: Whether they identify or not we should support college students from foster care. In this episode, we talk about supporting foster students on campuses in our new reality and what your campus can do to advocate for these students. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
562: Dr. C. Adam Callery: Post Covid-19, Resetting Business for Continuity

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 37:19


In this episode, Managing Director of Sagesse Lumiere, Dr. C. Adam Callery, talks about small In businesses in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. Today, Dr. Callery talks about the implications of the pandemic on future business strategies, the importance of agility, and understanding cashflow. How often should a business of any size check their financial status? Hear about some emerging trends, three critical activities for success, how Dr. Callery helps other entrepreneurs, and get his valuable advice, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end.” “If you want to be successful moving forward, you have to be ready for these unexpected changes.” “You can't be afraid to act fast, but you don't want to be reckless.” “You have to take a step back sometimes and attack a problem formally.” “I cannot just assume that because my bank account has money in it that I'm actually in a good position.” “You have to position yourself, or maybe carve out specific time, for you to really learn your industry.” “You have to be close enough to the operations to know what's going on.” “It is extremely important, whether you're an existing business owner or a new business owner, to truly understand what cashflow means.” “You can do it. You can actually be an entrepreneur. Just go out and do it.” “Bring people around you who have the knowledge that you need, because you're not going to know everything, and if you adapt that knowledge, you'll be successful.”   More about Dr. Callery Dr. Callery is an entrepreneur and higher education educator. For the past eleven (11) years, Dr. Callery has worked directly with the start-up and emerging business communities at a national level. For ten of the eleven years, Dr. Callery has held the roles as facilitator and trainer for two (2) nationally recognized small business growth programs, the US Small Business Administration's Streetwise MBA Program in Chicago and the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program. His company, Sagesse Lumiere, a small business coaching and consulting firm, was established seven years ago to complement the work he was doing in these programs. To date, Dr. Callery has advised over one thousand small business founders while participating within the national programs cited above. Dr. Callery, as a coach and consultant, works with small business owners on approaches to effectively build value by deploying new business practices and processes to improve financial performance and operational efficiency. Prior to working with small business owners as a business coach, Dr. Callery worked for several Fortune 1000 companies such as IBM, Dow/Dupont, Pepsi, United Airlines, and First National Bank of Chicago. His broad industry experience has prepared him to be a capable business consultant. Since leaving the corporate arena, he has become a trusted advisor for many small business founders. As a higher education educator, he has served as an Associate Dean for workforce development programs and currently works as a tenured faculty member for Harold Washington College, one of the City Colleges of Chicago. Dr. Callery has earned a Bachelor's in Chemical Engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology; a Master of Business Administration from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and a Doctorate in Higher Education from National Louis University, Chicago.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Small Business, COVID-19, Research, Success, Cashflow, Entrepreneurship, Mentorship, Finance   Resources: The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program WSC1998: AVOIDING THE BLUES FOR AIRLINE TRAVELERS   To learn more, follow Dr. Callery at: Website:          https://sagesselumiere.com Twitter:            @callerysagesse Instagram:       @callery_sagesselumiere LinkedIn:         Dr. C. Adam Callery   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:03 Hi, Dr. Callery. Welcome to the podcast. It's an honor to have you on. So thanks so much for joining me.   00:10 I'm so happy to be here. And so glad you invited me to attend your podcast.   00:14 Oh, this is great. And you know, like I said in the, in the intro, you were our lead instructor for the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business program. So I owe a lot of my being a therapist and having to be a business owner to now being a business owner who happens to be a therapist to you and the rest of the staff and business advisors. It was really life changing. So thank you so much.   00:40 Well, I think I thank you for being a participant in the program. It's a hard program, we asked a lot of you for an extended period of time. And I have to say, I cannot do it solely by myself. It really is just a good strong team that covers so many different areas of business management that's needed for most small business owners. So I'm just having to have good people around me, that helps make the process very smooth.   01:05 Yeah, absolutely. And today, we are going to talk about sort of small business owners, and the effects of COVID-19, which we have been in for the last 18 months and doesn't look like it's ending anytime soon. But we are back to work. There are mitigation factors in place. But now, how do we position ourselves for the long term in this new world? So my question is, what are some of the lessons you have learned over the past 18 months? And what are the implications for your future business strategies?   01:50 Well, I think that's a great question. Because myself, I'm also a business owner, I am a small business coach. And I would have to say for the last 18 months, that's been a question that's been raised many times, I can think back to March, when we first moved into COVID. Everything shut down. And to be honest, it seemed very dark at that time. And then for the next three to four months, I was working with a lot of small business owners, and we were having those discussions, what are what's next, you know, how do I get out of this. And in fact, if you started to look at the newspaper, you'll see headlines saying this is the worst crisis since the depression or behind closed doors, there's calamity. And when you read those phrases, it actually diminishes your ability to be a leader, and organizer of your business. And so what I had to do as a coach started having different discussions and say, we must look forward. And the way I did that was having a time with individuals to stop and say, Hey, if we take a look at the Great Depression, or the great recession of 2008, those same phrases were being said then, yet, we were still standing in 2020. So we have to believe that we're going to pass through this period as well. And so the discussion became, how do we do that, and in most cases, and then bring back or I should say, shorten your horizon from looking out two to three years, to just make it now bring it down to three months down the six months, make it manageable, it was easier for you to see out three months, it's easier for to see how six months, and then just be very tactical. And so during that last quarter of 2020, through the beginning of the initiation of 2021, many of the conversations with business owners have centered on that, how can we focus on some short tactical goals that keep the lights on, they keep my current employees satisfied, so they stay with me to make sure the customers I do have still like the services are providing or the product that they're buying from us. Therefore, we have to maintain the same level of quality. So just being very tactical that way. And then hopefully, when we're on the other side, we can then return to a posture where we're thinking longer term.   04:06 And all that, to me just sounds like a small business owners that we have to be really agile, and we have to be able to pivot. And so can you speak to a little bit more about agility as a business owner, and how we can foster that if it's something that we're not used to?   04:28 Well, agility, you know, it's a strong word, right? So it means that we're flexible. But again, coming through this COVID period, it didn't seem like flexibility existed. Everywhere I turned, something was shutting down. So I've seen closer to the end, then something that was gonna be an opportunity in the future. And I came across a quote, it came out of the book called Good to Great. That was written in 2001. And I wrote it down someone just read it verbatim because it's a unique quote, but I think it addresses issue. It says never confused. That you will prevail in the end. So that saying this thing of, I have faith that I'm going to win, I have faith that my business is going to win, it's going to be successful, and I'm gonna make a lot of money from it, or I'm going to be fame, I'm going to become famous from it, you have this faith, you got to have this confidence, that's probably a better word, I got to have the confidence that I will make it through. But here's what the rest of the quote says it says, I can never lose that confidence. However, I must have the discipline to confront the most brutal acts of your current reality. So the current reality of 2020 was, everybody's impacted at the same time, my competitors, my peers, people across the ocean, everyone is getting hit with this calamity. So now I have to think out of the box, and I also have to think very practically, so that's where the agility comes in, I didn't have a lot of time to wait six months to see if it's gonna work, because I may not be here. So I may have to take some cost cutting measures that are going to be very draconian, but necessary, I may have to talk to my staff and negotiate with them, and maybe get them to take a cut and pay, letting them know I'm trying to keep everyone alive here, I may have to talk to my customers in a different way and find out, are you still here? You know, are you still viable, because my customer is also impacted by this. So then I can sort of forecast what my sales potential could be. Because many of the customers went out of business for many of my clients. So agility means that you are being sorry, that you're focusing on today. And you're being very practical, very tactical, you're using your experiences, from your I should say, your past experiences as a business leader, and a business owner. But you also are willing, and here's the key, you are willing to take in advice from subject matter experts who are in your industry, and also outside your industry to help you navigate this because this was so unknown, a lot of unknown territory that we were crossing through.   06:55 Absolutely. And I would also think that in that time, I'll use the example of the physical therapy profession, but kind of acknowledge acknowledging emerging trends during this time. So for the physical therapy world, certainly here in New York City, we were close, literally shut down ghost town from March to almost June or July of 2020. So what do you have to do to keep things going? So the emerging trend was telehealth? Yeah, telehealth has been a trend and it has been coming up and coming up. But I think as a PT, if you didn't acknowledge that that trend existed, and didn't hug that trend, like it's your best friend, you you were in trouble, right? So what other kinds of trends Did you see within the small business world that people had to acknowledge and embrace in order to not only bring them through 2020. But I'm sure a lot of those trends have continued well into this year.   07:56 I agree 100%, the hardest trend, and I don't know if I can call it a trend, that's probably more of an action, the action that I may have to return to what I was before. And what I mean by that is, maybe we're a sizable business, you had 50 employees, or maybe employees and contractors working for you that accounted for about 50 people that you're responsible for, had a fairly good customer base that you're working with COVID hits and everything shuts down. Now, you may have to go back to what you were three years earlier, that's when you started the business where you were a smaller company, not as nimble because you were smaller, but you were very focused and very targeted. And that was the trend, I was saying that people say I'm at the roll back to where I was before. And that by rolling back doesn't mean I'm failed, which is another trend element. It doesn't mean I'm failing, it means I had to adjust, you know. So it's realizing that businesses aren't always going to go up with hockey stick and grow, grow, grow, grow without interruption, that there will be these troughs. And if I hit a trough, I may have to back up a little bit. In this case, people have to back up a lot. A great example of that would be the restaurant community. Here in Chicago, I've seen it all over where people physically had to change the menu, they may have 30 items on the menu. And they just took duct tape and started covering over things and reduce the menu down to something that they could manage based on staff based on a cost of the ingredients based on just pure demand, because now they're doing just takeout services, no longer doing to sit in services. why they do that, because I have to still pay the rent, I still have to pay some utilities, I still have to pay something. So I have to have some money coming in. And I want to be here for the next day. So I may have to swallow deeply. And Take another deep breath and say I have to go back to where I was maybe when I started the business so I can survive this period not knowing if you remember not knowing back in April, how long is this going to go? Because the predictions were two months, six months, two years, five years. Nobody knew. So You had to be very specific and very intentional about how far you will go back in time in order to survive and be here for the future.   10:09 Yeah, I mean, gosh, back in March, when New York City shut down, I was like, ah, six or eight weeks, we'll   10:15 be back up and running. Let's see, 18 months later,   10:21 not quite back to where we were. But getting closer. But to your point, yeah, I thought it would just be like six or eight weeks. And this will be a little adjustment that I'd have to make in my business. But it, it actually turned into a long term adjustment that I love. And I'm glad now that it's part of my business. So that ability to pivot quickly actually turned into a big positive for my company, because now I can actually see more people because I don't have to see them in person.   10:51 I agree. I agree. And I stole something else out to you. It's not so much of a trend, but it's probably a revelation. So we know a lot of business owners have different backgrounds, and they come from different walks of life. And so if we put an academic hat on, we have individuals coming out of MBA programs, and they have knowledge around business. The key is what does an MBA program teach? What MBA program teaches is that you need to go out and look at the environment that you're in. So that means you research on what some of these latest trends are. When we have a situation like COVID, I know many business owners typically don't worry about what the trends are, they worry more about what's going on in their daily environment in their community, and their marketplace, and they're just focused on can I sell something tomorrow, I think COVID has opened up a new reality that if you want to be successful moving forward, you have to be ready for these unexpected change as well. How can I reduce the number of unexpected changes, I start to do some research, I start to do some reading in my industry and also outside of my industry. So I can see those trends that you were talking about earlier. So telemarketing has been or tele health rather, has been around for a long time. People talk about it, but it wasn't economically feasible. Then when I need it, those who knew about it jumped on it. So but I had to know about it, I needed to have that information. So this is an important time as business leaders now to say, what else do I need to know? Do I need to join my industry associations? Do I need to go out and and go to conferences, go to particular training programs, where I can start to learn about what is going on around me so I can be better equipped for the next situation may not be a pandemic? Or it could be droughts, if you're out west? Who knows? It's going to be something so how can I be prepared for the next something?   12:39 Yeah, because you know, something that you had brought that you brought up in our kind of communication before we recorded this is and I like this phrase you put in quotations, you can't be afraid to act fast. But you don't want to be reckless. Yes, yeah, right. And so by doing the research, you can act quickly, and not in a reckless manner. Because you know where you are, you know, what the industry is holding, and you've got that research. So you can act quickly with authority. And with some sense of operation.   13:15 I agree. And ask where, you know, we want to say, you want to be intentional. And that's what that word really means. And especially when we're in our programs, we use that word a lot. But it's good to unpack it. So you just mentioned and that reckless, and I'm not trying to be strong willed. So when I'm talking to my employees, I'm trying to hit them over here with a club, but I'm intentional. So I have I know where I want to go, I've taken the time to do some research. So I've set a goal in mind, I've also decided on a path that we can take, but I'm also willing to ask around to see if that's the best path. So that's where I'm not being reckless, I'll go ahead and qualify it by talking to other subject matter experts, talk to other people in the industry and say, This is what I want to do based on my capabilities. What do you guys think? What do you people think? And that can help me then to minimize risk? Because we'll never eliminate it. We're just trying to minimize risk. So we can be successful.   14:10 Absolutely. And so now, we've we've sort of identified research we have we spoke to people, we got advice. Now we want to move forward. So we need some sort of formal operations. So these operations, as you said, they kind of revolve around three critical activities. So can you share with the listeners what those critical activities are, to make that those formal operations successful?   14:38 So I can that'd be beautiful. We've met through the Goldman Sachs program and what I've learned over the last 10 years in that program, is that you have to take a step back sometimes and attack a problem formally. And so we start off with the purpose, what is your business purpose? And what that means, of course, is what do you think? to do in your marketplace, who you're trying to sell to, why you're doing it, why are you actually involved in this work? The second thing we try to do is examine how we actually do the work. And this is the operational piece. So how do we actually do the work? How do we earn our revenues? How do we manage our team? How do we actually produce the product or service? Are we doing it efficiently? And then the last piece I call her reflection, but that's the research piece. I've been doing this for five years, I've been doing it for 10 years, is this the best way to do it now, based on the changes in the business environment, changes in government regulations, changes in social trends, changes in the number of competitors, or the type of competitors that so the three pieces are looking at my purpose? Why did I get into this business? Why do I want to do this or continue to do this kind of work, I look at my model my business model in general, and think about how I currently conduct business and see there's a better way I can do it more efficiently, more effectively. And then last but not least, I have this reflection or research activity that I do continuously continuous learning to make sure I understand my marketplace, understand my industry, understand what's happening with competitors around me also start to probe and find out are my customers still satisfied with what I'm doing? And if not, what do I need to do to reach them?   16:21 Yeah, and I'm glad that you said that you're continuously looking at this, because this isn't something that you do when you start your business, you assess your purpose, your model and solutions and reflect. It's not like you just do it once. Yes. Like how often would you say do you recommend even the business owners that you work with, kind of go through these three critical activities?   16:47 Well, I think we can take the model from the corporates. Now you understand corporations are huge, billion dollar places, but they are billion dollar places for a reason. And that is because they do take the time to annually look at what they do, and assess whether or not is making sense. So if I was any business owner, I don't care what size you are, I would make it a point to say maybe in the fall, that November period, Christmas period, when it's kind of quiet, people focused on vacation or focus on the holidays, you take that time, sit down with your management team and say, hey, let's think about how our last year went. Is there something that we want to do better, right doesn't mean that you did anything wrong? Is there something that I can improve upon? Or are there some new things coming down the pipeline that I need to be aware of, or we'd need to be aware of, that we need to plan for starting in January. So doing an annually isn't a bad practice. And if you do it formally, and you do it every year, it just becomes part of your routine. And you'll start to think about the questions you want to ask each other during those sessions. And you'll be able to flesh out what is happening with the business. In fact, you probably want to go ahead and bring in some of your key employees that sit them around a table, get some insight from them on what they're experiencing, when you're engaging your clients, when they're engaging your suppliers, or if what they see, in general, they may see some things in the market that you have missed. And it's a good time to sit back and get their feedback as well.   18:16 And how often would you say suggest to a business owner small of any size, but let's say a small business owner, to really look at the financials of their business once a quarter every month, every week, every night before you go to bed? Like is there overkill? Or? Or what? What are your thoughts on that?   18:40 That's a tough question is a tough question, right? Because Is there any should you have any limit on when you look at your numbers, because for instance, everybody will tell you, you need to know your numbers. So if I'm sitting in front of an investor, or a banker, they're going to say you need to know your numbers. But I guess the question is, what are they really asking me? They're probably just asking, do you know enough about your numbers to tell me whether or not you're profitable? That's really the question they want to know. And they want you to be able to tell them that, tell them you're profitable in a confident manner. And they can easily see if you're sort of dancing around the question, right? Because you really don't know your numbers today. They can sense that in the way you respond, your eye contact, and so on. So to your direct question, how often should I look, if I put on my accounting hat, we typically look once a month. So every month we take a step back, and we see how the business is performing financially. In order to do that, we probably need to have some type of system in place. That could be a QuickBooks system, or it could be a cell spreadsheet. It depends on the complexity of your business. And that's when we have to define a small business. So small business can be defined as any business with less than 500 employees. That's a big business. But let's say I'm a mom and pop I have less than 10 employees. In fact, I am the key employee and everyone else is a contractor. If I'm that size, once a month is probably still appropriate, I need to take the time to stop. And look, I cannot just assume that because my bank account has money in it, that I'm actually in a good position. So if I take the time, look at it once a month, that's probably enough. The furthest I would like to go out is probably three months, you know, quarterly, but want to go beyond that. Because a lot can happen to a business in two days, let alone in 90 days. And if I'm not keeping track of my numbers, I may find myself in a very dire cashflow position, and maybe find myself going out of business fairly quickly.   20:42 Yeah, excellent advice. Excellent advice. Thank you for that. And you know, as we start to wrap things up, what would be if you could give one or two pieces of advice to let's say, a new small business owner, so their business is less than a year old? What is your best advice for those business owners?   21:04 I think it's extremely important for the person just getting started to do some of the things we're talking about earlier, you have to position yourself or maybe carve out specific time for you to really learn your industry. So that could mean joining an industry association, going to those industry association meetings. So that's gonna take time, read some of their white papers that they generate about your industry. So for instance, I was at one time I was looking at buying a limo service, I love this guy service used to take me to the airport all the time, all his drivers were professional, his cars were clean, well maintained. And all I knew about the business at the time was the fact he took me in a limo to the airport. But that's not knowing the business. So I went ahead, I contacted limo Association, they sent out to me information on the business, you know, on the industry, the cost factors, the maintenance issues, some of the trends in the industry. After reading all those materials, and learning that it was a very highly capitalized business, I realized that it wasn't for me, at that time, still like the business. But I knew I was not in a position where I had enough capital to keep the cars up to spec to meet the requirements of running a limo business. So if I'm starting a business, whatever it is, I need to know as much as possible about that industry and the business model itself. How's the business make money? What are the cost factors? What are the what are the cost influencers, I need to know that like the back of my hand, then when I'm running the business on a day to day, I need to be in the business to see how it really operates. I've met some people that have started a business. And I've started another one that started know when I started another one. And I now ask them I said, Well, how do you possibly run three businesses at the same time? Well, I got people working for me. And what comes to mind is something someone told me many years ago, is that you have to smell the people. And what this is gain from Business School, and the professor was saying, you have to be close enough to the operations to know what's going on. And if you're too far away from it, there's too many things that can happen to the operations that will shut you down. And so if you're just getting started, your focus needs to be in the business and getting the business to a place where it's stable, and is sustainable. That usually means creating cash reserves, that usually means bringing in solid employees, it usually means having a great understanding of your customers so that you know you have returning customers that'll help keep the business afloat.   23:42 Excellent. Thank you so much. I know a lot of people that listen to this podcast or maybe budding entrepreneurs, they've been in business for maybe a year or two. So I think that advice is really great for that group. Now, is there anything have we not covered something that you were like, I want to hit this point during this podcast?   24:02 I think it's important, we haven't used that key phrase. And that's cash flow. It is extremely important whether you are a existing business owner, or a new business owner to truly understand what cash flow means. And so when we talk about cash flow, what it means in general, is that we're talking about the money that's coming in. And that's where most people focus is, Hey, I'm making revenues, things are going well. But you can't just stop there, you got to think about the cash outflow. And people say I write the checks every day, I know how much money is going out. The third piece is timing. You have to think about when the money has to be paid out. When does that liability has to be paid out, and whether or not I'm going to have enough cash on hand to pay it on time. Because once I default on that payment, I'm now in trouble. The bank is knocking at the door. My creditors are knocking at the door, my investors are knocking at the door and I'm going to have problems paying my employees so on and so on. So cash flow is very important. And it's important from the standpoint of you have to truly understand the definition of it. And what it means is inflow is outflow. And it's also timing. When is the money coming in to pay those current debts that I have? Will I run into a situation where I don't have enough coming in to pay those debts? And if I do, what am I going to do about it? Am I going to reach into my personal account and pay it? Am I going to run down to the bank and ask for a line of credit? Do I need to run out and find investors? Who can give me additional cash to help me close that gap? So cash flow is critical?   25:36 Yeah. And I think, as you were saying that the thing that popped into my mind is, ooh, this is why Ponzi schemes ultimately fail.   25:44 Yes, yes. Because the money stops coming in. And their commitments outweigh our Yeah, extend beyond the, the amount of money that's coming in.   25:54 Right. Right. Yeah, that is why a Ponzi scheme fails. And, and I agree that cash flow is so important. And it's something that I didn't really wrap my head around fully until the Goldman Sachs program. You know, I knew like, yeah, money's coming in. But once I started doing cash flow statements, I was like, Ah, okay, yeah. Now I got it. No, I know, I can now I understand this as, as one of the three sisters, you know, your cash flow statement, your balance sheet, and your income statement.   26:32 Exactly, exactly. And it's the cash flow statement, and we never talk about, you talk about it. If you again, be school, we talk about all the time, but most people just stop at the income statement. In particular, they stop at the income side, then when you introduce the balance sheet, I don't see why I really need it. I don't have any assets. But they don't combine the two to come up with the cash flow. And that's what you really want.   26:53 Yeah, yeah. Excellent. All right. Now, where can actually let's talk before we before I asked, Where can people find you? Why don't you talk a little bit more about your business? And how you help other entrepreneurs, your coaching business and what you do to help entrepreneurs?   27:12 Well, what I do is I focus in the business development area, as well as the operations or organizational development area. And what does that mean? So I come in as a business coach, not as a consultant, I sit down with my clients, and we have discussion. So it's like we're doing now and we focus on the issues that are facing them. So in a business development side, for instance, such as a marketing issue, we're not talking about social media, what we're talking about is more around a target market. Have they identified the right persons, or the right audience? When it comes to marketing? Also, you got to think about the delivery of the product and service. Are there some challenges in terms of quality, some challenges in terms of delivery, that they're facing? And then we start to peel back a little bit? And this is where we get into the operations? Why are you having those challenges? Is it a capability issue is a capacity issue, these things have to be fixed, or the marketing, social media really won't matter? So I focus on a business development sort of working backwards? What are you trying to sell? What are you servicing? How are you working with your clients? And what are your business capabilities, what is what is your business capacity, in order to essentially achieve the goals that you've set for the business or to meet your current demand for your customers, those are all very important pieces, because most businesses will suffer or in a trough when they get to that third and fifth year when they try to scale up. And they always find, hey, I have this resource deficit. And I usually think it's money but it's not so much money, it's really capacity and capability, they may not have the right people on hand, they may not have the skill themselves in order to scale up and they need to go back, build up those skills so that they can grow. And that's where the coaching comes in and sort of help the build up those skills.   28:57 Awesome. Now where can people find you?   29:00 Well, they can find me right on the internet. I have a website out there, my, my company has a very unique names, it's called suggests luminaire and will suggest and stores wisdom, and then luminaires light. And so right out there on the internet, I have a web page where you can contact me through that or you can come back contact me through LinkedIn. So I do have a LinkedIn profile out there. That's probably the best way most people will contact me through LinkedIn. And then we'll set up an appointment and we go from there.   29:29 Perfect and we will have direct links to all of that at podcast at healthy wealthy, smart, calm and the Show Notes for this episode, so don't worry if you didn't have a pen you can take it down. totally get it we will have one click direct links to all of that. And now, Dr. calorie for the last question, which is a question I asked everyone, knowing where you are now in your life and in your business, what advice would you give to your younger self   29:57 so what I would tell my younger self I'm fully invested in entrepreneurship, I would tell my younger self is that you can do it, you can actually be an entrepreneur. To be honest, when I came out of school or coming came out of undergraduate, my mind wasn't there, my mind was I had to go through this career track, because that's the only possibility that entrepreneur thing, or that small business thing was just too far out there. You have to literally be born into it. It has to be a legacy relationship in order to start a business. Today, I recognize after meeting so many people in this space, that's really not it is really tied to have any interest. People use the word passion, but I go beyond the same passion, you really have that ambition that you're willing to give all in order to accomplish this. And so I would tell my younger self, that you do have that ability, you do have that ambition, just go out and do it. Bring people around you who have the knowledge that you need, because you're not gonna know everything. And if you adapt that knowledge, you'll be successful.   31:03 And I think that's great advice. And especially for a lot of the physical therapists who listen to this podcast, because so often we graduate, and we think, well, I'll work at a clinic, I'll work at a hospital, I'll do that for 40 years, and then I'll retire. You know, it's like, it's never it. Because in school, we're not really given any entrepreneurial mentorship or classes, you really have to seek it out on your own. And so I think that's great advice for any students listening or newer graduates, who think, Well, my mom wasn't wasn't an entrepreneur, my dad or I don't, I don't have any real role models in my immediate family, but that you can do it if you surround yourself with the right people, and you have the ambition and passion to do it. So I think that is excellent advice. So thank you for that. Well, and thank you again, for coming on the podcast and for being a great instructor in the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business program, I can put a link up to that too, if people are interested in learning more about the program because it is a life changing program. It was for me and I'm sure as an instructor, it must have been for you as well.   32:13 Oh, it hasn't. It hasn't, I have to say, I never, I never thought I'd have this experience. It's been now going into my 11th year and I've actually set before 1000 business owners never thought that could happen in my wildest dreams and having the ability to have conversations like we're having now. Again, it's opened up my mind to say the The possibilities are limitless in this country when it comes to being able to create something that you want to create. And that's the beauty of it. So it's it's a fantastic opportunity. Fantastic country fantastic. Time, even though it's difficult time, it's a fantastic time to to do something that you want to do.   32:57 Excellent. And on that note, I will wrap things up by saying thank you again and thank you to all of the listeners for tuning in today. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

The Curiosity Hour Podcast
Episode 202 - Erin A. Cech, PhD (The Curiosity Hour Podcast by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund)

The Curiosity Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:04


Episode 202 Professor Erin A. Cech, PhD. Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund are honored to have as our guest, Professor Erin A. Cech, PhD. Erin A. Cech is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Associate Professor by courtesy in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Cech joined the University of Michigan in 2016. Before coming to UM, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University and was on faculty at Rice University. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 2011 from the University of California, San Diego and undergraduate degrees in Electrical Engineering and Sociology from Montana State University. Cech's research examines cultural mechanisms of inequality reproduction--specifically, how inequality is reproduced through processes that are not overtly discriminatory or coercive, but rather those that are built into seemingly innocuous cultural beliefs and practices. She investigates this puzzle through three avenues of research. First, she uses quantitative and qualitative approaches to examine inequality in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professions--specifically, the recruitment and retention of women, LGBT, and under-represented racial/ethnic minority students and practitioners and the role of professional cultures in this inequality. Second, Cech examines how cultural definitions of “good work” and “good workers” can anchor inequality in the workforce. For example, she examines the role of the “passion principle” in the reproduction of occupational inequalities: how seemingly voluntary and self-expressive career decisions help reproduce processes like occupational sex segregation. Finally, she studies how cultural understandings of the extent and origin of inequality help to uphold unequal social structures. Cech's research is funded by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation. She is a member of the editorial board of the American Journal of Sociology and her research has been cited in The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Time, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Forbes, Chronicle of Higher Education and the news sections of Science and Nature. Cech's first book, The Trouble with Passion: How Searching for Fulfilment at Work Fosters Inequality (University of California Press) is out Nov 9th, but it is available for preorder at the link below, or through Barnes & Noble, Amazon, etc. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520303232/the-trouble-with-passion Professor Cech's website: https://erinacech.com has information about her other research and links to talks and presentations. Note: Guests create their own bio description for each episode. Tommy and Dan requested and were provided with a review copy of the book in preparation for interviewing Professor Cech. Thank you to the publisher and Professor Cech for providing us with these review copies! The Curiosity Hour Podcast is hosted and produced by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund. The Curiosity Hour Podcast is listener supported! The easiest way to donate is via the Venmo app and you can donate to (at symbol) CuriosityHour (Download app here: venmo.com) The Curiosity Hour Podcast is available free on 13 platforms: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible, Soundcloud, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Podbean, PlayerFM, Castbox, and Pocket Casts. Disclaimers: The Curiosity Hour Podcast may contain content not suitable for all audiences. Listener discretion advised. The views and opinions expressed by the guests on this podcast are solely those of the guest(s). These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of The Curiosity Hour Podcast. This podcast may contain explicit language. The Public Service Announcement near the end of the episode solely represents the views of Tommy and Dan and not our guests or our listeners.

Progressive Voices
Leslie Marshall Show -10/20- How Achieving Debt-Free College Will Address the Student Debt Crisis

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 41:58


Today's guest hosts are Edwith Theogene and Charlotte Hancock, Organizing Director and Communications Director for Generation Progress. They discuss how over 43 million Americans currently have student loan debt, and young people are disproportionately likely to be included in that group. Younger generations are deeply invested in ending this crisis, as student debt is holding them back from the financial security they need to buy homes, start and provide for families, and save for retirement. But in order to end the student debt crisis for good, America needs to do more than cancel existing debt—we also need to prevent future student loan debt by addressing the college affordability crisis. One way to do that is by passing legislation for free or debt-free college. We've seen several bills introduced in Congress already and a free community college provision was included in President Biden's America College Promise plan, but we have yet to see any of these proposals become law. To talk more about the fight for debt-free college, and why college affordability and student debt solutions are two sides of the same coin, Edwith and Charlotte are joined by two expert guests. They are Jaylon Herbin, an outreach associate with the Center for Responsible Lending (CRL), and Marshall Anthony, the associate director of policy and advocacy for Higher Education at the Center for American Progress. Then, during the final segment of the show, Edwith and Charlotte are joined by Generation Progress's program associate Ella Azoulay.  Ella discusses the Debt-Free College For All Week of Action, which Generation Progress is spearheading next week. Generation Progress' website is GenProgress.org and their Twitter handle is @GenProgress. Edwith Theogene's Twitter handle is @WhoIsEdwith and Charlotte Hancock's handle is @CharlatAnne. Marshall Anthony's Twitter handle is @mcanthonyjr and the handle for the Center for American Progress Higher Education team is @CAPHigherEd. The Twitter handle for Jaylon Herbin is @HerbinJaylon and the handle for the Center for Responsible Lending is @CRLONLIN.

My Circus, My Monkeys
One of the Scariest Things to a Supervisor with (Insert Your Talent Here)

My Circus, My Monkeys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:17


It's October so as we prep for Halloween, we thought we'd explore some of the scariest parts of being a supervisor. Now there are general scary things that impact most supervisors – like downsizing or budget cuts, but the rest of the scariness is really determined by your talent themes. In this episode, we talk about how to identify those things that are most scary for you as a supervisor in terms of your talents and how those things can be huge energy drains if not addressed. We also talk about what you can do to make those things less "scary" for you, so you can more effectively use your energy and supervise your team. In conjunction with this episode, we're a series on social media featuring one possible scary thing for each of the 34 Talent Themes. So if you're not already following us on social media, here are our links to our  Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/StrengthsUniversity and Instagram page -  https://www.instagram.com/strengthsuniversity/

Where We Live
Adam Harris: Fixing Racism In Higher Education

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:30


In 1831, Simeon Jocelyn, a New Haven abolitionist, tried to establish a Black college near Yale. Now Adam Harris, the author of The State Must Provide: Why America's Colleges Have Always Been Unequal — And How To Set Them Right, documents this ill-fated attempt — and others nationally — to establish institutions of learning for African-Americans against the tide of public and legislative opposition. Harris also examines a long history of underfunding Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and how Black students are affected, to this day, by a lack of investment and equity in higher education. What's next? Harris explains. GUESTS: Adam Harris - Author of The State Must Provide: Why America's Colleges Have Always Been Unequal — And How To Set Them Right; Staff Writer, The Atlantic Jane Gates - Provost and Senior Vice President, Academic and Student Affairs, Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU) Orsella Hughes - Executive Director, Prosperity Foundation Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Digication Scholars Conversations
S2 E07 - Creating a Culture of Confidence and Connection at Boston University (Part 1) - Natalie McKnight

Digication Scholars Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:17


In this wide-ranging Digication Scholars Conversation, Boston University's Natalie McKnight and host Jeff Yan cover a number of topics, starting with how the meaning of “culture” on campus has evolved over time, and the role that Natalie plays in creating and maintaining campus culture and values in her role as Dean in the College of General Studies. In offering a definition of General Studies, Natalie describes a culture of viewing topics and issues through the lens of multiple disciplines and forming connections between seemingly unrelated areas. They go on to discuss the mental health crisis in higher education and the ways that student attitudes have evolved to value social responsibility and inclusivity over the pursuit of high-paying careers. “I derive a lot of hope, looking at these students and their wisdom on these issues, and their embracing of inclusivity, not because it's trendy, but because it's right.”

Student Affairs NOW
Canceling the Culture of Nice in Higher Education

Student Affairs NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:52


Dr. Carlton Green talks with host Raechele Pope about how racism often manifests in a culture of nice in higher education where white individuals hesitate to discuss race and racism openly and directly thus reinforcing long standing harms and racial trauma for people of color. Fear of being called racist often becomes more important than the fear of actually acting in racist ways. They also discuss how to move beyond the culture of nice in student affairs and higher education.

WorkforceRx with Futuro Health
Maria Flynn, President & CEO of Jobs for the Future: Now Is the Time to Ask the Hard Questions

WorkforceRx with Futuro Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 35:04


The combination of a unique economic moment and major new funding out of Washington is creating an opportunity to rethink workforce development policies and programs. But will the tough questions be asked that will lead to a significant reshaping of the nation's approach? Maria Flynn, president and CEO of Jobs for the Future, is hopeful, but is not yet seeing the “blue sky redesign” discussion she thinks is necessary. “We are largely operating public systems that were designed for a different era. A lot of the conversations now are about funding but are not questioning those underlying assumptions of 'are these the systems that we need for today and the future'? My answer to that is largely no,” says Flynn.  There's a lot to learn in this probing conversation with Futuro Health CEO Van Ton Quinlivan about transforming American education and workforce systems, the growing corporate role in education, helping employers deliver on diversity, strategies to boost innovation, taking a regional approach to economic development and much more.

Where We Live
With outcry over critical race theory, we hear from Connecticut educators and students

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:00


With a General Election just around the corner, the so-called “sleepy” town of Guilford has made national headlines, gripped by a polarizing debate over what's being taught in schools. Guilford High School English Chair George Cooksey and Superintendent Paul Freeman explain that while critical race theory is not itself taught in the K-12 environment in Guilford, “dimension” and diversity of source material is still a priority. Plus, a new Black and Latino Studies elective is rolling out in Connecticut high schools next fall, following the first mandate of its kind in the country. A Windsor High School teacher and student who are piloting the course weigh in. How are educators and curricula adapting to reflect our world? And how can they be caught in the political crossfire? Dr. Paul Freeman - Superintendent, Guilford Public Schools George Cooksey - English Chair, Guilford High School Daisha Brabham - Windsor High School Social Studies Teacher Shakila Campbell - Windsor High School Student Dr. Saran Stewart - Associate Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs; Director of Global Education at UConn's Neag School of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Innovators
The Challenged Authority of Science: Research, Public Health & Public Policy (with Dr. David Allison, Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington)

Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:10


Dr. David Allison – Dean of the School of Public Health at Indiana University Bloomington – joins Innovators to talk about what perceptions and trust are like today in fields like research, public health, and public safety, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Allison became Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University-Bloomington School of Public Health in 2017. Prior to assuming his current role as Dean, he served as Distinguished Professor, Quetelet Endowed Professor, and Director of the NIH-funded Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Allison received his Ph.D. from Hofstra University in 1990. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a second post-doctoral fellowship at the NIH-funded New York Obesity Research Center at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center. He was a research scientist at the NY Obesity Research Center and Associate Professor of Medical Psychology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons until 2001.  Innovators is a podcast production of Harris Search.  *The views and opinions shared by the guests on Innovators do not necessarily reflect the views of the interviewee's institution or organization.*

Janet Mefferd Today
10 - 19 - 21 - Janet - Mefferd - Today - John Ellis (Revival) John Ellis (Higher Education)

Janet Mefferd Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:49


How do we return to our first love, Jesus Christ? I'll talk it over with Dr. Tom Phillips, vice president of The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association and author of the book, "Ignite Your Passion for Jesus: Your Guide to Experience Personal Revival." Plus: What are the roots of what ails academia? Dr. John Ellis, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of California, Santa Cruz, will discuss his book, "The Breakdown of Higher Education: How it Happened, the Damage it Does and What Can Be Done." That's next time on Tuesday's JANET MEFFERD TODAY.

State of Sport Management
Cindy Veraldo

State of Sport Management

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:20


Dr. Cindy Veraldo from Mount Saint Joseph joined us to talk about course rigor. We talked about whether academic rigor should be considered when designing a course. Also, what about assignments/group projects/discussions or other assessment options? Dr. Veraldo also talked about getting feedback from others on your course, consider the rigor of courses taught by others in your program, and impact on student outcomes + course evaluations.

New Books Network
The Economics of Higher Education

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 54:03


In this episode, Daniel Peris, the host of the “Keep Calm and Carry On Investing” podcast, and David Finegold have a wide-ranging discussion of economics and governance questions inherent in K-12 and higher education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Chloe Made Me Study
Ep.102 Monday Minisode #24

Chloe Made Me Study

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:43


#102 – Welcome to another minisode of the Chloe Made Me Study podcast. Each Monday, I will release a super short episode designed to share one studying idea, strategy or mindset shift that will help you start your study week off feeling focused, productive and confident. These minisodes will help you shake off any negative studying baggage from the week before and offer a moment to pause, reflect and change your approach so you can move off in a new, more successful direction. In this week's minisode, we're going to talk about fresh starts. If you love the feel and promise of a new notebook or a new module or semester of studying, then you're going to want to stick this minisode in your earbuds. We're going to talk about the power of fresh starts and how you can use these to best effect – to help you increase your motivation, progress and studying enjoyment. Click here to find out more about my membership, The Kickbutt Students Club. Click here to discover my range of study skills trainings. Click here to grab a copy of my book, The Return to Study Handbook. Click here to sign up to my free studying resource library. And finally, come follow me on Instagram @chloe.burroughs.

Illuminate Higher Education
Lifelong Learning, Reimagined with Ryan Stowers, Charles Koch Foundation's Executive Director

Illuminate Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 49:35


In this episode of Illuminate Higher Education, N2N Services CEO Kiran Kodithala speaks with Ryan Stowers, Charles Koch Foundation's Executive Director.Ryan kicks things off by outlining a core issue in our higher education system, which is that it's severely outdated. As it stands, only one-third of students at four-year institutions believe that they'll graduate with the skills and knowledge to be successful in the workplace. This illustrates an obvious area of opportunity, which can start with collectively changing the way we think and act about the role higher education plays in our lives.For example, we may need to move away from education solely as a function of seat time, credit hours, or degrees. Instead, we need a significant shift towards an individualized approach, honing in on a specific learner's aptitudes, passions, and interests. Ryan suggests that we need to pay a lot more attention to individual learner's voices and preferences, which will mean putting the ownership of what those pathways look like back in the hands of the learner so that they can be presented with a dynamic set of options to adequately receive the continued education they seek.Connect with Ryan Stowers: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-stowers-1832024/Learn more about the Charles Koch Foundation at https://charleskochfoundation.org/This episode is brought to you by N2N's Illuminate App, The iPaaS for Higher Education. Learn more at https://illuminateapp.com/web/higher-education/Subscribe and listen to more episodes at IlluminateHigherEducation.com

Trends + Tensions presented by BHDP
Preparing Future Nurses through Innovative Design

Trends + Tensions presented by BHDP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 34:54


After the COVID-19 pandemic thrust the nursing profession into the spotlight, facilities and schools have experienced increasing difficulty in attracting and retaining talent. Our guests—Dr. Beth Schultz of Manchester University and BHDP Architects Kevin Denman and Jessica Sears—share their perspectives following an enlightening roundtable discussion with nursing educators at independent colleges across the US. Learn why designing functional simulation spaces plays a pivotal role in future nurses' success—and can impact their longevity in the profession.

The Dissenter
#535 Glenn Geher: Politics and Academic Values in Higher Education

The Dissenter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:51


------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao ------------------Follow me on--------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDissenterYT This show is sponsored by Enlites, Learning & Development done differently. Check the website here: http://enlites.com/ Dr. Glenn Geher is Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York at New Paltz where he has been awarded SUNY Chancellor Awards for Excellence for both Teaching and Research. His most recent book is Positive Evolutionary Psychology: Darwin's Guide to Living a Richer Life. In this episode, we talk about a recent paper - Politics and Academic Values in Higher Education: Just How Much Does Political Orientation Drive the Values of the Ivory Tower? We first talk about academic values, particularly academic rigor, academic freedom, student emotional well-being, social justice, and the advancement of knowledge. We then get into the story behind the publication of the paper, Jonathan Haidt's talk at New Paltz, what led to the study it, how the study was designed, among other aspects of the process. We discuss the conclusions of the paper, and we end by talking about how academia should deal with these academic values and the biases that arise from personality, political orientation, gender, and field of expertise. -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, MARK BLYTH, ROBERTO INGUANZO, MIKKEL STORMYR, ERIC NEURMANN, SAMUEL ANDREEFF, FRANCIS FORDE, TIAGO NUNES, BERNARD HUGUENEY, ALEXANDER DANNBAUER, FERGAL CUSSEN, YEVHEN BODRENKO, HAL HERZOG, NUNO MACHADO, DON ROSS, JONATHAN LEIBRANT, JOÃO LINHARES, OZLEM BULUT, NATHAN NGUYEN, STANTON T, SAMUEL CORREA, ERIK HAINES, MARK SMITH, J.W., JOÃO EIRA, TOM HUMMEL, SARDUS FRANCE, DAVID SLOAN WILSON, YACILA DEZA-ARAUJO, IDAN SOLON, ROMAIN ROCH, DMITRY GRIGORYEV, TOM ROTH, DIEGO LONDOÑO CORREA, YANICK PUNTER, ADANER USMANI, CHARLOTTE BLEASE, NICOLE BARBARO, ADAM HUNT, PAWEL OSTASZEWSKI, AL ORTIZ, NELLEKE BAK, KATHRINE AND PATRICK TOBIN, GUY MADISON, GARY G HELLMANN, SAIMA AFZAL, ADRIAN JAEGGI, NICK GOLDEN, PAULO TOLENTINO, JOÃO BARBOSA, JULIAN PRICE, EDWARD HALL, HEDIN BRØNNER, DOUGLAS P. FRY, FRANCA BORTOLOTTI, GABRIEL PONS CORTÈS, AND URSULA LITZCKE! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY PRODUCERS, YZAR WEHBE, JIM FRANK, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK, IAN GILLIGAN, LUIS CAYETANO, TOM VANEGDOM, CURTIS DIXON, BENEDIKT MUELLER, VEGA GIDEY, AND THOMAS TRUMBLE! AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, MICHAL RUSIECKI, ROSEY, JAMES PRATT, MATTHEW LAVENDER, SERGIU CODREANU, AND BOGDAN KANIVETS!

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Govt says perspective is needed considering 90% of population is vaccinated

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 15:17


Simon Harris, Minister for Further and Higher Education, discusses Covid restrictions, labour market shortages and scoliosis waiting lists.

Getting Smart Podcast
Daniel Pianko and Nasir Qadree of Investing in the Future of Learning

Getting Smart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:15


On this episode of the Getting Smart Podcast, Tom is joined by Daniel Pianko and Nasir Qadree. Daniel is the co-founder and managing director of Achieve Partners, an investment fund harnessing digital transformation to build new models for learning and new pathways to good jobs. He also hosts the Better Money, Better World podcast.  Nasir Qadree is the Founder and Managing Partner at Zeal Capital Partners, an inclusive investment vehicle partnering with entrepreneurs to bridge America's Wealth and Skills gaps.  Before Zeal, Nasir led AT&T social impact fund and before that was head of education at Village Capital, an early impact seed fund. Let's listen in as they discuss investment in learning, why it's more important than ever and how investments are shifting towards social, as well as financial impacts. 

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast
OTC AskRegs Experts: New R2T4 Rules and How NCAA's EFA Guidance Impacts Aid Offices

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:14


This week on “Off the Cuff” we're bringing listeners a new podcast format featuring in-depth discussion with NASFAA staff on the latest pressing regulatory topics and questions. Justin is joined by NASFAA Policy Analyst Jill Desjean and NASFAA U Instructor David Tolman to discuss how a rule from the Department of Education on distance learning changed the treatment of return of Title IV funds in term-based programs that offer modules. David addresses some of the questions he and his team are receiving on the topic before Jill details recent guidance on how student athletes' academic scholarships could affect their estimated financial assistance and what aid offices should be aware of. Listeners, we want to hear from you! Leave us a comment and let us know what topics you want covered on future episodes.

The CyberWire
Notes from the underground: data breach extortion and a criminal market shuts down. International cooperation against ransomware. Cyber risk and higher education.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:37


Data breach extortion seems to be an emerging criminal trend. Notes on a darknet market's retirement. Verizon advises Visible users to look to their credentials. Windows users' attention is drawn to seven potentially serious vulnerabilities (all patchable). The Necro botnet is installing Monero cryptojackers. Organizing an international response to ransomware. Carole Theriault shares thoughts on social engineering. Dinah Davis from Arctic Wolf on the supply chain attack framework. And a quick look at the state of cyber risk in higher education. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/198

Chloe Made Me Study
Ep.101 The Secret to Achieving Academic Success (It's Not Intelligence or Hard Work)

Chloe Made Me Study

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:01


#101 – Wanna know the secret to achieving academic success? Well I can tell you straight away that I don't mean your level of intelligence or how much effort you put into your studies. It can be pretty easy to compare ourselves to other students, right? To see other students achieve the grades and results that we want and to assume this is because they're smarter or ‘just more academic' than we are. Well I'm pleased to say that I'm going to clear up this misinformation in today's episode and I'm going to share with you the TRUE secret to achieving academic success. Because the differences in your outcomes compared to the outcomes of more successful students comes down to something you have complete control over – your approach. I'm going to walk you through some powerful ideas in today's episode to help you realise that the secret to achieving academic success is completely attainable. To get the links and shownotes for this episode, head to: https://chloeburroughs.com/episode101. Join the waitlist for the Kickbutt Students Club. Check out this link to grab a copy of my book, The Return to Study Handbook.

SA Voices From the Field
SA Voices From the Field Celebrates 100 Episodes

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:09


Today on SA Voices from the Field we are celebrating the 100th episode of the podcast. We are talking with our own podcast producer Dr. Christopher Lewis who has been a part of the podcast since before the podcast started. We also are joined by Dr. Kevin Kruger, President and CEO of NASPA as we talk about the podcast's history and future.  Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

Ipse Dixit
Thomas J. Tobin on Copyright & Higher Education Quality

Ipse Dixit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:30


In this episode, Thomas J. Tobin, an author, speaker, and scholar of higher education quality discusses his work on copyright education and distance learning. Among other things, he discusses how became interested in distance learning, how it lead to an interest in copyright policy and education, and the different ways in which he has advanced that conversation. He also describes the process of creating his comic book "The Copyright Ninja," and how it is used by copyright educators. Tobin is on Twitter at @ThomasJTobin. He has also shared the following links:UW-Madison Center for Teaching, Learning, & Mentoring: https://ctlm.wisc.edu/ The Pre-Raphaelite Critic: https://mathcs.duq.edu/~tobin/PR_Critic/ "Copyright for Distance Educators" (2000), Distance Learning Administration conference: http://mathcs.duq.edu/~tobin/cv/essay.dla.02.ppt"Copyright for Distance Education" (2001), Intellectual Property and Digital Information in Higher Education: Problems and Solutions. Temple University: http://mathcs.duq.edu/~tobin/cv/essay.temple.01.rtfCopyrightx: https://cyber.harvard.edu/teaching/copyrightx"Training Your Faculty about Copyright when the Lawyer Isn't Looking" (2014), Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration: https://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/summer172/tobin172.htmlKneece, M. (2015). The Art of Comic Book Writing: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/220559/the-art-of-comic-book-writing-by-mark-kneece/Michael Watson, comic-book artist: https://www.facebook.com/5KWATTSThe Copyright Ninja (2017): https://squareup.com/store/thomasjtobin (US), http://mathcs.duq.edu/~tobin/cv/copyright.ninja.canada.html (Canada)This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Digication Scholars Conversations
S2 E06 - The Dance of Your Life Story: The Urgent Need For Arts Education and Advocacy (Part 2) - Jill Flanders Crosby

Digication Scholars Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:02


Episode Notes:More information about Jill's book, Situated Narratives and Sacred Dance: Performing the Entangled Histories of Cuba and West Africa can be found here: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/academics/college-of-arts-and-sciences/departments/theatre-and-dance/secrets-under-the-skin/The public ePortfolios of Jill's students which are mentioned during the conversation are listed below:Kavya Bhagawatula - https://alaska.digication.com/kavya-bhagawatula-copy-for-jill-dance-370-f20/home-1/published Abbigale Seitz - https://alaska.digication.com/dnce-370-abbigales-portfolio-copy-for-jill-f20/home-1/published Tess Zernzack Hagensieker - https://alaska.digication.com/tess-dance-repertoire-and-performance-copy-for-jill/home-1/published Panika Teeple - https://alaska.digication.com/panika-teeple-copy-for-jill-of-dance-370/home-1/published Lily Myers - https://alaska.digication.com/lily-myers-dance-research-copy-for-jill-f20/home-1/published Blake Blanning - https://alaska.digication.com/blake-blanning-interdisciplinary-dance-studies-copy-for-jill-dance-370-f20/home-1/published

Student Affairs NOW
Understanding the Lived Experiences of Multiracial People in Higher Education

Student Affairs NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:48


The rise in the number of young people who identify as biracial or multiracial presents college campuses with an opportunity to expand their racial understanding to better serve this growing population and become more inclusive in the process. Improving the college experience for multiracial students will require modifying existing student data-collection methods and providing better resources and support to ensure their inclusion.

The Founder Hour
Gagan Biyani | Disrupting Education with Udemy and Maven

The Founder Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 69:40


Gagan Biyani is the co-founder and CEO of Maven, an online platform where top creators teach cohort-based courses. Prior to Maven, Gagan founded Sprig, a food delivery startup, and also co-founded Udemy, the world's largest marketplace for teaching and learning with over 155,000 courses and 40 million students worldwide.We spoke with Gagan all about his upbringing, his early career and founding Udemy, why he ended up getting fired from the company, his thoughts on the higher education system in America, why he started Maven and what he hopes to accomplish, and much more.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & STAY UPDATED > http://bit.ly/tfh-newsletterFOLLOW TFH ON INSTAGRAM > http://www.instagram.com/thefounderhourFOLLOW TFH ON TWITTER > http://www.twitter.com/thefounderhourINTERESTED IN BECOMING A SPONSOR? EMAIL US > partnerships@thefounderhour.com

Chloe Made Me Study
Ep.100 Monday Minisode #23

Chloe Made Me Study

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:27


#100 – Welcome to another minisode of the Chloe Made Me Study podcast. Each Monday, I will release a super short episode designed to share one studying idea, strategy or mindset shift that will help you start your study week off feeling focused, productive and confident. These minisodes will help you shake off any negative studying baggage from the week before and offer a moment to pause, reflect and change your approach so you can move off in a new, more successful direction. In this week's minisode, we're going to be talking about procrastination and the desire to delay things in the present in the hope that our future selves will be better equipped to deal with it. I'm going to be sharing some insight into why we do this but, importantly, how we can become more proactive in our studies; how we can take small, consistent steps that not only help us make more progress but that also help develop our habits and routines to become these better equipped future selves.  Click here to find out more about my membership, The Kickbutt Students Club. Click here to discover my range of study skills trainings. Click here to grab a copy of my book, The Return to Study Handbook. Click here to sign up to my free studying resource library. And finally, come follow me on Instagram @chloe.burroughs.

Now What
64 Representation Matters with Roxanne Martinez

Now What

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 36:06


EPISODE NAME: “Representation Matters” with Roxanne Martinez    Host: Diane Gil, KeKey Moore, DJLG Executive Producer: DJ LG Special Guest: Roxanne Martinez, FWISD Trustee, District 9 0:00 - 1:10: This is a follow up to episode 63 with special guest Roxanne Martinez. If you have not listened to Episode 63, make sure to do so. In this episode Roxanne shares her personal experience with America's healthcare programs, the government's systematic approach to oppress those who are most in need, the poor, and the sick and why representation matters for communities of color at all levels. Roxanne also shares a glimpse into the politics behind a 2021 run off election victory as FWISD Trustee District 9.  1:11:  Diane begins the show recognizing the inspiring story Roxanne has shared so far. She comments that Roxanne did all things America expects of citizens, following the steps to achieve success.  2:02:  Roxanne shares about her experience in Corporate America, the  healthcare system and social programs that are designed to oppress the most vulnerable and needy citizens.  6:50:  Key reminds listeners that over 66% of all bankruptcies in America are a result of medical bills.  8:02: Roxanne shares her experience and thoughts about America's healthcare system, and it's failure to provide support and resources to those in need.  9:15: Roxanne, Key and LG discuss poverty and the inequities our healthcare creates in our communities, and how ObamaCare was critical to her livelihood.  Roxanne explains how her experience in Corporate America during her cancer treatment, the disappointment with our government's health care programs, and the support of her community in her darkest moments inspired her to reflect on what she wants her legacy to be.   11:20: Key and Roxanne discuss what the role of a school board trustee is and the constituents they serve.  12:07 Roxanne shares the important role of a district school board trustee and its responsibilities such as establishing a district's financial budget, policies, and academic goals. Roxanne shares three key focus areas for FWISD, elementary literacy, middle school mathematics, and high school college and career readiness.  19:20: Unsure of whether Roxanne would survive her cancer diagnosis, she shares her cancer journal that helped put words to the most important things in life, and what she wants her legacy to be. During this time, Roxanne shares her motivation to become an entrepreneur and the founding of Roxstar Marketing.  19:36 After surviving breast cancer, Roxanne devotes the next 10 years in her community leading grass root initiatives to help her community overcome the educational and healthcare inequities.  20:50 Roxanne explains how title 1 schools in her community do not have the financial resources to support its students. She rejuvenated a debunk booster club, and organized school PTAs and booster clubs. Her deep commitment to her community cultivated a strong student led movement to march to the polls and vote.  21:50 Roxanne is asked by the students why her name wasn't on the ballot, and who was their community's representation. This sparked a personal call to action to lift her community up in a broader capacity.  22:30 Roxanne begins to educate herself on the elected officials who did not reflect the makeup of her community and makes a plan to run for a future local election.  25:00 Key and Roxanne discuss the process and challenges of running a political campaign, and how team Roxy led her to a run-off victory for FWISD trustee district 9 against all odds in a political process that was not built for people like Roxanne.  29:00 Key and Roxanne discuss their shared experiences in political campaigns, and the reality of the run off process designed to oppress and maintain a white power structure that disenfranchises minority candidate and minority voters.  30:00 Roxanne shares her campaign strategy and why representation matters. Key reminds the audience that over 90% of current elected officials are white males, and recognizes the significance and impact Roxanne has made for her community and people of color.  33:50 Roxanne reminds listeners this is only the first step in a long and hard journey to changing the political makeup representing the communities they serve. 34:15 Roxanne challenges everyone to continue participating in the local election process, and looks forward to the day she sees her youth-led organizers on the election ballot.   Roxanne challenges everyone to continue participating in the local election process, and looks forward to the day she sees her youth-led organizers on the election ballot.   The Now What podcast is a space where we give a platform to honor and share voices and stories just like Roxanne's.  “Now What” Takeaways: Turn your Now What into action by joining our members forum on our website “Follow” the show from wherever you are listening from, and share this podcast with 1 friend.  Checkout nowwhatradio.com to listen directly to the show, stream our live DJ sessions Subscribe to our mailing list so you can be the first to hear what's new Related Episodes:  13: A Latina's Journey to Higher Education 19: A Latina's Journey to Political Office 25: Politicas for the People 101 32: Voto Latino 64: Against All Odds Our voices, Our music, Our people - Now What Join the Movement: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/nowwhatradio Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NowWhatRadio; https://www.facebook.com/kekey.moore/; https://www.facebook.com/diane.gil/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/now_what_radio/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@now_what_podcast?lang=en YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQVr4_MBqOP8gCwAPMFIkaA DJ Sessions: www.nowwhatpodcast.org/radio Listen to other episodes: www.nowwhatradio.com

The Real News Podcast
The always-looming debt ceiling apocalypse is a ‘totally manufactured crisis'

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:17


Just about every year, like clockwork, the issue of raising the federal debt ceiling generates apocalyptic and platitude-filled proclamations of impending doom from politicians, as well as breathless coverage by the mainstream press. Then, in the blink of an eye, lawmakers inevitably raise the debt ceiling and the issue disappears down the national memory hole as the news cycle moves on. Rest assured, the consequences of not raising the debt ceiling would be catastrophic, and with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warning Congress that the federal government will run out of cash and extraordinary measures by Oct. 18, the clock is ticking. So why is this issue even up for debate? Why do we need to have an apocalyptic partisan showdown almost every year over raising the debt ceiling, a procedure that used to be entirely mundane and uncontroversial?In this interview for the TRNN podcast, Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez and political scientist Ed Burmila try to answer three basic questions for listeners: What the hell is the debt ceiling? Why is it a constant source of political anxiety? And should we care about it? Ed Burmila is a writer and political analyst whose work has appeared in outlets like The Nation, The Washington Post, Rolling Stone, The Baffler, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. He's been publishing the popular blog ginandtacos.com since 2003, he hosts a companion podcast called Mass for Shut-Ins, and he is currently finishing a book that will be published in September 2022 with Bold Type Books on why the Democratic Party is stuck in a cycle of making the same mistakes.